Atrial Septum: The thin membrane-like muscular structure separating the right and the left upper chambers (HEART ATRIA) of a heart.Heart Septum: This structure includes the thin muscular atrial septum between the two HEART ATRIA, and the thick muscular ventricular septum between the two HEART VENTRICLES.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Heart Septal Defects, Atrial: Developmental abnormalities in any portion of the ATRIAL SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. Classification of atrial septal defects is based on location of the communication and types of incomplete fusion of atrial septa with the ENDOCARDIAL CUSHIONS in the fetal heart. They include ostium primum, ostium secundum, sinus venosus, and coronary sinus defects.Coronary Restenosis: Recurrent narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery following surgical procedures performed to alleviate a prior obstruction.Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome: A condition caused by underdevelopment of the whole left half of the heart. It is characterized by hypoplasia of the left cardiac chambers (HEART ATRIUM; HEART VENTRICLE), the AORTA, the AORTIC VALVE, and the MITRAL VALVE. Severe symptoms appear in early infancy when DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS closes.Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Drug-Eluting Stents: Stents that are covered with materials that are embedded with chemicals that are gradually released into the surrounding milieu.Heart Septal Defects: Abnormalities in any part of the HEART SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communication between the left and the right chambers of the heart. The abnormal blood flow inside the heart may be caused by defects in the ATRIAL SEPTUM, the VENTRICULAR SEPTUM, or both.Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Sirolimus: A macrolide compound obtained from Streptomyces hygroscopicus that acts by selectively blocking the transcriptional activation of cytokines thereby inhibiting cytokine production. It is bioactive only when bound to IMMUNOPHILINS. Sirolimus is a potent immunosuppressant and possesses both antifungal and antineoplastic properties.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Lymphangiectasis: A transient dilatation of the lymphatic vessels.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Coronary Thrombosis: Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Fetal Heart: The heart of the fetus of any viviparous animal. It refers to the heart in the postembryonic period and is differentiated from the embryonic heart (HEART/embryology) only on the basis of time.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Septum of Brain: GRAY MATTER structures of the telencephalon and LIMBIC SYSTEM in the brain, but containing widely varying definitions among authors. Included here is the cortical septal area, subcortical SEPTAL NUCLEI, and the SEPTUM PELLUCIDUM.Coronary Stenosis: Narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery.Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors: Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.Ticlopidine: An effective inhibitor of platelet aggregation commonly used in the placement of STENTS in CORONARY ARTERIES.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.Echocardiography, Transesophageal: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Ventricular Septum: The muscular structure separating the right and the left lower chambers (HEART VENTRICLES) of the heart. The ventricular septum consists of a very small membranous portion just beneath the AORTIC VALVE, and a large thick muscular portion consisting of three sections including the inlet septum, the trabecular septum, and the outlet septum.Cardiovascular Agents: Agents that affect the rate or intensity of cardiac contraction, blood vessel diameter, or blood volume.Septum Pellucidum: A triangular double membrane separating the anterior horns of the LATERAL VENTRICLES of the brain. It is situated in the median plane and bounded by the CORPUS CALLOSUM and the body and columns of the FORNIX (BRAIN).Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Metals: Electropositive chemical elements characterized by ductility, malleability, luster, and conductance of heat and electricity. They can replace the hydrogen of an acid and form bases with hydroxyl radicals. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Myxoma: A benign neoplasm derived from connective tissue, consisting chiefly of polyhedral and stellate cells that are loosely embedded in a soft mucoid matrix, thereby resembling primitive mesenchymal tissue. It occurs frequently intramuscularly where it may be mistaken for a sarcoma. It appears also in the jaws and the skin. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Streptococcus constellatus: A species of gram-positive bacteria in the STREPTOCOCCUS MILLERI GROUP. It is commonly found in the oropharnyx flora and has a proclivity for abscess formation in the upper body and respiratory tract.Graft Occlusion, Vascular: Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.Tunica Intima: The innermost layer of an artery or vein, made up of one layer of endothelial cells and supported by an internal elastic lamina.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Nasal Septum: The partition separating the two NASAL CAVITIES in the midplane. It is formed by the SEPTAL NASAL CARTILAGE, parts of skull bones (ETHMOID BONE; VOMER), and membranous parts.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Heart Neoplasms: Tumors in any part of the heart. They include primary cardiac tumors and metastatic tumors to the heart. Their interference with normal cardiac functions can cause a wide variety of symptoms including HEART FAILURE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; or EMBOLISM.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Pulmonary Veins: The veins that return the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.Angioplasty, Balloon: Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.Coated Materials, Biocompatible: Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Drug Implants: Small containers or pellets of a solid drug implanted in the body to achieve sustained release of the drug.Paclitaxel: A cyclodecane isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew tree, TAXUS BREVIFOLIA. It stabilizes MICROTUBULES in their polymerized form leading to cell death.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Pacemaker, Artificial: A device designed to stimulate, by electric impulses, contraction of the heart muscles. It may be temporary (external) or permanent (internal or internal-external).Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A family of percutaneous techniques that are used to manage CORONARY OCCLUSION, including standard balloon angioplasty (PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY), the placement of intracoronary STENTS, and atheroablative technologies (e.g., ATHERECTOMY; ENDARTERECTOMY; THROMBECTOMY; PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL LASER ANGIOPLASTY). PTCA was the dominant form of PCI, before the widespread use of stenting.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Hyperplasia: An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.Aspirin: The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Alloys: A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Neointima: The new and thickened layer of scar tissue that forms on a PROSTHESIS, or as a result of vessel injury especially following ANGIOPLASTY or stent placement.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Foramen Ovale, Patent: A condition in which the FORAMEN OVALE in the ATRIAL SEPTUM fails to close shortly after birth. This results in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. An isolated patent ovale foramen without other structural heart defects is usually of no hemodynamic significance.Coronary Aneurysm: Abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of CORONARY VESSELS. Most coronary aneurysms are due to CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS, and the rest are due to inflammatory diseases, such as KAWASAKI DISEASE.Myocardial Revascularization: The restoration of blood supply to the myocardium. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Electrophysiologic Techniques, Cardiac: Methods to induce and measure electrical activities at specific sites in the heart to diagnose and treat problems with the heart's electrical system.Embryo Implantation, Delayed: Delay in the attachment and implantation of BLASTOCYST to the uterine ENDOMETRIUM. The blastocyst remains unattached beyond the normal duration thus delaying embryonic development.Retreatment: The therapy of the same disease in a patient, with the same agent or procedure repeated after initial treatment, or with an additional or alternate measure or follow-up. It does not include therapy which requires more than one administration of a therapeutic agent or regimen. Retreatment is often used with reference to a different modality when the original one was inadequate, harmful, or unsuccessful.Angioscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery performed on the interior of blood vessels.Aortic Coarctation: A birth defect characterized by the narrowing of the AORTA that can be of varying degree and at any point from the transverse arch to the iliac bifurcation. Aortic coarctation causes arterial HYPERTENSION before the point of narrowing and arterial HYPOTENSION beyond the narrowed portion.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Phenprocoumon: Coumarin derivative that acts as a long acting oral anticoagulant.Atherectomy, Coronary: Percutaneous transluminal procedure for removing atheromatous plaque from the coronary arteries. Both directional (for removing focal atheromas) and rotational (for removing concentric atheromatous plaque) atherectomy devices have been used.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Catheter Ablation: Removal of tissue with electrical current delivered via electrodes positioned at the distal end of a catheter. Energy sources are commonly direct current (DC-shock) or alternating current at radiofrequencies (usually 750 kHz). The technique is used most often to ablate the AV junction and/or accessory pathways in order to interrupt AV conduction and produce AV block in the treatment of various tachyarrhythmias.Tomography, Optical Coherence: An imaging method using LASERS that is used for mapping subsurface structure. When a reflective site in the sample is at the same optical path length (coherence) as the reference mirror, the detector observes interference fringes.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Cochlear Implantation: Surgical insertion of an electronic hearing device (COCHLEAR IMPLANTS) with electrodes to the COCHLEAR NERVE in the inner ear to create sound sensation in patients with residual nerve fibers.Absorbable Implants: Implants constructed of materials designed to be absorbed by the body without producing an immune response. They are usually composed of plastics and are frequently used in orthopedics and orthodontics.Prolapse: The protrusion of an organ or part of an organ into a natural or artificial orifice.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Angioplasty: Reconstruction or repair of a blood vessel, which includes the widening of a pathological narrowing of an artery or vein by the removal of atheromatous plaque material and/or the endothelial lining as well, or by dilatation (BALLOON ANGIOPLASTY) to compress an ATHEROMA. Except for ENDARTERECTOMY, usually these procedures are performed via catheterization as minimally invasive ENDOVASCULAR PROCEDURES.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Coronary Occlusion: Complete blockage of blood flow through one of the CORONARY ARTERIES, usually from CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Atrial Fibrillation: Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.Lens Implantation, Intraocular: Insertion of an artificial lens to replace the natural CRYSTALLINE LENS after CATARACT EXTRACTION or to supplement the natural lens which is left in place.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Angina Pectoris: The symptom of paroxysmal pain consequent to MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA usually of distinctive character, location and radiation. It is thought to be provoked by a transient stressful situation during which the oxygen requirements of the MYOCARDIUM exceed that supplied by the CORONARY CIRCULATION.Pulmonary Atresia: A congenital heart defect characterized by the narrowing or complete absence of the opening between the RIGHT VENTRICLE and the PULMONARY ARTERY. Lacking a normal PULMONARY VALVE, unoxygenated blood in the right ventricle can not be effectively pumped into the lung for oxygenation. Clinical features include rapid breathing, CYANOSIS, right ventricle atrophy, and abnormal heart sounds (HEART MURMURS).Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Tubulin Modulators: Agents that interact with TUBULIN to inhibit or promote polymerization of MICROTUBULES.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Creatine Kinase, MB Form: An isoenzyme of creatine kinase found in the CARDIAC MUSCLE.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Pulmonary Valve Stenosis: The pathologic narrowing of the orifice of the PULMONARY VALVE. This lesion restricts blood outflow from the RIGHT VENTRICLE to the PULMONARY ARTERY. When the trileaflet valve is fused into an imperforate membrane, the blockage is complete.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Endovascular Procedures: Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Angina, Stable: Persistent and reproducible chest discomfort usually precipitated by a physical exertion that dissipates upon cessation of such an activity. The symptoms are manifestations of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Beta Particles: High energy POSITRONS or ELECTRONS ejected from a disintegrating atomic nucleus.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Uterus: The hollow thick-walled muscular organ in the female PELVIS. It consists of the fundus (the body) which is the site of EMBRYO IMPLANTATION and FETAL DEVELOPMENT. Beyond the isthmus at the perineal end of fundus, is CERVIX UTERI (the neck) opening into VAGINA. Beyond the isthmi at the upper abdominal end of fundus, are the FALLOPIAN TUBES.Brachytherapy: A collective term for interstitial, intracavity, and surface radiotherapy. It uses small sealed or partly-sealed sources that may be placed on or near the body surface or within a natural body cavity or implanted directly into the tissues.Acute Coronary Syndrome: An episode of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA that generally lasts longer than a transient anginal episode that ultimately may lead to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Angioscopes: Endoscopes used for viewing the interior of blood vessels.Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease: Pathological process resulting in the fibrous obstruction of the small- and medium-sized PULMONARY VEINS and PULMONARY HYPERTENSION. Veno-occlusion can arise from fibrous proliferation of the VASCULAR INTIMA and VASCULAR MEDIA; THROMBOSIS; or a combination of both.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Endometrium: The mucous membrane lining of the uterine cavity that is hormonally responsive during the MENSTRUAL CYCLE and PREGNANCY. The endometrium undergoes cyclic changes that characterize MENSTRUATION. After successful FERTILIZATION, it serves to sustain the developing embryo.Diabetic Angiopathies: VASCULAR DISEASES that are associated with DIABETES MELLITUS.Iliac Vein: A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Tracheoesophageal Fistula: Abnormal passage between the ESOPHAGUS and the TRACHEA, acquired or congenital, often associated with ESOPHAGEAL ATRESIA.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Angina, Unstable: Precordial pain at rest, which may precede a MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.
Repair of atrial and ventricular septa with prosthesis (35.6) Repair of atrial and ventricular septa with tissue graft (35.7) ... Implantation of total replacement heart system Artificial heart (37.6) Implantation of heart and circulatory assist system ( ... Insertion of non-drug-eluting peripheral vessel stent(s) (39.91) Freeing of vessel (39.92) Injection of sclerosing agent into ... Other and unspecified repair of atrial and ventricular septa (35.8) Total repair of certain congenital cardiac anomalies (35.9 ...
Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation. production of septal defect in heart. enlargement of existing septal defect Atrial ... Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent. Drug-eluting stent. *Bentall procedure. *Valve-sparing aortic root replacement ...
Atrial septostomy. Balloon septostomy. creation of septal defect in heart Blalock-Hanlon procedure. shunt from heart chamber to ... Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation. .mw-parser-output .nobold{font-weight:normal}. production of septal defect in heart ... Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent. Drug-eluting stent. *Bentall procedure. *Valve-sparing aortic root replacement ... "Cryoablation for the Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation". Retrieved May 23, 2015.. *^ Peter W. Macfarlane, Adriaan van Oosterom, ...
Atrial septostomy. Balloon septostomy. creation of septal defect in heart Blalock-Hanlon procedure. shunt from heart chamber to ... Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation. .mw-parser-output .nobold{font-weight:normal}. production of septal defect in heart ... Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent. Drug-eluting stent. *Bentall procedure. *Valve-sparing aortic root replacement ... "Evaluation and management of the adult patient with transposition of the great arteries following atrial-level (Senning or ...
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Atrial septostomy. Balloon septostomy. creation of septal defect in heart Blalock-Hanlon procedure. shunt from heart chamber to ... Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation. .mw-parser-output .nobold{font-weight:normal}. production of septal defect in heart ... Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent. Drug-eluting stent. *Bentall procedure. *Valve-sparing aortic root replacement ... including atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. It is also used in the emergent treatment of wide complex tachycardias, ...
Atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter resulted in 112,000 deaths in 2013, up from 29,000 in 1990. Sudden cardiac death is the ... It involves the extraction of clots from occluded coronary arteries and deployment of stents and balloons through a small hole ... Pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum: This type of pulmonary atresia is associated with complete and intact ... Other therapeutic modalities employed in this field include antiarrhythmic drug therapy and implantation of pacemakers and ...
... which involved using the atrial septum to create an intratrial baffle that redirected bloodflow at the atrial level; Senning ... In most cases, the coronary implantation sites will be at left and right anterior positions at the base of the neo-aorta; ... treatment usually involves endovascular stenting and/or xenograft patching. General anaesthesia and cardiopulmonary bypass are ... through which the congenital or palliative atrial septal defect (ASD) is repaired; where a Rashkind balloon atrial septostomy ...
It is used in recurrent atrial flutter (Afl), atrial fibrillation (AF), supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), atrial tachycardia ... either to block the atrioventricular node after implantation of a pacemaker or to block conduction within the left atrium, ... Coronary stent. Bare-metal stent. Drug-eluting stent. *Bentall procedure. *Valve-sparing aortic root replacement ... Atrial septostomy. Balloon septostomy. creation of septal defect in heart Blalock-Hanlon procedure. shunt from heart chamber to ...
The nasal trigger points where enlarged turbinates are in contact with the nasal septum are addressed with a septoplasty and a ... A stimulation trial can be performed before the permanent implantation, with the view to improving selection of the candidates ... Collins, Lois M. (October 3, 2007). "Utah company's new stent may help repair heart defects". Deseret News. Salt Lake City, ... "Inheritance of persistent foramen ovale and atrial septal defects and the relation to familial migraine with aura". Heart ( ...
Supraventricular tachycardias include atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. ... However the insertion of stents and pacemakers is performed by cardiologists Adult cardiologyEdit. Cardiology is a specialty of ... Pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum: This type of pulmonary atresia is associated with complete and intact ... Other therapeutic modalities employed in this field include antiarrhythmic drug therapy and implantation of pacemakers and ...
Transcatheter Creation of an Atrial Septal Defect with Brockenbrough Method Followed by Stent Implantation in the Atrial Septum ... Transcatheter Creation of an Atrial Septal Defect with Brockenbrough Method Followed by Stent Implantation in the Atrial Septum ... of the transcatheter creation of an ASD that combines the Brockenbrough method and stent implantation for the atrial septum ... We report transcatheter creation of an ASD with Brockenbrough method followed by stent implantation for hypoxemia improvement ...
... stent implantation is usually required to prevent recoil.1 Self expanding as well as balloon expandable stents have been used ... In older patients who have an intact atrial septum it may be necessary first to perforate the septum using a transseptal needle ... 11 and stent implantation. Stenting seems to keep the duct open effectively when the systemic circulation is dependent-that is ... 1998) Stenting of systemic venous pathways after atrial repair for complete transposition. Heart 79:211-212, A useful overview ...
Balloon dilation and stent implantation in the stenotic segment of the vertical vein relieved the obstruction until the patient ... 3233805 - Partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage and intact atrial septum with mitral stenos.... 17700405 - Precordial ... Prosthesis Implantation / instrumentation*. Pulmonary Veins / abnormalities*, radiography, ultrasonography. Stents*. From ... Balloon dilation and stent implantation in the stenotic segment of the vertical vein relieved the obstruction until the patient ...
Implantation of ICD, Pacemaker and CRT devices *Non-invasive diagnostic *Atrial septum occlude devices ... Adels areas of expertise include cardiovascular interventions (Angioplasty + stenting of coronary arteries, peripheral vessels ... atrial septum occlude devices, AV-Ablation, Rehabilitation and physical therapy.. He has several publications in German and ... including renal + carotid arteries), IVUS of coronary arteries, Hemodynamic studies and myocardial biopsy, implantation of ICD ...
Stenting of the atrial septum. In some cases, some procedures are performed outside the cardiac catheterization laboratory in ... Transcatheter valve implantation. *Balloon angioplasty and/or stent implantation of stenotic blood vessels *Coarctation of the ... the implantation of an additional stent (bottom left), as well as the final result with excellent flow to the re-opened left ... followed by implantation of an endovascular stent. Figure 5 documents the occluded left pulmonary artery (top left, level of ...
An internally or externally powered microcircuit component is supported on a stent-like structure and adapted to be placed in ... Placement in the ventricular septum permits measurement of pressure and temperature in the left ventricle without introducing ... Here, an incision is made through the ventricular septum 28 or the atrial septum 30 with a device like that shown in FIG. 1 ... a stent having a first end, a second end, and a lumen extending therebetween, the stent adapted for placement in the septum ...
Hybrid transatrial stent insertion for left atrial decompression in hypoplastic left heart syndrome with intact atrial septum. ... Long-term prognostic value of risk scores after drug-eluting stent implantation for unprotected left main coronary artery: A ... Coronary and peripheral stenting in aorto-ostial protruding stents: The balloon assisted access to protruding stent technique. ... Impact of six versus 12 months of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with drug-eluting stent implantation after risk ...
... atrial side) (Figure 4) and delivered antegrade via the right femoral vein, across the atrial septum, and into the ... aiming to achieve mild flaring of the ends of the valve stent on the ventricular and atrial sides (Figure 5). In the second ... TEE Assessment of Transcatheter Mitral Valve Implantation. (Top) Simultaneous left atrial (left) and left ventricular (right) ... In a third case due to presence of previous stroke and concomitant pacemaker leads the atrial septum was closed using a 25 mm ...
Abdominal aortic embolisation of a Figulla atrial septum occlude device, at the level of the celiac axis after an atrial septal ... Unexpanded, irretrievable stent in the proximal right coronary artery: successful management with stent graft implantation. ... Direct coronarystent implantation: safety, feasibility, and predictors of successof the strategy of direct coronary stent ... Nonsurgical retrieval of embolized coronary stents. Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2000;51:432-40.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar ...
i,Background and Objectives,/i,. We evaluated and compared the influence of treatment for atrial septal defect (ASD), patent ... Five patients underwent balloon dilatation, one of them with a stent implantation. Ten patients were operated on with resection ... The z-scores of thicknesses of interventricular septum and posterior wall of LV, and those of RV and LV end-diastolic ... percutaneous angioplasty was performed using either balloon dilatation only or with stent implantation. ...
Publication: Novel Approach to the Newborn With Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome and Intact Atrial Septum Authors: Alexander J. ... Publication: Recanalization of Systemic Venous Baffles by Radiofrequency Perforation and Stent Implantation Authors: Authors: ... Publication: Radiofrequency Perforation and Cutting Balloon Septoplasty of Intact Atrial Septum in a Newborn With Hypoplastic ... Left atrial appendage occlusion using a Watchman device in a transplanted heart ... English ...
Publication: Novel Approach to the Newborn With Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome and Intact Atrial Septum Authors: Alexander J. ... Publication: Recanalization of Systemic Venous Baffles by Radiofrequency Perforation and Stent Implantation Authors: Authors: ... Publication: Radiofrequency Perforation and Cutting Balloon Septoplasty of Intact Atrial Septum in a Newborn With Hypoplastic ... Publication: Transcatheter Creation of an Atrial Setpal Defect Using Radiofrequency Perforation. Authors: Henri Justino MD Lee ...
Repair of atrial and ventricular septa with prosthesis (35.6) Repair of atrial and ventricular septa with tissue graft (35.7) ... Implantation of total replacement heart system Artificial heart (37.6) Implantation of heart and circulatory assist system ( ... Insertion of non-drug-eluting peripheral vessel stent(s) (39.91) Freeing of vessel (39.92) Injection of sclerosing agent into ... Other and unspecified repair of atrial and ventricular septa (35.8) Total repair of certain congenital cardiac anomalies (35.9 ...
Visit LAvie Clinic and Book Your appointment with Dr Adel Abushi for consulting Cardic desease Angioplasty stenting carotid ... Implantation of ICD, Pacemaker and CRT devices. Non-invasive diagnostic. Atrial septum occlude devices ... stenting of coronary arteries, peripheral vessels including renal + carotid arteries), IVUS of coronary arteries, Hemodynamic ... atrial septum occlude devices, AV-Ablation, Rehabilitation and physical therapy.. Dr Adel has over 10 years of teaching at the ...
Closure of defects of the atrial and ventricular septum (dividing wall) by placement of an implant (occluder) by ... Implantation of minimally invasive defibrillator systems (S-ICD; Cameron Health), which no longer require leads to be placed in ... growth stent), which adapts as the patient grows ... Implantation of drug pumps for the continuous infusion of ... State-of-the-art treatment procedures for severe heart rhythm disturbances by the implantation of defibrillators (AICD) and ...
... at second implantation site 52 against the left-atrial side of septum 362 around the hole previously made in the septum. A ... Alternatively, catheter 22 houses a sheath which compresses stent 50 during delivery of stent to second implantation site 52. ... deploying the stent such that the stent expands and is implanted in the blood vessel at an implantation site. ... deploying the stent such that the stent expands and is implanted in the blood vessel at an implantation site. ...
Coronary artery injury is a particularly rare complication of pacemaker implantation. Herein, we reported the case of a 76-year ... The coronary artery was covered by a stent and the lead position was corrected. Based on the published research, the majority ... Herein, we reported the case of a 76-year-old woman with sick sinus syndrome undergoing permanent pacemaker implantation who ... of right ventricular pacemaker leads implanted on the septum are indeed implanted on the anteroseptal junction. Since, the left ...
Intraoperative Stent Implantation; Sameer Gafoor and Evan M Zahn. LEFT ATRIAL APPENDAGE CLOSURE ... Disorders of the Atrial Septum: Closure with HELEX or Gore Septal Occluder; Matt Daniels and Neil Wilson ... Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency: Percutaneous Caval Stent Valve Implantation for Treatment of Tricuspid Insufficiency; Alexander ... Atrial Septal Defect: Amplatzer-Type ASD Occluders; Mustafa Al-Qbandi, Qi-Ling Cao, and Ziyad M. Hijazi ...
Coarctation of the aorta: balloon angioplasty or stent implantation. *Atrial septal defect (ASD) closure with devices ...
Coarctation of the aorta: balloon angioplasty or stent implantation. *Atrial septal defect (ASD) closure with devices ...
... and angioplasty with bare-metal stent implantation to the left anterior descending artery 4 years earlier, develope… ... Intracardiac Echocardiography (ICE)-Guided Biopsy of a Right Atrial Mass. ABSTRACT: Although performing a biopsy of the right ... ventricular septum is a routine procedure in many cardiac catheterization laboratories, the ability to direct a bioptome to a ... Thrombus Contribution to Very Late Restenosis of Bare-Metal Stent Treated by Excimer Laser Angioplasty: In Vivo Assessment with ...
4. Stent implantation (bare-metal or drug0eluting). 5. coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) ... 3. atrial flutter and fibrillation. 4. isolated ventricular premature beats. 5. conduction block (all the types of bundle ... PCI or stent. Fibrinolysis. aspirin. Beta blockers to reduce infarct size (reducing demand). Oxygen and morphine. Same shit, ...
Stent insertion for bleeding oesophageal varices (IPG392) Evidence-based recommendations on stent (mesh tube) insertion for ... Thoracoscopic exclusion of the left atrial appendage (with or without surgical ablation) for non-valvular atrial fibrillation ... Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for aortic stenosis (IPG586) Evidence-based recommendations on transcatheter aortic ... Non-surgical reduction of the myocardial septum (IPG40) Evidence-based recommendations on non-surgical reduction of the ...
Balloon dilation/stenting for cor triatriatum dexter (abnormal septum in the heart) ... Occlusion (closure) of other cardiac shunts (atrial and ventricular septal defects [ASD, VSD]) ... Pacemaker implantation. *Balloon valvuloplasty (dilation) for pulmonic and subaortic (heart valve) stenosis ... Stenting for vascular stenosis. Contact the Small Animal Internal Medicine or Veterinary Cardiology Service for appointments or ...
The interatrial shunt is designed to be implanted trans-venously and placed in the atrial septum, where a valve regulates left ... Filed Under: Business/Financial News, Stents, Vascular, Wall Street Beat Tagged With: Edwards Lifesciences, Johnson and Johnson ... V-Wave today released results from the 1st-in-human implantation of its investigational interatrial shunt device designed for ... The interatrial shunt is designed to be implanted trans-venously and placed in the atrial septum, the Israel-based company said ...
  • The right atrium was opened by cutting through the right atrial appendage (RAA). (medscape.com)
  • Therefore, using 12-lead ECG monitoring, the COMPARE Study (electro C ardiographic evaluati O n of ische M ia com P aring inv A sive to pha R macological tr E atment) was designed to assess the frequency and clinical consequences of transient myocardial ischemia, in patients with NSTEMI/UA treated with either early invasive PCI/stent or those managed conservatively (medications or PCI/stent following recurrent symptoms). (jove.com)
  • Vascular or myocardial injury was common, especially within 30 days of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (about 69%), with the latter associated with left coronary ostial occlusion by calcified native aortic valve tissue in 2 cases. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Vascular or myocardial injury is very common early after transcatheter aortic valve implantation and myocardial amyloidosis represents a relatively frequent potentially significant comorbid condition. (onlinejacc.org)
  • A 53-year-old man with advanced heart failure because of a long-standing history of ischemic coronary artery disease with multiple myocardial infarctions and stent placements, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes mellitus type II was admitted with advanced cardiogenic shock in an outside hospital. (lww.com)
  • We evaluated and compared the influence of treatment for atrial septal defect (ASD), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), and coarctation of the aorta (CoA) on serum levels of N-terminal proatriopeptide and N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide. (hindawi.com)
  • Based on the published research, the majority of right ventricular pacemaker leads implanted on the septum are indeed implanted on the anteroseptal junction. (kowsarpub.com)
  • Primary TR may be due to congenital, rheumatic, neoplastic, traumatic, infective endocarditis, endomyocardial fibrosis, or iatrogenic (following pacemaker lead implantation or right ventricular [RV] biopsy) causes (3) ( Table 1 ). (onlinejacc.org)
  • The catheter-based procedure requires femoral vein puncture and catheter crossing of the inter-atrial septum, which he characterized as "pretty routine" for many interventionalists and electrophysiologists. (tctmd.com)
  • The interatrial shunt is designed to be implanted trans-venously and placed in the atrial septum, the Israel-based company said. (massdevice.com)
  • V-Wave today released results from the 1st-in-human implantation of its investigational interatrial shunt device designed for patients with advanced heart failure, touting a 100% success rate for implantation and no device-related adverse events. (massdevice.com)
  • Taken together, the present study shows that implantation of an interatrial shunt device appears to be safe with an acceptable MACCE rate through 1 year of follow-up," Kaye said. (tctmd.com)
  • However, the LAA closure device was finally snared by a three-loop snare and pulled across the interatrial septum (IAS) without taking the device into a protective guiding sheath - and this without tearing the IAS. (regionh.dk)
  • What Would Be the Ideal Drug-eluting Stent for Managing Patients with Long Lesions? (icrjournal.com)
  • 3. The apparatus of claim 1 , wherein the stent comprises one or more hooks on the first end and one or more hooks on the second end. (google.ca)
  • 10. The apparatus of claim 1 , wherein the stent exhibits a dumbbell configuration. (google.ca)
  • 11. The apparatus of claim 10 , wherein the stent self-expands into the dumbell configuration when released from the confines of a catheter. (google.ca)
  • In the membranous type (6.6%), the atrioventricular portion of the membranous septum forms the floor of the right atrium at the expected location of the tricuspid valve. (medscape.com)
  • Vessel stents coated with active substances, e.g. glucocorticoids, cystostatic agents, immune modulators or antiproliferative agents. (dhzb.de)
  • 9. The medical apparatus of claim 8 , wherein the first and second stents are expandable for engaging a vessel wall. (google.com)
  • 2. The apparatus of claim 1 , wherein the sensor is coupled to the stent in a manner such that, when the stent is placed in the septum, the sensor is exposed to blood in at least one of the first and second heart chambers. (google.ca)
  • In healthy people, the main site of gene expression is atrial, but in disease states such as heart failure, ventricular gene expression is upregulated [ 4 , 5 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • A single-chamber pacemaker can be set to commence from the atrial or from the ventricular position, depending on the precipitating condition-bradycardia, heart block, junctional rhythm, or sick sinus syndrome. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • An ASD is a hole in the wall (septum) which separates the top two chambers of the heart. (drnnkhanna.com)
  • The 1% cardiomyocytes in the myocardium have an ability to generate this action potential, The portion in the heart that possess the specialised cells that generate and propagate the impulse is the pacemaker cell and is called Sino atrial node. (wockhardthospitals.com)
  • It is known as the hole in the septum of the heart muscle in layman language. (treatmenttoursindia.com)
  • Introduction: Truncus arteriosus with intact ventricular septum is a rare and unique variant of persistent truncus arteriosus (PTA) which usually presents with central cyanosis and congestive heart failure in neonate and early infancy. (researchgate.net)
  • Despite aggressive medical therapy, his health was deteriorating, and he was scheduled for a total artificial heart (TAH) implantation. (lww.com)
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