Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Angioplasty, Balloon: Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.Angioplasty: Reconstruction or repair of a blood vessel, which includes the widening of a pathological narrowing of an artery or vein by the removal of atheromatous plaque material and/or the endothelial lining as well, or by dilatation (BALLOON ANGIOPLASTY) to compress an ATHEROMA. Except for ENDARTERECTOMY, usually these procedures are performed via catheterization as minimally invasive ENDOVASCULAR PROCEDURES.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Endarterectomy, Carotid: The excision of the thickened, atheromatous tunica intima of a carotid artery.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Coronary Restenosis: Recurrent narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery following surgical procedures performed to alleviate a prior obstruction.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Coronary Stenosis: Narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery.Alloys: A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions.Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors: Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.Graft Occlusion, Vascular: Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.Iliac Vein: A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.Drug-Eluting Stents: Stents that are covered with materials that are embedded with chemicals that are gradually released into the surrounding milieu.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Intracranial Embolism: Blocking of a blood vessel in the SKULL by an EMBOLUS which can be a blood clot (THROMBUS) or other undissolved material in the blood stream. Most emboli are of cardiac origin and are associated with HEART DISEASES. Other non-cardiac sources of emboli are usually associated with VASCULAR DISEASES.Renal Artery Obstruction: Narrowing or occlusion of the RENAL ARTERY or arteries. It is due usually to ATHEROSCLEROSIS; FIBROMUSCULAR DYSPLASIA; THROMBOSIS; EMBOLISM, or external pressure. The reduced renal perfusion can lead to renovascular hypertension (HYPERTENSION, RENOVASCULAR).Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Ticlopidine: An effective inhibitor of platelet aggregation commonly used in the placement of STENTS in CORONARY ARTERIES.Embolic Protection Devices: Vascular filters or occlusive devices that provide mechanical protection of the distal end organ from blood clots or EMBOLISM-causing debri dislodged during ENDOVASCULAR PROCEDURES.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Coronary Thrombosis: Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Carotid Artery, Internal: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Intracranial Arteriosclerosis: Vascular diseases characterized by thickening and hardening of the walls of ARTERIES inside the SKULL. There are three subtypes: (1) atherosclerosis with fatty deposits in the ARTERIAL INTIMA; (2) Monckeberg's sclerosis with calcium deposits in the media and (3) arteriolosclerosis involving the small caliber arteries. Clinical signs include HEADACHE; CONFUSION; transient blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX); speech impairment; and HEMIPARESIS.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.Atherectomy, Coronary: Percutaneous transluminal procedure for removing atheromatous plaque from the coronary arteries. Both directional (for removing focal atheromas) and rotational (for removing concentric atheromatous plaque) atherectomy devices have been used.Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency: Localized or diffuse reduction in blood flow through the vertebrobasilar arterial system, which supplies the BRAIN STEM; CEREBELLUM; OCCIPITAL LOBE; medial TEMPORAL LOBE; and THALAMUS. Characteristic clinical features include SYNCOPE; lightheadedness; visual disturbances; and VERTIGO. BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS or other BRAIN INFARCTION may be associated.Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Filtration: A process of separating particulate matter from a fluid, such as air or a liquid, by passing the fluid carrier through a medium that will not pass the particulates. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Embolism: Blocking of a blood vessel by an embolus which can be a blood clot or other undissolved material in the blood stream.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.LatviaPatient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments: Univalent antigen-binding fragments composed of one entire IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN and the amino terminal end of one of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS from the hinge region, linked to each other by disulfide bonds. Fab contains the IMMUNOGLOBULIN VARIABLE REGIONS, which are part of the antigen-binding site, and the first IMMUNOGLOBULIN CONSTANT REGIONS. This fragment can be obtained by digestion of immunoglobulins with the proteolytic enzyme PAPAIN.Retreatment: The therapy of the same disease in a patient, with the same agent or procedure repeated after initial treatment, or with an additional or alternate measure or follow-up. It does not include therapy which requires more than one administration of a therapeutic agent or regimen. Retreatment is often used with reference to a different modality when the original one was inadequate, harmful, or unsuccessful.Sirolimus: A macrolide compound obtained from Streptomyces hygroscopicus that acts by selectively blocking the transcriptional activation of cytokines thereby inhibiting cytokine production. It is bioactive only when bound to IMMUNOPHILINS. Sirolimus is a potent immunosuppressant and possesses both antifungal and antineoplastic properties.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Aspirin: The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)Endovascular Procedures: Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Phlebography: Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.Popliteal Artery: The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.Tracheal StenosisThrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Cardiovascular Agents: Agents that affect the rate or intensity of cardiac contraction, blood vessel diameter, or blood volume.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Radiography, Interventional: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A family of percutaneous techniques that are used to manage CORONARY OCCLUSION, including standard balloon angioplasty (PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY), the placement of intracoronary STENTS, and atheroablative technologies (e.g., ATHERECTOMY; ENDARTERECTOMY; THROMBECTOMY; PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL LASER ANGIOPLASTY). PTCA was the dominant form of PCI, before the widespread use of stenting.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Myocardial Revascularization: The restoration of blood supply to the myocardium. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Metals: Electropositive chemical elements characterized by ductility, malleability, luster, and conductance of heat and electricity. They can replace the hydrogen of an acid and form bases with hydroxyl radicals. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Thrombectomy: Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material from a blood vessel at the point of its formation. Removal of a clot arising from a distant site is called EMBOLECTOMY.Renal Artery: A branch of the abdominal aorta which supplies the kidneys, adrenal glands and ureters.Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde: Fiberoptic endoscopy designed for duodenal observation and cannulation of VATER'S AMPULLA, in order to visualize the pancreatic and biliary duct system by retrograde injection of contrast media. Endoscopic (Vater) papillotomy (SPHINCTEROTOMY, ENDOSCOPIC) may be performed during this procedure.Superior Vena Cava Syndrome: A condition that occurs when the obstruction of the thin-walled SUPERIOR VENA CAVA interrupts blood flow from the head, upper extremities, and thorax to the RIGHT ATRIUM. Obstruction can be caused by NEOPLASMS; THROMBOSIS; ANEURYSM; or external compression. The syndrome is characterized by swelling and/or CYANOSIS of the face, neck, and upper arms.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Femoral Vein: The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.Angina Pectoris: The symptom of paroxysmal pain consequent to MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA usually of distinctive character, location and radiation. It is thought to be provoked by a transient stressful situation during which the oxygen requirements of the MYOCARDIUM exceed that supplied by the CORONARY CIRCULATION.Subclavian Steal Syndrome: A clinically significant reduction in blood supply to the BRAIN STEM and CEREBELLUM (i.e., VERTEBROBASILAR INSUFFICIENCY) resulting from reversal of blood flow through the VERTEBRAL ARTERY from occlusion or stenosis of the proximal subclavian or brachiocephalic artery. Common symptoms include VERTIGO; SYNCOPE; and INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION of the involved upper extremity. Subclavian steal may also occur in asymptomatic individuals. (From J Cardiovasc Surg 1994;35(1):11-4; Acta Neurol Scand 1994;90(3):174-8)Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex: Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex important for platelet adhesion and aggregation. It is an integrin complex containing INTEGRIN ALPHAIIB and INTEGRIN BETA3 which recognizes the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence present on several adhesive proteins. As such, it is a receptor for FIBRINOGEN; VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR; FIBRONECTIN; VITRONECTIN; and THROMBOSPONDINS. A deficiency of GPIIb-IIIa results in GLANZMANN THROMBASTHENIA.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Angiography, Digital Subtraction: A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.Cerebral Revascularization: Microsurgical revascularization to improve intracranial circulation. It usually involves joining the extracranial circulation to the intracranial circulation but may include extracranial revascularization (e.g., subclavian-vertebral artery bypass, subclavian-external carotid artery bypass). It is performed by joining two arteries (direct anastomosis or use of graft) or by free autologous transplantation of highly vascularized tissue to the surface of the brain.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Endarterectomy: Surgical excision, performed under general anesthesia, of the atheromatous tunica intima of an artery. When reconstruction of an artery is performed as an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ATHERECTOMY.Cholestasis: Impairment of bile flow due to obstruction in small bile ducts (INTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS) or obstruction in large bile ducts (EXTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS).Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Tunica Intima: The innermost layer of an artery or vein, made up of one layer of endothelial cells and supported by an internal elastic lamina.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Atherectomy: Endovascular procedure in which atheromatous plaque is excised by a cutting or rotating catheter. It differs from balloon and laser angioplasty procedures which enlarge vessels by dilation but frequently do not remove much plaque. If the plaque is removed by surgical excision under general anesthesia rather than by an endovascular procedure through a catheter, it is called ENDARTERECTOMY.Brachiocephalic Trunk: The first and largest artery branching from the aortic arch. It distributes blood to the right side of the head and neck and to the right arm.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Asymptomatic Diseases: Diseases that do not exhibit symptoms.Balloon Occlusion: Use of a balloon CATHETER to block the flow of blood through an artery or vein.Carotid Artery, Common: The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.Subclavian Artery: Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Treatment Failure: A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.Hospital Costs: The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Ischemia: A hypoperfusion of the BLOOD through an organ or tissue caused by a PATHOLOGIC CONSTRICTION or obstruction of its BLOOD VESSELS, or an absence of BLOOD CIRCULATION.Hypertension, Renovascular: Hypertension due to RENAL ARTERY OBSTRUCTION or compression.Coated Materials, Biocompatible: Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.Intestinal Obstruction: Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.Ischemic Attack, Transient: Brief reversible episodes of focal, nonconvulsive ischemic dysfunction of the brain having a duration of less than 24 hours, and usually less than one hour, caused by transient thrombotic or embolic blood vessel occlusion or stenosis. Events may be classified by arterial distribution, temporal pattern, or etiology (e.g., embolic vs. thrombotic). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp814-6)Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Amaurosis Fugax: Transient complete or partial monocular blindness due to retinal ischemia. This may be caused by emboli from the CAROTID ARTERY (usually in association with CAROTID STENOSIS) and other locations that enter the central RETINAL ARTERY. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p245)Bronchial DiseasesDrainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Vertebral Artery: The first branch of the SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY with distribution to muscles of the NECK; VERTEBRAE; SPINAL CORD; CEREBELLUM; and interior of the CEREBRUM.Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A diagnostic technique that incorporates the measurement of molecular diffusion (such as water or metabolites) for tissue assessment by MRI. The degree of molecular movement can be measured by changes of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with time, as reflected by tissue microstructure. Diffusion MRI has been used to study BRAIN ISCHEMIA and tumor response to treatment.Hyperplasia: An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Neointima: The new and thickened layer of scar tissue that forms on a PROSTHESIS, or as a result of vessel injury especially following ANGIOPLASTY or stent placement.Carotid Artery, External: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the exterior of the head, the face, and the greater part of the neck.Angina, Unstable: Precordial pain at rest, which may precede a MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Iridium Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of iridium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Ir atoms with atomic weights 182-190, 192, and 194-198 are radioactive iridium isotopes.Aneurysm, Dissecting: Aneurysm caused by a tear in the TUNICA INTIMA of a blood vessel leading to interstitial HEMORRHAGE, and splitting (dissecting) of the vessel wall, often involving the AORTA. Dissection between the intima and media causes luminal occlusion. Dissection at the media, or between the media and the outer adventitia causes aneurismal dilation.Fibrinolytic Agents: Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.Phenprocoumon: Coumarin derivative that acts as a long acting oral anticoagulant.Aortic Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.Silicones: A broad family of synthetic organosiloxane polymers containing a repeating silicon-oxygen backbone with organic side groups attached via carbon-silicon bonds. Depending on their structure, they are classified as liquids, gels, and elastomers. (From Merck Index, 12th ed)Angioplasty, Laser: A technique utilizing a laser coupled to a catheter which is used in the dilatation of occluded blood vessels. This includes laser thermal angioplasty where the laser energy heats up a metal tip, and direct laser angioplasty where the laser energy directly ablates the occlusion. One form of the latter approach uses an EXCIMER LASER which creates microscopically precise cuts without thermal injury. When laser angioplasty is performed in combination with balloon angioplasty it is called laser-assisted balloon angioplasty (ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, LASER-ASSISTED).Cranial Nerve Injuries: Dysfunction of one or more cranial nerves causally related to a traumatic injury. Penetrating and nonpenetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; NECK INJURIES; and trauma to the facial region are conditions associated with cranial nerve injuries.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.No-Reflow Phenomenon: Markedly reduced or absent REPERFUSION in an infarct zone following the removal of an obstruction or constriction of an artery.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Vascular Access Devices: Devices to be inserted into veins or arteries for the purpose of carrying fluids into or from a peripheral or central vascular location. They may include component parts such as catheters, ports, reservoirs, and valves. They may be left in place temporarily for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Paclitaxel: A cyclodecane isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew tree, TAXUS BREVIFOLIA. It stabilizes MICROTUBULES in their polymerized form leading to cell death.Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Thrombolytic Therapy: Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.Coronary Occlusion: Complete blockage of blood flow through one of the CORONARY ARTERIES, usually from CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS.Vena Cava, Inferior: The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Venous Thrombosis: The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Creatine Kinase, MB Form: An isoenzyme of creatine kinase found in the CARDIAC MUSCLE.Jaundice, Obstructive: Jaundice, the condition with yellowish staining of the skin and mucous membranes, that is due to impaired BILE flow in the BILIARY TRACT, such as INTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS, or EXTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS.Life Tables: Summarizing techniques used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in populations. These methods can be applied to the study not only of death, but also of any defined endpoint such as the onset of disease or the occurrence of disease complications.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Gastric Outlet Obstruction: The hindering of output from the STOMACH into the SMALL INTESTINE. This obstruction may be of mechanical or functional origin such as EDEMA from PEPTIC ULCER; NEOPLASMS; FOREIGN BODIES; or AGING.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Credentialing: The recognition of professional or technical competence through registration, certification, licensure, admission to association membership, the award of a diploma or degree, etc.Peripheral Arterial Disease: Lack of perfusion in the EXTREMITIES resulting from atherosclerosis. It is characterized by INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION, and an ANKLE BRACHIAL INDEX of 0.9 or less.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Catheters: A flexible, tubular device that is used to carry fluids into or from a blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Radiology, Interventional: Subspecialty of radiology that combines organ system radiography, catheter techniques and sectional imaging.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Bile Duct Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the BILE DUCTS.Intermittent Claudication: A symptom complex characterized by pain and weakness in SKELETAL MUSCLE group associated with exercise, such as leg pain and weakness brought on by walking. Such muscle limpness disappears after a brief rest and is often relates to arterial STENOSIS; muscle ISCHEMIA; and accumulation of LACTATE.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Aortic Coarctation: A birth defect characterized by the narrowing of the AORTA that can be of varying degree and at any point from the transverse arch to the iliac bifurcation. Aortic coarctation causes arterial HYPERTENSION before the point of narrowing and arterial HYPOTENSION beyond the narrowed portion.Heparin: A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.Propensity Score: Conditional probability of exposure to a treatment given observed covariates.Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Ureteral Obstruction: Blockage in any part of the URETER causing obstruction of urine flow from the kidney to the URINARY BLADDER. The obstruction may be congenital, acquired, unilateral, bilateral, complete, partial, acute, or chronic. Depending on the degree and duration of the obstruction, clinical features vary greatly such as HYDRONEPHROSIS and obstructive nephropathy.Carotid Artery, Internal, Dissection: The splitting of the vessel wall in one or both (left and right) internal carotid arteries (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL). Interstitial hemorrhage into the media of the vessel wall can lead to occlusion of the internal carotid artery and aneurysm formation.Embolism, Cholesterol: Blocking of a blood vessel by CHOLESTEROL-rich atheromatous deposits, generally occurring in the flow from a large artery to small arterial branches. It is also called arterial-arterial embolization or atheroembolism which may be spontaneous or iatrogenic. Patients with spontaneous atheroembolism often have painful, cyanotic digits of acute onset.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Brain Ischemia: Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.Myocardial Bridging: A malformation that is characterized by a muscle bridge over a segment of the CORONARY ARTERIES. Systolic contractions of the muscle bridge can lead to narrowing of coronary artery; coronary compression; MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and SUDDEN CARDIAC DEATH.Limb Salvage: An alternative to amputation in patients with neoplasms, ischemia, fractures, and other limb-threatening conditions. Generally, sophisticated surgical procedures such as vascular surgery and reconstruction are used to salvage diseased limbs.Peripheral Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any one of the BLOOD VESSELS in the vasculature outside the HEART.Mesenteric Artery, Superior: A large vessel supplying the whole length of the small intestine except the superior part of the duodenum. It also supplies the cecum and the ascending part of the colon and about half the transverse part of the colon. It arises from the anterior surface of the aorta below the celiac artery at the level of the first lumbar vertebra.Ultrasonography, Doppler: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)Nephrostomy, Percutaneous: The insertion of a catheter through the skin and body wall into the kidney pelvis, mainly to provide urine drainage where the ureter is not functional. It is used also to remove or dissolve renal calculi and to diagnose ureteral obstruction.Brachytherapy: A collective term for interstitial, intracavity, and surface radiotherapy. It uses small sealed or partly-sealed sources that may be placed on or near the body surface or within a natural body cavity or implanted directly into the tissues.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Acute Coronary Syndrome: An episode of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA that generally lasts longer than a transient anginal episode that ultimately may lead to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Jejunostomy: Surgical formation of an opening through the ABDOMINAL WALL into the JEJUNUM, usually for enteral hyperalimentation.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Mesenteric Artery, Inferior: The artery supplying nearly all the left half of the transverse colon, the whole of the descending colon, the sigmoid colon, and the greater part of the rectum. It is smaller than the superior mesenteric artery (MESENTERIC ARTERY, SUPERIOR) and arises from the aorta above its bifurcation into the common iliac arteries.Time: The dimension of the physical universe which, at a given place, orders the sequence of events. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Plastics: Polymeric materials (usually organic) of large molecular weight which can be shaped by flow. Plastic usually refers to the final product with fillers, plasticizers, pigments, and stabilizers included (versus the resin, the homogeneous polymeric starting material). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Fluoroscopy: Production of an image when x-rays strike a fluorescent screen.Catheterization, Peripheral: Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Vascular Grafting: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES, or transplanted BLOOD VESSELS, or other biological material to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Brachiocephalic Veins: Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. They drain blood from the head, neck, and upper extremities, and unite to form the superior vena cava.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Myocardial Reperfusion: Generally, restoration of blood supply to heart tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. Reperfusion can be induced to treat ischemia. Methods include chemical dissolution of an occluding thrombus, administration of vasodilator drugs, angioplasty, catheterization, and artery bypass graft surgery. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Death: Irreversible cessation of all bodily functions, manifested by absence of spontaneous breathing and total loss of cardiovascular and cerebral functions.Pancreatic Ducts: Ducts that collect PANCREATIC JUICE from the PANCREAS and supply it to the DUODENUM.Dilatation: The act of dilating.Ureteroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the ureter.
... requiring further stenting.[11] Due to the permanence of the stent and small but definite risk of complications, most experts ... Venous sinus stenting[edit]. Venous sinus stenoses leading to venous hypertension appear to play a significant part in relation ... A Systematic Analysis of Transverse Sinus Stenting". Interventional neurology. 2 (3): 132-143. doi:10.1159/000357503. PMC ... Major complications only occurred in 3/207 patients (1.4%).[17] In the largest single series of transverse sinus stenting there ...
Chicago Bears (second stint)[edit]. On November 23, 2016, Fales was signed by the Bears from the Ravens' practice squad.[68] In ...
Thrombolysis, stenting and surgery[edit]. Thrombolysis, stenting and surgery are not used as widely as anticoagulation or ... Stenting involves the catheterization of the affected artery during angiography, and the insertion of a mesh-like tube; this is ... Stenting, as well as the insertion of coils by means of angiography, may be performed if there is an aneurysm and/or extension ... and occasionally obstruction may be treated with angioplasty and stenting. No randomized controlled trials have been performed ...
Second stint with Ravens[edit]. Brown spent the 2001 and 2002 seasons in rehabilitation before he was picked back up by the ... Second stint with Browns[edit]. Brown was signed as an unrestricted free agent by the "reactivated" Cleveland Browns before the ... In his first stint as a Raven, Brown who, at 6-foot-7, 360 pounds, was known as an energetic and intimidating player, earned ...
Cincinnati Bengals (second stint)[edit]. On March 15, 2015, Johnson re-joined his former team, signing a four-year, $24 million ...
Pittsburgh Steelers (second stint)[edit]. McFadden, along with Arizona's sixth round draft pick was traded back to the Steelers ...
Second Stint with Dodgers[edit]. On June 12, 2016, Choate signed a minor league deal with the Los Angeles Dodgers. In 24 games ...
Second stint with Yankees[edit]. Hernández signed a one-year contract to return to the New York Yankees on March 11, 2004.[9] ...
Stent placement and removal[edit]. A guide wire has to be placed in the ureter. After dilatation of the ureteric stricture with ... In fact it is a double J stent on which a balloon is mounted. It is connected to a delivery device (pusher) to introduce it ... Having a Ureteric Stent - What to Expect and How to Manage. Authors: Mr. H. B. Joshi (Specialist Registrar in Urology, ... The ureteric balloon catheter may be used in conjunction with a double J stent for additional drainage. To remove the catheter ...
Chicago Bears (second stint)[edit]. On November 29, 2017, Houston was claimed off waivers by the Bears.[17] He appeared in five ... "Lamarr Houston Producing In Second Stint With Bears". CBS Chicago. Retrieved February 17, 2018 ... games and recorded four sacks during his second stint with the Bears.[18] ...
Second stint with Yankees[edit]. On April 14, 2016, Swisher signed a minor league contract to return to the Yankees. They ...
Second Stint with Cubs[edit]. Hill was hitting .195 in 14 games with Pensacola when, on May 19, he was reacquired by the Cubs. ... Second Stint with Nationals[edit]. Hill signed a minor league contract with the Washington Nationals on February 4, 2014. ...
Carolina Panthers (second stint)[edit]. 2015 season[edit]. On March 9, 2015, Ginn re-signed with the Carolina Panthers on a two ...
Second stint with the Marlins[edit]. On March 27, 2013, Olivo signed a one-year deal with the Miami Marlins, just one day after ... Second stint with the Mariners[edit]. On November 4, 2010, Olivo was traded to the Toronto Blue Jays as part of a conditional ...
Second stint with Tokyo Yakult Swallows[edit]. On January 30, 2018, Aoki signed a three-year deal to return to the Tokyo Yakult ...
Minor league stint with the Yankees[edit]. On March 22, 2013 Wang signed a minor league contract with the New York Yankees.[36] ...
Second stint with the Nuggets (2014-2015)[edit]. On June 26, 2014, Afflalo was traded back to the Denver Nuggets in exchange ... On July 27, 2017, Afflalo signed with the Orlando Magic, returning to the franchise for a second stint.[33] ...
Second stint with Steelers[edit]. Ventrone was signed to the Steelers' practice squad on December 29, 2015 and then to the ...
Dallas Cowboys (first stint)[edit]. On December 7, 1993, he was signed by the Dallas Cowboys to the practice squad. On December ... San Francisco (second stint)[edit]. On November 11, 1993, he was signed to the San Francisco 49ers' practice squad and was ... San Francisco 49ers (first stint)[edit]. On May 3, 1993, he was signed as a free agent by the San Francisco 49ers to play ... Dallas Cowboys (second stint)[edit]. In October 1994, he was signed by the Dallas Cowboys and released after one week. ...
Carolina Panthers (second stint)[edit]. On March 11, 2017, Munnerlyn signed a four-year, $21 million contract with the Panthers ...
Chicago Bears (second stint)[edit]. Okoye returned to the Bears on August 31, 2012,[13] and signed a one-year contract on ...
In 2008, Adriano finally regained his form during his stint at São Paulo FC and earned a recall to the national team. On 10 ...
... and stents[edit]. Stent implantation has been correlated with impaired endothelial function in several ... Sirolimus eluting stents were previously used because they showed low rates of in-stent restenosis, but further investigation ... "Paclitaxel-coated balloon catheter versus paclitaxel-coated stent for the treatment of coronary in-stent restenosis". ... "Recent advances to accelerate re-endothelialization for vascular stents". Journal of Tissue Engineering. 8: 2041731417731546. ...
Second Stint with Dodgers[edit]. In July, the Dodgers reacquired Dessens from the Royals for pitcher Odalis Pérez and two minor ... Second Stint with Pirates[edit]. In January 2008, Dessens signed a minor league contract with the Pittsburgh Pirates, but was ...
Stint at Santa Fe[edit]. Although then came the injuries, at the end of the 1965 campaign "Maravilla" was sold to Independiente ...
... into which a bare-metal stent, a drug-eluting stent, a bioabsorbable stent, a dual-therapy stent (combination of both drug and ... A stent graft or covered stent is type of vascular stent with a fabric coating that creates a contained tube but is expandable ... For people named Stent, see Stent (surname). For other uses, see Stent (disambiguation). ... Other types are duodenal stents, colonic stents, and pancreatic stents, the designations referring to the location of their ...
Definition A coronary stent is an artificial support device placed in the coronary artery to keep the vessel open after ... Coated stents, also called drug-eluting stents, are stents that have. KEY TERMS. Angina- Also called angina pectoris, chest ... The stent is usually a stainless steel mesh tube. Since the stent will be placed inside an artery, the device comes in various ... The stent is inserted into the artery with the balloon-tip catheter. The stent is flat when inserted so that it can travel ...
One or both ends of the stent may be coiled to prevent it from moving out of place; this is called a JJ stent, double J stent ... Sexual activity is also possible with a stent, but stents with a thread may significantly hinder sex.[2] The stent also can ... Stent placement[edit]. Three-dimensional reconstructed CT scan image of a ureteral stent in the left kidney (indicated by ... A ureteral stent (pronounced you-REE-ter-ul), or ureteric stent, is a thin tube inserted into the ureter to prevent or treat ...
Carotid artery stenting (CAS) is an endovascular procedure where a stent is deployed within the lumen of the carotid artery to ... Carotid stenting is the preferred therapy for patients who are at an increased risk with carotid surgery. High risk factors ... Carotid stenting may be considered an alternative to carotid surgery in average surgical risk patients, albeit with a higher ... The EVA-3s trial was stopped early due to an early finding that stenting was too dangerous. The trial was criticized that they ...
Endoscopic stenting is a medical procedure by which a stent, a hollow device designed to prevent contriction or collapse of a ... Endoscopic stents are commonly referred to as self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS). SEMS "play an important role in the ... McLoughlin MT, Byrne MF (June 2008). "Endoscopic stenting-Where are we now and where can we go?" (PDF). World J. Gastroenterol ... management of malignant obstructing lesions in the gastrointestinal tract." A stent may be inserted into the common bile duct ...
http://www.mediafire.com/file/qeu8n7xaq3t85fj/Colonic_Stenting_Bowel_Cancer_Australia.pdf/file. .header { height: 70px; ...
Is rescue stenting an effective strategy for these patients? ... Rescue Stent (n=48). P Value. Age, y. 66.6±13.7. 68.0±12.1. ... The stent was patent in 20 (87.0%) of the 23 patients. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor was significantly associated with stent ... Compared with no stenting group, RS group showed a significantly higher rate of good outcome (modified Rankin Scale score, 0-2 ... Permanent placement of a self-expanding stent has been suggested as a primary or rescue modality for intracranial LVO.[12-17] ...
... Lead Guest Editor: Linxia Gu. Guest Editors: Ahmed Al-Jumaily, Xinwei Han, and Xiaodong ...
Carotid stenting. In carotid stenting, a long, hollow tube (catheter) is threaded through the arteries to the narrowed carotid ... A metal mesh tube (stent) is inserted into the vessel to serve as a scaffold that helps prevent the artery from narrowing again ...
Based on their release modes, they can be classified into self-expanding peripheral stents and... ... Peripheral stents are main devices used in endovascular treatment for peripheral vascular diseases. ... and other details of peripheral stents and elaborates on their structures, features, and model types based on peripheral stents ... they can be classified into self-expanding peripheral stents and balloon-expanding peripheral stents. This chapter mainly ...
Read reviews, compare customer ratings, see screenshots and learn more about Stint. Download Stint and enjoy it on your iPhone ... Stint is an on demand global work force powered by university students. We instantly connect students, with spare time and a ...
Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial]) have suggested similar outcomes for carotid stenting compared with ... Noting that carotid stenting is estimated to reduce the absolute 5-year stroke risk by 16% for patients with symptomatic ... A mortality rate of 32% at 2 years after carotid artery stenting (CAS) in a new study has raised concerns about the risk- ... P]atients will appreciate getting a carotid artery stented and avoiding a stroke," he concludes. "However, they will be even ...
Carotid artery stenting (CAS), which has emerged as an alternative therapy to high-risk surgical patients, has become an ... Ederle J, Dobson J, Featherstone RL, et al.; International Carotid Stenting Study investigators. Carotid artery stenting com- ... Carotid artery stenting with a new-generation double-mesh stent in three high-volume Italian centres: clinical results of a ... Randomized trial of stent versus surgery for asymptomatic carotid stenosis. N Engl J Med. 2016;374:1011-20.CrossRefPubMedGoogle ...
... covers carotid artery stenting (CAS) procedures under certain circumstances including through study participation. Listed below ... The National Coverage Determination (NCD) for Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty (PTA) covers carotid artery stenting (CAS) ...
... Carotid Artery Endarterectomy or Carotid Stenting are used to treat Carotid Artery ... Angiplasty and stenting will be performed to reduce the blockage. This is done with the use of a small balloon device. ... Carotid Angioplasty and Stenting. *This surgery is usually performed using local anesthesia and minimal sedation. ...
Stent (ca); استنت (fa); Stent (nl); ᎠᎦᏖᎾ ᎪᏣᎸᏗᏍᏗ ᎩᎦ ᎤᏪᏓᏍᏗ (chr); Stent (id); Stent (pl); stent (nb); Stent (sh); stent (ro); ... Stent (es); Stoðnet (is); Stent (eu); стент (ru); Stent (de); Ստենտ (hy); 支架 (zh); Stent (ku); Stent (tr); ステント (ja); Stent (sv ... Stent (cs); உறைகுழாய் (ta); Stent (it); stent (fr); Stent (et); ਸਟੇਂਟ (pa); 支架 (zh-hans); Стент (sr-ec); stent (pt); Stent (sr- ... and stenting is the placement of a stent. (en); tub de metal sau de plastic introdus în lumenul unui recipient anatomic sau o ...
This structure can be an artery, a vein, or another structure such as the tube that carries urine (ureter). The stent holds the ... A stent is a tiny tube placed into a hollow structure in your body. ... When a stent is placed into the body, the procedure is called stenting. There are different kinds of stents. Most are made of a ... This stent prevents the artery from re-closing.. A drug-eluting stent is coated with a medicine. This medicine helps further ...
... , also known as tracheobronchial prostheses, are tube-shaped devices that are inserted into an airway. They are ... A dedicated tracheobronchial stent. Chest 1990; 97:328.. *Dutau H, Toutblanc B, Lamb C, Seijo L. Use of the Dumon Y-stent in ... Airway stents. Present and future. Clin Chest Med 1995; 16:465.. *Chhajed PN, Malouf MA, Tamm M, Glanville AR. Ultraflex stents ... The indications for airway stenting, types of stents, insertion technique, and potential complications are reviewed here. Other ...
... Nonresident Senior Fellow - Foreign Policy, Center on the United States and Europe. ... Angela Stent is director of the Center for Eurasian, Russian and East European Studies and a professor of government and ... Angela Stent is director of the Center for Eurasian, Russian and East European Studies and a professor of government and ... Stent received her bachelors from Cambridge University, her Master of Science with distinction from the London School of ...
Several types of stents are available for different indications. They are primarily used to keep narrowed blood vessels open ... A urinary stent can be placed inside the ureter to allow the urine to flow out. Stents can be used in this way as a temporary ... Urinary stents. A urinary stent is used to hold the ureter open in cases where it has narrowed. Ureters are long tubes that ... Stent grafts. These are tubular devices made up of special fabric that is supported by a rigid metal stent. These are mainly ...
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PRNewswire/ -- Reportbuyer.com just published a new market research report: Coronary Stents Market in India 2013 Netscribes ... Coronary Stents Market in India 2013. Netscribes latest market research report titled Coronary stents Market in India 2013 ... Slide 5: Coronary stents - Uses, Characteristics and Types. Slide 6: Development of Coronary Stents. Market Overview. Slide 7: ... Since profit margins are higher in case of foreign-manufactured stents, hospitals push for the sale of such stents rather than ...
Stenting of Ilio-femoral outflow - 3 years experience * 1. 3 years experience with venous stenting Michał Molski MD PhD ... 6. Guidelines for cPVOO stenting - AVF 2009 Michal Molski 17.08.2019 * 7. Guidelines for cPVOO stenting - ESVS 2015 Michal ... Stent deployment ( Wallstent - Boston Scientific ) Postdilatation ( Boston Scientific ballons ) Control flebography Acces site ... 9. Material Between 2013 and 2019.06 • 54 patients were qualified for cPVOO stenting Between 2016.03 and 2019.06 • 36 patients ...
Stenting synonyms, Stenting pronunciation, Stenting translation, English dictionary definition of Stenting. n. 1. An opening in ... Stenting. Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.. Related to Stenting: angioplasty, angiography ... In the past decade, some doctors have tested stenting on blocked carotids.. Carotid overhaul: stents and surgery go neck and ... The live case will be performed using an alternate side branch stenting approach and the Sideguard[TM] Bifurcation Stenting ...
Listen to Mark Spike Stent now.. Listen to Mark Spike Stent in full in the Spotify app ...
  • Ureteral stents are used to ensure the patency of a ureter , which may be compromised, for example, by a kidney stone . (wikipedia.org)
  • A ureteral stent (pronounced you-REE-ter-ul), or ureteric stent , is a thin tube inserted into the ureter to prevent or treat obstruction of the urine flow from the kidney . (wikipedia.org)
  • Three-dimensional reconstructed CT scan image of a ureteral stent in the left kidney (indicated by yellow arrow). (wikipedia.org)
  • The main complications with ureteral stents are dislocation, infection and blockage by encrustation. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1. A ureteral stent, comprising: an elongate body having a proximal end and a distal end and defining a lumen and an opening in communication with the lumen, the lumen having a diameter, the opening having a width greater than ½ the size of the diameter of the lumen and less than the diameter of the lumen, the opening having a length at least twice the width of the opening. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 2. The ureteral stent of claim 1, wherein the elongate body defines at least one channel on an outer surface of the elongate body. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 3. The ureteral stent of claim 1, further comprising: a retention member disposed at least one of the proximal end or the distal end of the elongate body, the retention member configured to help anchor the elongate body within a ureter. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 4. The ureteral stent of claim 1, further comprising: a first retention member at the proximal end of the elongate body and a second retention member at the distal end of the elongate body, the first retention member configured to be disposed within a bladder, the second retention member configured to be disposed within a kidney. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 6. The ureteral stent of claim 1, wherein the opening extends from the proximal end to the distal end of the elongate body. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 7. The ureteral stent of claim 1, wherein the opening is configured to laterally receive a guidewire therethrough, the elongate body being configured to releasably couple the guidewire within the lumen of the elongate body such that the elongate body can be slidably moved along the guidewire. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 9. The ureteral stent of claim 8, wherein the elongate body defines a plurality of channels on an outer surface of the elongate body. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Do use code 50382 when a ureteral stent is removed and replaced percutaneously. (aapc.com)
  • Two days later the nephrostomy is removed under fluoroscopic guidance to avoid pulling out the ureteral stent (50389). (aapc.com)
  • Example 3) Thirty year old with fractured ureteral stent. (aapc.com)
  • A new ureteral stent is placed. (aapc.com)
  • This bioabsorbable stent, a polymer made from lactic acid, provides the structural support needed in the artery during and immediately following angioplasty. (uhn.ca)
  • The stent used is the only bioabsorbable stent available for clinical use right now and is currently only available by special access from Health Canada. (uhn.ca)
  • Imaged via ultrasound two years after surgery, this artery shows no trace of the bioabsorbable stent used to prop it open. (technologyreview.com)
  • The invention provides for an intravascular stent having a plurality of cylindrical rings connected by links with apertures and/or undulating links. (google.ca)
  • An intravascular stent especially suited for implanting in curved arterial portions. (google.co.uk)
  • 12. The stenting ring according to claim 1, which has an axial length and which is a component part of a stent, which stent exhibits a lumen and an axial length which is longer than the axial length of the ring. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • As a result, when the stent is coated with a medicine the more constant density of stent elements results in an even dose being applied to the inside wall of the lumen, avoiding the possibility that a toxic dose be supplied at one area while a less than effective dose is applied to another area. (google.co.uk)
  • A stent is commonly used as a tubular structure left inside the lumen of a duct to relieve an obstruction. (google.es)
  • Commonly, stents are inserted into the lumen in a non-expanded form and are then expanded autonomously (or with the aid of a second device) in situ. (google.es)
  • c) after said coiled spring has cooled sufficiently, reversing the winding direction of said coiled spring to form the stent. (google.com)
  • A state advisory group on Thursday recommended legislative changes to bolster oversight of coronary stent placements amid widespread concerns about unnecessary medical procedures, but it stopped short of proposing that state law regulate physician reviews in hospitals. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Studies in the US have shown that almost half the cases of stenting may have been unnecessary and cardiologists in India have also admitted that inappropriate stenting is quite prevalent here too. (indiatimes.com)
  • All the cases of inappropriate or unnecessary use of stents in the US were reported by hospitals. (indiatimes.com)
  • Unnecessary stenting alone is estimated to cost the US healthcare system about $2.4 billion per year. (indiatimes.com)
  • Routine frontal stenting is unnecessary (see image below). (medscape.com)
  • They found that there was no significant differences out to four years of follow-up between surgery and carotid stenting when counting all three, but carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has a higher risk of heart attacks and CAS has a higher risk of minor stroke than open surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) said that its thoracic stent graft for the treatment of a potentially deadly blunt-force chest injury performed well five years after implantation, according to a new study. (massdevice.com)
  • By delaying coronary stent implantation, we hope to be able to reduce the size of the infarction and reduce the risk of suffering from heart failure following a heart attack. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • These gizmos, called drug-coated stents, worked so much better than plain old metal ones that 6 million people worldwide received them in the few years they have been available. (dailystrength.org)
  • Reuters Health) - For people with type 2 diabetes, maintaining good blood sugar control in the years after receiving a coronary artery stent is associated with a lower risk of heart attack and stroke, according to a recent study. (reuters.com)
  • 13. The stenting ring according to claim 12, the stent apart from the ring exhibiting a matrix of struts, which matrix has a characteristic pattern, which pattern is not shared by the ring. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • At regular intervals along the edge, distinct clusters of T lymphocytes and macrophages (not shown) occurred, suggesting inflammatory cell clustering at the site of stent struts ( Figures 2B and 2 C). These immunohistochemical images illustrate a stent-strut- induced inflammation of an in-stent restenotic lesion retrieved by DCA. (ahajournals.org)
  • 15 . The stent of claim 11 comprising a plurality of cavities in the expansion struts. (google.com.au)
  • Abbott's new bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting stent, or BVS, is made up of two layers of a biodegradable polymer: one that contains the immunosuppressant drug everolimus, the other forming a longer-lasting backbone. (technologyreview.com)
  • This first randomized clinical study of a polymer-coated zotarolimus-eluting stent (Resolute Onyx) that utilizes a novel thin-strutted metallic platform allowing for better x-ray visibility was shown to be non-inferior to an ultrathin-strutted bioresorbable polymer-coated sirolimus-eluting stent (Orsiro) that uses a cobalt-chromium strut platform. (news-medical.net)
  • This novel microstructured polymer stents are made of a shape memory polymer (e.g. polyurethane). (innovations-report.de)
  • Below body temperature the shape memory polymer stent has a compressed geometry (temporary form, see left figure). (innovations-report.de)
  • When heating the shape memory polymer stent on body temperature the stent turns into an uncompressed geometry (predefined permanent form, see right figure). (innovations-report.de)
  • Therefore the polymer stent is a reliable device for angioplasty procedures. (innovations-report.de)
  • Orsiro is a cobalt-chromium stent that elutes the drug sirolimus via the Berlin-based company's Biolute bioabsorbable polymer coating. (massdevice.com)
  • This paper provides evidence for the first time that instances of allergic reactions, presumably to the polymer in the stent, can occur," said study co-author Dr. Charles Bennett , an NMH epidemiologist and oncologist. (upi.com)
  • They also concluded the polymer coating on the stent itself is the most probable cause of hypersensitivity in the majority of cases, rather than the medications the stent is coated with. (upi.com)
  • The larger question, of course, is not just which type of stent to use. (bmj.com)