A hematopoietic growth factor and the ligand of the cell surface c-kit protein (PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEINS C-KIT). It is expressed during embryogenesis and is a growth factor for a number of cell types including the MAST CELLS and the MELANOCYTES in addition to the HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS.
Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.
A protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is specific for STEM CELL FACTOR. This interaction is crucial for the development of hematopoietic, gonadal, and pigment stem cells. Genetic mutations that disrupt the expression of PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEINS C-KIT are associated with PIEBALDISM, while overexpression or constitutive activation of the c-kit protein-tyrosine kinase is associated with tumorigenesis.
Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.
These growth factors comprise a family of hematopoietic regulators with biological specificities defined by their ability to support proliferation and differentiation of blood cells of different lineages. ERYTHROPOIETIN and the COLONY-STIMULATING FACTORS belong to this family. Some of these factors have been studied and used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and bone marrow failure syndromes.
Cells derived from the BLASTOCYST INNER CELL MASS which forms before implantation in the uterine wall. They retain the ability to divide, proliferate and provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.
The transfer of STEM CELLS from one individual to another within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or between species (XENOTRANSPLANTATION), or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). The source and location of the stem cells determines their potency or pluripotency to differentiate into various cell types.
Cells with high proliferative and self renewal capacities derived from adults.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.
Cells that can give rise to cells of the three different GERM LAYERS.
Glycoproteins found on immature hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells. They are the only molecules to date whose expression within the blood system is restricted to a small number of progenitor cells in the bone marrow.
A multilineage cell growth factor secreted by LYMPHOCYTES; EPITHELIAL CELLS; and ASTROCYTES which stimulates clonal proliferation and differentiation of various types of blood and tissue cells.
Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.
Granulated cells that are found in almost all tissues, most abundantly in the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. Like the BASOPHILS, mast cells contain large amounts of HISTAMINE and HEPARIN. Unlike basophils, mast cells normally remain in the tissues and do not circulate in the blood. Mast cells, derived from the bone marrow stem cells, are regulated by the STEM CELL FACTOR.
A particular zone of tissue composed of a specialized microenvironment where stem cells are retained in a undifferentiated, self-renewable state.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Self-renewing cells that generate the main phenotypes of the nervous system in both the embryo and adult. Neural stem cells are precursors to both NEURONS and NEUROGLIA.
Cells from adult organisms that have been reprogrammed into a pluripotential state similar to that of EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS.
A cytologic technique for measuring the functional capacity of stem cells by assaying their activity.
Cell surface receptors for colony stimulating factors, local mediators, and hormones that regulate the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of hemopoietic cells.
The development and formation of various types of BLOOD CELLS. Hematopoiesis can take place in the BONE MARROW (medullary) or outside the bone marrow (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).
The developmental history of specific differentiated cell types as traced back to the original STEM CELLS in the embryo.
Specialized stem cells that are committed to give rise to cells that have a particular function; examples are MYOBLASTS; MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS; and skin stem cells. (Stem Cells: A Primer [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Institutes of Health (US); 2000 May [cited 2002 Apr 5]. Available from: http://www.nih.gov/news/stemcell/primer.htm)
Transfer of MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS).
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
A glycoprotein of MW 25 kDa containing internal disulfide bonds. It induces the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of neutrophilic granulocyte precursor cells and functionally activates mature blood neutrophils. Among the family of colony-stimulating factors, G-CSF is the most potent inducer of terminal differentiation to granulocytes and macrophages of leukemic myeloid cell lines.
A humoral factor that stimulates the production of thrombocytes (BLOOD PLATELETS). Thrombopoietin stimulates the proliferation of bone marrow MEGAKARYOCYTES and their release of blood platelets. The process is called THROMBOPOIESIS.
Bone-marrow-derived, non-hematopoietic cells that support HEMATOPOETIC STEM CELLS. They have also been isolated from other organs and tissues such as UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD, umbilical vein subendothelium, and WHARTON JELLY. These cells are considered to be a source of multipotent stem cells because they include subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells.
The release of stem cells from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood circulation for the purpose of leukapheresis, prior to stem cell transplantation. Hematopoietic growth factors or chemotherapeutic agents often are used to stimulate the mobilization.
The cells in the erythroid series derived from MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS or from the bi-potential MEGAKARYOCYTE-ERYTHROID PROGENITOR CELLS which eventually give rise to mature RED BLOOD CELLS. The erythroid progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by ERYTHROPOIETIN, and then further differentiate into ERYTHROBLASTS when stimulated by other factors.
Blood of the fetus. Exchange of nutrients and waste between the fetal and maternal blood occurs via the PLACENTA. The cord blood is blood contained in the umbilical vessels (UMBILICAL CORD) at the time of delivery.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
Methods for maintaining or growing CELLS in vitro.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
Cell separation is the process of isolating and distinguishing specific cell types or individual cells from a heterogeneous mixture, often through the use of physical or biological techniques.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.
The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.
Experimentation on STEM CELLS and on the use of stem cells.
Very large BONE MARROW CELLS which release mature BLOOD PLATELETS.
CULTURE MEDIA free of serum proteins but including the minimal essential substances required for cell growth. This type of medium avoids the presence of extraneous substances that may affect cell proliferation or unwanted activation of cells.
An acidic glycoprotein of MW 23 kDa with internal disulfide bonds. The protein is produced in response to a number of inflammatory mediators by mesenchymal cells present in the hemopoietic environment and at peripheral sites of inflammation. GM-CSF is able to stimulate the production of neutrophilic granulocytes, macrophages, and mixed granulocyte-macrophage colonies from bone marrow cells and can stimulate the formation of eosinophil colonies from fetal liver progenitor cells. GM-CSF can also stimulate some functional activities in mature granulocytes and macrophages.
Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
A heterogenous group of disorders characterized by the abnormal increase of MAST CELLS in only the skin (MASTOCYTOSIS, CUTANEOUS), in extracutaneous tissues involving multiple organs (MASTOCYTOSIS, SYSTEMIC), or in solid tumors (MASTOCYTOMA).
Cells derived from a FETUS that retain the ability to divide, proliferate and provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.
Highly proliferative, self-renewing, and colony-forming stem cells which give rise to NEOPLASMS.
Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.
Glycoprotein hormone, secreted chiefly by the KIDNEY in the adult and the LIVER in the FETUS, that acts on erythroid stem cells of the BONE MARROW to stimulate proliferation and differentiation.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Mammalian pigment cells that produce MELANINS, pigments found mainly in the EPIDERMIS, but also in the eyes and the hair, by a process called melanogenesis. Coloration can be altered by the number of melanocytes or the amount of pigment produced and stored in the organelles called MELANOSOMES. The large non-mammalian melanin-containing cells are called MELANOPHORES.
A family of neutral serine proteases with CHYMOTRYPSIN-like activity. Chymases are primarily found in the SECRETORY GRANULES of MAST CELLS and are released during mast cell degranulation.
The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.
Euploid male germ cells of an early stage of SPERMATOGENESIS, derived from prespermatogonia. With the onset of puberty, spermatogonia at the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubule proliferate by mitotic then meiotic divisions and give rise to the haploid SPERMATOCYTES.
An octamer transcription factor that is expressed primarily in totipotent embryonic STEM CELLS and GERM CELLS and is down-regulated during CELL DIFFERENTIATION.
A technique of culturing mixed cell types in vitro to allow their synergistic or antagonistic interactions, such as on CELL DIFFERENTIATION or APOPTOSIS. Coculture can be of different types of cells, tissues, or organs from normal or disease states.
A lymphohematopoietic cytokine that plays a role in regulating the proliferation of ERYTHROID PRECURSOR CELLS. It induces maturation of MEGAKARYOCYTES which results in increased production of BLOOD PLATELETS. Interleukin-11 was also initially described as an inhibitor of ADIPOGENESIS of cultured preadipocytes.
A family of neutral serine proteases with TRYPSIN-like activity. Tryptases are primarily found in the SECRETORY GRANULES of MAST CELLS and are released during mast cell degranulation.
Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
The preparation of leukocyte concentrates with the return of red cells and leukocyte-poor plasma to the donor.
Mice homozygous for the mutant autosomal recessive gene "scid" which is located on the centromeric end of chromosome 16. These mice lack mature, functional lymphocytes and are thus highly susceptible to lethal opportunistic infections if not chronically treated with antibiotics. The lack of B- and T-cell immunity resembles severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndrome in human infants. SCID mice are useful as animal models since they are receptive to implantation of a human immune system producing SCID-human (SCID-hu) hematochimeric mice.
Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.
Connective tissue cells of an organ found in the loose connective tissue. These are most often associated with the uterine mucosa and the ovary as well as the hematopoietic system and elsewhere.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
A cellular transcriptional coactivator that was originally identified by its requirement for the stable assembly IMMEDIATE-EARLY PROTEINS of the HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS. It is a nuclear protein that is a transcriptional coactivator for a number of transcription factors including VP16 PROTEIN; GA-BINDING PROTEIN; EARLY GROWTH RESPONSE PROTEIN 2; and E2F4 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR. It also interacts with and stabilizes HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS PROTEIN VMW65 and helps regulate GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of IMMEDIATE-EARLY GENES in HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS.
The production of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES). In humans, erythrocytes are produced by the YOLK SAC in the first trimester; by the liver in the second trimester; by the BONE MARROW in the third trimester and after birth. In normal individuals, the erythrocyte count in the peripheral blood remains relatively constant implying a balance between the rate of erythrocyte production and rate of destruction.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.
The physiological renewal, repair, or replacement of tissue.
A cytokine that stimulates the growth and differentiation of B-LYMPHOCYTES and is also a growth factor for HYBRIDOMAS and plasmacytomas. It is produced by many different cells including T-LYMPHOCYTES; MONOCYTES; and FIBROBLASTS.
The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.
The action of a drug in promoting or enhancing the effectiveness of another drug.
The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.
Leukocytes with abundant granules in the cytoplasm. They are divided into three groups according to the staining properties of the granules: neutrophilic, eosinophilic, and basophilic. Mature granulocytes are the NEUTROPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and BASOPHILS.
The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
A membrane-bound or cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of CYCLIC ADP-RIBOSE (cADPR) from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). This enzyme generally catalyzes the hydrolysis of cADPR to ADP-RIBOSE, as well, and sometimes the synthesis of cyclic ADP-ribose 2' phosphate (2'-P-cADPR) from NADP.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.
Culture media containing biologically active components obtained from previously cultured cells or tissues that have released into the media substances affecting certain cell functions (e.g., growth, lysis).
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A field of medicine concerned with developing and using strategies aimed at repair or replacement of damaged, diseased, or metabolically deficient organs, tissues, and cells via TISSUE ENGINEERING; CELL TRANSPLANTATION; and ARTIFICIAL ORGANS and BIOARTIFICIAL ORGANS and tissues.
Process of classifying cells of the immune system based on structural and functional differences. The process is commonly used to analyze and sort T-lymphocytes into subsets based on CD antigens by the technique of flow cytometry.
The process of generating white blood cells (LEUKOCYTES) from the pluripotent HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS of the BONE MARROW. There are two significant pathways to generate various types of leukocytes: MYELOPOIESIS, in which leukocytes in the blood are derived from MYELOID STEM CELLS, and LYMPHOPOIESIS, in which leukocytes of the lymphatic system (LYMPHOCYTES) are generated from lymphoid stem cells.
Coloration of the skin.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.
A class of cellular receptors that have an intrinsic PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE activity.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
Transplantation of stem cells collected from the peripheral blood. It is a less invasive alternative to direct marrow harvesting of hematopoietic stem cells. Enrichment of stem cells in peripheral blood can be achieved by inducing mobilization of stem cells from the BONE MARROW.
Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
The reproductive cells in multicellular organisms at various stages during GAMETOGENESIS.
A bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis and HYDROLYSIS of CYCLIC ADP-RIBOSE (cADPR) from NAD+ to ADP-RIBOSE. It is a cell surface molecule which is predominantly expressed on LYMPHOID CELLS and MYELOID CELLS.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Cell surface proteins that bind erythropoietin with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells.
A group of genetically identical cells all descended from a single common ancestral cell by mitosis in eukaryotes or by binary fission in prokaryotes. Clone cells also include populations of recombinant DNA molecules all carrying the same inserted sequence. (From King & Stansfield, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Single cells that have the potential to form an entire organism. They have the capacity to specialize into extraembryonic membranes and tissues, the embryo, and all postembryonic tissues and organs. (Stem Cells: A Primer [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Institutes of Health (US); 2000 May [cited 2002 Apr 5]. Available from: http://www.nih.gov/news/stemcell/primer.htm)
Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).
Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.
Family of RNA viruses that infects birds and mammals and encodes the enzyme reverse transcriptase. The family contains seven genera: DELTARETROVIRUS; LENTIVIRUS; RETROVIRUSES TYPE B, MAMMALIAN; ALPHARETROVIRUS; GAMMARETROVIRUS; RETROVIRUSES TYPE D; and SPUMAVIRUS. A key feature of retrovirus biology is the synthesis of a DNA copy of the genome which is integrated into cellular DNA. After integration it is sometimes not expressed but maintained in a latent state (PROVIRUSES).
An INTERLEUKIN-6 related cytokine that exhibits pleiotrophic effects on many physiological systems that involve cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Leukemia inhibitory factor binds to and acts through the lif receptor.
A tube-like invagination of the EPIDERMIS from which the hair shaft develops and into which SEBACEOUS GLANDS open. The hair follicle is lined by a cellular inner and outer root sheath of epidermal origin and is invested with a fibrous sheath derived from the dermis. (Stedman, 26th ed) Follicles of very long hairs extend into the subcutaneous layer of tissue under the SKIN.
Mice bearing mutant genes which are phenotypically expressed in the animals.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
The cells found in the body fluid circulating throughout the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
BENZOIC ACID amides.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
A multi-functional catenin that participates in CELL ADHESION and nuclear signaling. Beta catenin binds CADHERINS and helps link their cytoplasmic tails to the ACTIN in the CYTOSKELETON via ALPHA CATENIN. It also serves as a transcriptional co-activator and downstream component of WNT PROTEIN-mediated SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.
A subclass of SOX transcription factors that are expressed in neuronal tissue where they may play a role in the regulation of CELL DIFFERENTIATION. Members of this subclass are generally considered to be transcriptional activators.
Antigens expressed primarily on the membranes of living cells during sequential stages of maturation and differentiation. As immunologic markers they have high organ and tissue specificity and are useful as probes in studies of normal cell development as well as neoplastic transformation.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
DNA molecules capable of autonomous replication within a host cell and into which other DNA sequences can be inserted and thus amplified. Many are derived from PLASMIDS; BACTERIOPHAGES; or VIRUSES. They are used for transporting foreign genes into recipient cells. Genetic vectors possess a functional replicator site and contain GENETIC MARKERS to facilitate their selective recognition.
The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.
The transfer of bacterial DNA by phages from an infected bacterium to another bacterium. This also refers to the transfer of genes into eukaryotic cells by viruses. This naturally occurring process is routinely employed as a GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUE.
A strain of non-obese diabetic mice developed in Japan that has been widely studied as a model for T-cell-dependent autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in which insulitis is a major histopathologic feature, and in which genetic susceptibility is strongly MHC-linked.
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
Inbred BALB/c mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been selectively bred to be genetically identical to each other, making them useful for scientific research and experiments due to their consistent genetic background and predictable responses to various stimuli or treatments.
A family of 6-membered heterocyclic compounds occurring in nature in a wide variety of forms. They include several nucleic acid constituents (CYTOSINE; THYMINE; and URACIL) and form the basic structure of the barbiturates.
A CXC chemokine that is chemotactic for T-LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES. It has specificity for CXCR4 RECEPTORS. Two isoforms of CXCL12 are produced by alternative mRNA splicing.
Transplantation between animals of different species.
A genus of the family RETROVIRIDAE consisting of non-oncogenic retroviruses that produce multi-organ diseases characterized by long incubation periods and persistent infection. Lentiviruses are unique in that they contain open reading frames (ORFs) between the pol and env genes and in the 3' env region. Five serogroups are recognized, reflecting the mammalian hosts with which they are associated. HIV-1 is the type species.
The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.
Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.
Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.
The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.
Signal molecules that are involved in the control of cell growth and differentiation.
Any procedure in which blood is withdrawn from a donor, a portion is separated and retained and the remainder is returned to the donor.
Therapies that involve the TRANSPLANTATION of CELLS or TISSUES developed for the purpose of restoring the function of diseased or dysfunctional cells or tissues.
Generating tissue in vitro for clinical applications, such as replacing wounded tissues or impaired organs. The use of TISSUE SCAFFOLDING enables the generation of complex multi-layered tissues and tissue structures.
A group of cells that includes FIBROBLASTS, cartilage cells, ADIPOCYTES, smooth muscle cells, and bone cells.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
A mononuclear phagocyte colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) synthesized by mesenchymal cells. The compound stimulates the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic cells of the monocyte-macrophage series. M-CSF is a disulfide-bonded glycoprotein dimer with a MW of 70 kDa. It binds to a specific high affinity receptor (RECEPTOR, MACROPHAGE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR).
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
A cytokine produced by bone marrow stromal cells that promotes the growth of B-LYMPHOCYTE precursors and is co-mitogenic with INTERLEUKIN-2 for mature T-LYMPHOCYTE activation.
One of a pair of excretory organs (mesonephroi) which grows caudally to the first pair (PRONEPHROI) during development. Mesonephroi are the permanent kidneys in adult amphibians and fish. In higher vertebrates, proneprhoi and most of mesonephroi degenerate with the appearance of metanephroi. The remaining ducts become WOLFFIAN DUCTS.
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
NAD+ Nucleosidase is an enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) into nicotinamide and ADP-ribose, which plays a role in regulating NAD+ levels and modulating cellular signaling pathways.
Piperazines are a class of heterocyclic organic compounds containing a seven-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 4, often used in pharmaceuticals as smooth muscle relaxants, antipsychotics, antidepressants, and antihistamines, but can also be found as recreational drugs with stimulant and entactogen properties.
Diffusible gene products that act on homologous or heterologous molecules of viral or cellular DNA to regulate the expression of proteins.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
Immature, nucleated ERYTHROCYTES occupying the stage of ERYTHROPOIESIS that follows formation of ERYTHROID PRECURSOR CELLS and precedes formation of RETICULOCYTES. The normal series is called normoblasts. Cells called MEGALOBLASTS are a pathologic series of erythroblasts.
An organism whose body contains cell populations of different genotypes as a result of the TRANSPLANTATION of donor cells after sufficient ionizing radiation to destroy the mature recipient's cells which would otherwise reject the donor cells.
A family of DNA-binding proteins that are primarily expressed in T-LYMPHOCYTES. They interact with BETA CATENIN and serve as transcriptional activators and repressors in a variety of developmental processes.
Transplantation of STEM CELLS collected from the fetal blood remaining in the UMBILICAL CORD and the PLACENTA after delivery. Included are the HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
A type VI intermediate filament protein expressed mostly in nerve cells where it is associated with the survival, renewal and mitogen-stimulated proliferation of neural progenitor cells.
The formation and development of blood cells outside the BONE MARROW, as in the SPLEEN; LIVER; or LYMPH NODES.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.
The male gonad containing two functional parts: the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES for the production and transport of male germ cells (SPERMATOGENESIS) and the interstitial compartment containing LEYDIG CELLS that produce ANDROGENS.
A TCF transcription factor that was originally identified as a DNA-binding protein that interacts with the enhancers of T-CELL RECEPTOR ALPHA GENES. It plays a role in T-LYMPHOCYTE development.
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
The external, nonvascular layer of the skin. It is made up, from within outward, of five layers of EPITHELIUM: (1) basal layer (stratum basale epidermidis); (2) spinous layer (stratum spinosum epidermidis); (3) granular layer (stratum granulosum epidermidis); (4) clear layer (stratum lucidum epidermidis); and (5) horny layer (stratum corneum epidermidis).
Cellular signaling in which a factor secreted by a cell affects other cells in the local environment. This term is often used to denote the action of INTERCELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS on surrounding cells.
A cell-separation technique where magnetizable microspheres or beads are first coated with monoclonal antibody, allowed to search and bind to target cells, and are then selectively removed when passed through a magnetic field. Among other applications, the technique is commonly used to remove tumor cells from the marrow (BONE MARROW PURGING) of patients who are to undergo autologous bone marrow transplantation.
The number of LEUKOCYTES and ERYTHROCYTES per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD. A complete blood count (CBC) also includes measurement of the HEMOGLOBIN; HEMATOCRIT; and ERYTHROCYTE INDICES.
Stem cells derived from HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS. Derived from these myeloid progenitor cells are the MEGAKARYOCYTES; ERYTHROID CELLS; MYELOID CELLS; and some DENDRITIC CELLS.
Wnt proteins are a large family of secreted glycoproteins that play essential roles in EMBRYONIC AND FETAL DEVELOPMENT, and tissue maintenance. They bind to FRIZZLED RECEPTORS and act as PARACRINE PROTEIN FACTORS to initiate a variety of SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway stabilizes the transcriptional coactivator BETA CATENIN.
A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of five named species: PAPIO URSINUS (chacma baboon), PAPIO CYNOCEPHALUS (yellow baboon), PAPIO PAPIO (western baboon), PAPIO ANUBIS (or olive baboon), and PAPIO HAMADRYAS (hamadryas baboon). Members of the Papio genus inhabit open woodland, savannahs, grassland, and rocky hill country. Some authors consider MANDRILLUS a subgenus of Papio.
The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Irradiation of the whole body with ionizing or non-ionizing radiation. It is applicable to humans or animals but not to microorganisms.
A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.
A group of lymphocyte surface antigens located on mouse LYMPHOCYTES. Specific Ly antigens are useful markers for distinguishing subpopulations of lymphocytes.
A multifunctional cytokine secreted by primarily by activated TH2 CELLS that may play a role as a regulator of allergic INFLAMMATION. It has been shown to enhance the growth and CELL DIFFERENTIATION of MAST CELLS, and can act on a variety of other immune cells.
Specific molecular sites on the surface of B- and T-lymphocytes which combine with IgEs. Two subclasses exist: low affinity receptors (Fc epsilon RII) and high affinity receptors (Fc epsilon RI).
c-Kit positive cells related to SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS that are intercalated between the autonomic nerves and the effector smooth muscle cells of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. Different phenotypic classes play roles as pacemakers, mediators of neural inputs, and mechanosensors.
Experimentation on, or using the organs or tissues from, a human or other mammalian conceptus during the prenatal stage of development that is characterized by rapid morphological changes and the differentiation of basic structures. In humans, this includes the period from the time of fertilization to the end of the eighth week after fertilization.
Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.
Endogenous or exogenous substances which inhibit the normal growth of human and animal cells or micro-organisms, as distinguished from those affecting plant growth (= PLANT GROWTH REGULATORS).
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
An acute myeloid leukemia in which 20-30% of the bone marrow or peripheral blood cells are of megakaryocyte lineage. MYELOFIBROSIS or increased bone marrow RETICULIN is common.
The introduction of functional (usually cloned) GENES into cells. A variety of techniques and naturally occurring processes are used for the gene transfer such as cell hybridization, LIPOSOMES or microcell-mediated gene transfer, ELECTROPORATION, chromosome-mediated gene transfer, TRANSFECTION, and GENETIC TRANSDUCTION. Gene transfer may result in genetically transformed cells and individual organisms.
Protein kinases that catalyze the PHOSPHORYLATION of TYROSINE residues in proteins with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.
Any of several ways in which living cells of an organism communicate with one another, whether by direct contact between cells or by means of chemical signals carried by neurotransmitter substances, hormones, and cyclic AMP.
Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.
Techniques and strategies which include the use of coding sequences and other conventional or radical means to transform or modify cells for the purpose of treating or reversing disease conditions.
A cytologic technique for measuring the functional capacity of tumor stem cells by assaying their activity. It is used primarily for the in vitro testing of antineoplastic agents.
The movement of cells or organisms toward or away from a substance in response to its concentration gradient.
A reverse developmental process in which terminally differentiated cells with specialized functions revert back to a less differentiated stage within their own CELL LINEAGE.
The process of losing secretory granules (SECRETORY VESICLES). This occurs, for example, in mast cells, basophils, neutrophils, eosinophils, and platelets when secretory products are released from the granules by EXOCYTOSIS.
The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
A single-chain polypeptide growth factor that plays a significant role in the process of WOUND HEALING and is a potent inducer of PHYSIOLOGIC ANGIOGENESIS. Several different forms of the human protein exist ranging from 18-24 kDa in size due to the use of alternative start sites within the fgf-2 gene. It has a 55 percent amino acid residue identity to FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR 1 and has potent heparin-binding activity. The growth factor is an extremely potent inducer of DNA synthesis in a variety of cell types from mesoderm and neuroectoderm lineages. It was originally named basic fibroblast growth factor based upon its chemical properties and to distinguish it from acidic fibroblast growth factor (FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR 1).
CXCR receptors with specificity for CXCL12 CHEMOKINE. The receptors may play a role in HEMATOPOIESIS regulation and can also function as coreceptors for the HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS.
Preparative treatment of transplant recipient with various conditioning regimens including radiation, immune sera, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive agents, prior to transplantation. Transplantation conditioning is very common before bone marrow transplantation.
A true neoplasm composed of a number of different types of tissue, none of which is native to the area in which it occurs. It is composed of tissues that are derived from three germinal layers, the endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. They are classified histologically as mature (benign) or immature (malignant). (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1642)
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
The secretion of histamine from mast cell and basophil granules by exocytosis. This can be initiated by a number of factors, all of which involve binding of IgE, cross-linked by antigen, to the mast cell or basophil's Fc receptors. Once released, histamine binds to a number of different target cell receptors and exerts a wide variety of effects.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
A factor synthesized in a wide variety of tissues. It acts synergistically with TGF-alpha in inducing phenotypic transformation and can also act as a negative autocrine growth factor. TGF-beta has a potential role in embryonal development, cellular differentiation, hormone secretion, and immune function. TGF-beta is found mostly as homodimer forms of separate gene products TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2 or TGF-beta3. Heterodimers composed of TGF-beta1 and 2 (TGF-beta1.2) or of TGF-beta2 and 3 (TGF-beta2.3) have been isolated. The TGF-beta proteins are synthesized as precursor proteins.
Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.
A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.
Spontaneous aggregations of human embryonic stem cells that occur in vitro after culturing in a medium that lacks LEUKEMIC INHIBITORY FACTOR. The embryoid bodies can further differentiate into cells that represent different lineages.

Socs1 binds to multiple signalling proteins and suppresses steel factor-dependent proliferation. (1/1661)

We have identified Socs1 as a downstream component of the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase signalling pathway. We show that the expression of Socs1 mRNA is rapidly increased in primary bone marrow-derived mast cells following exposure to Steel factor, and Socs1 inducibly binds to the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase via its Src homology 2 (SH2) domain. Previous studies have shown that Socs1 suppresses cytokine-mediated differentiation in M1 cells inhibiting Janus family kinases. In contrast, constitutive expression of Socs1 suppresses the mitogenic potential of Kit while maintaining Steel factor-dependent cell survival signals. Unlike Janus kinases, Socs1 does not inhibit the catalytic activity of the Kit tyrosine kinase. In order to define the mechanism by which Socs1-mediated suppression of Kit-dependent mitogenesis occurs, we demonstrate that Socs1 binds to the signalling proteins Grb-2 and the Rho-family guanine nucleotide exchange factors Vav. We show that Grb2 binds Socs1 via its SH3 domains to putative diproline determinants located in the N-terminus of Socs1, and Socs1 binds to the N-terminal regulatory region of Vav. These data suggest that Socs1 is an inducible switch which modulates proliferative signals in favour of cell survival signals and functions as an adaptor protein in receptor tyrosine kinase signalling pathways.  (+info)

Increase of hematopoietic responses by triple or single helical conformer of an antitumor (1-->3)-beta-D-glucan preparation, Sonifilan, in cyclophosphamide-induced leukopenic mice. (2/1661)

It has been suggested that the immunopharmacological activity of soluble (1-->3)-beta-D-glucan depends on its conformation in mice. In this study, we examined the relationship between the conformation of Sonifilan (SPG) and hematopietic responses in cyclophosphamide (Cy)-induced leukopenic mice. SPG, a high molecular weight (1-->3)-beta-D-glucan, has a triple helical conformation in water, and it was changed by treatment with aqueous sodium hydroxide to the single helical conformer (SPG-OH). The effects of SPG or SPG-OH on hematopoietic responses in cyclophosphamide induced leukopenic mice were investigated by monitoring i) gene expression of cytokines by RT-PCR, ii) protein synthesis of interleukin 6 (IL-6) by ELISA and iii) colony formation of bone marrow cells (BMC). The mice administered Cy and SPG or SPG-OH expressed and produced higher levels of IL-6 mRNA and protein than the mice administered only Cy. Gene expression of NK1.1 was also induced by Cy/SPG (or SPG-OH) treatment. Induced gene expression of stem cell factor (SCF) and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) by SPG/SPG-OH were also found in in vitro culture of BMC from Cy treated mice. These results strongly suggested that conformation of the glucans, single and triple helix, are independent of the hematopietic response.  (+info)

Influence of monoclonal antiplatelet glycoprotein antibodies on in vitro human megakaryocyte colony formation and proplatelet formation. (3/1661)

The influence of antiplatelet glycoprotein (GP) antibodies on megakaryocytopoiesis in patients with idiopathic or immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) has been well studied. However, the influence of GP antibodies on proplatelet formation is poorly understood. Here we investigated whether in vitro human megakaryocyte colony formation and proplatelet formation are affected by various monoclonal antiplatelet GP antibodies (MoAb). The megakaryocyte colony formation inhibition assay was performed by methylcellulose culture with modifications, using peripheral blood nonadherent mononuclear cells. The proplatelet formation inhibition assay was performed by megakaryocytes derived from CD34(+) cells, stimulated with thrombopoietin + stem cell factor, which were then incubated with antiplatelet GP MoAb for 24 or 48 hours. Anti-GP-Ibalpha MoAb (CD42b; HIP1) slightly inhibited megakaryocyte colony formation (P < .05). and strongly inhibited proplatelet formation (after 24 hours incubation, P < .0002; after 48 hours incubation, P < .0007). Anti-GP-IIb MoAb (CD41; 5B12) inhibited only proplatelet formation (only after 24 hours incubation, P <. 03). Anti-integrin alphavbeta3 MoAb (CD51/CD61; 23C6) only slightly inhibited colony size (P < .05). However, anti-GP-IIIa MoAb (CD61; Y2/51) did not inhibit either colony formation or proplatelet formation. These results suggest that antiplatelet GP MoAbs have differing effects on in vitro megakaryocyte colony formation and proplatelet formation.  (+info)

Cytokine treatment or accessory cells are required to initiate engraftment of purified primitive human hematopoietic cells transplanted at limiting doses into NOD/SCID mice. (4/1661)

Little is known about the cell types or mechanisms that underlie the engraftment process. Here, we have examined parameters affecting the engraftment of purified human Lin-CD34+CD38- normal and AML cells transplanted at limiting doses into NOD/SCID recipients. Mice transplanted with 500 to 1000 Lin-CD34+CD38- cord blood (CB) or AML cells required the co-transplantation of accessory cells (ACs) or short-term in vivo cytokine treatment for engraftment, whereas transplantation of higher doses (>5000 Lin-CD34+CD38- cells) did not show these requirements suggesting that ACs are effective for both normal and leukemic stem cell engraftment in this model. Mature Lin+CD34- and primitive Lin-CD34+CD38+ cells were capable of acting as ACs even though no repopulating cells are present. Cytokine treatment of NOD/SCID mice could partially replace the requirement for co-transplantation of AC. Furthermore, no difference was seen between the percentage of engrafted mice treated with cytokines for only the first 10 days after transplant compared to those receiving cytokines for the entire time of repopulation. Surprisingly, no engraftment was detected in mice when cytokine treatment was delayed until 10 days posttransplant. Together, these studies suggest that the engraftment process requires pluripotent stem cells plus accessory cells or cytokine treatment which act early after transplantation. The NOD/SCID xenotransplant system provides the means to further clarify the processes underlying human stem cell engraftment.  (+info)

Comparative study of the in vitro behavior of cord blood subpopulations after short-term cytokine exposure. (5/1661)

We investigated the effect of short-term cytokine exposure on defined cord blood subpopulations. CD34+Thy1+, CD34+Thy1-, CD34+38-, CD34+38+, CD34+DR+, CD34+DR-, CD34+Rhodamine123 (Rh123)- and CD34+Rh123+ cells were incubated for 7 days in IMDM + 10% FCS + IL3 + IL6 + G-CSF + SCF (36GS) + flt3L. We evaluated LTHC-IC, immunophenotype and nucleated cell count for each cell population before and after cytokine exposure. Short-term exposure of CD34+38+, CD34+Thy1-, CD34+DR+, CD34+DR- and CD34+Rh123+ cells to 36GS causes a significant increase in cell number, whereas CD34+38-, CD34+Thy1+, and CD34+Rh123- cells show only a limited increase. CD34 status post cytokine incubation shows that CD34+38+, CD34+Thy1-, CD34+DR+, and CD34+Rh123+ fractions have a lower proportion of cells remaining CD34+ than CD34+38- CD34+Thy1+, CD34+DR- and CD34+Rh123- fractions. LTHC-IC analyses among input subpopulations show a higher frequency among CD34+38+, CD34+Thy1-, CD34+DR+, CD34+DR- and CD34+Rh123+ cells as compared with CD34+38-, CD34+Thy1+ and CD34+Rh123- cells. However, when LTHC-IC were evaluated after cytokine exposure, CD34+38-, CD34+Thy1+, and CD34+Rh123- cells showed a higher frequency of LTHC-IC as compared with other subpopulations. Addition of flt3L to 36GS doubled the numbers in all subpopulations without altering the proportion of CD34+ cells. Results suggest that CD34+38-, CD34+Thy1+ and CD34+Rh123- cells have a limited proliferative response to cytokines, the stem cell component of these populations is largely maintained and that expansion is derived from mature cell populations.  (+info)

Long-term culture of human CD34(+) progenitors with FLT3-ligand, thrombopoietin, and stem cell factor induces extensive amplification of a CD34(-)CD14(-) and a CD34(-)CD14(+) dendritic cell precursor. (6/1661)

Current in vitro culture systems allow the generation of human dendritic cells (DCs), but the output of mature cells remains modest. This contrasts with the extensive amplification of hematopoietic progenitors achieved when culturing CD34(+) cells with FLT3-ligand and thrombopoietin. To test whether such cultures contained DC precursors, CD34(+) cord blood cells were incubated with the above cytokines, inducing on the mean a 250-fold and a 16,600-fold increase in total cell number after 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. The addition of stem cell factor induced a further fivefold increase in proliferation. The majority of the cells produced were CD34(-)CD1a- CD14(+) (p14(+)) and CD34(-)CD1a-CD14(-) (p14(-)) and did not display the morphology, surface markers, or allostimulatory capacity of DC. When cultured with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), both subsets differentiated without further proliferation into immature (CD1a+, CD14(-), CD83(-)) macropinocytic DC. Mature (CD1a+, CD14(-), CD83(+)) DCs with high allostimulatory activity were generated if such cultures were supplemented with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). In addition, p14(-) cells generated CD14(+) cells with GM-CSF and TNF, which in turn, differentiated into DC when exposed to GM-CSF and IL-4. Similar results were obtained with frozen DC precursors and also when using pooled human serum AB+ instead of bovine serum, emphasizing that this system using CD34(+) cells may improve future prospects for immunotherapy.  (+info)

Cellulose as an inert matrix for presenting cytokines to target cells: production and properties of a stem cell factor-cellulose-binding domain fusion protein. (7/1661)

A chimaera of stem cell factor (SCF) and a cellulose-binding domain from the xylanase Cex (CBDCex) effectively immobilizes SCF on a cellulose surface. The fusion protein retains both the cytokine properties of SCF and the cellulose-binding characteristics of CBDCex. When adsorbed on cellulose, SCF-CBDCex is up to 7-fold more potent than soluble SCF-CBDCex and than native SCF at stimulating the proliferation of factor-dependent cell lines. When cells are incubated with cellulose-bound SCF-CBDCex, activated receptors and SCF-CBDCex co-localize on the cellulose matrix. The strong binding of SCF-CBDCex to the cellulose surface permits the effective and localized stimulation of target cells; this is potentially significant for long-term perfusion culturing of factor-dependent cells. It also permits the direct analysis of the effects of surface-bound cytokines on target cells.  (+info)

A randomized phase 3 study of peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization with stem cell factor and filgrastim in high-risk breast cancer patients. (8/1661)

This randomized study compared the number of leukaphereses required to collect an optimal target yield of 5 x 10(6) CD34(+) peripheral blood progenitor cells/kg, using either stem cell factor (SCF) at 20 micrograms/kg/d in combination with Filgrastim at 10 micrograms/kg/d or Filgrastim alone at 10 micrograms/kg/d, from 203 patients with high-risk stage II, III, or IV breast cancer. Leukapheresis began on day 5 of cytokine administration and continued daily until the target yield of CD34(+) cells had been reached or a maximum of 5 leukaphereses performed. By day 5 of leukapheresis, 63% of the patients treated with SCF plus Filgrastim (n = 100) compared with 47% of those receiving Filgrastim alone (n = 103) reached the CD34(+) cell target yield. There was a clinically and statistically significant reduction (P <.05) in the number of leukaphereses required to reach the target yield for the patients receiving SCF plus Filgrastim (median, 4 leukaphereses) compared with patients receiving Filgrastim alone (median, 6 or more leukapherses; ie, <50% of patients reached the target in 5 leukaphereses). All patients receiving SCF were premedicated with antihistamines, albuterol, and pseudoephedrine. Treatment was safe, generally well tolerated, and not associated with life-threatening or fatal toxicity. In conclusion, SCF plus Filgrastim is a more effective peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC)-mobilization regimen than Filgrastim alone. In addition to the potential for reduced leukapheresis-related morbidity and costs, SCF offers additional options for obtaining cells for further graft manipulation.  (+info)

Stem Cell Factor (SCF), also known as Kit Ligand or Steel Factor, is a growth factor that plays a crucial role in the regulation of hematopoiesis, which is the process of producing various blood cells. It is a glycoprotein that binds to the c-Kit receptor found on hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells, promoting their survival, proliferation, and differentiation into mature blood cells.

SCF is involved in the development and function of several types of blood cells, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. It also plays a role in the maintenance and self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells, which are essential for the continuous production of new blood cells throughout an individual's lifetime.

In addition to its role in hematopoiesis, SCF has been implicated in various other biological processes, such as melanogenesis, gametogenesis, and tissue repair and regeneration. Dysregulation of SCF signaling has been associated with several diseases, including certain types of cancer, bone marrow failure disorders, and autoimmune diseases.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), stem cells are "initial cells" or "precursor cells" that have the ability to differentiate into many different cell types in the body. They can also divide without limit to replenish other cells for as long as the person or animal is still alive.

There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells, which come from human embryos, and adult stem cells, which are found in various tissues throughout the body. Embryonic stem cells have the ability to differentiate into all cell types in the body, while adult stem cells have more limited differentiation potential.

Stem cells play an essential role in the development and repair of various tissues and organs in the body. They are currently being studied for their potential use in the treatment of a wide range of diseases and conditions, including cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and neurological disorders. However, more research is needed to fully understand the properties and capabilities of these cells before they can be used safely and effectively in clinical settings.

Proto-oncogene proteins c-kit, also known as CD117 or stem cell factor receptor, are transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinases that play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and migration. They are encoded by the c-KIT gene located on human chromosome 4q12.

These proteins consist of an extracellular ligand-binding domain, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. The binding of their ligand, stem cell factor (SCF), leads to receptor dimerization, autophosphorylation, and activation of several downstream signaling pathways such as PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK, and JAK/STAT.

Abnormal activation or mutation of c-kit proto-oncogene proteins has been implicated in the development and progression of various malignancies, including gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), mast cell diseases, and melanoma. Targeted therapies against c-kit, such as imatinib mesylate (Gleevec), have shown promising results in the treatment of these malignancies.

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are immature, self-renewing cells that give rise to all the mature blood and immune cells in the body. They are capable of both producing more hematopoietic stem cells (self-renewal) and differentiating into early progenitor cells that eventually develop into red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. HSCs are found in the bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and peripheral blood. They have the ability to repair damaged tissues and offer significant therapeutic potential for treating various diseases, including hematological disorders, genetic diseases, and cancer.

Hematopoietic cell growth factors are a group of glycoproteins that stimulate the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of hematopoietic cells, which are the precursor cells that give rise to all blood cells. These growth factors include colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) such as granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), as well as erythropoietin (EPO) and thrombopoietin (TPO).

G-CSF primarily stimulates the production of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the immune response to bacterial infections. GM-CSF stimulates the production of both granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages, while M-CSF specifically stimulates the production of monocytes/macrophages. EPO stimulates the production of red blood cells, while TPO stimulates the production of platelets.

Hematopoietic cell growth factors are used clinically to treat a variety of conditions associated with impaired hematopoiesis, such as chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, aplastic anemia, and congenital disorders of hematopoiesis. They can also be used to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood for collection and transplantation.

Embryonic stem cells are a type of pluripotent stem cell that are derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst, which is a very early-stage embryo. These cells have the ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body, making them a promising area of research for regenerative medicine and the study of human development and disease. Embryonic stem cells are typically obtained from surplus embryos created during in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures, with the consent of the donors. The use of embryonic stem cells is a controversial issue due to ethical concerns surrounding the destruction of human embryos.

Stem cell transplantation is a medical procedure where stem cells, which are immature and unspecialized cells with the ability to differentiate into various specialized cell types, are introduced into a patient. The main purpose of this procedure is to restore the function of damaged or destroyed tissues or organs, particularly in conditions that affect the blood and immune systems, such as leukemia, lymphoma, aplastic anemia, and inherited metabolic disorders.

There are two primary types of stem cell transplantation: autologous and allogeneic. In autologous transplantation, the patient's own stem cells are collected, stored, and then reinfused back into their body after high-dose chemotherapy or radiation therapy to destroy the diseased cells. In allogeneic transplantation, stem cells are obtained from a donor (related or unrelated) whose human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type closely matches that of the recipient.

The process involves several steps: first, the patient undergoes conditioning therapy to suppress their immune system and make space for the new stem cells. Then, the harvested stem cells are infused into the patient's bloodstream, where they migrate to the bone marrow and begin to differentiate and produce new blood cells. This procedure requires close monitoring and supportive care to manage potential complications such as infections, graft-versus-host disease, and organ damage.

Adult stem cells, also known as somatic stem cells, are undifferentiated cells found in specialized tissues or organs throughout the body of a developed organism. Unlike embryonic stem cells, which are derived from blastocysts and have the ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body (pluripotency), adult stem cells are typically more limited in their differentiation potential, meaning they can only give rise to specific types of cells within the tissue or organ where they reside.

Adult stem cells serve to maintain and repair tissues by replenishing dying or damaged cells. They can divide and self-renew over time, producing one daughter cell that remains a stem cell and another that differentiates into a mature, functional cell type. The most well-known adult stem cells are hematopoietic stem cells, which give rise to all types of blood cells, and mesenchymal stem cells, which can differentiate into various connective tissue cells such as bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle.

The potential therapeutic use of adult stem cells has been explored in various medical fields, including regenerative medicine and cancer therapy. However, their limited differentiation capacity and the challenges associated with isolating and expanding them in culture have hindered their widespread application. Recent advances in stem cell research, such as the development of techniques to reprogram adult cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), have opened new avenues for studying and harnessing the therapeutic potential of these cells.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) is a medical procedure where hematopoietic stem cells (immature cells that give rise to all blood cell types) are transplanted into a patient. This procedure is often used to treat various malignant and non-malignant disorders affecting the hematopoietic system, such as leukemias, lymphomas, multiple myeloma, aplastic anemia, inherited immune deficiency diseases, and certain genetic metabolic disorders.

The transplantation can be autologous (using the patient's own stem cells), allogeneic (using stem cells from a genetically matched donor, usually a sibling or unrelated volunteer), or syngeneic (using stem cells from an identical twin).

The process involves collecting hematopoietic stem cells, most commonly from the peripheral blood or bone marrow. The collected cells are then infused into the patient after the recipient's own hematopoietic system has been ablated (or destroyed) using high-dose chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. This allows the donor's stem cells to engraft, reconstitute, and restore the patient's hematopoietic system.

HSCT is a complex and potentially risky procedure with various complications, including graft-versus-host disease, infections, and organ damage. However, it offers the potential for cure or long-term remission in many patients with otherwise fatal diseases.

Pluripotent stem cells are a type of undifferentiated stem cell that have the ability to differentiate into any cell type of the three germ layers (endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm) of a developing embryo. These cells can give rise to all the cell types that make up the human body, with the exception of those that form the extra-embryonic tissues such as the placenta.

Pluripotent stem cells are characterized by their ability to self-renew, which means they can divide and produce more pluripotent stem cells, and differentiate, which means they can give rise to specialized cell types with specific functions. Pluripotent stem cells can be derived from embryos at the blastocyst stage of development or generated in the lab through a process called induced pluripotency, where adult cells are reprogrammed to have the properties of embryonic stem cells.

Pluripotent stem cells hold great promise for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering because they can be used to generate large numbers of specific cell types that can potentially replace or repair damaged or diseased tissues in the body. However, their use is still a subject of ethical debate due to concerns about the source of embryonic stem cells and the potential risks associated with their use in clinical applications.

CD34 is a type of antigen that is found on the surface of certain cells in the human body. Specifically, CD34 antigens are present on hematopoietic stem cells, which are immature cells that can develop into different types of blood cells. These stem cells are found in the bone marrow and are responsible for producing red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.

CD34 antigens are a type of cell surface marker that is used in medical research and clinical settings to identify and isolate hematopoietic stem cells. They are also used in the development of stem cell therapies and transplantation procedures. CD34 antigens can be detected using various laboratory techniques, such as flow cytometry or immunohistochemistry.

It's important to note that while CD34 is a useful marker for identifying hematopoietic stem cells, it is not exclusive to these cells and can also be found on other cell types, such as endothelial cells that line blood vessels. Therefore, additional markers are often used in combination with CD34 to more specifically identify and isolate hematopoietic stem cells.

Interleukin-3 (IL-3) is a type of cytokine, which is a small signaling protein that modulates the immune response, cell growth, and differentiation. IL-3 is primarily produced by activated T cells and mast cells. It plays an essential role in the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells, which give rise to all blood cell types. Specifically, IL-3 supports the development of myeloid lineage cells, including basophils, eosinophils, mast cells, megakaryocytes, and erythroid progenitors.

IL-3 binds to its receptor, the interleukin-3 receptor (IL-3R), which consists of two subunits: CD123 (the alpha chain) and CD131 (the beta chain). The binding of IL-3 to its receptor triggers a signaling cascade within the cell that ultimately leads to changes in gene expression, promoting cell growth and differentiation. Dysregulation of IL-3 production or signaling has been implicated in several hematological disorders, such as leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

Bone marrow cells are the types of cells found within the bone marrow, which is the spongy tissue inside certain bones in the body. The main function of bone marrow is to produce blood cells. There are two types of bone marrow: red and yellow. Red bone marrow is where most blood cell production takes place, while yellow bone marrow serves as a fat storage site.

The three main types of bone marrow cells are:

1. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs): These are immature cells that can differentiate into any type of blood cell, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. They have the ability to self-renew, meaning they can divide and create more hematopoietic stem cells.
2. Red blood cell progenitors: These are immature cells that will develop into mature red blood cells, also known as erythrocytes. Red blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and carbon dioxide back to the lungs.
3. Myeloid and lymphoid white blood cell progenitors: These are immature cells that will develop into various types of white blood cells, which play a crucial role in the body's immune system by fighting infections and diseases. Myeloid progenitors give rise to granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils), monocytes, and megakaryocytes (which eventually become platelets). Lymphoid progenitors differentiate into B cells, T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells.

Bone marrow cells are essential for maintaining a healthy blood cell count and immune system function. Abnormalities in bone marrow cells can lead to various medical conditions, such as anemia, leukopenia, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, or thrombocytosis, depending on the specific type of blood cell affected. Additionally, bone marrow cells are often used in transplantation procedures to treat patients with certain types of cancer, such as leukemia and lymphoma, or other hematologic disorders.

Mast cells are a type of white blood cell that are found in connective tissues throughout the body, including the skin, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. They play an important role in the immune system and help to defend the body against pathogens by releasing chemicals such as histamine, heparin, and leukotrienes, which help to attract other immune cells to the site of infection or injury. Mast cells also play a role in allergic reactions, as they release histamine and other chemicals in response to exposure to an allergen, leading to symptoms such as itching, swelling, and redness. They are derived from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow and mature in the tissues where they reside.

A stem cell niche is a specific microenvironment in which stem cells reside, interact with surrounding cells and receive molecular signals that regulate their self-renewal, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. This specialized niche provides the necessary conditions for maintaining the undifferentiated state of stem cells and controlling their fate decisions. The components of a stem cell niche typically include various cell types (such as supporting cells, immune cells, and blood vessels), extracellular matrix proteins, signaling molecules, and physical factors like oxygen tension and mechanical stress. Together, these elements create a unique microenvironment that helps to preserve the functional integrity and potential of stem cells for tissue repair, regeneration, and homeostasis.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Neural stem cells (NSCs) are a type of undifferentiated cells found in the central nervous system, including the brain and spinal cord. They have the ability to self-renew and generate the main types of cells found in the nervous system, such as neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. NSCs are capable of dividing symmetrically to increase their own population or asymmetrically to produce one stem cell and one differentiated cell. They play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of the nervous system, and have the potential to be used in regenerative medicine and therapies for neurological disorders and injuries.

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) are a type of pluripotent stem cells that are generated from somatic cells, such as skin or blood cells, through the introduction of specific genes encoding transcription factors. These reprogrammed cells exhibit similar characteristics to embryonic stem cells, including the ability to differentiate into any cell type of the three germ layers (endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm). The discovery and development of iPSCs have opened up new possibilities in regenerative medicine, drug testing and development, and disease modeling, while avoiding ethical concerns associated with embryonic stem cells.

A Colony-Forming Units (CFU) assay is a type of laboratory test used to measure the number of viable, or living, cells in a sample. It is commonly used to enumerate bacteria, yeast, and other microorganisms. The test involves placing a known volume of the sample onto a nutrient-agar plate, which provides a solid growth surface for the cells. The plate is then incubated under conditions that allow the cells to grow and form colonies. Each colony that forms on the plate represents a single viable cell from the original sample. By counting the number of colonies and multiplying by the known volume of the sample, the total number of viable cells in the sample can be calculated. This information is useful in a variety of applications, including monitoring microbial populations, assessing the effectiveness of disinfection procedures, and studying microbial growth and survival.

Colony-stimulating factor (CSF) receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind and respond to colony-stimulating factors, which are a group of growth factors that stimulate the production of blood cells in the bone marrow. These receptors play an important role in regulating the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, which give rise to all types of blood cells.

There are several types of CSF receptors, including:

* Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor: This receptor is composed of two subunits, the alpha and beta chains, and is expressed on the surface of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, as well as mature granulocytes and macrophages. GM-CSF binding to this receptor stimulates the production and activation of these cells.
* Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor: This receptor is composed of a single subunit and is expressed on the surface of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, as well as mature neutrophils. G-CSF binding to this receptor stimulates the production and activation of neutrophils, which are a type of white blood cell that plays an important role in the immune response to bacterial infections.
* Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) receptor: This receptor is composed of two subunits, the alpha and beta chains, and is expressed on the surface of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, as well as mature macrophages. M-CSF binding to this receptor stimulates the production and activation of macrophages, which are a type of white blood cell that plays an important role in the immune response to infections and tissue injury.

Mutations in CSF receptors have been associated with various hematological disorders, including certain types of leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

Hematopoiesis is the process of forming and developing blood cells. It occurs in the bone marrow and includes the production of red blood cells (erythropoiesis), white blood cells (leukopoiesis), and platelets (thrombopoiesis). This process is regulated by various growth factors, hormones, and cytokines. Hematopoiesis begins early in fetal development and continues throughout a person's life. Disorders of hematopoiesis can result in conditions such as anemia, leukopenia, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, or thrombocytosis.

'Cell lineage' is a term used in biology and medicine to describe the developmental history or relationship of a cell or group of cells to other cells, tracing back to the original progenitor or stem cell. It refers to the series of cell divisions and differentiation events that give rise to specific types of cells in an organism over time.

In simpler terms, cell lineage is like a family tree for cells, showing how they are related to each other through a chain of cell division and specialization events. This concept is important in understanding the development, growth, and maintenance of tissues and organs in living beings.

Multipotent stem cells are a type of stem cell that have the ability to differentiate into multiple cell types, but are more limited than pluripotent stem cells. These stem cells are found in various tissues and organs throughout the body, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, and dental pulp. They can give rise to a number of different cell types within their own germ layer (endoderm, mesoderm, or ectoderm), but cannot cross germ layer boundaries. For example, multipotent stem cells found in bone marrow can differentiate into various blood cells such as red and white blood cells, but they cannot differentiate into nerve cells or liver cells. These stem cells play important roles in tissue repair and regeneration, and have potential therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine.

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation (MSCT) is a medical procedure that involves the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are multipotent stromal cells that can differentiate into a variety of cell types, including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. These cells can be obtained from various sources, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue, umbilical cord blood, or dental pulp.

In MSCT, MSCs are typically harvested from the patient themselves (autologous transplantation) or from a donor (allogeneic transplantation). The cells are then processed and expanded in a laboratory setting before being injected into the patient's body, usually through an intravenous infusion.

MSCT is being investigated as a potential treatment for a wide range of medical conditions, including degenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders, and tissue injuries. The rationale behind this approach is that MSCs have the ability to migrate to sites of injury or inflammation, where they can help to modulate the immune response, reduce inflammation, and promote tissue repair and regeneration.

However, it's important to note that while MSCT holds promise as a therapeutic option, more research is needed to establish its safety and efficacy for specific medical conditions.

Cell division is the process by which a single eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) divides into two identical daughter cells. This complex process involves several stages, including replication of DNA, separation of chromosomes, and division of the cytoplasm. There are two main types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of cell division that results in two genetically identical daughter cells. It is a fundamental process for growth, development, and tissue repair in multicellular organisms. The stages of mitosis include prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, followed by cytokinesis, which divides the cytoplasm.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is a type of cell division that occurs in the gonads (ovaries and testes) during the production of gametes (sex cells). Meiosis results in four genetically unique daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. This process is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity. The stages of meiosis include meiosis I and meiosis II, which are further divided into prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

In summary, cell division is the process by which a single cell divides into two daughter cells, either through mitosis or meiosis. This process is critical for growth, development, tissue repair, and sexual reproduction in multicellular organisms.

Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) is a type of growth factor that specifically stimulates the production and survival of granulocytes, a type of white blood cell crucial for fighting off infections. G-CSF works by promoting the proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into mature granulocytes, primarily neutrophils, in the bone marrow.

Recombinant forms of G-CSF are used clinically as a medication to boost white blood cell production in patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiation therapy for cancer, those with congenital neutropenia, and those who have had a bone marrow transplant. By increasing the number of circulating neutrophils, G-CSF helps reduce the risk of severe infections during periods of intense immune suppression.

Examples of recombinant G-CSF medications include filgrastim (Neupogen), pegfilgrastim (Neulasta), and lipegfilgrastim (Lonquex).

Thrombopoietin (TPO) is a glycoprotein hormone that plays a crucial role in the regulation of platelet production, also known as thrombopoiesis. It is primarily produced by the liver and to some extent by megakaryocytes, which are the cells responsible for producing platelets.

TPO binds to its receptor, c-Mpl, on the surface of megakaryocytes and their precursor cells, stimulating their proliferation, differentiation, and maturation into platelets. By regulating the number of platelets in circulation, TPO helps maintain hemostasis, the process that prevents excessive bleeding after injury.

In addition to its role in thrombopoiesis, TPO has been shown to have potential effects on other cell types, including hematopoietic stem cells and certain immune cells. However, its primary function remains the regulation of platelet production.

Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cells found in various tissues, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord blood. They have the ability to differentiate into multiple cell types, such as osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, under specific conditions. MSCs also possess immunomodulatory properties, making them a promising tool in regenerative medicine and therapeutic strategies for various diseases, including autoimmune disorders and tissue injuries. It is important to note that the term "Mesenchymal Stem Cells" has been replaced by "Mesenchymal Stromal Cells" in the scientific community to better reflect their biological characteristics and potential functions.

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization is the process of mobilizing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood. HSCs are immature cells that have the ability to differentiate into all types of blood cells, including red and white blood cells and platelets.

Mobilization is often achieved through the use of medications such as granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) or plerixafor, which stimulate the release of HSCs from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood. This allows for the collection of HSCs from the peripheral blood through a procedure called apheresis.

Mobilized HSCs can be used in stem cell transplantation procedures to reconstitute a patient's hematopoietic system after high-dose chemotherapy or radiation therapy. It is an important process in the field of regenerative medicine and has been used to treat various diseases such as leukemia, lymphoma, and sickle cell disease.

Erythroid precursor cells, also known as erythroblasts or normoblasts, are early stage cells in the process of producing mature red blood cells (erythrocytes) in the bone marrow. These cells are derived from hematopoietic stem cells and undergo a series of maturation stages, including proerythroblast, basophilic erythroblast, polychromatophilic erythroblast, and orthochromatic erythroblast, before becoming reticulocytes and then mature red blood cells. During this maturation process, the cells lose their nuclei and become enucleated, taking on the biconcave shape and flexible membrane that allows them to move through small blood vessels and deliver oxygen to tissues throughout the body.

Fetal blood refers to the blood circulating in a fetus during pregnancy. It is essential for the growth and development of the fetus, as it carries oxygen and nutrients from the placenta to the developing tissues and organs. Fetal blood also removes waste products, such as carbon dioxide, from the fetal tissues and transports them to the placenta for elimination.

Fetal blood has several unique characteristics that distinguish it from adult blood. For example, fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is the primary type of hemoglobin found in fetal blood, whereas adults primarily have adult hemoglobin (HbA). Fetal hemoglobin has a higher affinity for oxygen than adult hemoglobin, which allows it to more efficiently extract oxygen from the maternal blood in the placenta.

Additionally, fetal blood contains a higher proportion of reticulocytes (immature red blood cells) and nucleated red blood cells compared to adult blood. These differences reflect the high turnover rate of red blood cells in the developing fetus and the need for rapid growth and development.

Examination of fetal blood can provide important information about the health and well-being of the fetus during pregnancy. For example, fetal blood sampling (also known as cordocentesis or percutaneous umbilical blood sampling) can be used to diagnose genetic disorders, infections, and other conditions that may affect fetal development. However, this procedure carries risks, including preterm labor, infection, and fetal loss, and is typically only performed when there is a significant risk of fetal compromise or when other diagnostic tests have been inconclusive.

Cell proliferation is the process by which cells increase in number, typically through the process of cell division. In the context of biology and medicine, it refers to the reproduction of cells that makes up living tissue, allowing growth, maintenance, and repair. It involves several stages including the transition from a phase of quiescence (G0 phase) to an active phase (G1 phase), DNA replication in the S phase, and mitosis or M phase, where the cell divides into two daughter cells.

Abnormal or uncontrolled cell proliferation is a characteristic feature of many diseases, including cancer, where deregulated cell cycle control leads to excessive and unregulated growth of cells, forming tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites in the body.

Cell culture is a technique used in scientific research to grow and maintain cells from plants, animals, or humans in a controlled environment outside of their original organism. This environment typically consists of a sterile container called a cell culture flask or plate, and a nutrient-rich liquid medium that provides the necessary components for the cells' growth and survival, such as amino acids, vitamins, minerals, and hormones.

There are several different types of cell culture techniques used in research, including:

1. Adherent cell culture: In this technique, cells are grown on a flat surface, such as the bottom of a tissue culture dish or flask. The cells attach to the surface and spread out, forming a monolayer that can be observed and manipulated under a microscope.
2. Suspension cell culture: In suspension culture, cells are grown in liquid medium without any attachment to a solid surface. These cells remain suspended in the medium and can be agitated or mixed to ensure even distribution of nutrients.
3. Organoid culture: Organoids are three-dimensional structures that resemble miniature organs and are grown from stem cells or other progenitor cells. They can be used to study organ development, disease processes, and drug responses.
4. Co-culture: In co-culture, two or more different types of cells are grown together in the same culture dish or flask. This technique is used to study cell-cell interactions and communication.
5. Conditioned medium culture: In this technique, cells are grown in a medium that has been conditioned by previous cultures of other cells. The conditioned medium contains factors secreted by the previous cells that can influence the growth and behavior of the new cells.

Cell culture techniques are widely used in biomedical research to study cellular processes, develop drugs, test toxicity, and investigate disease mechanisms. However, it is important to note that cell cultures may not always accurately represent the behavior of cells in a living organism, and results from cell culture experiments should be validated using other methods.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Cell separation is a process used to separate and isolate specific cell types from a heterogeneous mixture of cells. This can be accomplished through various physical or biological methods, depending on the characteristics of the cells of interest. Some common techniques for cell separation include:

1. Density gradient centrifugation: In this method, a sample containing a mixture of cells is layered onto a density gradient medium and then centrifuged. The cells are separated based on their size, density, and sedimentation rate, with denser cells settling closer to the bottom of the tube and less dense cells remaining near the top.

2. Magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS): This technique uses magnetic beads coated with antibodies that bind to specific cell surface markers. The labeled cells are then passed through a column placed in a magnetic field, which retains the magnetically labeled cells while allowing unlabeled cells to flow through.

3. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS): In this method, cells are stained with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies that recognize specific cell surface or intracellular markers. The stained cells are then passed through a laser beam, which excites the fluorophores and allows for the detection and sorting of individual cells based on their fluorescence profile.

4. Filtration: This simple method relies on the physical size differences between cells to separate them. Cells can be passed through filters with pore sizes that allow smaller cells to pass through while retaining larger cells.

5. Enzymatic digestion: In some cases, cells can be separated by enzymatically dissociating tissues into single-cell suspensions and then using various separation techniques to isolate specific cell types.

These methods are widely used in research and clinical settings for applications such as isolating immune cells, stem cells, or tumor cells from biological samples.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

Flow cytometry is a medical and research technique used to measure physical and chemical characteristics of cells or particles, one cell at a time, as they flow in a fluid stream through a beam of light. The properties measured include:

* Cell size (light scatter)
* Cell internal complexity (granularity, also light scatter)
* Presence or absence of specific proteins or other molecules on the cell surface or inside the cell (using fluorescent antibodies or other fluorescent probes)

The technique is widely used in cell counting, cell sorting, protein engineering, biomarker discovery and monitoring disease progression, particularly in hematology, immunology, and cancer research.

Bone marrow is the spongy tissue found inside certain bones in the body, such as the hips, thighs, and vertebrae. It is responsible for producing blood-forming cells, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. There are two types of bone marrow: red marrow, which is involved in blood cell production, and yellow marrow, which contains fatty tissue.

Red bone marrow contains hematopoietic stem cells, which can differentiate into various types of blood cells. These stem cells continuously divide and mature to produce new blood cells that are released into the circulation. Red blood cells carry oxygen throughout the body, white blood cells help fight infections, and platelets play a crucial role in blood clotting.

Bone marrow also serves as a site for immune cell development and maturation. It contains various types of immune cells, such as lymphocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, which help protect the body against infections and diseases.

Abnormalities in bone marrow function can lead to several medical conditions, including anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and various types of cancer, such as leukemia and multiple myeloma. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy are common diagnostic procedures used to evaluate bone marrow health and function.

Stem cell research is a branch of medical science that focuses on the study and application of stem cells, which are undifferentiated or unspecialized cells with the ability to differentiate into various specialized cell types in the body. These cells have the potential to regenerate and repair damaged tissues and organs, making them a promising area of research for the development of new treatments for a wide range of diseases and conditions, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, heart disease, and more.

Stem cell research involves several key areas, such as:

1. Isolation and culture: Scientists isolate stem cells from various sources, such as embryos, umbilical cord blood, or adult tissues, and grow them in a lab to study their properties and behaviors.
2. Differentiation: Researchers induce stem cells to differentiate into specific cell types, such as heart cells, brain cells, or pancreatic cells, by exposing them to various growth factors and other chemical signals.
3. Genetic modification: Scientists may modify the genes of stem cells to enhance their therapeutic potential or to study the effects of genetic mutations on cell behavior and development.
4. Transplantation: In some cases, researchers transplant stem cells into animal models or human patients to investigate their ability to repair damaged tissues and organs.
5. Ethical considerations: Stem cell research raises several ethical concerns related to the use of embryonic stem cells, which are derived from human embryos. These concerns have led to ongoing debates about the limits and regulations surrounding this area of research.

Overall, stem cell research holds great promise for the development of new medical treatments and therapies, but it also requires careful consideration of ethical issues and rigorous scientific investigation to ensure its safety and effectiveness.

Megakaryocytes are large, specialized bone marrow cells that are responsible for the production and release of platelets (also known as thrombocytes) into the bloodstream. Platelets play an essential role in blood clotting and hemostasis, helping to prevent excessive bleeding during injuries or trauma.

Megakaryocytes have a unique structure with multilobed nuclei and abundant cytoplasm rich in organelles called alpha-granules and dense granules, which store various proteins, growth factors, and enzymes necessary for platelet function. As megakaryocytes mature, they extend long cytoplasmic processes called proplatelets into the bone marrow sinuses, where these extensions fragment into individual platelets that are released into circulation.

Abnormalities in megakaryocyte number, size, or function can lead to various hematological disorders, such as thrombocytopenia (low platelet count), thrombocytosis (high platelet count), and certain types of leukemia.

"Serum-free culture media" refers to a type of nutrient medium used in cell culture and tissue engineering that does not contain fetal bovine serum (FBS) or other animal serums. Instead, it is supplemented with defined, chemically-defined components such as hormones, growth factors, vitamins, and amino acids.

The use of serum-free media offers several advantages over traditional media formulations that contain serum. For example, it reduces the risk of contamination with adventitious agents, such as viruses and prions, that may be present in animal serums. Additionally, it allows for greater control over the culture environment, as the concentration and composition of individual components can be carefully regulated. This is particularly important in applications where precise control over cell behavior is required, such as in the production of therapeutic proteins or in stem cell research.

However, serum-free media may not be suitable for all cell types, as some cells require the complex mixture of growth factors and other components found in animal serums to survive and proliferate. Therefore, it is important to carefully evaluate the needs of each specific cell type when selecting a culture medium.

Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) is a type of cytokine, which is a small signaling protein involved in immune response and hematopoiesis (the formation of blood cells). GM-CSF's specific role is to stimulate the production, proliferation, and activation of granulocytes (a type of white blood cell that fights against infection) and macrophages (large white blood cells that eat foreign substances, bacteria, and dead or dying cells).

In medical terms, GM-CSF is often used in therapeutic settings to boost the production of white blood cells in patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiation treatment for cancer. This can help to reduce the risk of infection during these treatments. It can also be used to promote the growth and differentiation of stem cells in bone marrow transplant procedures.

A plant stem is not typically defined in a medical context, but rather in the field of botany. However, I can certainly provide a general biological definition for you.

In plants, stems are organs that serve primarily as support structures, holding leaves, flowers, and fruits aloft where they can receive sunlight and exchange gases. They also act as conduits, transporting water, nutrients, and sugars made during photosynthesis between the roots and shoots of a plant.

The stem is usually composed of three main tissue systems: dermal, vascular, and ground. The dermal tissue system forms the outermost layer(s) of the stem, providing protection and sometimes participating in gas exchange. The vascular tissue system contains the xylem (which transports water and nutrients upward) and phloem (which transports sugars and other organic compounds downward). The ground tissue system, located between the dermal and vascular tissues, is responsible for food storage and support.

While not a direct medical definition, understanding the structure and function of plant stems can be relevant in fields such as nutrition, agriculture, and environmental science, which have implications for human health.

Mastocytosis is a group of rare disorders caused by the accumulation of abnormal number of mast cells in various tissues of the body, particularly the skin and internal organs such as the bone marrow, liver, spleen, and gastrointestinal tract. Mast cells are types of white blood cells that play an important role in the immune system, releasing chemicals like histamine, heparin, and leukotrienes during allergic reactions or injury to help protect the body. However, excessive accumulation of mast cells can lead to chronic inflammation, tissue damage, and various symptoms.

There are two main types of mastocytosis: cutaneous mastocytosis (CM) and systemic mastocytosis (SM). CM primarily affects the skin, causing redness, itching, hives, and other skin abnormalities. SM, on the other hand, involves internal organs and can be more severe, with symptoms such as diarrhea, stomach pain, fatigue, bone pain, and anaphylaxis (a life-threatening allergic reaction).

Mastocytosis is typically caused by genetic mutations that lead to the overproduction of mast cells. The diagnosis of mastocytosis usually involves a combination of physical examination, medical history, blood tests, skin biopsy, and bone marrow aspiration. Treatment options depend on the type and severity of the disease and may include antihistamines, corticosteroids, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and in severe cases, stem cell transplantation.

Fetal stem cells are a type of stem cell that are derived from fetal tissue, which is tissue obtained from an elective abortion or a spontaneous miscarriage. These stem cells have the ability to differentiate into various cell types, including neurons, cardiac muscle cells, and hepatocytes (liver cells). Fetal stem cells are unique in that they have a greater capacity for self-renewal and can generate a larger number of differentiated cells compared to adult stem cells. They also have the potential to be less immunogenic than other types of stem cells, making them a promising candidate for cell-based therapies and regenerative medicine. However, the use of fetal stem cells is a subject of ethical debate due to their source.

Neoplastic stem cells, also known as cancer stem cells (CSCs), are a subpopulation of cells within a tumor that are capable of self-renewal and generating the heterogeneous lineages of cells that comprise the tumor. These cells are believed to be responsible for the initiation, maintenance, and progression of cancer, as well as its recurrence and resistance to therapy.

CSCs share some similarities with normal stem cells, such as their ability to divide asymmetrically and give rise to differentiated progeny. However, they also have distinct characteristics that distinguish them from their normal counterparts, including aberrant gene expression, altered signaling pathways, and increased resistance to apoptosis (programmed cell death).

The existence of CSCs has important implications for cancer diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Targeting these cells specifically may be necessary to achieve durable remissions and prevent relapse, as they are thought to survive conventional therapies that target the bulk of the tumor. Further research is needed to better understand the biology of CSCs and develop effective strategies for their elimination.

CD (cluster of differentiation) antigens are cell-surface proteins that are expressed on leukocytes (white blood cells) and can be used to identify and distinguish different subsets of these cells. They are important markers in the field of immunology and hematology, and are commonly used to diagnose and monitor various diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases.

CD antigens are designated by numbers, such as CD4, CD8, CD19, etc., which refer to specific proteins found on the surface of different types of leukocytes. For example, CD4 is a protein found on the surface of helper T cells, while CD8 is found on cytotoxic T cells.

CD antigens can be used as targets for immunotherapy, such as monoclonal antibody therapy, in which antibodies are designed to bind to specific CD antigens and trigger an immune response against cancer cells or infected cells. They can also be used as markers to monitor the effectiveness of treatments and to detect minimal residual disease (MRD) after treatment.

It's important to note that not all CD antigens are exclusive to leukocytes, some can be found on other cell types as well, and their expression can vary depending on the activation state or differentiation stage of the cells.

Erythropoietin (EPO) is a hormone that is primarily produced by the kidneys and plays a crucial role in the production of red blood cells in the body. It works by stimulating the bone marrow to produce more red blood cells, which are essential for carrying oxygen to various tissues and organs.

EPO is a glycoprotein that is released into the bloodstream in response to low oxygen levels in the body. When the kidneys detect low oxygen levels, they release EPO, which then travels to the bone marrow and binds to specific receptors on immature red blood cells called erythroblasts. This binding triggers a series of events that promote the maturation and proliferation of erythroblasts, leading to an increase in the production of red blood cells.

In addition to its role in regulating red blood cell production, EPO has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects and may play a role in modulating the immune system. Abnormal levels of EPO have been associated with various medical conditions, including anemia, kidney disease, and certain types of cancer.

EPO is also used as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of anemia caused by chronic kidney disease, chemotherapy, or other conditions that affect red blood cell production. Recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) is a synthetic form of the hormone that is produced using genetic engineering techniques and is commonly used in clinical practice to treat anemia. However, misuse of rhEPO for performance enhancement in sports has been a subject of concern due to its potential to enhance oxygen-carrying capacity and improve endurance.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Melanocytes are specialized cells that produce, store, and transport melanin, the pigment responsible for coloring of the skin, hair, and eyes. They are located in the bottom layer of the epidermis (the outermost layer of the skin) and can also be found in the inner ear and the eye's retina. Melanocytes contain organelles called melanosomes, which produce and store melanin.

Melanin comes in two types: eumelanin (black or brown) and pheomelanin (red or yellow). The amount and type of melanin produced by melanocytes determine the color of a person's skin, hair, and eyes. Exposure to UV radiation from sunlight increases melanin production as a protective response, leading to skin tanning.

Melanocyte dysfunction or abnormalities can lead to various medical conditions, such as albinism (lack of melanin production), melasma (excessive pigmentation), and melanoma (cancerous growth of melanocytes).

Chymases are a type of enzyme that belong to the family of serine proteases. They are found in various tissues and organs, including the heart, lungs, and immune cells called mast cells. Chymases play a role in several physiological and pathological processes, such as inflammation, tissue remodeling, and blood pressure regulation.

One of the most well-known chymases is found in the mast cells and is often referred to as "mast cell chymase." This enzyme can cleave and activate various proteins, including angiotensin I to angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor that increases blood pressure. Chymases have also been implicated in the development of cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension and heart failure, as well as respiratory diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

In summary, chymases are a group of serine protease enzymes that play important roles in various physiological and pathological processes, particularly in inflammation, tissue remodeling, and blood pressure regulation.

Cell survival refers to the ability of a cell to continue living and functioning normally, despite being exposed to potentially harmful conditions or treatments. This can include exposure to toxins, radiation, chemotherapeutic drugs, or other stressors that can damage cells or interfere with their normal processes.

In scientific research, measures of cell survival are often used to evaluate the effectiveness of various therapies or treatments. For example, researchers may expose cells to a particular drug or treatment and then measure the percentage of cells that survive to assess its potential therapeutic value. Similarly, in toxicology studies, measures of cell survival can help to determine the safety of various chemicals or substances.

It's important to note that cell survival is not the same as cell proliferation, which refers to the ability of cells to divide and multiply. While some treatments may promote cell survival, they may also inhibit cell proliferation, making them useful for treating diseases such as cancer. Conversely, other treatments may be designed to specifically target and kill cancer cells, even if it means sacrificing some healthy cells in the process.

Spermatogonia are a type of diploid germ cells found in the seminiferous tubules of the testis. They are the stem cells responsible for sperm production (spermatogenesis) in males. There are two types of spermatogonia: A-dark (Ad) and A-pale (Ap). The Ad spermatogonia function as reserve stem cells, while the Ap spermatogonia serve as the progenitor cells that divide to produce type B spermatogonia. Type B spermatogonia then differentiate into primary spermatocytes, which undergo meiosis to form haploid spermatozoa.

Octamer Transcription Factor-3 (OTF-3 or Oct3) is a specific protein that belongs to the class of POU domain transcription factors. These proteins play crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression during cell growth, development, and differentiation. The "POU" name refers to the presence of two conserved domains - a POU-specific domain and a POU homeodomain - that recognize and bind to specific DNA sequences called octamer motifs, which are involved in controlling the transcription of target genes.

Oct3, encoded by the Pou2f1 gene, is widely expressed in various tissues, including lymphoid cells, neurons, and embryonic stem cells. It has been shown to regulate the expression of several genes that are essential for cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Dysregulation of Oct3 has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancers and neurological disorders.

In summary, Octamer Transcription Factor-3 (Oct3) is a POU domain transcription factor that binds to octamer motifs in DNA and regulates the expression of target genes involved in cell growth, development, and differentiation.

Coculture techniques refer to a type of experimental setup in which two or more different types of cells or organisms are grown and studied together in a shared culture medium. This method allows researchers to examine the interactions between different cell types or species under controlled conditions, and to study how these interactions may influence various biological processes such as growth, gene expression, metabolism, and signal transduction.

Coculture techniques can be used to investigate a wide range of biological phenomena, including the effects of host-microbe interactions on human health and disease, the impact of different cell types on tissue development and homeostasis, and the role of microbial communities in shaping ecosystems. These techniques can also be used to test the efficacy and safety of new drugs or therapies by examining their effects on cells grown in coculture with other relevant cell types.

There are several different ways to establish cocultures, depending on the specific research question and experimental goals. Some common methods include:

1. Mixed cultures: In this approach, two or more cell types are simply mixed together in a culture dish or flask and allowed to grow and interact freely.
2. Cell-layer cultures: Here, one cell type is grown on a porous membrane or other support structure, while the second cell type is grown on top of it, forming a layered coculture.
3. Conditioned media cultures: In this case, one cell type is grown to confluence and its culture medium is collected and then used to grow a second cell type. This allows the second cell type to be exposed to any factors secreted by the first cell type into the medium.
4. Microfluidic cocultures: These involve growing cells in microfabricated channels or chambers, which allow for precise control over the spatial arrangement and flow of nutrients, waste products, and signaling molecules between different cell types.

Overall, coculture techniques provide a powerful tool for studying complex biological systems and gaining insights into the mechanisms that underlie various physiological and pathological processes.

Interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a type of cytokine, which is a small signaling protein involved in the immune response and hematopoiesis (the formation of blood cells). IL-11 is primarily produced by bone marrow stromal cells and is involved in regulating the production and function of platelets, which are cell fragments necessary for blood clotting.

IL-11 has a number of biological activities, including promoting the growth and differentiation of megakaryocytes (the precursor cells to platelets), stimulating the production of acute phase proteins during inflammation, and regulating the function of certain immune cells. In addition, IL-11 has been shown to have effects on other tissues, including promoting the growth and survival of some cancer cells.

Dysregulation of IL-11 signaling has been implicated in a number of diseases, including thrombocytopenia (low platelet count), certain types of anemia, and various cancers.

Tryptase is a type of enzyme that is found in the cells called mast cells, which are a part of the immune system. Specifically, tryptase is a serine protease, which means it helps to break down other proteins in the body. Tryptase is often released during an allergic reaction or as part of an inflammatory response. It can be measured in the blood and is sometimes used as a marker for mast cell activation or degranulation. High levels of tryptase may indicate the presence of certain medical conditions, such as systemic mastocytosis or anaphylaxis.

Proto-oncogene proteins are normal cellular proteins that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, such as signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). They are involved in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and survival under physiological conditions.

When proto-oncogene proteins undergo mutations or aberrations in their expression levels, they can transform into oncogenic forms, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and division. These altered proteins are then referred to as oncogene products or oncoproteins. Oncogenic mutations can occur due to various factors, including genetic predisposition, environmental exposures, and aging.

Examples of proto-oncogene proteins include:

1. Ras proteins: Involved in signal transduction pathways that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Activating mutations in Ras genes are found in various human cancers.
2. Myc proteins: Regulate gene expression related to cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and metabolism. Overexpression of Myc proteins is associated with several types of cancer.
3. EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor): A transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that regulates cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Mutations or overexpression of EGFR are linked to various malignancies, such as lung cancer and glioblastoma.
4. Src family kinases: Intracellular tyrosine kinases that regulate signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, survival, and migration. Dysregulation of Src family kinases is implicated in several types of cancer.
5. Abl kinases: Cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases that regulate various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and stress responses. Aberrant activation of Abl kinases, as seen in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

Understanding the roles of proto-oncogene proteins and their dysregulation in cancer development is essential for developing targeted cancer therapies that aim to inhibit or modulate these aberrant signaling pathways.

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences. This technique is particularly useful for the detection and quantification of RNA viruses, as well as for the analysis of gene expression.

The process involves two main steps: reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first step, reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to convert RNA into complementary DNA (cDNA) by reading the template provided by the RNA molecule. This cDNA then serves as a template for the PCR amplification step.

In the second step, the PCR reaction uses two primers that flank the target DNA sequence and a thermostable polymerase enzyme to repeatedly copy the targeted cDNA sequence. The reaction mixture is heated and cooled in cycles, allowing the primers to anneal to the template, and the polymerase to extend the new strand. This results in exponential amplification of the target DNA sequence, making it possible to detect even small amounts of RNA or cDNA.

RT-PCR is a sensitive and specific technique that has many applications in medical research and diagnostics, including the detection of viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus, and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). It can also be used to study gene expression, identify genetic mutations, and diagnose genetic disorders.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Leukapheresis is a medical procedure that involves the separation and removal of white blood cells (leukocytes) from the blood. It is performed using a specialized machine called an apheresis instrument, which removes the desired component (in this case, leukocytes) and returns the remaining components (red blood cells, platelets, and plasma) back to the donor or patient. This procedure is often used in the treatment of certain blood disorders, such as leukemia and lymphoma, where high white blood cell counts can cause complications. It may also be used to collect stem cells for transplantation purposes. Leukapheresis is generally a safe procedure with minimal side effects, although it may cause temporary discomfort or bruising at the site of needle insertion.

SCID mice is an acronym for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency mice. These are genetically modified mice that lack a functional immune system due to the mutation or knockout of several key genes required for immunity. This makes them ideal for studying the human immune system, infectious diseases, and cancer, as well as testing new therapies and treatments in a controlled environment without the risk of interference from the mouse's own immune system. SCID mice are often used in xenotransplantation studies, where human cells or tissues are transplanted into the mouse to study their behavior and interactions with the human immune system.

Autologous transplantation is a medical procedure where cells, tissues, or organs are removed from a person, stored and then returned back to the same individual at a later time. This is different from allogeneic transplantation where the tissue or organ is obtained from another donor. The term "autologous" is derived from the Greek words "auto" meaning self and "logos" meaning study.

In autologous transplantation, the patient's own cells or tissues are used to replace or repair damaged or diseased ones. This reduces the risk of rejection and eliminates the need for immunosuppressive drugs, which are required in allogeneic transplants to prevent the body from attacking the foreign tissue.

Examples of autologous transplantation include:

* Autologous bone marrow or stem cell transplantation, where stem cells are removed from the patient's blood or bone marrow, stored and then reinfused back into the same individual after high-dose chemotherapy or radiation therapy to treat cancer.
* Autologous skin grafting, where a piece of skin is taken from one part of the body and transplanted to another area on the same person.
* Autologous chondrocyte implantation, where cartilage cells are harvested from the patient's own knee, cultured in a laboratory and then implanted back into the knee to repair damaged cartilage.

Stromal cells, also known as stromal/stroma cells, are a type of cell found in various tissues and organs throughout the body. They are often referred to as the "connective tissue" or "supporting framework" of an organ because they play a crucial role in maintaining the structure and function of the tissue. Stromal cells include fibroblasts, adipocytes (fat cells), and various types of progenitor/stem cells. They produce and maintain the extracellular matrix, which is the non-cellular component of tissues that provides structural support and biochemical cues for other cells. Stromal cells also interact with immune cells and participate in the regulation of the immune response. In some contexts, "stromal cells" can also refer to cells found in the microenvironment of tumors, which can influence cancer growth and progression.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

Host Cell Factor C1 (HCF-1) is a large cellular protein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression and chromatin dynamics within the host cell. It acts as a scaffold or docking platform, interacting with various transcription factors, coactivators, and histone modifying enzymes to form complex regulatory networks involved in different cellular processes such as development, differentiation, and metabolism. HCF-1 is particularly important for the regulation of viral gene expression during infection by certain DNA viruses, including Herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Mutations in the HCF-1 gene have been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, highlighting its essential role in normal cellular functioning.

Erythropoiesis is the process of forming and developing red blood cells (erythrocytes) in the body. It occurs in the bone marrow and is regulated by the hormone erythropoietin (EPO), which is produced by the kidneys. Erythropoiesis involves the differentiation and maturation of immature red blood cell precursors called erythroblasts into mature red blood cells, which are responsible for carrying oxygen to the body's tissues. Disorders that affect erythropoiesis can lead to anemia or other blood-related conditions.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

Cytokines are a broad and diverse category of small signaling proteins that are secreted by various cells, including immune cells, in response to different stimuli. They play crucial roles in regulating the immune response, inflammation, hematopoiesis, and cellular communication.

Cytokines mediate their effects by binding to specific receptors on the surface of target cells, which triggers intracellular signaling pathways that ultimately result in changes in gene expression, cell behavior, and function. Some key functions of cytokines include:

1. Regulating the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of immune cells such as T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and macrophages.
2. Coordinating the inflammatory response by recruiting immune cells to sites of infection or tissue damage and modulating their effector functions.
3. Regulating hematopoiesis, the process of blood cell formation in the bone marrow, by controlling the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.
4. Modulating the development and function of the nervous system, including neuroinflammation, neuroprotection, and neuroregeneration.

Cytokines can be classified into several categories based on their structure, function, or cellular origin. Some common types of cytokines include interleukins (ILs), interferons (IFNs), tumor necrosis factors (TNFs), chemokines, colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), and transforming growth factors (TGFs). Dysregulation of cytokine production and signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammation, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Regeneration in a medical context refers to the process of renewal, restoration, and growth that replaces damaged or missing cells, tissues, organs, or even whole limbs in some organisms. This complex biological process involves various cellular and molecular mechanisms, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which work together to restore the structural and functional integrity of the affected area.

In human medicine, regeneration has attracted significant interest due to its potential therapeutic applications in treating various conditions, including degenerative diseases, trauma, and congenital disorders. Researchers are actively studying the underlying mechanisms of regeneration in various model organisms to develop novel strategies for promoting tissue repair and regeneration in humans.

Examples of regeneration in human medicine include liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy, where the remaining liver lobes can grow back to their original size within weeks, and skin wound healing, where keratinocytes migrate and proliferate to close the wound and restore the epidermal layer. However, the regenerative capacity of humans is limited compared to some other organisms, such as planarians and axolotls, which can regenerate entire body parts or even their central nervous system.

Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a cytokine, a type of protein that plays a crucial role in communication between cells, especially in the immune system. It is produced by various cells including T-cells, B-cells, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells in response to infection, injury, or inflammation.

IL-6 has diverse effects on different cell types. In the immune system, it stimulates the growth and differentiation of B-cells into plasma cells that produce antibodies. It also promotes the activation and survival of T-cells. Moreover, IL-6 plays a role in fever induction by acting on the hypothalamus to raise body temperature during an immune response.

In addition to its functions in the immune system, IL-6 has been implicated in various physiological processes such as hematopoiesis (the formation of blood cells), bone metabolism, and neural development. However, abnormal levels of IL-6 have also been associated with several diseases, including autoimmune disorders, chronic inflammation, and cancer.

"Cell count" is a medical term that refers to the process of determining the number of cells present in a given volume or sample of fluid or tissue. This can be done through various laboratory methods, such as counting individual cells under a microscope using a specialized grid called a hemocytometer, or using automated cell counters that use light scattering and electrical impedance techniques to count and classify different types of cells.

Cell counts are used in a variety of medical contexts, including hematology (the study of blood and blood-forming tissues), microbiology (the study of microscopic organisms), and pathology (the study of diseases and their causes). For example, a complete blood count (CBC) is a routine laboratory test that includes a white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin level, hematocrit value, and platelet count. Abnormal cell counts can indicate the presence of various medical conditions, such as infections, anemia, or leukemia.

Drug synergism is a pharmacological concept that refers to the interaction between two or more drugs, where the combined effect of the drugs is greater than the sum of their individual effects. This means that when these drugs are administered together, they produce an enhanced therapeutic response compared to when they are given separately.

Drug synergism can occur through various mechanisms, such as:

1. Pharmacodynamic synergism - When two or more drugs interact with the same target site in the body and enhance each other's effects.
2. Pharmacokinetic synergism - When one drug affects the metabolism, absorption, distribution, or excretion of another drug, leading to an increased concentration of the second drug in the body and enhanced therapeutic effect.
3. Physiochemical synergism - When two drugs interact physically, such as when one drug enhances the solubility or permeability of another drug, leading to improved absorption and bioavailability.

It is important to note that while drug synergism can result in enhanced therapeutic effects, it can also increase the risk of adverse reactions and toxicity. Therefore, healthcare providers must carefully consider the potential benefits and risks when prescribing combinations of drugs with known or potential synergistic effects.

A mammalian embryo is the developing offspring of a mammal, from the time of implantation of the fertilized egg (blastocyst) in the uterus until the end of the eighth week of gestation. During this period, the embryo undergoes rapid cell division and organ differentiation to form a complex structure with all the major organs and systems in place. This stage is followed by fetal development, which continues until birth. The study of mammalian embryos is important for understanding human development, evolution, and reproductive biology.

Granulocytes are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the body's immune system. They are called granulocytes because they contain small granules in their cytoplasm, which are filled with various enzymes and proteins that help them fight off infections and destroy foreign substances.

There are three types of granulocytes: neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. Neutrophils are the most abundant type and are primarily responsible for fighting bacterial infections. Eosinophils play a role in defending against parasitic infections and regulating immune responses. Basophils are involved in inflammatory reactions and allergic responses.

Granulocytes are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream, where they circulate and patrol for any signs of infection or foreign substances. When they encounter a threat, they quickly move to the site of infection or injury and release their granules to destroy the invading organisms or substances.

Abnormal levels of granulocytes in the blood can indicate an underlying medical condition, such as an infection, inflammation, or a bone marrow disorder.

Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a medical procedure in which damaged or destroyed bone marrow is replaced with healthy bone marrow from a donor. Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside bones that produces blood cells. The main types of BMT are autologous, allogeneic, and umbilical cord blood transplantation.

In autologous BMT, the patient's own bone marrow is used for the transplant. This type of BMT is often used in patients with lymphoma or multiple myeloma who have undergone high-dose chemotherapy or radiation therapy to destroy their cancerous bone marrow.

In allogeneic BMT, bone marrow from a genetically matched donor is used for the transplant. This type of BMT is often used in patients with leukemia, lymphoma, or other blood disorders who have failed other treatments.

Umbilical cord blood transplantation involves using stem cells from umbilical cord blood as a source of healthy bone marrow. This type of BMT is often used in children and adults who do not have a matched donor for allogeneic BMT.

The process of BMT typically involves several steps, including harvesting the bone marrow or stem cells from the donor, conditioning the patient's body to receive the new bone marrow or stem cells, transplanting the new bone marrow or stem cells into the patient's body, and monitoring the patient for signs of engraftment and complications.

BMT is a complex and potentially risky procedure that requires careful planning, preparation, and follow-up care. However, it can be a life-saving treatment for many patients with blood disorders or cancer.

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

ADP-ribosyl cyclase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR). This enzyme plays a role in intracellular signaling, particularly in calcium mobilization in various cell types including immune cells and neurons. The regulation of this enzyme has been implicated in several physiological processes as well as in the pathophysiology of some diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

Developmental gene expression regulation refers to the processes that control the activation or repression of specific genes during embryonic and fetal development. These regulatory mechanisms ensure that genes are expressed at the right time, in the right cells, and at appropriate levels to guide proper growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of an organism.

Developmental gene expression regulation is a complex and dynamic process involving various molecular players, such as transcription factors, chromatin modifiers, non-coding RNAs, and signaling molecules. These regulators can interact with cis-regulatory elements, like enhancers and promoters, to fine-tune the spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development.

Dysregulation of developmental gene expression can lead to various congenital disorders and developmental abnormalities. Therefore, understanding the principles and mechanisms governing developmental gene expression regulation is crucial for uncovering the etiology of developmental diseases and devising potential therapeutic strategies.

Conditioned culture media refers to a type of growth medium that has been previously used to culture and maintain the cells of an organism. The conditioned media contains factors secreted by those cells, such as hormones, nutrients, and signaling molecules, which can affect the behavior and growth of other cells that are introduced into the media later on.

When the conditioned media is used for culturing a new set of cells, it can provide a more physiologically relevant environment than traditional culture media, as it contains factors that are specific to the original cell type. This can be particularly useful in studies that aim to understand cell-cell interactions and communication, or to mimic the natural microenvironment of cells in the body.

It's important to note that conditioned media should be handled carefully and used promptly after preparation, as the factors it contains can degrade over time and affect the quality of the results.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Regenerative medicine is a branch of medicine that deals with the repair or replacement of damaged or diseased cells, tissues, and organs using various strategies, including the use of stem cells, tissue engineering, gene therapy, and biomaterials. The goal of regenerative medicine is to restore normal function and structure to tissues and organs, thereby improving the patient's quality of life and potentially curing diseases that were previously considered incurable.

Regenerative medicine has shown promise in a variety of clinical applications, such as the treatment of degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis, spinal cord injuries, heart disease, diabetes, and liver failure. It also holds great potential for use in regenerative therapies for wound healing, tissue reconstruction, and cosmetic surgery.

The field of regenerative medicine is rapidly evolving, with new discoveries and advances being made regularly. As our understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms that drive tissue repair and regeneration continues to grow, so too will the potential clinical applications of this exciting and promising field.

Immunophenotyping is a medical laboratory technique used to identify and classify cells, usually in the context of hematologic (blood) disorders and malignancies (cancers), based on their surface or intracellular expression of various proteins and antigens. This technique utilizes specific antibodies tagged with fluorochromes, which bind to the target antigens on the cell surface or within the cells. The labeled cells are then analyzed using flow cytometry, allowing for the detection and quantification of multiple antigenic markers simultaneously.

Immunophenotyping helps in understanding the distribution of different cell types, their subsets, and activation status, which can be crucial in diagnosing various hematological disorders, immunodeficiencies, and distinguishing between different types of leukemias, lymphomas, and other malignancies. Additionally, it can also be used to monitor the progression of diseases, evaluate the effectiveness of treatments, and detect minimal residual disease (MRD) during follow-up care.

Leukopoiesis is the process of formation and development of leukocytes or white blood cells in the body. It occurs in the bone marrow, where immature cells known as hematopoietic stem cells differentiate and mature into various types of white blood cells, including neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils. These cells play a crucial role in the body's immune system by helping to fight infections and diseases. Leukopoiesis is regulated by various growth factors and hormones that stimulate the production and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into mature white blood cells.

Skin pigmentation is the coloration of the skin that is primarily determined by two types of melanin pigments, eumelanin and pheomelanin. These pigments are produced by melanocytes, which are specialized cells located in the epidermis. Eumelanin is responsible for brown or black coloration, while pheomelanin produces a red or yellow hue.

The amount and distribution of melanin in the skin can vary depending on genetic factors, age, sun exposure, and various other influences. Increased production of melanin in response to UV radiation from the sun helps protect the skin from damage, leading to darkening or tanning of the skin. However, excessive sun exposure can also cause irregular pigmentation, such as sunspots or freckles.

Abnormalities in skin pigmentation can result from various medical conditions, including albinism (lack of melanin production), vitiligo (loss of melanocytes leading to white patches), and melasma (excessive pigmentation often caused by hormonal changes). These conditions may require medical treatment to manage or improve the pigmentation issues.

Apoptosis is a programmed and controlled cell death process that occurs in multicellular organisms. It is a natural process that helps maintain tissue homeostasis by eliminating damaged, infected, or unwanted cells. During apoptosis, the cell undergoes a series of morphological changes, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and fragmentation into membrane-bound vesicles called apoptotic bodies. These bodies are then recognized and engulfed by neighboring cells or phagocytic cells, preventing an inflammatory response. Apoptosis is regulated by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways that involve proteins such as caspases, Bcl-2 family members, and inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs).

Cell movement, also known as cell motility, refers to the ability of cells to move independently and change their location within tissue or inside the body. This process is essential for various biological functions, including embryonic development, wound healing, immune responses, and cancer metastasis.

There are several types of cell movement, including:

1. **Crawling or mesenchymal migration:** Cells move by extending and retracting protrusions called pseudopodia or filopodia, which contain actin filaments. This type of movement is common in fibroblasts, immune cells, and cancer cells during tissue invasion and metastasis.
2. **Amoeboid migration:** Cells move by changing their shape and squeezing through tight spaces without forming protrusions. This type of movement is often observed in white blood cells (leukocytes) as they migrate through the body to fight infections.
3. **Pseudopodial extension:** Cells extend pseudopodia, which are temporary cytoplasmic projections containing actin filaments. These protrusions help the cell explore its environment and move forward.
4. **Bacterial flagellar motion:** Bacteria use a whip-like structure called a flagellum to propel themselves through their environment. The rotation of the flagellum is driven by a molecular motor in the bacterial cell membrane.
5. **Ciliary and ependymal movement:** Ciliated cells, such as those lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tubes, have hair-like structures called cilia that beat in coordinated waves to move fluids or mucus across the cell surface.

Cell movement is regulated by a complex interplay of signaling pathways, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and adhesion molecules, which enable cells to respond to environmental cues and navigate through tissues.

Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) are a type of transmembrane receptors found on the cell surface that play a crucial role in signal transduction and regulation of various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, metabolism, and survival. They are called "tyrosine kinases" because they possess an intrinsic enzymatic activity that catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to tyrosine residues on target proteins, thereby modulating their function.

RTKs are composed of three main domains: an extracellular domain that binds to specific ligands (growth factors, hormones, or cytokines), a transmembrane domain that spans the cell membrane, and an intracellular domain with tyrosine kinase activity. Upon ligand binding, RTKs undergo conformational changes that lead to their dimerization or oligomerization, which in turn activates their tyrosine kinase activity. Activated RTKs then phosphorylate specific tyrosine residues on downstream signaling proteins, initiating a cascade of intracellular signaling events that ultimately result in the appropriate cellular response.

Dysregulation of RTK signaling has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and developmental disorders. As such, RTKs are important targets for therapeutic intervention in these conditions.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (PBSCT) is a medical procedure that involves the transplantation of stem cells, which are immature cells found in the bone marrow that can develop into different types of blood cells. In PBSCT, these stem cells are collected from the peripheral blood instead of directly from the bone marrow.

The process begins with mobilization, where a growth factor medication is given to the donor to stimulate the release of stem cells from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood. After several days, the donor's blood is then removed through a procedure called apheresis, where the stem cells are separated and collected while the remaining blood components are returned to the donor.

The collected stem cells are then infused into the recipient's bloodstream, where they migrate to the bone marrow and begin to repopulate, leading to the production of new blood cells. This procedure is often used as a treatment for various malignant and non-malignant disorders, such as leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and aplastic anemia.

PBSCT offers several advantages over traditional bone marrow transplantation, including faster engraftment, lower risk of graft failure, and reduced procedure-related morbidity. However, it also has its own set of challenges, such as the potential for increased incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and the need for more stringent HLA matching between donor and recipient.

Transgenic mice are genetically modified rodents that have incorporated foreign DNA (exogenous DNA) into their own genome. This is typically done through the use of recombinant DNA technology, where a specific gene or genetic sequence of interest is isolated and then introduced into the mouse embryo. The resulting transgenic mice can then express the protein encoded by the foreign gene, allowing researchers to study its function in a living organism.

The process of creating transgenic mice usually involves microinjecting the exogenous DNA into the pronucleus of a fertilized egg, which is then implanted into a surrogate mother. The offspring that result from this procedure are screened for the presence of the foreign DNA, and those that carry the desired genetic modification are used to establish a transgenic mouse line.

Transgenic mice have been widely used in biomedical research to model human diseases, study gene function, and test new therapies. They provide a valuable tool for understanding complex biological processes and developing new treatments for a variety of medical conditions.

Germ cells are the reproductive cells, also known as sex cells, that combine to form offspring in sexual reproduction. In females, germ cells are called ova or egg cells, and in males, they are called spermatozoa or sperm cells. These cells are unique because they carry half the genetic material necessary for creating new life. They are produced through a process called meiosis, which reduces their chromosome number by half, ensuring that when two germ cells combine during fertilization, the normal diploid number of chromosomes is restored.

CD38 is a type of antigen that is found on the surface of many different types of cells in the human body, including immune cells such as T-cells and B-cells. Antigens are substances (usually proteins) on the surface of cells that can be recognized by the immune system, triggering an immune response.

CD38 plays a role in several different cellular processes, including the regulation of calcium levels within cells, the production of energy in the form of ATP, and the modulation of immune responses. It is also involved in the activation and proliferation of T-cells and B-cells, which are critical components of the adaptive immune system.

CD38 can be targeted by certain types of immunotherapy, such as monoclonal antibodies, to help stimulate an immune response against cancer cells that express this antigen on their surface.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Erythropoietin receptors are cell surface proteins found on immature red blood cell precursors in the bone marrow. They bind to the hormone erythropoietin (EPO), which is produced by the kidneys in response to low oxygen levels in the blood. When EPO binds to its receptor, it activates a signaling pathway that promotes the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of red blood cell precursors, leading to increased production of red blood cells. This process is critical for maintaining adequate oxygen delivery to tissues in the body. Mutations in the erythropoietin receptor gene can lead to various blood disorders, including anemia and polycythemia.

A clone is a group of cells that are genetically identical to each other because they are derived from a common ancestor cell through processes such as mitosis or asexual reproduction. Therefore, the term "clone cells" refers to a population of cells that are genetic copies of a single parent cell.

In the context of laboratory research, cells can be cloned by isolating a single cell and allowing it to divide in culture, creating a population of genetically identical cells. This is useful for studying the behavior and characteristics of individual cell types, as well as for generating large quantities of cells for use in experiments.

It's important to note that while clone cells are genetically identical, they may still exhibit differences in their phenotype (physical traits) due to epigenetic factors or environmental influences.

Totipotent stem cells are a type of stem cell that have the greatest developmental potential and can differentiate into any cell type in the body, including extra-embryonic tissues such as the placenta. These stem cells are derived from the fertilized egg (zygote) and are capable of forming a complete organism. As development progresses, totipotent stem cells become more restricted in their differentiation potential, giving rise to pluripotent stem cells, which can differentiate into any cell type in the body but not extra-embryonic tissues. Totipotent stem cells are rarely found in adults and are primarily studied in the context of embryonic development and regenerative medicine.

Homeodomain proteins are a group of transcription factors that play crucial roles in the development and differentiation of cells in animals and plants. They are characterized by the presence of a highly conserved DNA-binding domain called the homeodomain, which is typically about 60 amino acids long. The homeodomain consists of three helices, with the third helix responsible for recognizing and binding to specific DNA sequences.

Homeodomain proteins are involved in regulating gene expression during embryonic development, tissue maintenance, and organismal growth. They can act as activators or repressors of transcription, depending on the context and the presence of cofactors. Mutations in homeodomain proteins have been associated with various human diseases, including cancer, congenital abnormalities, and neurological disorders.

Some examples of homeodomain proteins include PAX6, which is essential for eye development, HOX genes, which are involved in body patterning, and NANOG, which plays a role in maintaining pluripotency in stem cells.

Homologous transplantation is a type of transplant surgery where organs or tissues are transferred between two genetically non-identical individuals of the same species. The term "homologous" refers to the similarity in structure and function of the donated organ or tissue to the recipient's own organ or tissue.

For example, a heart transplant from one human to another is an example of homologous transplantation because both organs are hearts and perform the same function. Similarly, a liver transplant, kidney transplant, lung transplant, and other types of organ transplants between individuals of the same species are also considered homologous transplantations.

Homologous transplantation is in contrast to heterologous or xenogeneic transplantation, where organs or tissues are transferred from one species to another, such as a pig heart transplanted into a human. Homologous transplantation is more commonly performed than heterologous transplantation due to the increased risk of rejection and other complications associated with xenogeneic transplants.

Retroviridae is a family of viruses that includes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other viruses that primarily use RNA as their genetic material. The name "retrovirus" comes from the fact that these viruses reverse transcribe their RNA genome into DNA, which then becomes integrated into the host cell's genome. This is a unique characteristic of retroviruses, as most other viruses use DNA as their genetic material.

Retroviruses can cause a variety of diseases in animals and humans, including cancer, neurological disorders, and immunodeficiency syndromes like AIDS. They have a lipid membrane envelope that contains glycoprotein spikes, which allow them to attach to and enter host cells. Once inside the host cell, the viral RNA is reverse transcribed into DNA by the enzyme reverse transcriptase, which is then integrated into the host genome by the enzyme integrase.

Retroviruses can remain dormant in the host genome for extended periods of time, and may be reactivated under certain conditions to produce new viral particles. This ability to integrate into the host genome has also made retroviruses useful tools in molecular biology, where they are used as vectors for gene therapy and other genetic manipulations.

Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) is a protein with pleiotropic functions, acting as a cytokine that plays a crucial role in various biological processes. Its name originates from its initial discovery as a factor that inhibits the proliferation of certain leukemic cells. However, LIF has been found to have a much broader range of activities beyond just inhibiting leukemia cells.

LIF is a member of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) family of cytokines and binds to a heterodimeric receptor complex consisting of the LIF receptor (LIFR) and glycoprotein 130 (gp130). The activation of this receptor complex triggers several downstream signaling pathways, including the Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways.

Some of the key functions of LIF include:

1. Embryonic development: During embryogenesis, LIF is essential for maintaining the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells and promoting their self-renewal in the early stages of development. It also plays a role in implantation and trophoblast differentiation during pregnancy.
2. Hematopoiesis: In the hematopoietic system, LIF supports the survival and proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and regulates their differentiation into various blood cell lineages.
3. Neuroprotection and neurogenesis: LIF has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in various models of neuronal injury and disease, including spinal cord injury, stroke, and Alzheimer's disease. It also promotes the survival and differentiation of neural progenitor cells, contributing to adult neurogenesis.
4. Inflammation: LIF is involved in regulating immune responses and inflammation by modulating the activation and function of various immune cells, such as T cells, B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells.
5. Pain regulation: LIF has been implicated in pain processing and modulation, with studies suggesting that it may contribute to both acute and chronic pain conditions.
6. Cancer: LIF has complex roles in cancer biology, acting as a tumor suppressor in some contexts while promoting tumor growth and progression in others. It can regulate various aspects of cancer cell behavior, including proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion.

In summary, LIF is a pleiotropic cytokine with diverse functions in various biological processes, including embryonic development, hematopoiesis, neuroprotection, inflammation, pain regulation, and cancer. Its multifaceted roles highlight the importance of understanding its precise mechanisms of action in different contexts to harness its therapeutic potential for various diseases.

A hair follicle is a part of the human skin from which hair grows. It is a complex organ that consists of several layers, including an outer root sheath, inner root sheath, and matrix. The hair follicle is located in the dermis, the second layer of the skin, and is surrounded by sebaceous glands and erector pili muscles.

The hair growth cycle includes three phases: anagen (growth phase), catagen (transitional phase), and telogen (resting phase). During the anagen phase, cells in the matrix divide rapidly to produce new hair fibers that grow out of the follicle. The hair fiber is made up of a protein called keratin, which also makes up the outer layers of the skin and nails.

Hair follicles are important for various biological functions, including thermoregulation, sensory perception, and social communication. They also play a role in wound healing and can serve as a source of stem cells that can differentiate into other cell types.

A "mutant strain of mice" in a medical context refers to genetically engineered mice that have specific genetic mutations introduced into their DNA. These mutations can be designed to mimic certain human diseases or conditions, allowing researchers to study the underlying biological mechanisms and test potential therapies in a controlled laboratory setting.

Mutant strains of mice are created through various techniques, including embryonic stem cell manipulation, gene editing technologies such as CRISPR-Cas9, and radiation-induced mutagenesis. These methods allow scientists to introduce specific genetic changes into the mouse genome, resulting in mice that exhibit altered physiological or behavioral traits.

These strains of mice are widely used in biomedical research because their short lifespan, small size, and high reproductive rate make them an ideal model organism for studying human diseases. Additionally, the mouse genome has been well-characterized, and many genetic tools and resources are available to researchers working with these animals.

Examples of mutant strains of mice include those that carry mutations in genes associated with cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, metabolic diseases, and immunological conditions. These mice provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of human diseases and help advance our understanding of potential therapeutic interventions.

A biological marker, often referred to as a biomarker, is a measurable indicator that reflects the presence or severity of a disease state, or a response to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers can be found in various materials such as blood, tissues, or bodily fluids, and they can take many forms, including molecular, histologic, radiographic, or physiological measurements.

In the context of medical research and clinical practice, biomarkers are used for a variety of purposes, such as:

1. Diagnosis: Biomarkers can help diagnose a disease by indicating the presence or absence of a particular condition. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a biomarker used to detect prostate cancer.
2. Monitoring: Biomarkers can be used to monitor the progression or regression of a disease over time. For instance, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are monitored in diabetes patients to assess long-term blood glucose control.
3. Predicting: Biomarkers can help predict the likelihood of developing a particular disease or the risk of a negative outcome. For example, the presence of certain genetic mutations can indicate an increased risk for breast cancer.
4. Response to treatment: Biomarkers can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific treatment by measuring changes in the biomarker levels before and after the intervention. This is particularly useful in personalized medicine, where treatments are tailored to individual patients based on their unique biomarker profiles.

It's important to note that for a biomarker to be considered clinically valid and useful, it must undergo rigorous validation through well-designed studies, including demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and clinical relevance.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Blood cells are the formed elements in the blood, including red blood cells (erythrocytes), white blood cells (leukocytes), and platelets (thrombocytes). These cells are produced in the bone marrow and play crucial roles in the body's functions. Red blood cells are responsible for carrying oxygen to tissues and carbon dioxide away from them, while white blood cells are part of the immune system and help defend against infection and disease. Platelets are cell fragments that are essential for normal blood clotting.

Benzamides are a class of organic compounds that consist of a benzene ring (a aromatic hydrocarbon) attached to an amide functional group. The amide group can be bound to various substituents, leading to a variety of benzamide derivatives with different biological activities.

In a medical context, some benzamides have been developed as drugs for the treatment of various conditions. For example, danzol (a benzamide derivative) is used as a hormonal therapy for endometriosis and breast cancer. Additionally, other benzamides such as sulpiride and amisulpride are used as antipsychotic medications for the treatment of schizophrenia and related disorders.

It's important to note that while some benzamides have therapeutic uses, others may be toxic or have adverse effects, so they should only be used under the supervision of a medical professional.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Beta-catenin is a protein that plays a crucial role in gene transcription and cell-cell adhesion. It is a key component of the Wnt signaling pathway, which regulates various processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration during embryonic development and tissue homeostasis in adults.

In the absence of Wnt signals, beta-catenin forms a complex with other proteins, including adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and axin, which targets it for degradation by the proteasome. When Wnt ligands bind to their receptors, this complex is disrupted, allowing beta-catenin to accumulate in the cytoplasm and translocate to the nucleus. In the nucleus, beta-catenin interacts with T cell factor/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factors to activate the transcription of target genes involved in cell fate determination, survival, and proliferation.

Mutations in the genes encoding components of the Wnt signaling pathway, including beta-catenin, have been implicated in various human diseases, such as cancer, developmental disorders, and degenerative conditions.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) is not a medical term per se, but a scientific term used in the field of molecular biology. GFP is a protein that exhibits bright green fluorescence when exposed to light, particularly blue or ultraviolet light. It was originally discovered in the jellyfish Aequorea victoria.

In medical and biological research, scientists often use recombinant DNA technology to introduce the gene for GFP into other organisms, including bacteria, plants, and animals, including humans. This allows them to track the expression and localization of specific genes or proteins of interest in living cells, tissues, or even whole organisms.

The ability to visualize specific cellular structures or processes in real-time has proven invaluable for a wide range of research areas, from studying the development and function of organs and organ systems to understanding the mechanisms of diseases and the effects of therapeutic interventions.

SOXB1 transcription factors are a subgroup of the SOX (SRY-related HMG box) family of transcription factors, which are characterized by a conserved high mobility group (HMG) box DNA-binding domain. The SOXB1 subfamily includes SOX1, SOX2, and SOX3, which play crucial roles during embryonic development and in the maintenance of stem cells. They regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences and interacting with other transcription factors and cofactors. SOXB1 proteins have been implicated in various biological processes, such as neurogenesis, eye development, and sex determination. Dysregulation of SOXB1 transcription factors has been associated with several human diseases, including cancer.

Antigens are substances (usually proteins) on the surface of cells, viruses, fungi, or bacteria that can be recognized by the immune system and provoke an immune response. In the context of differentiation, antigens refer to specific markers that identify the developmental stage or lineage of a cell.

Differentiation antigens are proteins or carbohydrates expressed on the surface of cells during various stages of differentiation, which can be used to distinguish between cells at different maturation stages or of different cell types. These antigens play an essential role in the immune system's ability to recognize and respond to abnormal or infected cells while sparing healthy cells.

Examples of differentiation antigens include:

1. CD (cluster of differentiation) molecules: A group of membrane proteins used to identify and define various cell types, such as T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, monocytes, and granulocytes.
2. Lineage-specific antigens: Antigens that are specific to certain cell lineages, such as CD3 for T cells or CD19 for B cells.
3. Maturation markers: Antigens that indicate the maturation stage of a cell, like CD34 and CD38 on hematopoietic stem cells.

Understanding differentiation antigens is crucial in immunology, cancer research, transplantation medicine, and vaccine development.

'Tumor cells, cultured' refers to the process of removing cancerous cells from a tumor and growing them in controlled laboratory conditions. This is typically done by isolating the tumor cells from a patient's tissue sample, then placing them in a nutrient-rich environment that promotes their growth and multiplication.

The resulting cultured tumor cells can be used for various research purposes, including the study of cancer biology, drug development, and toxicity testing. They provide a valuable tool for researchers to better understand the behavior and characteristics of cancer cells outside of the human body, which can lead to the development of more effective cancer treatments.

It is important to note that cultured tumor cells may not always behave exactly the same way as they do in the human body, so findings from cell culture studies must be validated through further research, such as animal models or clinical trials.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

A genetic vector is a vehicle, often a plasmid or a virus, that is used to introduce foreign DNA into a host cell as part of genetic engineering or gene therapy techniques. The vector contains the desired gene or genes, along with regulatory elements such as promoters and enhancers, which are needed for the expression of the gene in the target cells.

The choice of vector depends on several factors, including the size of the DNA to be inserted, the type of cell to be targeted, and the efficiency of uptake and expression required. Commonly used vectors include plasmids, adenoviruses, retroviruses, and lentiviruses.

Plasmids are small circular DNA molecules that can replicate independently in bacteria. They are often used as cloning vectors to amplify and manipulate DNA fragments. Adenoviruses are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect a wide range of host cells, including human cells. They are commonly used as gene therapy vectors because they can efficiently transfer genes into both dividing and non-dividing cells.

Retroviruses and lentiviruses are RNA viruses that integrate their genetic material into the host cell's genome. This allows for stable expression of the transgene over time. Lentiviruses, a subclass of retroviruses, have the advantage of being able to infect non-dividing cells, making them useful for gene therapy applications in post-mitotic tissues such as neurons and muscle cells.

Overall, genetic vectors play a crucial role in modern molecular biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study gene function, develop new therapies, and modify organisms for various purposes.

Gene expression profiling is a laboratory technique used to measure the activity (expression) of thousands of genes at once. This technique allows researchers and clinicians to identify which genes are turned on or off in a particular cell, tissue, or organism under specific conditions, such as during health, disease, development, or in response to various treatments.

The process typically involves isolating RNA from the cells or tissues of interest, converting it into complementary DNA (cDNA), and then using microarray or high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine which genes are expressed and at what levels. The resulting data can be used to identify patterns of gene expression that are associated with specific biological states or processes, providing valuable insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of diseases and potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

In recent years, gene expression profiling has become an essential tool in various fields, including cancer research, drug discovery, and personalized medicine, where it is used to identify biomarkers of disease, predict patient outcomes, and guide treatment decisions.

Genetic transduction is a process in molecular biology that describes the transfer of genetic material from one bacterium to another by a viral vector called a bacteriophage (or phage). In this process, the phage infects one bacterium and incorporates a portion of the bacterial DNA into its own genetic material. When the phage then infects a second bacterium, it can transfer the incorporated bacterial DNA to the new host. This can result in the horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of traits such as antibiotic resistance or virulence factors between bacteria.

There are two main types of transduction: generalized and specialized. In generalized transduction, any portion of the bacterial genome can be packaged into the phage particle, leading to a random assortment of genetic material being transferred. In specialized transduction, only specific genes near the site where the phage integrates into the bacterial chromosome are consistently transferred.

It's important to note that genetic transduction is not to be confused with transformation or conjugation, which are other mechanisms of HGT in bacteria.

Inbred NOD (Nonobese Diabetic) mice are a strain of laboratory mice that are genetically predisposed to develop autoimmune diabetes. This strain was originally developed in Japan and has been widely used as an animal model for studying type 1 diabetes and its complications.

NOD mice typically develop diabetes spontaneously at around 12-14 weeks of age, although the onset and severity of the disease can vary between individual mice. The disease is caused by a breakdown in immune tolerance, leading to an autoimmune attack on the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas.

Inbred NOD mice are highly valuable for research purposes because they exhibit many of the same genetic and immunological features as human patients with type 1 diabetes. By studying these mice, researchers can gain insights into the underlying mechanisms of the disease and develop new treatments and therapies.

A "knockout" mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which one or more genes have been deleted or "knocked out" using molecular biology techniques. This allows researchers to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes, as well as potential associations with human diseases. The mice are generated by introducing targeted DNA modifications into embryonic stem cells, which are then used to create a live animal. Knockout mice have been widely used in biomedical research to investigate gene function, disease mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets.

BALB/c is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The strain was developed at the Institute of Cancer Research in London by Henry Baldwin and his colleagues in the 1920s, and it has since become one of the most commonly used inbred strains in the world.

BALB/c mice are characterized by their black coat color, which is determined by a recessive allele at the tyrosinase locus. They are also known for their docile and friendly temperament, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory.

One of the key features of BALB/c mice that makes them useful for research is their susceptibility to certain types of tumors and immune responses. For example, they are highly susceptible to developing mammary tumors, which can be induced by chemical carcinogens or viral infection. They also have a strong Th2-biased immune response, which makes them useful models for studying allergic diseases and asthma.

BALB/c mice are also commonly used in studies of genetics, neuroscience, behavior, and infectious diseases. Because they are an inbred strain, they have a uniform genetic background, which makes it easier to control for genetic factors in experiments. Additionally, because they have been bred in the laboratory for many generations, they are highly standardized and reproducible, making them ideal subjects for scientific research.

Pyrimidines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds similar to benzene and pyridine, containing two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 3 of the six-member ring. They are one of the two types of nucleobases found in nucleic acids, the other being purines. The pyrimidine bases include cytosine (C) and thymine (T) in DNA, and uracil (U) in RNA, which pair with guanine (G) and adenine (A), respectively, through hydrogen bonding to form the double helix structure of nucleic acids. Pyrimidines are also found in many other biomolecules and have various roles in cellular metabolism and genetic regulation.

Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12), also known as stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), is a small signaling protein belonging to the chemokine family. Chemokines are a group of cytokines, or signaling molecules, that play important roles in immune responses and inflammation by recruiting and activating various immune cells.

CXCL12 is produced by several types of cells, including stromal cells, endothelial cells, and certain immune cells. It exerts its effects by binding to a specific receptor called C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), which is found on the surface of various cell types, including immune cells, stem cells, and some cancer cells.

The CXCL12-CXCR4 axis plays crucial roles in various physiological processes, such as embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, hematopoiesis (the formation of blood cells), and neurogenesis (the formation of neurons). Additionally, this signaling pathway has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including cancer metastasis, inflammatory diseases, and HIV infection.

In summary, Chemokine CXCL12 is a small signaling protein that binds to the CXCR4 receptor and plays essential roles in various physiological processes and pathological conditions.

Heterologous transplantation is a type of transplantation where an organ or tissue is transferred from one species to another. This is in contrast to allogeneic transplantation, where the donor and recipient are of the same species, or autologous transplantation, where the donor and recipient are the same individual.

In heterologous transplantation, the immune systems of the donor and recipient are significantly different, which can lead to a strong immune response against the transplanted organ or tissue. This is known as a graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), where the immune cells in the transplanted tissue attack the recipient's body.

Heterologous transplantation is not commonly performed in clinical medicine due to the high risk of rejection and GVHD. However, it may be used in research settings to study the biology of transplantation and to develop new therapies for transplant rejection.

A lentivirus is a type of slow-acting retrovirus that can cause chronic diseases and cancers. The term "lentivirus" comes from the Latin word "lentus," which means slow. Lentiviruses are characterized by their ability to establish a persistent infection, during which they continuously produce new viral particles.

Lentiviruses have a complex genome that includes several accessory genes, in addition to the typical gag, pol, and env genes found in all retroviruses. These accessory genes play important roles in regulating the virus's replication cycle and evading the host's immune response.

One of the most well-known lentiviruses is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which causes AIDS. Other examples include the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Lentiviruses have also been used as vectors for gene therapy, as they can efficiently introduce new genes into both dividing and non-dividing cells.

The cell cycle is a series of events that take place in a cell leading to its division and duplication. It consists of four main phases: G1 phase, S phase, G2 phase, and M phase.

During the G1 phase, the cell grows in size and synthesizes mRNA and proteins in preparation for DNA replication. In the S phase, the cell's DNA is copied, resulting in two complete sets of chromosomes. During the G2 phase, the cell continues to grow and produces more proteins and organelles necessary for cell division.

The M phase is the final stage of the cell cycle and consists of mitosis (nuclear division) and cytokinesis (cytoplasmic division). Mitosis results in two genetically identical daughter nuclei, while cytokinesis divides the cytoplasm and creates two separate daughter cells.

The cell cycle is regulated by various checkpoints that ensure the proper completion of each phase before progressing to the next. These checkpoints help prevent errors in DNA replication and division, which can lead to mutations and cancer.

Fibroblasts are specialized cells that play a critical role in the body's immune response and wound healing process. They are responsible for producing and maintaining the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the non-cellular component present within all tissues and organs, providing structural support and biochemical signals for surrounding cells.

Fibroblasts produce various ECM proteins such as collagens, elastin, fibronectin, and laminins, forming a complex network of fibers that give tissues their strength and flexibility. They also help in the regulation of tissue homeostasis by controlling the turnover of ECM components through the process of remodeling.

In response to injury or infection, fibroblasts become activated and start to proliferate rapidly, migrating towards the site of damage. Here, they participate in the inflammatory response, releasing cytokines and chemokines that attract immune cells to the area. Additionally, they deposit new ECM components to help repair the damaged tissue and restore its functionality.

Dysregulation of fibroblast activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including fibrosis (excessive scarring), cancer (where they can contribute to tumor growth and progression), and autoimmune diseases (such as rheumatoid arthritis).

Cell adhesion refers to the binding of cells to extracellular matrices or to other cells, a process that is fundamental to the development, function, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Cell adhesion is mediated by various cell surface receptors, such as integrins, cadherins, and immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecules (Ig-CAMs), which interact with specific ligands in the extracellular environment. These interactions lead to the formation of specialized junctions, such as tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, that help to maintain tissue architecture and regulate various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. Disruptions in cell adhesion can contribute to a variety of diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and degenerative disorders.

Graft survival, in medical terms, refers to the success of a transplanted tissue or organ in continuing to function and integrate with the recipient's body over time. It is the opposite of graft rejection, which occurs when the recipient's immune system recognizes the transplanted tissue as foreign and attacks it, leading to its failure.

Graft survival depends on various factors, including the compatibility between the donor and recipient, the type and location of the graft, the use of immunosuppressive drugs to prevent rejection, and the overall health of the recipient. A successful graft survival implies that the transplanted tissue or organ has been accepted by the recipient's body and is functioning properly, providing the necessary physiological support for the recipient's survival and improved quality of life.

Growth substances, in the context of medical terminology, typically refer to natural hormones or chemically synthesized agents that play crucial roles in controlling and regulating cell growth, differentiation, and division. They are also known as "growth factors" or "mitogens." These substances include:

1. Proteins: Examples include insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). They bind to specific receptors on the cell surface, activating intracellular signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

2. Steroids: Certain steroid hormones, such as androgens and estrogens, can also act as growth substances by binding to nuclear receptors and influencing gene expression related to cell growth and division.

3. Cytokines: Some cytokines, like interleukins (ILs) and hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs), contribute to the regulation of hematopoiesis, immune responses, and inflammation, thus indirectly affecting cell growth and differentiation.

These growth substances have essential roles in various physiological processes, such as embryonic development, tissue repair, and wound healing. However, abnormal or excessive production or response to these growth substances can lead to pathological conditions, including cancer, benign tumors, and other proliferative disorders.

Blood component removal, also known as blood component therapy or apheresis, is a medical procedure that involves separating and removing specific components of the blood, such as red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, or plasma, while returning the remaining components back to the donor or patient. This process can be used for therapeutic purposes, such as in the treatment of certain diseases and conditions, or for donation, such as in the collection of blood products for transfusion. The specific method and equipment used to perform blood component removal may vary depending on the intended application and the particular component being removed.

Cell-and tissue-based therapy is a type of medical treatment that involves the use of living cells or tissues to repair, replace, or regenerate damaged or diseased cells or tissues in the body. This can include the transplantation of stem cells, which are immature cells that have the ability to develop into different types of cells, as well as the use of fully differentiated cells or tissues that have specific functions in the body.

Cell-and tissue-based therapies may be used to treat a wide variety of medical conditions, including degenerative diseases, injuries, and congenital defects. Some examples of cell-and tissue-based therapies include:

* Bone marrow transplantation: This involves the transplantation of blood-forming stem cells from the bone marrow of a healthy donor to a patient in need of new blood cells due to disease or treatment with chemotherapy or radiation.
* Corneal transplantation: This involves the transplantation of healthy corneal tissue from a deceased donor to a patient with damaged or diseased corneas.
* Articular cartilage repair: This involves the use of cells or tissues to repair damaged articular cartilage, which is the smooth, white tissue that covers the ends of bones where they come together to form joints.

Cell-and tissue-based therapies are a rapidly evolving field of medicine, and researchers are continually exploring new ways to use these treatments to improve patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that cell-and tissue-based therapies also carry some risks, including the possibility of rejection or infection, and they should only be performed by qualified medical professionals in appropriate settings.

Tissue engineering is a branch of biomedical engineering that combines the principles of engineering, materials science, and biological sciences to develop functional substitutes for damaged or diseased tissues and organs. It involves the creation of living, three-dimensional structures that can restore, maintain, or improve tissue function. This is typically accomplished through the use of cells, scaffolds (biodegradable matrices), and biologically active molecules. The goal of tissue engineering is to develop biological substitutes that can ultimately restore normal function and structure in damaged tissues or organs.

Connective tissue cells are a type of cell that are responsible for the production and maintenance of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which provides structural support and separates different tissues in the body. There are several types of connective tissue cells, including:

1. Fibroblasts: These are the most common type of connective tissue cell. They produce and maintain the ECM by synthesizing and secreting collagen, elastin, and other proteins that give the matrix its strength and elasticity.
2. Chondrocytes: These cells are found in cartilage and are responsible for producing and maintaining the cartilaginous matrix, which is composed of collagen and proteoglycans.
3. Osteoblasts: These cells are responsible for the formation and mineralization of bone tissue. They produce and secrete type I collagen and other proteins that form the organic matrix of bone, and they also regulate the deposition of calcium salts that mineralize the matrix.
4. Adipocytes: These are fat cells that store energy in the form of lipids. They are found in adipose tissue, which is a type of connective tissue that provides insulation and cushioning to the body.
5. Macrophages: These are large, mobile phagocytic cells that play an important role in the immune system. They are derived from monocytes and are found in many types of connective tissue, where they help to remove foreign particles, debris, and microorganisms.
6. Mast cells: These are connective tissue cells that contain granules filled with histamine, heparin, and other substances that are involved in inflammation and allergic reactions. They play a role in the immune response by releasing these granules when activated by antigens or other stimuli.

Connective tissue cells are essential for maintaining the structure and function of the body's tissues and organs, and they play an important role in wound healing, tissue repair, and the immune response.

DNA-binding proteins are a type of protein that have the ability to bind to DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), the genetic material of organisms. These proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as regulation of gene expression, DNA replication, repair and recombination.

The binding of DNA-binding proteins to specific DNA sequences is mediated by non-covalent interactions, including electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals forces. The specificity of binding is determined by the recognition of particular nucleotide sequences or structural features of the DNA molecule.

DNA-binding proteins can be classified into several categories based on their structure and function, such as transcription factors, histones, and restriction enzymes. Transcription factors are a major class of DNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region of genes and recruiting other proteins to modulate transcription. Histones are DNA-binding proteins that package DNA into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin structure. Restriction enzymes are DNA-binding proteins that recognize and cleave specific DNA sequences, and are widely used in molecular biology research and biotechnology applications.

Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (M-CSF) is a growth factor that belongs to the family of colony-stimulating factors (CSFs). It is a glycoprotein hormone that plays a crucial role in the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of mononuclear phagocytes, including macrophages. M-CSF binds to its receptor, CSF1R, which is expressed on the surface of monocytes, macrophages, and their precursors.

M-CSF stimulates the production of mature macrophages from monocyte precursors in the bone marrow and enhances the survival and function of mature macrophages in peripheral tissues. It also promotes the activation of macrophages, increasing their ability to phagocytize and destroy foreign particles, microorganisms, and tumor cells.

In addition to its role in the immune system, M-CSF has been implicated in various physiological processes, including hematopoiesis, bone remodeling, angiogenesis, and female reproduction. Dysregulation of M-CSF signaling has been associated with several pathological conditions, such as inflammatory diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a small signaling protein that is involved in the development and function of immune cells, particularly T cells and B cells. It is produced by stromal cells found in the bone marrow, thymus, and lymphoid organs. IL-7 binds to its receptor, IL-7R, which is expressed on the surface of immature T cells and B cells, as well as some mature immune cells.

IL-7 plays a critical role in the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of T cells and B cells during their development in the thymus and bone marrow, respectively. It also helps to maintain the homeostasis of these cell populations in peripheral tissues by promoting their survival and preventing apoptosis.

In addition to its role in immune cell development and homeostasis, IL-7 has been shown to have potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and autoimmune disorders. However, further research is needed to fully understand its mechanisms of action and potential side effects before it can be widely used in clinical settings.

Mesonephros is defined as the intermediate part of the embryonic excretory system in higher vertebrates, which develops into the permanent kidney in some lower vertebrates. In humans, it represents the transitory kidney that functions during early fetal life and gives rise to the male reproductive structures (i.e., epididymis, vas deferens, and efferent ductules) after its excretory function is taken over by the metanephros or permanent kidney. The mesonephros consists of a number of tubules called mesonephric tubules, which open into the mesonephric (Wolffian) duct, and a network of blood vessels known as the mesonephric capillaries or glomeruli.

Phosphorylation is the process of adding a phosphate group (a molecule consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen atoms) to a protein or other organic molecule, which is usually done by enzymes called kinases. This post-translational modification can change the function, localization, or activity of the target molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Phosphorylation is reversible, and the removal of the phosphate group is facilitated by enzymes called phosphatases.

A fetus is the developing offspring in a mammal, from the end of the embryonic period (approximately 8 weeks after fertilization in humans) until birth. In humans, the fetal stage of development starts from the eleventh week of pregnancy and continues until childbirth, which is termed as full-term pregnancy at around 37 to 40 weeks of gestation. During this time, the organ systems become fully developed and the body grows in size. The fetus is surrounded by the amniotic fluid within the amniotic sac and is connected to the placenta via the umbilical cord, through which it receives nutrients and oxygen from the mother. Regular prenatal care is essential during this period to monitor the growth and development of the fetus and ensure a healthy pregnancy and delivery.

NAD+ nucleosidase, also known as NMN hydrolase or nicotinamide mononucleotide hydrolase, is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) to produce nicotinamide and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) is a crucial coenzyme involved in various redox reactions in the body, and its biosynthesis involves several steps, one of which is the conversion of nicotinamide to NMN by the enzyme nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT).

The hydrolysis of NMN to nicotinamide and PRPP by NAD+ nucleosidase is a rate-limiting step in the salvage pathway of NAD+ biosynthesis, which recycles nicotinamide back to NMN and then to NAD+. Therefore, NAD+ nucleosidase plays an essential role in maintaining NAD+ homeostasis in the body.

Deficiencies or mutations in NAD+ nucleosidase can lead to various metabolic disorders, including neurological and cardiovascular diseases, as well as aging-related conditions associated with decreased NAD+ levels.

Piperazines are a class of heterocyclic organic compounds that contain a seven-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 4. They have the molecular formula N-NRR' where R and R' can be alkyl or aryl groups. Piperazines have a wide range of uses in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and as building blocks in organic synthesis.

In a medical context, piperazines are used in the manufacture of various drugs, including some antipsychotics, antidepressants, antihistamines, and anti-worm medications. For example, the antipsychotic drug trifluoperazine and the antidepressant drug nefazodone both contain a piperazine ring in their chemical structure.

However, it's important to note that some piperazines are also used as recreational drugs due to their stimulant and euphoric effects. These include compounds such as BZP (benzylpiperazine) and TFMPP (trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine), which have been linked to serious health risks, including addiction, seizures, and death. Therefore, the use of these substances should be avoided.

Trans-activators are proteins that increase the transcriptional activity of a gene or a set of genes. They do this by binding to specific DNA sequences and interacting with the transcription machinery, thereby enhancing the recruitment and assembly of the complexes needed for transcription. In some cases, trans-activators can also modulate the chromatin structure to make the template more accessible to the transcription machinery.

In the context of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection, the term "trans-activator" is often used specifically to refer to the Tat protein. The Tat protein is a viral regulatory protein that plays a critical role in the replication of HIV by activating the transcription of the viral genome. It does this by binding to a specific RNA structure called the Trans-Activation Response Element (TAR) located at the 5' end of all nascent HIV transcripts, and recruiting cellular cofactors that enhance the processivity and efficiency of RNA polymerase II, leading to increased viral gene expression.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

Erythroblasts are immature red blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow. They are also known as normoblasts and are a stage in the development of red blood cells, or erythrocytes. Erythroblasts are larger than mature red blood cells and have a nucleus, which is lost during the maturation process. These cells are responsible for producing hemoglobin, the protein that carries oxygen in the blood. Abnormal increases or decreases in the number of erythroblasts can be indicative of certain medical conditions, such as anemia or leukemia.

A radiation chimera is not a widely used or recognized medical term. However, in the field of genetics and radiation biology, a "chimera" refers to an individual that contains cells with different genetic backgrounds. A radiation chimera, therefore, could refer to an organism that has become a chimera as a result of exposure to radiation, which can cause mutations and changes in the genetic makeup of cells.

Ionizing radiation, such as that used in cancer treatments or nuclear accidents, can cause DNA damage and mutations in cells. If an organism is exposed to radiation and some of its cells undergo mutations while others do not, this could result in a chimera with genetically distinct populations of cells.

However, it's important to note that the term "radiation chimera" is not commonly used in medical literature or clinical settings. If you encounter this term in a different context, I would recommend seeking clarification from the source to ensure a proper understanding.

TCF (T-cell factor) transcription factors are a family of proteins that play a crucial role in the Wnt signaling pathway, which is involved in various biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration. TCF transcription factors bind to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region of target genes and regulate their transcription.

In the absence of Wnt signaling, TCF proteins form a complex with transcriptional repressors, which inhibits gene transcription. When Wnt ligands bind to their receptors, they initiate a cascade of intracellular signals that result in the accumulation and nuclear localization of β-catenin, a key player in the Wnt signaling pathway.

In the nucleus, β-catenin interacts with TCF proteins, displacing the transcriptional repressors and converting TCF into an activator of gene transcription. This leads to the expression of target genes that are involved in various cellular processes, including cell cycle regulation, stem cell maintenance, and tumorigenesis.

Mutations in TCF transcription factors or components of the Wnt signaling pathway have been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, developmental disorders, and degenerative diseases.

Cord blood stem cell transplantation is a medical procedure that involves the infusion of stem cells derived from the umbilical cord blood into a patient. These stem cells, specifically hematopoietic stem cells, have the ability to differentiate into various types of blood cells, including red and white blood cells and platelets.

Cord blood stem cell transplantation is often used as a treatment for patients with various malignant and non-malignant disorders, such as leukemia, lymphoma, sickle cell disease, and metabolic disorders. The procedure involves collecting cord blood from the umbilical cord and placenta after the birth of a baby, processing and testing it for compatibility with the recipient's immune system, and then infusing it into the patient through a vein in a process similar to a blood transfusion.

The advantages of using cord blood stem cells include their availability, low risk of transmission of infectious diseases, and reduced risk of graft-versus-host disease compared to other sources of hematopoietic stem cells, such as bone marrow or peripheral blood. However, the number of stem cells in a cord blood unit is generally lower than that found in bone marrow or peripheral blood, which can limit its use in some patients, particularly adults.

Overall, cord blood stem cell transplantation is an important and promising area of regenerative medicine, offering hope for patients with a wide range of disorders.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

Nestin is a type of class VI intermediate filament protein that is primarily expressed in various types of undifferentiated or progenitor cells in the nervous system, including neural stem cells and progenitor cells. It is often used as a marker for these cells due to its expression during stages of active cell division and migration. Nestin is also expressed in some other tissues undergoing regeneration or injury.

Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) is defined as the production of blood cells outside of the bone marrow in adults. In normal physiological conditions, hematopoiesis occurs within the bone marrow cavities of flat bones such as the pelvis, ribs, skull, and vertebrae. However, certain disease states or conditions can cause EMH to occur in various organs such as the liver, spleen, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood.

EMH can be seen in several pathological conditions, including hematologic disorders such as myeloproliferative neoplasms (e.g., polycythemia vera, essential thrombocytopenia), myelodysplastic syndromes, and leukemias. It can also occur in response to bone marrow failure or infiltration by malignant cells, as well as in some non-hematologic disorders such as fibrocystic disease of the breast and congenital hemolytic anemias.

EMH may lead to organ enlargement, dysfunction, and clinical symptoms depending on the site and extent of involvement. Treatment of EMH is generally directed at managing the underlying condition causing it.

Inbred strains of mice are defined as lines of mice that have been brother-sister mated for at least 20 consecutive generations. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the mice of an inbred strain are genetically identical to one another, with the exception of spontaneous mutations.

Inbred strains of mice are widely used in biomedical research due to their genetic uniformity and stability, which makes them useful for studying the genetic basis of various traits, diseases, and biological processes. They also provide a consistent and reproducible experimental system, as compared to outbred or genetically heterogeneous populations.

Some commonly used inbred strains of mice include C57BL/6J, BALB/cByJ, DBA/2J, and 129SvEv. Each strain has its own unique genetic background and phenotypic characteristics, which can influence the results of experiments. Therefore, it is important to choose the appropriate inbred strain for a given research question.

The testis, also known as the testicle, is a male reproductive organ that is part of the endocrine system. It is located in the scrotum, outside of the abdominal cavity. The main function of the testis is to produce sperm and testosterone, the primary male sex hormone.

The testis is composed of many tiny tubules called seminiferous tubules, where sperm are produced. These tubules are surrounded by a network of blood vessels, nerves, and supportive tissues. The sperm then travel through a series of ducts to the epididymis, where they mature and become capable of fertilization.

Testosterone is produced in the Leydig cells, which are located in the interstitial tissue between the seminiferous tubules. Testosterone plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of male secondary sexual characteristics, such as facial hair, deep voice, and muscle mass. It also supports sperm production and sexual function.

Abnormalities in testicular function can lead to infertility, hormonal imbalances, and other health problems. Regular self-examinations and medical check-ups are recommended for early detection and treatment of any potential issues.

T-cell transcription factor 1 (TFH1), also known as TCF7, is a protein that plays a crucial role in the development and function of T cells, which are a type of white blood cell involved in immune response. TFH1 is a transcription factor, meaning it binds to specific regions of DNA and helps control the expression of genes involved in T cell activation, differentiation, and survival.

TFH1 is part of a family of transcription factors called basic helix-loop-helix proteins, which are characterized by a conserved region known as the bHLH domain. This domain allows TFH1 to bind to DNA and regulate gene expression. In T cells, TFH1 helps control the expression of genes involved in T cell activation and differentiation, including those that encode cytokine receptors and other transcription factors.

Mutations in the gene that encodes TFH1 (TCF7) have been associated with various immune disorders, including autoimmune diseases and primary immunodeficiencies. Additionally, recent research has suggested that TFH1 may play a role in cancer biology, as it has been shown to be upregulated in certain types of tumors and may contribute to tumor growth and progression.

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

The epidermis is the outermost layer of the skin, composed mainly of stratified squamous epithelium. It forms a protective barrier that prevents water loss and inhibits the entry of microorganisms. The epidermis contains no blood vessels, and its cells are nourished by diffusion from the underlying dermis. The bottom-most layer of the epidermis, called the stratum basale, is responsible for generating new skin cells that eventually move up to replace dead cells on the surface. This process of cell turnover takes about 28 days in adults.

The most superficial part of the epidermis consists of dead cells called squames, which are constantly shed and replaced. The exact rate at which this happens varies depending on location; for example, it's faster on the palms and soles than elsewhere. Melanocytes, the pigment-producing cells, are also located in the epidermis, specifically within the stratum basale layer.

In summary, the epidermis is a vital part of our integumentary system, providing not only physical protection but also playing a crucial role in immunity and sensory perception through touch receptors called Pacinian corpuscles.

Paracrine communication is a form of cell-to-cell communication in which a cell releases a signaling molecule, known as a paracrine factor, that acts on nearby cells within the local microenvironment. This type of communication allows for the coordination and regulation of various cellular processes, including growth, differentiation, and survival.

Paracrine factors can be released from a cell through various mechanisms, such as exocytosis or diffusion through the extracellular matrix. Once released, these factors bind to specific receptors on the surface of nearby cells, triggering intracellular signaling pathways that lead to changes in gene expression and cell behavior.

Paracrine communication is an important mechanism for maintaining tissue homeostasis and coordinating responses to injury or disease. For example, during wound healing, paracrine signals released by immune cells can recruit other cells to the site of injury and stimulate their proliferation and differentiation to promote tissue repair.

It's worth noting that paracrine communication should be distinguished from autocrine signaling, where a cell releases a signaling molecule that binds back to its own receptors, and endocrine signaling, where a hormone is released into the bloodstream and travels to distant target cells.

Immunomagnetic separation (IMS) is a medical diagnostic technique that combines the specificity of antibodies with the magnetic properties of nanoparticles to isolate and concentrate target cells or molecules from a sample. This method is widely used in research and clinical laboratories for the detection and analysis of various biological components, including bacteria, viruses, parasites, and tumor cells.

The process involves the use of magnetic beads coated with specific antibodies that bind to the target cells or molecules. Once bound, an external magnetic field is applied to separate the labeled cells or molecules from the unbound components in the sample. The isolated targets can then be washed, concentrated, and further analyzed using various methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry, or microscopy.

IMS offers several advantages over traditional separation techniques, including high specificity, gentle handling of cells, minimal sample manipulation, and the ability to process large volumes of samples. These features make IMS a valuable tool in various fields, such as immunology, microbiology, hematology, oncology, and molecular biology.

A "Blood Cell Count" is a medical laboratory test that measures the number of red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), and platelets in a sample of blood. This test is often used as a part of a routine check-up or to help diagnose various medical conditions, such as anemia, infection, inflammation, and many others.

The RBC count measures the number of oxygen-carrying cells in the blood, while the WBC count measures the number of immune cells that help fight infections. The platelet count measures the number of cells involved in clotting. Abnormal results in any of these counts may indicate an underlying medical condition and further testing may be required for diagnosis and treatment.

Myeloid progenitor cells are a type of precursor cells that originate from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow. These cells have the ability to differentiate into various types of blood cells, including red blood cells, platelets, and different kinds of white blood cells, specifically granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils), monocytes, and megakaryocytes. Myeloid progenitor cells are crucial for the maintenance of normal hematopoiesis and immune function. Abnormalities in myeloid progenitor cell differentiation or function can lead to various hematological disorders such as leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloproliferative neoplasms.

Wnt proteins are a family of secreted signaling molecules that play crucial roles in the regulation of fundamental biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. They were first discovered in 1982 through genetic studies in Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies) and have since been found to be highly conserved across various species, from invertebrates to humans.

Wnt proteins exert their effects by binding to specific receptors on the target cell surface, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling pathways:

1. Canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway: In the absence of Wnt ligands, β-catenin is continuously degraded by a destruction complex consisting of Axin, APC (Adenomatous polyposis coli), and GSK3β (Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta). When Wnt proteins bind to their receptors Frizzled and LRP5/6, the formation of a "signalosome" complex leads to the inhibition of the destruction complex, allowing β-catenin to accumulate in the cytoplasm and translocate into the nucleus. Here, it interacts with TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor) transcription factors to regulate the expression of target genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival.
2. Non-canonical Wnt pathways: These include the Wnt/Ca^2+^ pathway and the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. In the Wnt/Ca^2+^ pathway, Wnt ligands bind to Frizzled receptors and activate heterotrimeric G proteins, leading to an increase in intracellular Ca^2+^ levels and activation of downstream targets such as protein kinase C (PKC) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII). These signaling events ultimately regulate cell movement, adhesion, and gene expression. In the PCP pathway, Wnt ligands bind to Frizzled receptors and coreceptor complexes containing Ror2 or Ryk, leading to activation of small GTPases such as RhoA and Rac1, which control cytoskeletal organization and cell polarity.

Dysregulation of Wnt signaling has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, developmental disorders, and degenerative conditions. In cancer, aberrant activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway contributes to tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis by promoting cell proliferation, survival, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Inhibitors targeting different components of the Wnt signaling pathway are currently being developed as potential therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment.

"Papio" is a term used in the field of primatology, specifically for a genus of Old World monkeys known as baboons. It's not typically used in human or medical contexts. Baboons are large monkeys with robust bodies and distinctive dog-like faces. They are native to various parts of Africa and are known for their complex social structures and behaviors.

Neurons, also known as nerve cells or neurocytes, are specialized cells that constitute the basic unit of the nervous system. They are responsible for receiving, processing, and transmitting information and signals within the body. Neurons have three main parts: the dendrites, the cell body (soma), and the axon. The dendrites receive signals from other neurons or sensory receptors, while the axon transmits these signals to other neurons, muscles, or glands. The junction between two neurons is called a synapse, where neurotransmitters are released to transmit the signal across the gap (synaptic cleft) to the next neuron. Neurons vary in size, shape, and structure depending on their function and location within the nervous system.

Whole-Body Irradiation (WBI) is a medical procedure that involves the exposure of the entire body to a controlled dose of ionizing radiation, typically used in the context of radiation therapy for cancer treatment. The purpose of WBI is to destroy cancer cells or suppress the immune system prior to a bone marrow transplant. It can be delivered using various sources of radiation, such as X-rays, gamma rays, or electrons, and is carefully planned and monitored to minimize harm to healthy tissues while maximizing the therapeutic effect on cancer cells. Potential side effects include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and an increased risk of infection due to decreased white blood cell counts.

Down-regulation is a process that occurs in response to various stimuli, where the number or sensitivity of cell surface receptors or the expression of specific genes is decreased. This process helps maintain homeostasis within cells and tissues by reducing the ability of cells to respond to certain signals or molecules.

In the context of cell surface receptors, down-regulation can occur through several mechanisms:

1. Receptor internalization: After binding to their ligands, receptors can be internalized into the cell through endocytosis. Once inside the cell, these receptors may be degraded or recycled back to the cell surface in smaller numbers.
2. Reduced receptor synthesis: Down-regulation can also occur at the transcriptional level, where the expression of genes encoding for specific receptors is decreased, leading to fewer receptors being produced.
3. Receptor desensitization: Prolonged exposure to a ligand can lead to a decrease in receptor sensitivity or affinity, making it more difficult for the cell to respond to the signal.

In the context of gene expression, down-regulation refers to the decreased transcription and/or stability of specific mRNAs, leading to reduced protein levels. This process can be induced by various factors, including microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation, histone modification, or DNA methylation.

Down-regulation is an essential mechanism in many physiological processes and can also contribute to the development of several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

The brainstem is the lower part of the brain that connects to the spinal cord. It consists of the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata. The brainstem controls many vital functions such as heart rate, breathing, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory and motor information between the cerebral cortex and the rest of the body. Additionally, several cranial nerves originate from the brainstem, including those that control eye movements, facial movements, and hearing.

I'm assuming you are asking for information about "Ly" antigens in the context of human immune system and immunology.

Ly (Lymphocyte) antigens are a group of cell surface markers found on human leukocytes, including T cells, NK cells, and some B cells. These antigens were originally identified through serological analysis and were historically used to distinguish different subsets of lymphocytes based on their surface phenotype.

The "Ly" nomenclature has been largely replaced by the CD (Cluster of Differentiation) system, which is a more standardized and internationally recognized classification system for cell surface markers. However, some Ly antigens are still commonly referred to by their historical names, such as:

* Ly-1 or CD5: A marker found on mature T cells, including both CD4+ and CD8+ subsets.
* Ly-2 or CD8: A marker found on cytotoxic T cells, which are a subset of CD8+ T cells that can directly kill infected or damaged cells.
* Ly-3 or CD56: A marker found on natural killer (NK) cells, which are a type of immune cell that can recognize and destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells without the need for prior activation.

It's worth noting that while these antigens were originally identified through serological analysis, they are now more commonly detected using flow cytometry, which allows for the simultaneous measurement of multiple surface markers on individual cells. This has greatly expanded our ability to identify and characterize different subsets of immune cells and has led to a better understanding of their roles in health and disease.

Interleukin-9 (IL-9) is a type of cytokine, which are small signaling proteins that mediate and regulate immunity, inflammation, and hematopoiesis. IL-9 is produced by several types of immune cells, including T cells (a type of white blood cell), mast cells, and eosinophils.

IL-9 plays a role in the development and function of various immune cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory and allergic diseases, such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and food allergy. It can promote the growth and survival of certain types of immune cells, including mast cells and B cells (another type of white blood cell), and can also enhance their activation and effector functions.

In addition to its role in immunity and inflammation, IL-9 has been shown to play a role in the development and progression of some types of cancer, such as lung cancer and leukemia. However, more research is needed to fully understand the complex functions of this cytokine and its potential as a therapeutic target.

IgE receptors, also known as Fc epsilon RI receptors, are membrane-bound proteins found on the surface of mast cells and basophils. They play a crucial role in the immune response to parasitic infections and allergies. IgE receptors bind to the Fc region of immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies, which are produced by B cells in response to certain antigens. When an allergen cross-links two adjacent IgE molecules bound to the same IgE receptor, it triggers a signaling cascade that leads to the release of mediators such as histamine, leukotrienes, and prostaglandins. These mediators cause the symptoms associated with allergic reactions, including inflammation, itching, and vasodilation. IgE receptors are also involved in the activation of the adaptive immune response by promoting the presentation of antigens to T cells.

Interstitial Cells of Cajal (ICCs) are specialized cells found in the walls of the gastrointestinal tract, as well as in other organs such as the urinary and vascular systems. They play a crucial role in regulating the motility of the digestive system by acting as pacemakers and mediators of nerve impulses that control muscle contractions. ICCs have a unique morphology, characterized by numerous extensions and a large number of mitochondria, which allow them to generate electrical signals and communicate with surrounding cells. They are named after Santiago Ramón y Cajal, the Spanish histologist who first described these cells in the late 19th century.

Embryo research refers to the scientific study and experimentation that involves human embryos. This research is conducted in order to gain a better understanding of human development during the earliest stages of life, as well as to investigate potential treatments for various diseases and conditions.

Human embryos used in research are typically created through in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures, in which sperm and eggs are combined in a laboratory dish to form an embryo. These embryos may be donated by individuals or couples who have undergone IVF treatments and have excess embryos that they do not plan to use for reproduction.

Embryo research can involve a variety of techniques, including stem cell research, genetic testing, and cloning. The goal of this research is to advance our knowledge of human development and disease, as well as to develop new treatments and therapies for a wide range of medical conditions. However, embryo research is a controversial topic, and there are ethical concerns surrounding the use of human embryos in scientific research.

A neoplasm is a tumor or growth that is formed by an abnormal and excessive proliferation of cells, which can be benign or malignant. Neoplasm proteins are therefore any proteins that are expressed or produced in these neoplastic cells. These proteins can play various roles in the development, progression, and maintenance of neoplasms.

Some neoplasm proteins may contribute to the uncontrolled cell growth and division seen in cancer, such as oncogenic proteins that promote cell cycle progression or inhibit apoptosis (programmed cell death). Others may help the neoplastic cells evade the immune system, allowing them to proliferate undetected. Still others may be involved in angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels that supply the tumor with nutrients and oxygen.

Neoplasm proteins can also serve as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, or treatment response. For example, the presence or level of certain neoplasm proteins in biological samples such as blood or tissue may indicate the presence of a specific type of cancer, help predict the likelihood of cancer recurrence, or suggest whether a particular therapy will be effective.

Overall, understanding the roles and behaviors of neoplasm proteins can provide valuable insights into the biology of cancer and inform the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

Growth inhibitors, in a medical context, refer to substances or agents that reduce or prevent the growth and proliferation of cells. They play an essential role in regulating normal cellular growth and can be used in medical treatments to control the excessive growth of unwanted cells, such as cancer cells.

There are two main types of growth inhibitors:

1. Endogenous growth inhibitors: These are naturally occurring molecules within the body that help regulate cell growth and division. Examples include retinoids, which are vitamin A derivatives, and interferons, which are signaling proteins released by host cells in response to viruses.

2. Exogenous growth inhibitors: These are synthetic or natural substances from outside the body that can be used to inhibit cell growth. Many chemotherapeutic agents and targeted therapies for cancer treatment fall into this category. They work by interfering with specific pathways involved in cell division, such as DNA replication or mitosis, or by inducing apoptosis (programmed cell death) in cancer cells.

It is important to note that growth inhibitors may also affect normal cells, which can lead to side effects during treatment. The challenge for medical researchers is to develop targeted therapies that specifically inhibit the growth of abnormal cells while minimizing harm to healthy cells.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (AMKL) is a type of cancer that affects the blood and bone marrow. Specifically, it is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which is characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal cells in the bone marrow that interfere with the production of normal blood cells.

In AMKL, the abnormal cells are megakaryoblasts, which are immature cells that should develop into platelet-producing cells called megakaryocytes. However, in AMKL, these cells do not mature properly and instead accumulate in the bone marrow and bloodstream, leading to a shortage of healthy blood cells.

Symptoms of AMKL may include fatigue, weakness, frequent infections, easy bruising or bleeding, and the appearance of small red spots on the skin (petechiae). Diagnosis typically involves a combination of physical exam, medical history, blood tests, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, and sometimes imaging studies.

Treatment for AMKL usually involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and/or stem cell transplantation. The specific treatment plan will depend on several factors, including the patient's age, overall health, and the extent of the disease.

Gene transfer techniques, also known as gene therapy, refer to medical procedures where genetic material is introduced into an individual's cells or tissues to treat or prevent diseases. This can be achieved through various methods:

1. **Viral Vectors**: The most common method uses modified viruses, such as adenoviruses, retroviruses, or lentiviruses, to carry the therapeutic gene into the target cells. The virus infects the cell and inserts the new gene into the cell's DNA.

2. **Non-Viral Vectors**: These include methods like electroporation (using electric fields to create pores in the cell membrane), gene guns (shooting gold particles coated with DNA into cells), or liposomes (tiny fatty bubbles that can enclose DNA).

3. **Direct Injection**: In some cases, the therapeutic gene can be directly injected into a specific tissue or organ.

The goal of gene transfer techniques is to supplement or replace a faulty gene with a healthy one, thereby correcting the genetic disorder. However, these techniques are still largely experimental and have their own set of challenges, including potential immune responses, issues with accurate targeting, and risks of mutations or cancer development.

Protein-Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) are a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in various cellular functions, including signal transduction, cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. They catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the tyrosine residues of proteins, thereby modifying their activity, localization, or interaction with other molecules.

PTKs can be divided into two main categories: receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). RTKs are transmembrane proteins that become activated upon binding to specific ligands, such as growth factors or hormones. NRTKs, on the other hand, are intracellular enzymes that can be activated by various signals, including receptor-mediated signaling and intracellular messengers.

Dysregulation of PTK activity has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, PTKs are important targets for drug development and therapy.

Cell communication, also known as cell signaling, is the process by which cells exchange and transmit signals between each other and their environment. This complex system allows cells to coordinate their functions and maintain tissue homeostasis. Cell communication can occur through various mechanisms including:

1. Autocrine signaling: When a cell releases a signal that binds to receptors on the same cell, leading to changes in its behavior or function.
2. Paracrine signaling: When a cell releases a signal that binds to receptors on nearby cells, influencing their behavior or function.
3. Endocrine signaling: When a cell releases a hormone into the bloodstream, which then travels to distant target cells and binds to specific receptors, triggering a response.
4. Synaptic signaling: In neurons, communication occurs through the release of neurotransmitters that cross the synapse and bind to receptors on the postsynaptic cell, transmitting electrical or chemical signals.
5. Contact-dependent signaling: When cells physically interact with each other, allowing for the direct exchange of signals and information.

Cell communication is essential for various physiological processes such as growth, development, differentiation, metabolism, immune response, and tissue repair. Dysregulation in cell communication can contribute to diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Neoplastic cell transformation is a process in which a normal cell undergoes genetic alterations that cause it to become cancerous or malignant. This process involves changes in the cell's DNA that result in uncontrolled cell growth and division, loss of contact inhibition, and the ability to invade surrounding tissues and metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body.

Neoplastic transformation can occur as a result of various factors, including genetic mutations, exposure to carcinogens, viral infections, chronic inflammation, and aging. These changes can lead to the activation of oncogenes or the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, which regulate cell growth and division.

The transformation of normal cells into cancerous cells is a complex and multi-step process that involves multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations. It is characterized by several hallmarks, including sustained proliferative signaling, evasion of growth suppressors, resistance to cell death, enabling replicative immortality, induction of angiogenesis, activation of invasion and metastasis, reprogramming of energy metabolism, and evading immune destruction.

Neoplastic cell transformation is a fundamental concept in cancer biology and is critical for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer development and progression. It also has important implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, as identifying the specific genetic alterations that underlie neoplastic transformation can help guide targeted therapies and personalized medicine approaches.

Genetic therapy, also known as gene therapy, is a medical intervention that involves the use of genetic material, such as DNA or RNA, to treat or prevent diseases. It works by introducing functional genes into cells to replace missing or faulty ones caused by genetic disorders or mutations. The introduced gene is incorporated into the recipient's genome, allowing for the production of a therapeutic protein that can help manage the disease symptoms or even cure the condition.

There are several approaches to genetic therapy, including:

1. Replacing a faulty gene with a healthy one
2. Inactivating or "silencing" a dysfunctional gene causing a disease
3. Introducing a new gene into the body to help fight off a disease, such as cancer

Genetic therapy holds great promise for treating various genetic disorders, including cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy, hemophilia, and certain types of cancer. However, it is still an evolving field with many challenges, such as efficient gene delivery, potential immune responses, and ensuring the safety and long-term effectiveness of the therapy.

A Tumor Stem Cell Assay is not a widely accepted or standardized medical definition. However, in the context of cancer research, a tumor stem cell assay generally refers to an experimental procedure used to identify and isolate cancer stem cells (also known as tumor-initiating cells) from a tumor sample.

Cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of cells within a tumor that are believed to be responsible for driving tumor growth, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. They have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into various cell types within the tumor, making them a promising target for cancer therapies.

A tumor stem cell assay typically involves isolating cells from a tumor sample and subjecting them to various tests to identify those with stem cell-like properties. These tests may include assessing their ability to form tumors in animal models or their expression of specific surface markers associated with cancer stem cells. The goal of the assay is to provide researchers with a better understanding of the biology of cancer stem cells and to develop new therapies that target them specifically.

Chemotaxis is a term used in biology and medicine to describe the movement of an organism or cell towards or away from a chemical stimulus. This process plays a crucial role in various biological phenomena, including immune responses, wound healing, and the development and progression of diseases such as cancer.

In chemotaxis, cells can detect and respond to changes in the concentration of specific chemicals, known as chemoattractants or chemorepellents, in their environment. These chemicals bind to receptors on the cell surface, triggering a series of intracellular signaling events that ultimately lead to changes in the cytoskeleton and directed movement of the cell towards or away from the chemical gradient.

For example, during an immune response, white blood cells called neutrophils use chemotaxis to migrate towards sites of infection or inflammation, where they can attack and destroy invading pathogens. Similarly, cancer cells can use chemotaxis to migrate towards blood vessels and metastasize to other parts of the body.

Understanding chemotaxis is important for developing new therapies and treatments for a variety of diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and inflammatory disorders.

Cell dedifferentiation is a process by which a mature, specialized cell reverts back to an earlier stage in its developmental lineage, regaining the ability to divide and differentiate into various cell types. This phenomenon is typically observed in cells that have been damaged or injured, as well as during embryonic development and certain disease states like cancer. In the context of tissue repair and regeneration, dedifferentiation allows for the generation of new cells with the potential to replace lost or damaged tissues. However, uncontrolled dedifferentiation can also contribute to tumor formation and progression.

Cell degranulation is the process by which cells, particularly immune cells like mast cells and basophils, release granules containing inflammatory mediators in response to various stimuli. These mediators include histamine, leukotrienes, prostaglandins, and other chemicals that play a role in allergic reactions, inflammation, and immune responses. The activation of cell surface receptors triggers a signaling cascade that leads to the exocytosis of these granules, resulting in degranulation. This process is important for the immune system's response to foreign invaders and for the development of allergic reactions.

In medical terms, the skin is the largest organ of the human body. It consists of two main layers: the epidermis (outer layer) and dermis (inner layer), as well as accessory structures like hair follicles, sweat glands, and oil glands. The skin plays a crucial role in protecting us from external factors such as bacteria, viruses, and environmental hazards, while also regulating body temperature and enabling the sense of touch.

Recombinant fusion proteins are artificially created biomolecules that combine the functional domains or properties of two or more different proteins into a single protein entity. They are generated through recombinant DNA technology, where the genes encoding the desired protein domains are linked together and expressed as a single, chimeric gene in a host organism, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells.

The resulting fusion protein retains the functional properties of its individual constituent proteins, allowing for novel applications in research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. For instance, recombinant fusion proteins can be designed to enhance protein stability, solubility, or immunogenicity, making them valuable tools for studying protein-protein interactions, developing targeted therapies, or generating vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

Examples of recombinant fusion proteins include:

1. Etaglunatide (ABT-523): A soluble Fc fusion protein that combines the heavy chain fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of an immunoglobulin with the extracellular domain of the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). This fusion protein functions as a decoy receptor, neutralizing IL-6 and its downstream signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.
2. Etanercept (Enbrel): A soluble TNF receptor p75 Fc fusion protein that binds to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inhibits its proinflammatory activity, making it a valuable therapeutic option for treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis.
3. Abatacept (Orencia): A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to the Fc region of an immunoglobulin, which downregulates T-cell activation and proliferation in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Belimumab (Benlysta): A monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein, preventing its interaction with the B-cell surface receptor and inhibiting B-cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
5. Romiplostim (Nplate): A fusion protein consisting of a thrombopoietin receptor agonist peptide linked to an immunoglobulin Fc region, which stimulates platelet production in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).
6. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp): A hyperglycosylated erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that functions as a longer-acting form of recombinant human erythropoietin, used to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer.
7. Palivizumab (Synagis): A monoclonal antibody directed against the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which prevents RSV infection and is administered prophylactically to high-risk infants during the RSV season.
8. Ranibizumab (Lucentis): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody fragment that binds and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), used in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other ocular disorders.
9. Cetuximab (Erbitux): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
10. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease.
11. Bevacizumab (Avastin): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, used in the treatment of various cancers, including colorectal, lung, breast, and kidney cancer.
12. Trastuzumab (Herceptin): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets HER2/neu receptor, used in the treatment of breast cancer.
13. Rituximab (Rituxan): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to CD20 antigen on B cells, used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis.
14. Palivizumab (Synagis): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus, used in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants.
15. Infliximab (Remicade): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
16. Natalizumab (Tysabri): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to α4β1 integrin, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease.
17. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.
18. Golimumab (Simponi): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and ulcerative colitis.
19. Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia): A PEGylated Fab' fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease.
20. Ustekinumab (Stelara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-12 and IL-23, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease.
21. Secukinumab (Cosentyx): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
22. Ixekizumab (Taltz): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
23. Brodalumab (Siliq): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17 receptor A, used in the treatment of psoriasis.
24. Sarilumab (Kevzara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
25. Tocilizumab (Actemra): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-induced cytokine release syndrome.
26. Siltuximab (Sylvant): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment of multicentric Castleman disease.
27. Satralizumab (Enspryng): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6 receptor alpha, used in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.
28. Sirukumab (Plivensia): A human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment

Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF-2), also known as basic fibroblast growth factor, is a protein involved in various biological processes such as cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. It plays a crucial role in wound healing, embryonic development, and angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels). FGF-2 is produced and secreted by various cells, including fibroblasts, and exerts its effects by binding to specific receptors on the cell surface, leading to activation of intracellular signaling pathways. It has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, where it can contribute to tumor growth and progression.

C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) is a type of protein found on the surface of some cells, including white blood cells, and is a type of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). CXCR4 binds specifically to the chemokine ligand CXCL12 (also known as stromal cell-derived factor 1, or SDF-1), which plays a crucial role in the trafficking and homing of immune cells, particularly hematopoietic stem cells and lymphocytes. The binding of CXCL12 to CXCR4 triggers various intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cell migration, proliferation, survival, and differentiation.

In addition to its role in the immune system, CXCR4 has been implicated in several physiological and pathological processes, such as embryonic development, neurogenesis, angiogenesis, cancer metastasis, and HIV infection. In cancer, the overexpression of CXCR4 or increased levels of its ligand CXCL12 have been associated with poor prognosis, tumor growth, and metastasis in various types of malignancies, including breast, lung, prostate, colon, and ovarian cancers. In HIV infection, the CXCR4 coreceptor, together with CD4, facilitates viral entry into host cells, particularly during the later stages of the disease when the virus shifts its preference from CCR5 to CXCR4 as a coreceptor.

In summary, CXCR4 is a cell-surface receptor that binds specifically to the chemokine ligand CXCL12 and plays essential roles in immune cell trafficking, hematopoiesis, cancer metastasis, and HIV infection.

Transplantation conditioning, also known as preparative regimen or immunoablative therapy, refers to the use of various treatments prior to transplantation of cells, tissues or organs. The main goal of transplantation conditioning is to suppress the recipient's immune system, allowing for successful engraftment and minimizing the risk of rejection of the donor tissue.

There are two primary types of transplantation conditioning: myeloablative and non-myeloablative.

1. Myeloablative conditioning is a more intensive regimen that involves the use of high-dose chemotherapy, radiation therapy or both. This approach eliminates not only immune cells but also stem cells in the bone marrow, requiring the recipient to receive a hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) from the donor to reconstitute their blood and immune system.
2. Non-myeloablative conditioning is a less intensive regimen that primarily targets immune cells while sparing the stem cells in the bone marrow. This approach allows for mixed chimerism, where both recipient and donor immune cells coexist, reducing the risk of severe complications associated with myeloablative conditioning.

The choice between these two types of transplantation conditioning depends on various factors, including the type of transplant, patient's age, overall health, and comorbidities. Both approaches carry risks and benefits, and the decision should be made carefully by a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals in consultation with the patient.

A teratoma is a type of germ cell tumor, which is a broad category of tumors that originate from the reproductive cells. A teratoma contains developed tissues from all three embryonic germ layers: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. This means that a teratoma can contain various types of tissue such as hair, teeth, bone, and even more complex organs like eyes, thyroid, or neural tissue.

Teratomas are usually benign (non-cancerous), but they can sometimes be malignant (cancerous) and can spread to other parts of the body. They can occur anywhere in the body, but they're most commonly found in the ovaries and testicles. When found in these areas, they are typically removed surgically.

Teratomas can also occur in other locations such as the sacrum, coccyx (tailbone), mediastinum (the area between the lungs), and pineal gland (a small gland in the brain). These types of teratomas can be more complex to treat due to their location and potential to cause damage to nearby structures.

DNA primers are short single-stranded DNA molecules that serve as a starting point for DNA synthesis. They are typically used in laboratory techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The primer binds to a complementary sequence on the DNA template through base pairing, providing a free 3'-hydroxyl group for the DNA polymerase enzyme to add nucleotides and synthesize a new strand of DNA. This allows for specific and targeted amplification or analysis of a particular region of interest within a larger DNA molecule.

Promoter regions in genetics refer to specific DNA sequences located near the transcription start site of a gene. They serve as binding sites for RNA polymerase and various transcription factors that regulate the initiation of gene transcription. These regulatory elements help control the rate of transcription and, therefore, the level of gene expression. Promoter regions can be composed of different types of sequences, such as the TATA box and CAAT box, and their organization and composition can vary between different genes and species.

Histamine release is the process by which mast cells and basophils (types of white blood cells) release histamine, a type of chemical messenger or mediator, into the surrounding tissue fluid in response to an antigen-antibody reaction. This process is a key part of the body's immune response to foreign substances, such as allergens, and helps to initiate local inflammation, increase blood flow, and recruit other immune cells to the site of the reaction.

Histamine release can also occur in response to certain medications, physical trauma, or other stimuli. When histamine is released in large amounts, it can cause symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, watery eyes, and hives. In severe cases, it can lead to anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction that requires immediate medical attention.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) is a type of cytokine, which is a cell signaling protein involved in the regulation of various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). TGF-β plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and wound healing. It also has been implicated in several pathological conditions such as fibrosis, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

TGF-β exists in multiple isoforms (TGF-β1, TGF-β2, and TGF-β3) that are produced by many different cell types, including immune cells, epithelial cells, and fibroblasts. The protein is synthesized as a precursor molecule, which is cleaved to release the active TGF-β peptide. Once activated, TGF-β binds to its receptors on the cell surface, leading to the activation of intracellular signaling pathways that regulate gene expression and cell behavior.

In summary, Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) is a multifunctional cytokine involved in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and wound healing. It has been implicated in several pathological conditions such as fibrosis, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

Epithelial cells are types of cells that cover the outer surfaces of the body, line the inner surfaces of organs and glands, and form the lining of blood vessels and body cavities. They provide a protective barrier against the external environment, regulate the movement of materials between the internal and external environments, and are involved in the sense of touch, temperature, and pain. Epithelial cells can be squamous (flat and thin), cuboidal (square-shaped and of equal height), or columnar (tall and narrow) in shape and are classified based on their location and function.

In situ hybridization (ISH) is a molecular biology technique used to detect and localize specific nucleic acid sequences, such as DNA or RNA, within cells or tissues. This technique involves the use of a labeled probe that is complementary to the target nucleic acid sequence. The probe can be labeled with various types of markers, including radioisotopes, fluorescent dyes, or enzymes.

During the ISH procedure, the labeled probe is hybridized to the target nucleic acid sequence in situ, meaning that the hybridization occurs within the intact cells or tissues. After washing away unbound probe, the location of the labeled probe can be visualized using various methods depending on the type of label used.

In situ hybridization has a wide range of applications in both research and diagnostic settings, including the detection of gene expression patterns, identification of viral infections, and diagnosis of genetic disorders.

Embryoid bodies are aggregates of pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells, that have been cultured in suspension and allowed to differentiate spontaneously into three-dimensional structures. These structures resemble early embryonic development and can contain cells from all three germ layers: ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. Embryoid bodies are often used as a tool in stem cell research to study the processes of differentiation and organogenesis.

Fluocinonide is a topical corticosteroid medication that is used to reduce inflammation and relieve itching, redness, and swelling associated with various skin conditions. It works by suppressing the immune system's response to irritation and reducing the production of inflammatory chemicals in the body. Fluocinonide is a potent steroid and is usually prescribed for short-term use only, as long-term use can lead to thinning of the skin, increased vulnerability to infection, and other side effects. It is available in various forms, including creams, ointments, and solutions, and is typically applied directly to the affected area of the skin one to three times a day.

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a type of cancer that originates in the bone marrow, the soft inner part of certain bones where new blood cells are made. In AML, the immature cells, called blasts, in the bone marrow fail to mature into normal blood cells. Instead, these blasts accumulate and interfere with the production of normal blood cells, leading to a shortage of red blood cells (anemia), platelets (thrombocytopenia), and normal white blood cells (leukopenia).

AML is called "acute" because it can progress quickly and become severe within days or weeks without treatment. It is a type of myeloid leukemia, which means that it affects the myeloid cells in the bone marrow. Myeloid cells are a type of white blood cell that includes monocytes and granulocytes, which help fight infection and defend the body against foreign invaders.

In AML, the blasts can build up in the bone marrow and spread to other parts of the body, including the blood, lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and brain. This can cause a variety of symptoms, such as fatigue, fever, frequent infections, easy bruising or bleeding, and weight loss.

AML is typically treated with a combination of chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and/or stem cell transplantation. The specific treatment plan will depend on several factors, including the patient's age, overall health, and the type and stage of the leukemia.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Nuclear reprogramming is a process by which the epigenetic information and gene expression profile of a differentiated cell are altered to resemble those of a pluripotent stem cell. This is typically achieved through the introduction of specific transcription factors, such as Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (often referred to as the Yamanaka factors), into the differentiated cell's nucleus. These factors work together to reprogram the cell's gene expression profile, leading to the activation of genes that are typically silent in differentiated cells and the repression of genes that are active in differentiated cells.

The result is a cell with many of the characteristics of a pluripotent stem cell, including the ability to differentiate into any cell type found in the body. This process has significant implications for regenerative medicine, as it offers the potential to generate patient-specific stem cells that can be used for tissue repair and replacement. However, nuclear reprogramming is still an inefficient and poorly understood process, and further research is needed to fully realize its potential.

The spleen is an organ in the upper left side of the abdomen, next to the stomach and behind the ribs. It plays multiple supporting roles in the body:

1. It fights infection by acting as a filter for the blood. Old red blood cells are recycled in the spleen, and platelets and white blood cells are stored there.
2. The spleen also helps to control the amount of blood in the body by removing excess red blood cells and storing platelets.
3. It has an important role in immune function, producing antibodies and removing microorganisms and damaged red blood cells from the bloodstream.

The spleen can be removed without causing any significant problems, as other organs take over its functions. This is known as a splenectomy and may be necessary if the spleen is damaged or diseased.

Siglec-3, also known as CD33, is a type of Siglec (Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin) that is primarily expressed on the surface of myeloid cells, including monocytes, macrophages, and some dendritic cell subsets. It is a transmembrane protein with an extracellular domain containing an N-terminal V-set immunoglobulin-like domain, followed by one to three C2-set immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane region, and a cytoplasmic tail. Siglec-3 selectively binds to sialic acid residues on glycoproteins and gangliosides, and its function is thought to regulate immune cell activation and inflammation. It has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and HIV infection.

Keratinocytes are the predominant type of cells found in the epidermis, which is the outermost layer of the skin. These cells are responsible for producing keratin, a tough protein that provides structural support and protection to the skin. Keratinocytes undergo constant turnover, with new cells produced in the basal layer of the epidermis and older cells moving upward and eventually becoming flattened and filled with keratin as they reach the surface of the skin, where they are then shed. They also play a role in the immune response and can release cytokines and other signaling molecules to help protect the body from infection and injury.

Lymphoid Enhancer-Binding Factor 1 (LEF1) is a protein that functions as a transcription factor, playing a crucial role in the Wnt signaling pathway. It is involved in the regulation of gene expression, particularly during embryonic development and immune system function. LEF1 helps control the differentiation and proliferation of certain cells, including B and T lymphocytes, which are essential for adaptive immunity. Mutations in the LEF1 gene have been associated with various human diseases, such as cancer and immunodeficiency disorders.

Culture media is a substance that is used to support the growth of microorganisms or cells in an artificial environment, such as a petri dish or test tube. It typically contains nutrients and other factors that are necessary for the growth and survival of the organisms being cultured. There are many different types of culture media, each with its own specific formulation and intended use. Some common examples include blood agar, which is used to culture bacteria; Sabouraud dextrose agar, which is used to culture fungi; and Eagle's minimum essential medium, which is used to culture animal cells.

'Cellular spheroids' refer to three-dimensional (3D) aggregates of cells that come together to form spherical structures. These spheroids can be formed by various cell types, including cancer cells, stem cells, and primary cells, and they are often used as models to study cell-cell interactions, cell signaling, drug development, and tumor biology in a more physiologically relevant context compared to traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures.

Cellular spheroids can form spontaneously under certain conditions or be induced through various methods such as hanging drop, spinner flask, or microfluidic devices. The formation of spheroids allows cells to interact with each other and the extracellular matrix in a more natural way, leading to the creation of complex structures that mimic the organization and behavior of tissues in vivo.

Studying cellular spheroids has several advantages over traditional 2D cultures, including better preservation of cell-cell interactions, improved modeling of drug penetration and resistance, and enhanced ability to recapitulate the complexity of tumor microenvironments. As a result, cellular spheroids have become an important tool in various areas of biomedical research, including cancer biology, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine.

Cell transplantation is the process of transferring living cells from one part of the body to another or from one individual to another. In medicine, cell transplantation is often used as a treatment for various diseases and conditions, including neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, and certain types of cancer. The goal of cell transplantation is to replace damaged or dysfunctional cells with healthy ones, thereby restoring normal function to the affected area.

In the context of medical research, cell transplantation may involve the use of stem cells, which are immature cells that have the ability to develop into many different types of specialized cells. Stem cell transplantation has shown promise in the treatment of a variety of conditions, including spinal cord injuries, stroke, and heart disease.

It is important to note that cell transplantation carries certain risks, such as immune rejection and infection. As such, it is typically reserved for cases where other treatments have failed or are unlikely to be effective.

Serine endopeptidases are a type of enzymes that cleave peptide bonds within proteins (endopeptidases) and utilize serine as the nucleophilic amino acid in their active site for catalysis. These enzymes play crucial roles in various biological processes, including digestion, blood coagulation, and programmed cell death (apoptosis). Examples of serine endopeptidases include trypsin, chymotrypsin, thrombin, and elastase.

Neurogenesis is the process by which new neurons (nerve cells) are generated in the brain. It occurs throughout life in certain areas of the brain, such as the hippocampus and subventricular zone, although the rate of neurogenesis decreases with age. Neurogenesis involves the proliferation, differentiation, and integration of new neurons into existing neural circuits. This process plays a crucial role in learning, memory, and recovery from brain injury or disease.

Chondrogenesis is the process of cartilage formation during embryonic development and in the healing of certain types of injuries. It involves the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes, which are the specialized cells that produce and maintain the extracellular matrix of cartilage.

During chondrogenesis, the mesenchymal stem cells condense and form a template for the future cartilaginous tissue. These cells then differentiate into chondrocytes, which begin to produce and deposit collagen type II, proteoglycans, and other extracellular matrix components that give cartilage its unique biochemical and mechanical properties.

Chondrogenesis is a critical process for the development of various structures in the body, including the skeletal system, where it plays a role in the formation of articular cartilage, growth plates, and other types of cartilage. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate chondrogenesis is important for developing therapies to treat cartilage injuries and degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis.

Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a condition that can occur after an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), where the donated immune cells (graft) recognize the recipient's tissues (host) as foreign and attack them. This results in inflammation and damage to various organs, particularly the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and liver.

Acute GVHD typically occurs within 100 days of transplantation and is characterized by symptoms such as rash, diarrhea, and liver dysfunction. Chronic GVHD, on the other hand, can occur after 100 days or even years post-transplant and may present with a wider range of symptoms, including dry eyes and mouth, skin changes, lung involvement, and issues with mobility and flexibility in joints.

GVHD is a significant complication following allogeneic HSCT and can have a substantial impact on the patient's quality of life and overall prognosis. Preventative measures, such as immunosuppressive therapy, are often taken to reduce the risk of GVHD, but its management remains a challenge in transplant medicine.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is a type of cytokine, which is a cell signaling molecule that mediates communication between cells in the immune system. Specifically, IL-4 is produced by activated T cells and mast cells, among other cells, and plays an important role in the differentiation and activation of immune cells called Th2 cells.

Th2 cells are involved in the immune response to parasites, as well as in allergic reactions. IL-4 also promotes the growth and survival of B cells, which produce antibodies, and helps to regulate the production of certain types of antibodies. In addition, IL-4 has anti-inflammatory effects and can help to downregulate the immune response in some contexts.

Defects in IL-4 signaling have been implicated in a number of diseases, including asthma, allergies, and certain types of cancer.

Membrane glycoproteins are proteins that contain oligosaccharide chains (glycans) covalently attached to their polypeptide backbone. They are integral components of biological membranes, spanning the lipid bilayer and playing crucial roles in various cellular processes.

The glycosylation of these proteins occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus during protein folding and trafficking. The attached glycans can vary in structure, length, and composition, which contributes to the diversity of membrane glycoproteins.

Membrane glycoproteins can be classified into two main types based on their orientation within the lipid bilayer:

1. Type I (N-linked): These glycoproteins have a single transmembrane domain and an extracellular N-terminus, where the oligosaccharides are predominantly attached via asparagine residues (Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequon).
2. Type II (C-linked): These glycoproteins possess two transmembrane domains and an intracellular C-terminus, with the oligosaccharides linked to tryptophan residues via a mannose moiety.

Membrane glycoproteins are involved in various cellular functions, such as:

* Cell adhesion and recognition
* Receptor-mediated signal transduction
* Enzymatic catalysis
* Transport of molecules across membranes
* Cell-cell communication
* Immunological responses

Some examples of membrane glycoproteins include cell surface receptors (e.g., growth factor receptors, cytokine receptors), adhesion molecules (e.g., integrins, cadherins), and transporters (e.g., ion channels, ABC transporters).

Interleukin-3 (IL-3) receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind to and interact with the cytokine interleukin-3. IL-3 is a growth factor that plays an important role in the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of hematopoietic cells, which give rise to all blood cells.

The IL-3 receptor is composed of two subunits: the alpha (IL-3Rα) subunit and the beta (IL-3Rβ) subunit. The alpha subunit is specific to the IL-3 receptor, while the beta subunit is shared with other cytokine receptors, including the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor and the interleukin-5 (IL-5) receptor.

The binding of IL-3 to its receptor activates a series of intracellular signaling pathways that ultimately lead to changes in gene expression, protein synthesis, and cellular responses. These responses include the proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells, as well as the activation and survival of immune cells such as mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils.

Abnormalities in IL-3 receptor signaling have been implicated in various diseases, including leukemia and other hematological disorders.

The Wnt signaling pathway is a complex cell communication system that plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and cancer. It is named after the Wingless (Wg) gene in Drosophila melanogaster and the Int-1 gene in mice, both of which were found to be involved in this pathway.

In essence, the Wnt signaling pathway involves the binding of Wnt proteins to Frizzled receptors on the cell surface, leading to the activation of intracellular signaling cascades. There are three main branches of the Wnt signaling pathway: the canonical (or Wnt/β-catenin) pathway, the noncanonical planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, and the noncanonical Wnt/calcium pathway.

The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is the most well-studied branch. In the absence of Wnt signaling, cytoplasmic β-catenin is constantly phosphorylated by a destruction complex consisting of Axin, APC, GSK3β, and CK1, leading to its ubiquitination and degradation in the proteasome. When Wnt ligands bind to Frizzled receptors and their coreceptor LRP5/6, Dishevelled is recruited and inhibits the destruction complex, allowing β-catenin to accumulate in the cytoplasm and translocate into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin interacts with TCF/LEF transcription factors to regulate the expression of target genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

Dysregulation of the Wnt signaling pathway has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, developmental disorders, and degenerative conditions. For example, mutations in components of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway can lead to the accumulation of β-catenin and subsequent activation of oncogenic target genes, contributing to tumorigenesis in various types of cancer.

Leukemia, myeloid is a type of cancer that originates in the bone marrow, where blood cells are produced. Myeloid leukemia affects the myeloid cells, which include red blood cells, platelets, and most types of white blood cells. In this condition, the bone marrow produces abnormal myeloid cells that do not mature properly and accumulate in the bone marrow and blood. These abnormal cells hinder the production of normal blood cells, leading to various symptoms such as anemia, fatigue, increased risk of infections, and easy bruising or bleeding.

There are several types of myeloid leukemias, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). AML progresses rapidly and requires immediate treatment, while CML tends to progress more slowly. The exact causes of myeloid leukemia are not fully understood, but risk factors include exposure to radiation or certain chemicals, smoking, genetic disorders, and a history of chemotherapy or other cancer treatments.

Up-regulation is a term used in molecular biology and medicine to describe an increase in the expression or activity of a gene, protein, or receptor in response to a stimulus. This can occur through various mechanisms such as increased transcription, translation, or reduced degradation of the molecule. Up-regulation can have important functional consequences, for example, enhancing the sensitivity or response of a cell to a hormone, neurotransmitter, or drug. It is a normal physiological process that can also be induced by disease or pharmacological interventions.

Luminescent proteins are a type of protein that emit light through a chemical reaction, rather than by absorbing and re-emitting light like fluorescent proteins. This process is called bioluminescence. The light emitted by luminescent proteins is often used in scientific research as a way to visualize and track biological processes within cells and organisms.

One of the most well-known luminescent proteins is Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which was originally isolated from jellyfish. However, GFP is actually a fluorescent protein, not a luminescent one. A true example of a luminescent protein is the enzyme luciferase, which is found in fireflies and other bioluminescent organisms. When luciferase reacts with its substrate, luciferin, it produces light through a process called oxidation.

Luminescent proteins have many applications in research, including as reporters for gene expression, as markers for protein-protein interactions, and as tools for studying the dynamics of cellular processes. They are also used in medical imaging and diagnostics, as well as in the development of new therapies.

Radiation-protective agents, also known as radioprotectors, are substances that help in providing protection against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. They can be used to prevent or reduce damage to biological tissues, including DNA, caused by exposure to radiation. These agents work through various mechanisms such as scavenging free radicals, modulating cellular responses to radiation-induced damage, and enhancing DNA repair processes.

Radiation-protective agents can be categorized into two main groups:

1. Radiosensitizers: These are substances that make cancer cells more sensitive to the effects of radiation therapy, increasing their susceptibility to damage and potentially improving treatment outcomes. However, radiosensitizers do not provide protection to normal tissues against radiation exposure.

2. Radioprotectors: These agents protect both normal and cancerous cells from radiation-induced damage. They can be further divided into two categories: direct and indirect radioprotectors. Direct radioprotectors interact directly with radiation, absorbing or scattering it away from sensitive tissues. Indirect radioprotectors work by neutralizing free radicals and reactive oxygen species generated during radiation exposure, which would otherwise cause damage to cellular structures and DNA.

Examples of radiation-protective agents include antioxidants like vitamins C and E, chemical compounds such as amifostine and cysteamine, and various natural substances found in plants and foods. It is important to note that while some radiation-protective agents have shown promise in preclinical studies, their efficacy and safety in humans require further investigation before they can be widely used in clinical settings.

Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis is a type of microarray analysis that allows for the simultaneous measurement of the expression levels of thousands of genes in a single sample. In this technique, oligonucleotides (short DNA sequences) are attached to a solid support, such as a glass slide, in a specific pattern. These oligonucleotides are designed to be complementary to specific target mRNA sequences from the sample being analyzed.

During the analysis, labeled RNA or cDNA from the sample is hybridized to the oligonucleotide array. The level of hybridization is then measured and used to determine the relative abundance of each target sequence in the sample. This information can be used to identify differences in gene expression between samples, which can help researchers understand the underlying biological processes involved in various diseases or developmental stages.

It's important to note that this technique requires specialized equipment and bioinformatics tools for data analysis, as well as careful experimental design and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

Stat5 (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5) is a transcription factor that plays a crucial role in various cellular processes, including growth, survival, and differentiation. It exists in two closely related isoforms, Stat5a and Stat5b, which are encoded by separate genes but share significant sequence homology and functional similarity.

When activated through phosphorylation by receptor or non-receptor tyrosine kinases, Stat5 forms homodimers or heterodimers that translocate to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, these dimers bind to specific DNA sequences called Stat-binding elements (SBEs) in the promoter regions of target genes, leading to their transcriptional activation or repression.

Stat5 is involved in various physiological and pathological conditions, such as hematopoiesis, lactation, immune response, and cancer progression. Dysregulation of Stat5 signaling has been implicated in several malignancies, including leukemias, lymphomas, and breast cancer, making it an attractive therapeutic target for these diseases.

T-lymphocytes, also known as T-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the adaptive immune system's response to infection. They are produced in the bone marrow and mature in the thymus gland. There are several different types of T-cells, including CD4+ helper T-cells, CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells, and regulatory T-cells (Tregs).

CD4+ helper T-cells assist in activating other immune cells, such as B-lymphocytes and macrophages. They also produce cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response. CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells directly kill infected cells by releasing toxic substances. Regulatory T-cells help maintain immune tolerance and prevent autoimmune diseases by suppressing the activity of other immune cells.

T-lymphocytes are important in the immune response to viral infections, cancer, and other diseases. Dysfunction or depletion of T-cells can lead to immunodeficiency and increased susceptibility to infections. On the other hand, an overactive T-cell response can contribute to autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammation.

Physiologic neovascularization is the natural and controlled formation of new blood vessels in the body, which occurs as a part of normal growth and development, as well as in response to tissue repair and wound healing. This process involves the activation of endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of blood vessels, and their migration, proliferation, and tube formation to create new capillaries. Physiologic neovascularization is tightly regulated by a balance of pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors, ensuring that it occurs only when and where it is needed. It plays crucial roles in various physiological processes, such as embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and wound healing.

Monoclonal antibodies are a type of antibody that are identical because they are produced by a single clone of cells. They are laboratory-produced molecules that act like human antibodies in the immune system. They can be designed to attach to specific proteins found on the surface of cancer cells, making them useful for targeting and treating cancer. Monoclonal antibodies can also be used as a therapy for other diseases, such as autoimmune disorders and inflammatory conditions.

Monoclonal antibodies are produced by fusing a single type of immune cell, called a B cell, with a tumor cell to create a hybrid cell, or hybridoma. This hybrid cell is then able to replicate indefinitely, producing a large number of identical copies of the original antibody. These antibodies can be further modified and engineered to enhance their ability to bind to specific targets, increase their stability, and improve their effectiveness as therapeutic agents.

Monoclonal antibodies have several mechanisms of action in cancer therapy. They can directly kill cancer cells by binding to them and triggering an immune response. They can also block the signals that promote cancer growth and survival. Additionally, monoclonal antibodies can be used to deliver drugs or radiation directly to cancer cells, increasing the effectiveness of these treatments while minimizing their side effects on healthy tissues.

Monoclonal antibodies have become an important tool in modern medicine, with several approved for use in cancer therapy and other diseases. They are continuing to be studied and developed as a promising approach to treating a wide range of medical conditions.

Leukemia is a type of cancer that originates from the bone marrow - the soft, inner part of certain bones where new blood cells are made. It is characterized by an abnormal production of white blood cells, known as leukocytes or blasts. These abnormal cells accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells, leading to a decrease in red blood cells (anemia), platelets (thrombocytopenia), and healthy white blood cells (leukopenia).

There are several types of leukemia, classified based on the specific type of white blood cell affected and the speed at which the disease progresses:

1. Acute Leukemias - These types of leukemia progress rapidly, with symptoms developing over a few weeks or months. They involve the rapid growth and accumulation of immature, nonfunctional white blood cells (blasts) in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The two main categories are:
- Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) - Originates from lymphoid progenitor cells, primarily affecting children but can also occur in adults.
- Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) - Develops from myeloid progenitor cells and is more common in older adults.

2. Chronic Leukemias - These types of leukemia progress slowly, with symptoms developing over a period of months to years. They involve the production of relatively mature, but still abnormal, white blood cells that can accumulate in large numbers in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The two main categories are:
- Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) - Affects B-lymphocytes and is more common in older adults.
- Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) - Originates from myeloid progenitor cells, characterized by the presence of a specific genetic abnormality called the Philadelphia chromosome. It can occur at any age but is more common in middle-aged and older adults.

Treatment options for leukemia depend on the type, stage, and individual patient factors. Treatments may include chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, stem cell transplantation, or a combination of these approaches.

Cell tracking is a technique used in medical research and clinical applications to monitor the movement, behavior, and fate of cells over time. This process typically involves labeling cells with a marker such as a dye, fluorescent protein, or magnetic nanoparticle, which allows researchers to observe and analyze the cells using various imaging techniques.

The labeled cells can be tracked individually or in groups, enabling the study of cell-cell interactions, migration patterns, proliferation rates, and other biological processes. Cell tracking has numerous applications in fields such as regenerative medicine, cancer research, developmental biology, and drug discovery.

There are different methods for cell tracking, including:

1. Intravital microscopy: This technique involves surgically implanting a microscope into a living organism to directly observe cells in their native environment over time.
2. Two-photon microscopy: Using laser pulses to excite fluorescent markers, this method allows for deep tissue imaging with minimal photodamage.
3. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): By labeling cells with magnetic nanoparticles, researchers can use MRI to non-invasively track cell movement and distribution within an organism.
4. Positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) scans: Radioactive tracers can be used to label cells for tracking via PET or CT imaging techniques.
5. Image analysis software: Specialized software can be used to analyze images captured through various imaging techniques, enabling researchers to track cell movement and behavior over time.

Overall, cell tracking is an essential tool in medical research, providing valuable insights into the dynamics of cellular processes and contributing to advancements in diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

Intercellular signaling peptides and proteins are molecules that mediate communication and interaction between different cells in living organisms. They play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). These signals can be released into the extracellular space, where they bind to specific receptors on the target cell's surface, triggering intracellular signaling cascades that ultimately lead to a response.

Peptides are short chains of amino acids, while proteins are larger molecules made up of one or more polypeptide chains. Both can function as intercellular signaling molecules by acting as ligands for cell surface receptors or by being cleaved from larger precursor proteins and released into the extracellular space. Examples of intercellular signaling peptides and proteins include growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, hormones, neurotransmitters, and their respective receptors.

These molecules contribute to maintaining homeostasis within an organism by coordinating cellular activities across tissues and organs. Dysregulation of intercellular signaling pathways has been implicated in various diseases, such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying intercellular signaling is essential for developing targeted therapies to treat these disorders.

A leukocyte count, also known as a white blood cell (WBC) count, is a laboratory test that measures the number of leukocytes in a sample of blood. Leukocytes are a vital part of the body's immune system and help fight infection and inflammation. A high or low leukocyte count may indicate an underlying medical condition, such as an infection, inflammation, or a bone marrow disorder. The normal range for a leukocyte count in adults is typically between 4,500 and 11,000 cells per microliter (mcL) of blood. However, the normal range can vary slightly depending on the laboratory and the individual's age and sex.

A lentigo is a small, sharply defined, pigmented macule (flat spot) on the skin. It's usually tan, brown, or black and can appear on various parts of the body, particularly where the skin has been exposed to the sun. Lentigos are typically harmless and don't require treatment unless they're uncomfortable or for cosmetic reasons. However, some types of lentigines, such as lentigo maligna, can progress into melanoma, a type of skin cancer, so regular self-examinations and professional skin checks are important.

It is essential to differentiate between simple lentigos and lentigo maligna, which is a precancerous lesion. Lentigo maligna tends to occur in older individuals, often on the face, and can appear as a large, irregularly shaped, and darkly pigmented patch. A dermatologist should evaluate any suspicious or changing skin spots for proper diagnosis and treatment.

CD24 is a cell surface glycoprotein that serves as a marker for B cells at various stages of development and differentiation. It is also expressed on the surface of certain other cell types, including neutrophils and some cancer cells. Antigens are substances that can stimulate an immune response and are recognized as foreign by the body's immune system. CD24 is not typically referred to as an antigen itself, but it can be used as a target for immunotherapy in certain types of cancer. In this context, monoclonal antibodies or other immune-based therapies may be developed to specifically recognize and bind to CD24 on the surface of cancer cells, with the goal of triggering an immune response against the cancer cells.

Tissue scaffolds, also known as bioactive scaffolds or synthetic extracellular matrices, refer to three-dimensional structures that serve as templates for the growth and organization of cells in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. These scaffolds are designed to mimic the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) found in biological tissues, providing a supportive environment for cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and migration.

Tissue scaffolds can be made from various materials, including naturally derived biopolymers (e.g., collagen, alginate, chitosan, hyaluronic acid), synthetic polymers (e.g., polycaprolactone, polylactic acid, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)), or a combination of both. The choice of material depends on the specific application and desired properties, such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, mechanical strength, and porosity.

The primary functions of tissue scaffolds include:

1. Cell attachment: Providing surfaces for cells to adhere, spread, and form stable focal adhesions.
2. Mechanical support: Offering a structural framework that maintains the desired shape and mechanical properties of the engineered tissue.
3. Nutrient diffusion: Ensuring adequate transport of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products throughout the scaffold to support cell survival and function.
4. Guided tissue growth: Directing the organization and differentiation of cells through spatial cues and biochemical signals.
5. Biodegradation: Gradually degrading at a rate that matches tissue regeneration, allowing for the replacement of the scaffold with native ECM produced by the cells.

Tissue scaffolds have been used in various applications, such as wound healing, bone and cartilage repair, cardiovascular tissue engineering, and neural tissue regeneration. The design and fabrication of tissue scaffolds are critical aspects of tissue engineering, aiming to create functional substitutes for damaged or diseased tissues and organs.

Confocal microscopy is a powerful imaging technique used in medical and biological research to obtain high-resolution, contrast-rich images of thick samples. This super-resolution technology provides detailed visualization of cellular structures and processes at various depths within a specimen.

In confocal microscopy, a laser beam focused through a pinhole illuminates a small spot within the sample. The emitted fluorescence or reflected light from this spot is then collected by a detector, passing through a second pinhole that ensures only light from the focal plane reaches the detector. This process eliminates out-of-focus light, resulting in sharp images with improved contrast compared to conventional widefield microscopy.

By scanning the laser beam across the sample in a raster pattern and collecting fluorescence at each point, confocal microscopy generates optical sections of the specimen. These sections can be combined to create three-dimensional reconstructions, allowing researchers to study cellular architecture and interactions within complex tissues.

Confocal microscopy has numerous applications in medical research, including studying protein localization, tracking intracellular dynamics, analyzing cell morphology, and investigating disease mechanisms at the cellular level. Additionally, it is widely used in clinical settings for diagnostic purposes, such as analyzing skin lesions or detecting pathogens in patient samples.

Organ specificity, in the context of immunology and toxicology, refers to the phenomenon where a substance (such as a drug or toxin) or an immune response primarily affects certain organs or tissues in the body. This can occur due to various reasons such as:

1. The presence of specific targets (like antigens in the case of an immune response or receptors in the case of drugs) that are more abundant in these organs.
2. The unique properties of certain cells or tissues that make them more susceptible to damage.
3. The way a substance is metabolized or cleared from the body, which can concentrate it in specific organs.

For example, in autoimmune diseases, organ specificity describes immune responses that are directed against antigens found only in certain organs, such as the thyroid gland in Hashimoto's disease. Similarly, some toxins or drugs may have a particular affinity for liver cells, leading to liver damage or specific drug interactions.

The yolk sac is a structure that forms in the early stages of an embryo's development. It is a extra-embryonic membrane, which means it exists outside of the developing embryo, and it plays a critical role in providing nutrients to the growing embryo during the initial stages of development.

In more detail, the yolk sac is responsible for producing blood cells, contributing to the formation of the early circulatory system, and storing nutrients that are absorbed from the yolk material inside the egg or uterus. The yolk sac also has a role in the development of the gut and the immune system.

As the embryo grows and the placenta develops, the yolk sac's function becomes less critical, and it eventually degenerates. However, remnants of the yolk sac can sometimes persist and may be found in the developing fetus or newborn baby. In some cases, abnormalities in the development or regression of the yolk sac can lead to developmental problems or congenital disorders.

RNA interference (RNAi) is a biological process in which RNA molecules inhibit the expression of specific genes. This process is mediated by small RNA molecules, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), that bind to complementary sequences on messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, leading to their degradation or translation inhibition.

RNAi plays a crucial role in regulating gene expression and defending against foreign genetic elements, such as viruses and transposons. It has also emerged as an important tool for studying gene function and developing therapeutic strategies for various diseases, including cancer and viral infections.

The Fluorescent Antibody Technique (FAT) is a type of immunofluorescence assay used in laboratory medicine and pathology for the detection and localization of specific antigens or antibodies in tissues, cells, or microorganisms. In this technique, a fluorescein-labeled antibody is used to selectively bind to the target antigen or antibody, forming an immune complex. When excited by light of a specific wavelength, the fluorescein label emits light at a longer wavelength, typically visualized as green fluorescence under a fluorescence microscope.

The FAT is widely used in diagnostic microbiology for the identification and characterization of various bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. It has also been applied in the diagnosis of autoimmune diseases and certain cancers by detecting specific antibodies or antigens in patient samples. The main advantage of FAT is its high sensitivity and specificity, allowing for accurate detection and differentiation of various pathogens and disease markers. However, it requires specialized equipment and trained personnel to perform and interpret the results.

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptors are specialized protein structures found on the surface of certain types of white blood cells, specifically neutrophils, as well as their precursor cells in the bone marrow. These receptors play a crucial role in regulating the production, differentiation, and function of these important immune cells.

G-CSF is a hormone-like growth factor that is produced by various cells in the body, including monocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. When G-CSF binds to its receptor on the surface of a neutrophil or precursor cell, it activates a series of intracellular signaling pathways that promote the proliferation and differentiation of these cells. This leads to an increase in the number of mature neutrophils available to fight infection and help maintain immune surveillance.

G-CSF receptors are members of the cytokine receptor superfamily, which includes a variety of receptors that bind to different types of growth factors and hormones. The G-CSF receptor is composed of two subunits, an alpha subunit that binds to G-CSF and a beta subunit that is shared with other cytokine receptors. When G-CSF binds to the alpha subunit, it induces a conformational change that allows the beta subunit to activate intracellular signaling pathways, including the JAK/STAT and MAPK pathways.

In addition to their role in regulating neutrophil production and function, G-CSF receptors have also been implicated in a variety of other physiological processes, including hematopoiesis, inflammation, and tissue repair. Dysregulation of the G-CSF signaling pathway has been associated with various diseases, including cancer, autoimmune disorders, and bone marrow failure syndromes.

Dental pulp is the soft tissue located in the center of a tooth, surrounded by the dentin. It contains nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue, and plays a vital role in the development and health of the tooth. The dental pulp helps to form dentin during tooth development and continues to provide nourishment to the tooth throughout its life. It also serves as a sensory organ, allowing the tooth to detect hot and cold temperatures and transmit pain signals to the brain. Injury or infection of the dental pulp can lead to serious dental problems, such as tooth decay or abscesses, and may require root canal treatment to remove the damaged tissue and save the tooth.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

The limbus cornea, also known as the corneoscleral junction, is the border between the transparent cornea and the opaque sclera in the eye. It's a circular, narrow region that contains cells called limbal stem cells, which are essential for maintaining the health and clarity of the cornea. These stem cells continuously regenerate and differentiate into corneal epithelial cells, replacing the outermost layer of the cornea. Any damage or disorder in this area can lead to vision impairment or loss.

Embryonal carcinoma stem cells (ECSCs) are a type of cancer stem cell found in embryonal carcinomas, which are a rare form of germ cell tumor that primarily affect the testicles and ovaries. These stem cells are characterized by their ability to differentiate into various cell types, similar to embryonic stem cells. They are believed to play a key role in the development and progression of embryonal carcinomas, as they can self-renew and generate the heterogeneous population of cancer cells that make up the tumor.

Embryonal carcinoma stem cells have been studied extensively as a model system for understanding the biology of cancer stem cells and developing new therapies for germ cell tumors. They are known to express specific markers, such as Oct-4, Nanog, and Sox2, which are also expressed in embryonic stem cells and are involved in maintaining their pluripotency.

It is important to note that while embryonal carcinoma stem cells share some similarities with embryonic stem cells, they are distinct from them and have undergone malignant transformation, making them a target for cancer therapy.

Integrin α4β1, also known as Very Late Antigen-4 (VLA-4), is a heterodimeric transmembrane receptor protein composed of two subunits, α4 and β1. It is involved in various cellular activities such as adhesion, migration, and signaling. This integrin plays a crucial role in the immune system by mediating the interaction between leukocytes (white blood cells) and the endothelial cells that line blood vessels. The activation of Integrin α4β1 allows leukocytes to roll along and then firmly adhere to the endothelium, followed by their migration into surrounding tissues, particularly during inflammation and immune responses. Additionally, Integrin α4β1 also interacts with extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin and helps regulate cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation in various cell types.

Endothelial cells are the type of cells that line the inner surface of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and heart chambers. They play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by controlling vasomotor tone, coagulation, platelet activation, and inflammation. Endothelial cells also regulate the transport of molecules between the blood and surrounding tissues, and contribute to the maintenance of the structural integrity of the vasculature. They are flat, elongated cells with a unique morphology that allows them to form a continuous, nonthrombogenic lining inside the vessels. Endothelial cells can be isolated from various tissues and cultured in vitro for research purposes.

Repressor proteins are a type of regulatory protein in molecular biology that suppress the transcription of specific genes into messenger RNA (mRNA) by binding to DNA. They function as part of gene regulation processes, often working in conjunction with an operator region and a promoter region within the DNA molecule. Repressor proteins can be activated or deactivated by various signals, allowing for precise control over gene expression in response to changing cellular conditions.

There are two main types of repressor proteins:

1. DNA-binding repressors: These directly bind to specific DNA sequences (operator regions) near the target gene and prevent RNA polymerase from transcribing the gene into mRNA.
2. Allosteric repressors: These bind to effector molecules, which then cause a conformational change in the repressor protein, enabling it to bind to DNA and inhibit transcription.

Repressor proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as development, metabolism, and stress response, by controlling gene expression patterns in cells.

Nuclear proteins are a category of proteins that are primarily found in the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell. They play crucial roles in various nuclear functions, such as DNA replication, transcription, repair, and RNA processing. This group includes structural proteins like lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, and regulatory proteins, such as histones and transcription factors, that are involved in gene expression. Nuclear localization signals (NLS) often help target these proteins to the nucleus by interacting with importin proteins during active transport across the nuclear membrane.

B-lymphocytes, also known as B-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the immune system's response to infection. They are responsible for producing antibodies, which are proteins that help to neutralize or destroy pathogens such as bacteria and viruses.

When a B-lymphocyte encounters a pathogen, it becomes activated and begins to divide and differentiate into plasma cells, which produce and secrete large amounts of antibodies specific to the antigens on the surface of the pathogen. These antibodies bind to the pathogen, marking it for destruction by other immune cells such as neutrophils and macrophages.

B-lymphocytes also have a role in presenting antigens to T-lymphocytes, another type of white blood cell involved in the immune response. This helps to stimulate the activation and proliferation of T-lymphocytes, which can then go on to destroy infected cells or help to coordinate the overall immune response.

Overall, B-lymphocytes are an essential part of the adaptive immune system, providing long-lasting immunity to previously encountered pathogens and helping to protect against future infections.

The neural crest is a transient, multipotent embryonic cell population that originates from the ectoderm (outermost layer) of the developing neural tube (precursor to the central nervous system). These cells undergo an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and migrate throughout the embryo, giving rise to a diverse array of cell types and structures.

Neural crest cells differentiate into various tissues, including:

1. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) components: sensory neurons, sympathetic and parasympathetic ganglia, and glial cells (e.g., Schwann cells).
2. Facial bones and cartilage, as well as connective tissue of the skull.
3. Melanocytes, which are pigment-producing cells in the skin.
4. Smooth muscle cells in major blood vessels, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and other organs.
5. Secretory cells in endocrine glands (e.g., chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla).
6. Parts of the eye, such as the cornea and iris stroma.
7. Dental tissues, including dentin, cementum, and dental pulp.

Due to their wide-ranging contributions to various tissues and organs, neural crest cells play a crucial role in embryonic development and organogenesis. Abnormalities in neural crest cell migration or differentiation can lead to several congenital disorders, such as neurocristopathies.

... (also known as SCF, KIT-ligand, KL, or steel factor) is a cytokine that binds to the c-KIT receptor (CD117). ... Rönnstrand L (October 2004). "Signal transduction via the stem cell factor receptor/c-Kit". Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 61 (19-20): ... Rönnstrand L (2004). "Signal transduction via the stem cell factor receptor/c-Kit". Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 61 (19-20): 2535-48. ... SCF may serve as guidance cues that direct hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to their stem cell niche (the microenvironment in ...
Stem Cells currently has an impact factor of 6.277. The journal is abstracted and indexed in the following bibliographic ... Stem Cells is a peer-review scientific journal of cell biology. It was established as The International Journal of Cell Cloning ... "About: Abstracting and Indexing Information". Stem Cells. Retrieved 16 October 2018. "Stem Cells (journal)". MIAR: Information ... "Stem Cells". 2020 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed.). Thomson Reuters. 2021. " ...
2005). "Leukemia inhibitory factor as an anti-apoptotic mitogen for pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells in a serum-free ... Stem cell markers are genes and their protein products used by scientists to isolate and identify stem cells. Stem cells can ... 2005). "Somatic stem cell marker prominin-1/CD133 is expressed in embryonic stem cell-derived progenitors". Stem Cells. 23 (6 ... "Integrins are markers of human neural stem cells". Stem Cells. 24 (9): 2078-84. doi:10.1634/stemcells.2005-0595. PMID 16690778 ...
"HASF is a stem cell paracrine factor that activates PKC epsilon mediated cytoprotection". Journal of Molecular and Cellular ... hypoxia and Akt-induced stem cell factor; ROS generated via pharmacologic activation of the mitochondrial potassium-sensitive ... "Protein kinase C-epsilon protects MCF-7 cells from TNF-mediated cell death by inhibiting Bax translocation". Apoptosis. 12 (10 ... "Arachidonic acid stimulates protein kinase C-epsilon redistribution in heart cells". Journal of Cell Science. 110 (14): 1625-34 ...
Important signaling factors for vasculogenesis are TGF-β, BMP4, and VEGF, all of which promote pluripotent stem cells to ... These parent stem cells, ESCs, give rise to progenitor cells, which are intermediate stem cells that lose potency. Progenitor ... Endothelial stem cells (ESCs) are one of three types of stem cells found in bone marrow. They are multipotent, which describes ... For stem cells, this usually occurs through several stages, when a cell proliferates giving rise to daughter cells that are ...
Kit (CD117) is the receptor of Stem Cell Factor. Sca-1 is a murine hematopoietic stem cell antigen. Lin is a series of lineage ... KSL cells in cell biology are an early form of mouse/murine hematopoietic stem cells. Characteristics are Kit (+), Sca-1 (+) ... Hematopoitic stem cells are of interest because of their ability to self-renew and differentiate into every types of blood cell ... Biology portal Science portal Cell biophysics Cell disruption Cell physiology Cellular adaptation Cellular microbiology Outline ...
"The pioneer factor SOX9 competes for epigenetic factors to switch stem cell fates". Nature Cell Biology. 25 (8): 1185-1195. doi ... "SOX9 Stem-Cell Factor: Clinical and Functional Relevance in Cancer". Journal of Oncology. 2019: 6754040. doi:10.1155/2019/ ... The process starts when the transcription factor Testis determining factor (encoded by the sex-determining region SRY of the Y ... and plays a role in the regulation of neural stem cell fate. In vivo and in vitro studies show that SOX-9 negatively regulates ...
... epidermal growth factors, platelet-derived growth factors, and stem cell factor. This dimerizes the transmembrane receptor to ... "The Wnt Signal Transduction Pathway in Stem Cells and Cancer Cells: Influence on Cellular Invasion". Stem Cell Reviews. 3 (1): ... "Stem cell factor is encoded at the SI locus of the mouse and is the ligand for the c-kit tyrosine kinase receptor". Cell. 63 (1 ... The Kit proto-oncogene encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor whose ligand is a paracrine protein called stem cell factor (SCF), ...
"Pluripotency Factors in Embryonic Stem Cells Regulate Differentiation into Germ Layers". Cell. 145 (6): 875-889. doi:10.1016/j. ... These transcription factors cause the pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells to select a germ layer fate. Sox2 promotes ... Through cell signaling cascades and interactions with the ectodermal and endodermal cells, the mesodermal cells begin the ... Amounts of each protein are different throughout the genome, causing the embryonic stem cells to select their fate. The ...
In mouse ESCs, Sall4 was found to bind the essential stem cell factor, octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4), in two ... implications for stem cell biology, development, and disease". Cell Stem Cell. 6 (4): 382-395. doi:10.1016/j.stem.2010.03.004. ... "An Oct4-centered protein interaction network in embryonic stem cells". Cell Stem Cell. 6 (4): 369-381. doi:10.1016/j.stem. ... a stem cell transcription factor". Cell Cycle. 13 (9): 1456-1462. doi:10.4161/cc.28418. PMC 4050143. PMID 24626181. Gao C, ...
"ISG15 is a critical microenvironmental factor for pancreatic cancer stem cells". Cancer Research. 74 (24): 7309-20. doi:10.1158 ... In pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, tumor-associated macrophages secrete ISG15 enhancing the phenotype of cancer stem cells in ... IFN regulatory factor-8/IFN consensus sequence binding protein, and IFN regulatory factor-4: characterization of a new subtype ... "Interferon stimulated gene 15 constitutively produced by melanoma cells induces e-cadherin expression on human dendritic cells ...
One of the key players in self-renewal and development of haematopoietic cells is stem cell factor (SCF), which binds to the c- ... The lymphoid lineage is composed of T-cells, B-cells and natural killer cells. This is lymphopoiesis. Cells of the myeloid ... differentiated cells may regain attributes of progenitor cells. An example is PAX5 factor, which is important in B cell ... As a stem cell matures it undergoes changes in gene expression that limit the cell types that it can become and moves it closer ...
2006 Creation of induced stem cells (iSC) from somatic cells by the simultaneous action of several factors. First produced by ... "Induction of pluripotent stem cells from adult human fibroblasts by defined factors". Cell. 131 (5): 861-872. doi:10.1016/j. ... "Induction of pluripotent stem cells from mouse embryonic and adult fibroblast cultures by defined factors". Cell. 126 (4): 663- ... "Old human cells rejuvenated with stem cell technology". News Center (in Samoan). Retrieved 26 July 2021. Ocampo A, Reddy P, ...
... reprogramming factor stoichiometry and stressors related to cell culture. Induced stem cells Epigenome editing Reik W, Dean W, ... "High-efficiency RNA interference in human embryonic stem cells". Stem Cells. 23 (3): 299-305. doi:10.1634/stemcells.2004-0252. ... This allows the production of stem cells for biomedical research, such as research into stem cell therapies, without the use of ... "Induction of pluripotent stem cells from adult human fibroblasts by defined factors". Cell. 131 (5): 861-872. doi:10.1016/j. ...
"Induction of pluripotent stem cells from adult human fibroblasts by defined factors". Cell. 131 (5): 861-72. doi:10.1016/j.cell ... Glis1 can be used as one of the four factors used in reprogramming somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. The three ... S2CID 4428172.*Lay summary in: Tiu G (June 9, 2011). "Stem Cell Pioneer Yamanaka Discovers New Factor, Glis1, For iPS Cell ... "Induction of pluripotent stem cells from mouse embryonic and adult fibroblast cultures by defined factors". Cell. 126 (4): 663- ...
As embryonic stem cells are derived from the inner cell mass at the blastocyst stage, removing them from the inner cell mass ... LIF is often added to stem cell culture media as an alternative to feeder cell culture, due to the limitation that feeder cells ... Removal of LIF pushes stem cells toward differentiation, however genetic manipulation of embryonic stem cells allows for LIF ... Feeder cells lacking the LIF gene do not effectively support stem cells. LIF promotes self-renewal by recruiting signal ...
"Enhanced cardiogenesis in embryonic stem cells overexpressing the GATA-4 transcription factor". Development. 124 (12): 2387- ... "A Murine Model of Holt-Oram Syndrome Defines Roles of the T-box Transcription Factor Tbx5 in Cardiogenesis and Disease". Cell. ... Viger, R. S.; Mertineit, C.; Trasler, J. M.; Nemer, M. (1998-07-15). "Transcription factor GATA-4 is expressed in a sexually ... "The cardiac transcription factors Nkx2‐5 and GATA‐4 are mutual cofactors". The EMBO Journal. 16 (18): 5687-5696. doi:10.1093/ ...
These transcription factors are the basis of the pluripotency of stem cells. Amniotic epithelial cells have the ability to ... the cells must be expanded in a lab to have enough cells for transplantation. Unlike embryonic stem cells, amniotic stem cells ... "Stem Cell Characteristics of Amniotic Epithelial Cells". Stem Cells. 23 (10): 1549-1559. doi:10.1634/stemcells.2004-0357. PMID ... such as neural stem cells and embryonic stem cells, are either limited or controversial in their retrieval. Similar positive ...
"Enhanced cardiogenesis in embryonic stem cells overexpressing the GATA-4 transcription factor". Development. 124 (12): 2387-95 ... These stem cells were named embryonal carcinoma P19 cells. These derived P19 cells grew rapidly without feeder cells and were ... Retinoic acid can induce not only P19 cells but also other progenitor cells or embryonic stem cells to differentiation. Since ... P19 cells provide valuable formation of both neuronal cells and muscle cells in vitro. Since P19 cells are easy to maintain and ...
Huang, Lixiang; Wang, Gan (2017). "The Effects of Different Factors on the Behavior of Neural Stem Cells". Stem Cells ... Neural stem cells (NSCs), however, are able to differentiate into many different types of nerve cells. This is one way that ... Schwann cells have the ability to regenerate, but the capacity that these cells can repair nerve cells declines as time goes on ... This is different from the motor neuron, which includes a cell body and branching of dendrites, while the nerve is made up of a ...
... "c-kit expression profile and regulatory factors during spermatogonial stem cell differentiation". BMC Developmental Biology. 13 ... These cells are called post migratory germ cells (PGCs). The gonocyte population develops from the post migratory germ cells ( ... This period consists of the primordial germ cells (PGC), the initial cells that commence germ cell development in the embryo, ... rather than spermatogonial stem cells (type A). Gonocytes are long-lived precursor germ cells responsible for the production of ...
"Induction of Pluripotent Stem Cells from Adult Human Fibroblasts by Defined Factors". Cell. 131 (5): 861-72. doi:10.1016/j.cell ... The cells of the inner cell mass (embryoblast), which are known as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), will further ... "Induction of Pluripotent Stem Cells from Mouse Embryonic and Adult Fibroblast Cultures by Defined Factors" (PDF). Cell. 126 (4 ... then four-cells, and finally eight-cells. One more cell division brings the number of cells to 16, at which time it is called a ...
To confer pluripotency in an embryonic stem cell, factors inhibit Xist transcription. These factors also upregulate ... "Tsix RNA and the germline factor, PRDM14, link X reactivation and stem cell reprogramming". Mol. Cell. 52 (6): 805-18. doi: ... Alternately, it may be necessary to study cells closer to the X inactivation stage rather than older cells in order to ... This cell is then able to remain pluripotent as X inactivation is not accomplished. The marker Rex1, as well as other members ...
"Induction of Pluripotent Stem Cells from Adult Human Fibroblasts by Defined Factors". Cell. 131 (5): 861-872. doi:10.1016/j. ... induction of an induced pluripotent stem cell, iPSC) and also in transdifferentiating a terminally differentiated cell to ... in 2012 in relation to the effectiveness of reprogramming somatic cells to pluripotent cells using viral and non-viral ... This phenomenon is essential in dedifferentiating a somatic cell to a pluripotent cell ( ...
Jun transcriptionally activates the promoters of SCF (stem cell factor) and CCL5. The induced SCF and CCL5 expression promotes ... and those cells exhibit cell cycle defects. Overexpression of c-jun in cells results in decreased level of p53 and p21, and ... It suggests that c-jun mediates the expansion of breast cancer stem cells to enhance tumor invasiveness. C-jun has been ... In cells absent of c-jun, the expression of p53 (cell cycle arrest inducer) and p21 (CDK inhibitor and p53 target gene) is ...
Several factors are important to regulate stem-cell characteristics within the niche: cell-cell interactions between stem cells ... These ECM factors are equally important when stem cells are grown in vitro. Given a choice between niche cell-stem cell ... The CSC niche is very similar to normal stem cells niche (embryonic stem cell (ESC), Adult Stem Cell ASC) in function ( ... The GSC niche consists of necessary somatic cells-terminal filament cells, cap cells, escort cells, and other stem cells which ...
"Oncogenic transcription factor Evi1 regulates hematopoietic stem cell proliferation through GATA-2 expression". The EMBO ... It has been hypothesized that it acts as a survival factor in tumor cell lines, preventing therapeutic-induced apoptosis and ... EVI1 is a nuclear transcription factor involved in many signaling pathways for both coexpression and coactivation of cell cycle ... Cell cycle and differentiation In vitro experiments using both human and mouse cell lines have shown that EVI1 prevents the ...
"Oncogenic transcription factor Evi1 regulates hematopoietic stem cell proliferation through GATA-2 expression". EMBO Journal. ... "Transcription Factor B-Cell-Specific Activator Protein (BSAP) Is Differentially Expressed in B Cells and in Subsets of B-Cell ... "CD73 Regulates Stemness and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Ovarian Cancer-Initiating Cells". Stem Cell Reports. 10 (4): ... goblet cells) of the rectum. ERICH4 has high expression within normal tissue and low-to-medium expression with renal cell ...
The selenocysteine tRNA activating factor plays a role in embryonic stem cell regeneration. The cell cycle regulators: cell ... ZNF226 is expressed at greater levels within human stem cells. With ZNF226 being a transcription factor, playing a role in ... selenocysteine tRNA activating factor (V$THAP11.01), and cell cycle regulators: cell cycle homology region (V$CHR.01) were ... "Single-stranded DNA binding protein Ssbp3 induces differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into trophoblast-like cells". ...
"Epidermal growth factor enhances osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells in vitro". Head & Face Medicine. 11: 29. ... Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a protein that stimulates cell growth and differentiation by binding to its receptor, EGFR. ... These data suggests that DPSCs in combination with EGF could be an effective stem cell-based therapy to bone tissue engineering ... EGF plays an enhancer role on the osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) because it is capable of ...
Stem cell factor (also known as SCF, KIT-ligand, KL, or steel factor) is a cytokine that binds to the c-KIT receptor (CD117). ... Rönnstrand L (October 2004). "Signal transduction via the stem cell factor receptor/c-Kit". Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 61 (19-20): ... Rönnstrand L (2004). "Signal transduction via the stem cell factor receptor/c-Kit". Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 61 (19-20): 2535-48. ... SCF may serve as guidance cues that direct hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to their stem cell niche (the microenvironment in ...
Here, we identified and characterized a stem cell population from adult murine submandibular glands. Of the different cells ... Stem cell-based regenerative therapy is a promising treatment for head and neck cancer patients that suffer from chronic dry ... is highly expressed in Lin-CD24+c-Kit+Sca1+ stem cells. Furthermore, GDNF expression was upregulated upon radiation therapy in ... Serial transplantations of this stem cell population into the submandibular gland of irradiated mice successfully restored ...
No risk factors of hospital stay prolongation were determined. We conclude that in spite of rapid engraftment, non- ... the incidence and analyze reasons which cause prolongation of hospital stay in patients engrafted after peripheral blood stem ... cell transplantation (PBSCT), we performed this retrospective analysis. One hundred patients (receiving 123 conditioning ... Factors that influence collection and engraftment of autologous peripheral-blood stem cells J Clin Oncol 1995 13: 2547-2555 ...
... World J Stem Cells ... Mesenchymal stem cells, Differentiation, Osteogenic, Chondrogenic, Literature review. Core Tip: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) ... Stimulating factors for regulation of osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells ... Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), distributed in many tissues in the human body, are multipotent cells capable of differentiating ...
Transcription factor MEF2C influences neural stem/progenitor cell differentiation and maturation in vivo.. Return to Grants ... Here, we show that conditional knockout of Mef2c in nestin-expressing neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs) impaired neuronal ... Emerging evidence suggests that myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors act as effectors of neurogenesis in the ... Stem Cell Basics *Stem Cell Key Terms. *Creating New Types of Stem Cells ...
Human Stem Cell Factor Recombinant Protein (Animal Free), 1 mg Orig. No. 009-F01-W20-1000 ... Human Stem Cell Factor Recombinant Protein (Animal Free), 1 mg Orig. No. 009-F01-W20-1000 ...
Research in these fields has broad implications in the areas of cell therapies and neurodegeneration. ... Transcription factors have crucial roles in stem cell biology and differentiation. ... Governing the Fate of Stem Cells With Transcription Factors. Stem cells are unique due to their ability to limitlessly self- ... Induction of pluripotent stem cells from adult human fibroblasts by defined factors. Cell vol. 131,5 (2007): 861-72. doi: ...
... and impairment of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and humoral immunity. This impairment leads to an immunocompromised state, ... Stem cell source contributes to the risk of infection. Compared with stem cells from bone marrow, peripheral blood stem cells ... The transplant procedure requires the harvesting of hematopoietic stem cells from a donor. The stem cell source may be bone ... encoded search term (Infections After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation) and Infections After Hematopoietic Stem Cell ...
... stem cells, plant stem cells and other related technologies. ... up the confusion about the differences between growth factors, ... Plant Stem Cells. Many companies offer plant stem cells, but they are not like human stem cells and do not provide any of the ... This is known as induced pluripotent stem cells (IPS). Stem cells can also be encouraged to grow skin-targeted growth factors ... However, there remains a great deal of confusion about the differences between growth factors, stem cells, plant stem cells and ...
Hydrogel Delivery of Neural Growth Factors and Stem Cells for the Treatment of Spinal Cord Injuries 12:00 pm - 12:00 pm ...
Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Is Essential for Subventricular Zone Neural Stem Cell and Progenitor Homeostasis as Revealed by a ... Bauer S, Patterson PH: Leukemia inhibitory factor promotes neural stem cell self-renewal in the adult brain. J Neurosci 2006;26 ... 2E1, E2). However, none of the flat cells were O4+. These large flat cells persisted even after 10 days of growth factor ... Maric D, Maric I, Chang YH, Barker JL: Prospective cell sorting of embryonic rat neural stem cells and neuronal and glial ...
Mobilization of human mesenchymal stem cells through different cytokines and growth factors after their immobilization by ... Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are known to play an important role in wound healing. Moreover, it is also known that patients ... Material & methods: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were isolated from femoral heads of healthy donors. They were cultured for ... with chronic wound healing diseases have compromised mesenchymal stem cell functionality. Based on these observations and the ...
Nuclear factor of activated T-cells, NFATC1, governs FLT3-ITD-driven hematopoietic stem cell transformation and a poor ... We have previously shown that the inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 2 (NFATC1) is ... We find that NFATC1 governs FLT3ITD-driven stem cell, progenitor and monocyte expansion and transformation, causing a fully ... it has been shown that although FLT3ITD increases proliferation of the hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), it doesnt lead to full ...
... and quantitative RT-PCR of cardiac side population stem cells. Adult cardiac side population stem cells (CSPCs) were isolated ... Desmin enters the nucleus of cardiac stem cells and modulates Nkx2.5 expression by participating in transcription factor ... Single inner cell masses yield embryonic stem cell lines differing in lifr expression and their developmental potential ... Embryonic stem cells facilitate the isolation of persistent clonal cardiovascular progenitor cell lines and leukemia inhibitor ...
Thus, this cell and growth-factor combination may be the ideal choice for cell-based intervertebral disc (IVD)-regeneration ... Both bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and adipose-derived MSCs (AD-MSCs) are proposed as suitable cells ... However, currently no consensus exists as to the optimum growth factor needed to drive differentiation to a nucleus pulposus ( ... The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of growth differentiation factor-6 (GDF6), compared with other transforming ...
While the inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 2 (NFAT2, NFATC1) is overexpressed in AML, it ... FLT3ITD triggers the proliferation of the quiescent hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool but fails to directly transform HSCs. ... We find that NFATC1 governs FLT3ITD-driven precursor cell expansion and transformation, causing a fully penetrant lethal AML. ... in which tamoxifen-inducible Cre-recombinase targets expression of a constitutively nuclear transcription factor NFATC1 to ...
Genomic risk factors and biomarkers as predictors of GvHD after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Lookup NU author(s): ... Genetic factors could improve the goodness of fit of a model when viewed alongside a clinical risk score, however, we were ... Results: In a cohort consisting of 442 HLA-matched sibling patient and donor pairs where the transplants were non T cell ... As an alternative to genetic factors, biomarkers could, however, be used as additional predictors. Further work is under way to ...
AnteAGE® Sun Safety , Bone Marrow Stem Cell Derived Protein Molecules Influence Skin Protection. ...
SCF / Stem Cell Factor. Target Synonyms. KITLG; MGF; SF; KL1; Kitl; FPH2; Kit-Ligand; Steel Factor; Mast Cell Growth Factor; ... Human Stem Cell Factor (SCF) ELISA Kit, Cat#EKU11610. Rating Required Select Rating. 1 star (worst). 2 stars. 3 stars (average) ... Intra-assay Precision (Precision within an assay): 3 samples with low, middle and high level Mini Samples Stem Cell Factor (SCF ... Inter-assay Precision (Precision between assays): 3 samples with low, middle and high level Mini Samples Stem Cell Factor (SCF ...
... Stem cells are unspecialised cells, defined by their ... Methods to study cell-cell communication from single-cell sequencing data This feature on cell-cell communication is adapted ... Loss of transcription factor alters chromatin accessibility Researchers have discovered that chromatin accessibility is heavily ... Japanese Study Identifies 35 Genetic Risk Factors for Atrial Fibrillation In a new study published in Nature, researchers have ...
This study suggests that the protein expression of embryonic stem cell reprogramming factors is enriched in benign as well as ... Background: The "stem cell theory of cancer" states that a subpopulation of cells with stem cell-like properties plays a ... Methods: In this study, the expression levels of the embryonic stem cell reprogramming factors Oct4, Nanog, Myc, Sox2, and Klf4 ... Table 2. Percentage of tumors with positive antigenicity for embryonic stem cell reprogramming factors Protein. Normal. Benign ...
... knees stem cells coronavirus stem cells journal stem cell therapy stem cell therapy parkinsons stem cell transplant stem cell ... test neurodegenerative neurodegenerative disorders stem cell characteristic stem cell characterization stem cell for ... Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from renal tubular cells of a patient with Alport syndrome. ... Pig NGF(Nerve Growth Factor) ELISA Kit. *Guinea pig RANTES(Regulated On Activation In Normal T-Cell Expressed And Secreted) ...
Growth Factors-They are the biggest buzz words in the skin care world today- but are they actually benefiting you? On the ... subject, Dr John Layke had this to say, Specific peptides and growth factors will be the next generation of improving the ... What are Peptides, Stem Cells and Growth Factors?. Stem Cells: are biological cells that can divide and have the unique ability ... Growth Factors: are cultured in a laboratory setting from stem cells that assign specific functions to stem cells in the body. ...
... neuron-restrictive silencing factor regulates expansion of adult mouse subventricular zone-derived neural stem/progenitor cells ... neuron-restrictive silencing factor regulates expansion of adult mouse subventricular zone-derived neural stem/progenitor cells ...
Nomenclature for factors of the HLA system, 2004. Marsh SGE., Albert ED., Bodmer WF., Bontrop RE., Dupont B., Erlich HA., ...
Home News Revolutionizing Skincare with Stem Cells: Bradceuticals Affordable Growth Factor Solutions ... The Post Revolutionizing Skincare with Stem Cells: Bradceuticals Affordable Growth Factor Solutions first appeared on ZEX PR ... Unlocking Youthful Beauty: Bradceuticals Stem Cell-Powered Skincare and Haircare. Tigard, OR, 20th September 2023, ZEX PR WIRE ... "At Bradceuticals, were proud to lead the charge in revolutionizing skincare with the power of stem cells. Our commitment to ...
Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Intrinsic/Extrinsic Factors Regulating Stemness, Growth, and Differentiation Mesenchymal Stem Cells: ... Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with the capability of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation ... www.mdpi.com/journal/cells/special_issues/Mesenchymal_Stem_Cells_Stemness_Growth_Differentiation ... Approximately 50 years have passed since MSC-like cells were first discovered, and many studies have been carried out to ...
We and others now work with human stem cells, which have proven to be far more prolific at creating growth factors. The cells ... Further, stem cell science has advanced with the discovery of IPS (induced pluripotency). We now know that adult stem cells can ... Jon Bon Jovi on Do you know that fat stem cells and bone marrow stem cells are really, really different? ... drgeorge on Do you know that fat stem cells and bone marrow stem cells are really, really different? ...
We also readily detected off-target alterations induced by four out of six RGNs targeted to endogenous loci in human cells by ... Here, we use a human cell-based reporter assay to characterize off-target cleavage of CRISPR-associated (Cas)9-based RGNs. We ... Our work demonstrates that RGNs can be highly active even with imperfectly matched RNA-DNA interfaces in human cells, a finding ... Stem cell therapy combined with controlled release of growth factors for the treatment of sphincter dysfunction *Shengzhou Shan ...
... this stem cell renewal is dependent on a newly described stem cell self-renewal factor known as DOT1L. ... Additionally, the activity of the animals spermatogonial stem cells was reduced in half after these treated stem cells were ... Identifying this essential factor not only helps us understand the biology of adult germline stem cells but could also allow us ... "These transcription factors probably contribute to the stem cell self-renewal process. Finding out the details of that is a ...
  • Of the different cells isolated from the submandibular gland, this specific population, Lin - CD24 + c-Kit + Sca1 + , possessed the highest capacity for proliferation, self renewal, and differentiation during serial passage in vitro. (jci.org)
  • Zhou JQ, Wan HY, Wang ZX, Jiang N. Stimulating factors for regulation of osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. (wjgnet.com)
  • It is usually considered that the differentiation process of MSCs depends on specialized external stimulating factors, including cell signaling pathways, cytokines, and other physical stimuli. (wjgnet.com)
  • Transcription factor MEF2C influences neural stem/progenitor cell differentiation and maturation in vivo. (ca.gov)
  • Here, we show that conditional knockout of Mef2c in nestin-expressing neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs) impaired neuronal differentiation in vivo, resulting in aberrant compaction and smaller somal size. (ca.gov)
  • Our scientists have developed a wide array of stem cell-focused reagents and resources for many applications including flow cytometry , western blotting , ELISAs , and recombinant proteins for cell differentiation. (biolegend.com)
  • RUNX1 is also required for the differentiation of CD8+, Th17, and regulatory T cells. (biolegend.com)
  • These findings revealed that RUNX1 acts as a tumor suppressor for myeloid leukemia and is crucial for the development and terminal differentiation of several blood cell lineages 2,3 . (biolegend.com)
  • STAT3 protein belongs to a group of intracellular transcription factors that mediate a variety of functions such as cellular differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. (biolegend.com)
  • Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with the capability of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation into skeletal and/or mesodermal tissues, including bone, fat, cartilage, and muscle tissues. (aibg.it)
  • We are particularly interested in studies illustrating intrinsic/extrinsic cellular and molecular factors regulating stemness, growth, and differentiation of tissue-specific MSCs as well as their potential implications for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. (aibg.it)
  • Human colonic epithelial cell renewal, proliferation, and differentiation are stringently controlled by numerous regulatory pathways. (utmb.edu)
  • To identify genetic programs of human colonic epithelial cell differentiation in vivo as well as candidate marker genes that define colonic epithelial stem/progenitor cells and the stem cell niche, we applied gene expression analysis of normal human colon tops and basal crypts by using expression microarrays with 30,000 genes. (utmb.edu)
  • In vitro analysis demonstrated that gremlin 1 partially inhibits Caco-2 cell differentiation upon confluence and activates Wnt signaling in normal rat intestinal epithelial cells. (utmb.edu)
  • Collectively, the expression data set provides a comprehensive picture of human colonic epithelial cell differentiation. (utmb.edu)
  • Overexpression of hepatocyte nuclear factor (Foxa-2), a master regulator significantly enhances the hepatic differentiation by triggering targeted liver-specific gene expression for liver development. (niscair.res.in)
  • The reprogrammed cells , designated induced-HSCs (iHSCs), possess clonal multilineage differentiation potential, reconstitute stem /progenitor compartments, and are serially transplantable. (bvsalud.org)
  • Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a member of the CSF family of glycoproteins that regulate hematopoietic cell proliferation, differentiation, and function. (stemcell.com)
  • In the 1980's, Arnold Caplan and his colleagues published an isolation method of fibroblast-like stromal cells from bone marrow and first identified them as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) because of their multilineage differentiation potential ( Caplan, 1991 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • and cell differentiation ( SOX2 and TGFB3 ) as well as immunohistochemical assay for VEGFA, TP53, Bcl2, TGFB1, and Ki67 protein expression have been performed in 85 FFPE RCC tumor specimens. (hindawi.com)
  • An aberrant miRNA expression could contribute to cancer development and progression [ 6 , 7 ] and could affect their target genes that are involved in many biological processes, such as cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, metabolism, and development [ 8 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • It is involved in p53 pathways and is implicated in cell death/survival signaling, the cell cycle, and differentiation, thereby playing a regulatory role in carcinogenesis [ 12 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • The encoded protein can block ES cell differentiation and can also autorepress its own expression in differentiating cells. (nih.gov)
  • In order to assess the incidence and analyze reasons which cause prolongation of hospital stay in patients engrafted after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT), we performed this retrospective analysis. (nature.com)
  • Peripheral blood stem cell and bone marrow transplantation for solid tumors and lymphomas: hematologic recovery and costs. (nature.com)
  • Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) results in the alteration of several components of the immune system. (medscape.com)
  • Transplantation can result in granulocytopenia as well as impairment of barrier defenses, cell-mediated immunity, and humoral immunity. (medscape.com)
  • Risks of infection also vary with the type of transplant, the indication for transplantation, and other host factors. (medscape.com)
  • Factors predicting long-term survival after T-cell depleted reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Transplantation of nonhematopoietic adult bone marrow stem/progenitor cells isolated by p75 nerve growth factor receptor into the penis rescues erectile function in a rat model of cavernous nerve injury. (cellsurgicalnetwork.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Transplantation of adult stem/progenitor cells may provide an effective treatment for erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy. (cellsurgicalnetwork.com)
  • Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) sustain blood formation throughout life and are the functional units of bone marrow transplantation . (bvsalud.org)
  • We show that transient expression of six transcription factors Run1t1, Hlf, Lmo2, Prdm5, Pbx1, and Zfp37 imparts multilineage transplantation potential onto otherwise committed lymphoid and myeloid progenitors and myeloid effector cells . (bvsalud.org)
  • MILAN - Studies are exploring hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) as a rescue therapy in early-stage multiple sclerosis (MS), researchers told colleagues at the 9th Joint ECTRIMS-ACTRIMS meeting. (medscape.com)
  • The researchers noted that the patients who underwent stem cell transplantation had numerous adverse effects. (medscape.com)
  • Non-low-risk patients are evaluated for stem cell transplantation in first remission. (medscape.com)
  • PRP and cartilage cell transplantation for osteoarthritis are still considered controversial treatments. (lu.se)
  • PRP and cartilage cell transplantation as treatments for osteoarthritis (OA) remain controversial. (lu.se)
  • Cartilage cell transplantation is not a very common procedure and is mainly offered to young and middle-aged individuals with loss of cartilage after suffering a traumatic joint injury. (lu.se)
  • There are various ways of performing cartilage cell transplantation, but the principle is the same for all procedures: to stimulate the growth of new cartilage and repair damaged cartilage. (lu.se)
  • However, there is not enough scientific evidence that cartilage cell transplantation actually works and there is a lack of data comparing the treatment method to placebo. (lu.se)
  • Altogether our FACS (fluorescence-activated cell sorter) analyses reveal that the neonatal subventricular zone is far more heterogeneous than previously suspected and our studies provide new insights into the signals and mechanisms that regulate their self-renewal and proliferation. (karger.com)
  • FLT3 ITD triggers the proliferation of the quiescent hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool but fails to directly transform HSCs. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We previously identified Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) as a novel factor that can support the proliferation and/or survival of NSPCs based on in vitro functional cloning strategy and revealed that MIF can support the proliferation of human brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs). (elsevierpure.com)
  • Using gene manipulation (over or downregulation of TPT1) techniques including CRISPR/Cas9-mediated heterozygous gene disruption showed that TPT1 contributed to the regulation of cell proliferation/survival in mouse NSPCs, human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived-NSPCs, human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) derived-NSPCs and BTICs. (elsevierpure.com)
  • The capacities of proliferation, migration, and repair of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were enhanced by BMSCs supernatant. (drcalapai.com)
  • A) The biological activity of Human Recombinant G-CSF, ACF was tested by its ability to promote the proliferation of mouse NFS-60 cells. (stemcell.com)
  • Cell proliferation was measured using a fluorometric assay method. (stemcell.com)
  • The EC50 is defined as the effective concentration of the cytokine at which cell proliferation is at 50% of maximum. (stemcell.com)
  • The signaling pathways stimulated by the KIT protein control many important cellular processes such as cell growth and division (proliferation), survival, and movement (migration). (medlineplus.gov)
  • As a result, signaling pathways that promote the proliferation of cells are overactive, which leads to increased production of mast cells and accumulation of the cells in various tissues. (medlineplus.gov)
  • We demonstrate that CD117+ cells display increased proliferation and migration. (biorxiv.org)
  • Further, in cell lines, CD117 activation by SCF promotes faster proliferation and invasiveness, while blocking CD117 activation with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) decreased progression in a context-dependent manner. (biorxiv.org)
  • TPX2 regulated by miR-29c-3p induces cell proliferation in osteosarcoma via the AKT signaling pathway. (xenbase.org)
  • The protein encoded by this gene is a DNA binding homeobox transcription factor involved in embryonic stem (ES) cell proliferation, renewal, and pluripotency. (nih.gov)
  • On the other hand, for primary teeth, enzymatic digestion always promoted a higher cell proliferation. (bvsalud.org)
  • We propose a computational model of the embryonic stem cell network, in which a core set of transcription factors (TFs) interact with each other and are induced by external factors. (lu.se)
  • Isolation and characterization of a population of immature dental pulp stem cells expressing OCT-4 and other embryonic stem cell markers. (bvsalud.org)
  • Moreover, it is also known that patients with chronic wound healing diseases have compromised mesenchymal stem cell functionality. (uni-muenchen.de)
  • SCF also increases the survival of various hematopoietic progenitor cells, such as megakaryocyte progenitors, in vitro. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hematopoietic progenitor cells have also been shown to migrate towards a higher concentration gradient of SCF in vitro, which suggests that SCF is involved in chemotaxis for these cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • D ) Quantification of salisphere number to seeding-cell number of each population at D7 and D14 in vitro. (jci.org)
  • However, most growth factor research is done in vitro and does not reflect the challenges that penetration has on those molecules. (gcimagazine.com)
  • Our studies also show that these NPs have differential requirements for LIF and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and for epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) for their propagation in vitro. (karger.com)
  • Furthermore, these cells exhibited hepatic functions in vitro , including glycogen storage, albumin production, urea secretion and functional assessment of hepatocytes. (niscair.res.in)
  • The aim of this study was to determinate the effect of different chemotherapy protocols used in the clinic on tumor stem cell markers in vitro . (isciii.es)
  • 5. Gronthos S, Mankani M, Brahim J, Robey PG, Shi S. Postnatal human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in vitro and in vivo. (bvsalud.org)
  • 11. Kramer PR, Nares S, Kramer SF, Grogan D, Kaiser M. Mesenchymal stem cells acquire characteristics of cells in the periodontal ligament in vitro. (bvsalud.org)
  • The stromal cells that surround HSCs are a component of the stem cell niche, and they release a number of ligands, including SCF. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the bone marrow, HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells are adjacent to stromal cells, such as fibroblasts and osteoblasts (Figure 2). (wikipedia.org)
  • These HSCs remain in the niche by adhering to ECM proteins and to the stromal cells themselves. (wikipedia.org)
  • We investigated the effects of transplanting nonhematopoietic adult bone marrow stem/progenitor cells (multipotent stromal cells) into the corpus cavernosum in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury. (cellsurgicalnetwork.com)
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Multipotent stromal cells were isolated from the bone marrow of transgenic green fluorescent protein rats by plastic adherence (rat multipotent stromal cells) or magnetic activated cell sorting using antibodies against p75 low affinity nerve growth factor receptor (p75 derived multipotent stromal cells). (cellsurgicalnetwork.com)
  • Immediately after injury 8 rats each were injected intracavernously with phosphate buffered saline (vehicle control), fibroblasts (cell control), rat multipotent stromal cells (cell treatment) or p75 derived multipotent stromal cells (cell treatment). (cellsurgicalnetwork.com)
  • Rats injected with typical multipotent stromal cells had partial erectile function rescue compared with animals that received p75 derived multipotent stromal cells. (cellsurgicalnetwork.com)
  • Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay suggested that basic fibroblast growth factor secreted by p75 derived multipotent stromal cells protected the cavernous nerve after bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury. (cellsurgicalnetwork.com)
  • One of the most challenging problems with growth factors and cytokines, or wound-healing peptides, is their stability. (gcimagazine.com)
  • Arguably, the fact that included in the 150 growth factors and cytokines made by human cells are cancer-fighting factors, it can be assumed that they provide the balance the skin needs to reverse aging without amplifying the cancer risk. (gcimagazine.com)
  • Damage may be mediated by excessive release of neurotransmitters from damaged cells, an inflammatory immune response with release of cytokines, accumulation of free radicals, and apoptosis. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Somatic mutations, which lead to sporadic GISTs, are present only in the tumor cells and are not inherited. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are associated with cancer progression, metastasis, and recurrence, and may also represent a subset of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). (biorxiv.org)
  • Using xenograft limiting dilution assays and serial tumor initiation assays, we show that CD117+ cells represent a CSC population. (biorxiv.org)
  • Cancer stem cells are responsible for tumor chemoresistance and recurrence in adjuvant and metastatic settings. (isciii.es)
  • After analyzing different tumor stem cell markers (SOX2, OCT4, CD133, CD44 and CD24) in pancreatic cancer cells treated with different chemotherapeutic protocols by means of RT-qPCR, Oxaliplatin and Gemcitabine in monotherapy were the chemotherapies that selected the most cancer stem cells while the FOLFIRI protocol decreased them. (isciii.es)
  • Additionally, characterization of the tumor microenvironment such as interactions with immune cells remain largely unknown. (springer.com)
  • Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subset of the tumor population and reside at the apex of the hierarchy [ 9 ]. (springer.com)
  • Apart from CSCs, there are a myriad of factors and interactions between various cell types and the tumor microenvironment (TME) that ultimately affect CCA progression. (springer.com)
  • Overexpression of CDK1, the CU Cancer Center scientists found, increased the spheroid forming ability, tumorigenic potential, and tumor-initiating capacity of the curious cell type. (genengnews.com)
  • Instead, the CU scientists asked which factors could cause these cells to initiate tumor growth in the first place. (genengnews.com)
  • This finding, the scientists indicated, could help explain how cells of different subtypes within cancers show various tumor-initiating capacities. (genengnews.com)
  • That is, enhanced tumor-initiating capacities could come down to interactions between stem cell genes and seemingly unrelated regulatory mechanisms. (genengnews.com)
  • Knockout of Sox2 in CDK1-overexpressing cells reduced CDK1-driven tumor-initiating capacity substantially. (genengnews.com)
  • Furthermore, GSEA analysis of CDK1-hi tumor cells identified a pathway signature common in all three cancer types, including E2F, G2M, MYC, and spermatogenesis, confirming a stem-like nature of CDK1-hi tumor cells. (genengnews.com)
  • Model-generated hypotheses were validated in multiple glioblastoma cell lines, in mouse tumor xenografts, and through analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas data. (aacrjournals.org)
  • NANOG confers resistance to complement-dependent cytotoxicity in immune-edited tumor cells through up-regulating CD59. (nih.gov)
  • Nanog, as a key cancer stem cell marker in tumor progression. (nih.gov)
  • Soluble and transmembrane SCF is produced by fibroblasts and endothelial cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Instead, stem cells are being induced to make fibroblasts by implanting fibroblast DNA into a ghost cell. (gcimagazine.com)
  • Even the use of stem cells in plastic surgery is primarily with the hope that they will become growth factor production cells, such as fibroblasts or macrophages. (gcimagazine.com)
  • It is this special shape that makes growth factors from stem cells and fibroblasts much more stable and active in the skin. (gcimagazine.com)
  • Reduces signs of aging skin- by helping to create new cells and stimulate fibroblasts (collagen and elastin) skin will be able to replenish what's lost on the cellular level. (beverlyhillsplasticsurgerygroup.com)
  • Identifying this essential factor not only helps us understand the biology of adult germline stem cells but could also allow us to one day reprogram somatic cells, like a type of skin cell called fibroblasts, to become germline stem cells, essentially creating a gamete in a petri dish. (justcarehealth.com)
  • 10. Kamata N, Fujimoto R, Tomonari M, Taki M, Nagayama M, Yasumoto S. Immortalization of human dental papilla, dental pulp, periodontal ligament cells and gingival fibroblasts by telomerase reverse transcriptase. (bvsalud.org)
  • Emerging evidence suggests that myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factors act as effectors of neurogenesis in the brain, with MEF2C the predominant isoform in developing cerebrocortex. (ca.gov)
  • The capability of these cells to differentiate depends on the stem cell type, the regulation of gene expression by various transcription factors and interaction with the stem cell niche 1,4 . (biolegend.com)
  • Transcription factors are proteins that regulate the transcription of genes, or the production of mRNA from DNA. (biolegend.com)
  • Transcription factors have an important role in the ability of a cell to self-renew and also differentiate into most cell types, also known as pluripotency 1 . (biolegend.com)
  • View our full list of available antibodies for transcription factors . (biolegend.com)
  • RUNX1 belongs to the runt domain family of transcription factors and regulates target gene expression through forming a heterodimeric DNA-binding complex with CBFB. (biolegend.com)
  • Finally, we show that LIF increases the expression of the core transcription factors: Klf4, Fbx15, Nanog, Sox2 and c-Myc. (karger.com)
  • The scientists discovered that DOT1L appeared to be controlling the Hoxc gene family, transcription factors that are important in controlling the expression of a variety of other genes. (justcarehealth.com)
  • These transcription factors probably contribute to the stem cell self-renewal process. (justcarehealth.com)
  • Tras analizar mediante RT-qPCR diferentes marcadores de células madre tumorales (SOX2, OCT4, CD133, CD44 y CD24) en células de cáncer de páncreas tratadas con diferentes protocolos quimioterapéuticos, el Oxaliplatino y la Gemcitabina en monoterapia fueron los quimioterápicos que seleccionaron en mayor medida las células madre cancerosas mientras que el protocolo FOLFIRI las disminuyó. (isciii.es)
  • The reporter responds to the activity of stemness master transcriptional factors SOX2 and OCT4 through six concatenated repeats of a SOX2/OCT4 response element (SORE6) [ 14 ]. (springer.com)
  • Ultimately, the CU scientists conducted a proteomic analysis that revealed an interaction between CDK1 and the pluripotent stem cell transcription factor Sox2. (genengnews.com)
  • Sox2 is a transcription factor that helps embryonic and neural stem cells keep their stem-ness. (genengnews.com)
  • It's very difficult to control a transcription factor like Sox2. (genengnews.com)
  • We can show Sox2 is very important for tumorigenesis, but it's difficult to have a Sox2 inhibitor," says Mayumi Fujita, M.D., Ph.D., an investigator at the CU Cancer Center and senior author of the current study, which found that CDK1 directly interacts with Sox2 to keep cancer cells "stemmy. (genengnews.com)
  • Importantly, this signature of MHC Class 1, CDK1, and Sox2 was common across melanoma, colon, and pancreatic cancers, implying that cancer stem cells across cancer types may share common features. (genengnews.com)
  • SCF is expressed along the pathways that the germ cells use to reach their terminal destination in the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Typically, only a fraction of 1% of topically applied growth factors will actually penetrate the skin enough to activate anti-aging pathways. (gcimagazine.com)
  • Pathway analysis revealed the differential expression of genes involved in cell cycle maintenance and apoptosis, as well as genes in bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Notch, Wnt, EPH, and MYC signaling pathways. (utmb.edu)
  • Dr. Sieck has developed an extensive array of state-of-the-art physiological, molecular and biomedical engineering techniques to explore cell signaling pathways. (mayo.edu)
  • Using the Drosophila testis model, we show that germline stem cells (GSCs) lacking the transcription factor Chinmo gain a competitive advantage for niche access. (lu.se)
  • Understanding what governs these properties at the molecular level is crucial for stem cell biology and its application to regenerative medicine. (lu.se)
  • Although T-cell depletion is increasingly used to reduce the risk of graft-versus-host disease its impact on the graft-versus-leukemia effect and long-term outcome post-transplant is unknown. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Aerosolized formulations of amphotericin B may be considered as prophylaxis in patients with prolonged neutropenia (patients receiving induction/reinduction therapy for acute leukemia and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients following conditioning or during treatment of graft versus host disease) and in lung transplant recipients. (medscape.com)
  • The scientists demonstrated that animals lacking DOT1L are unable to maintain spermatogonial stem cells, which affects their capacity to constantly make sperm. (justcarehealth.com)
  • treated spermatogonial stem cells with a substance that inhibits the methyltransferase activity of DOT1L to test if the same mechanism was in charge of the outcomes they had seen in sperm formation. (justcarehealth.com)
  • Additionally, the activity of the animals' spermatogonial stem cells was reduced in half after these treated stem cells were implanted into otherwise healthy mice. (justcarehealth.com)
  • Reprogramming somatic cells to become spermatogonial stem cells is one of the steps. (justcarehealth.com)
  • Stem cells can also be encouraged to grow skin-targeted growth factors by leaving them in the same growth media as a fibroblast. (gcimagazine.com)
  • Fibroblast (cell control) and phosphate buffered saline (vehicle control) injection did not improve erectile function. (cellsurgicalnetwork.com)
  • Here we define a 4-color flow cytometry panel using CD133, LeX, CD140a, NG2 to define a neural stem cell (NSC) as well as 4 classes of multipotential progenitors and 3 classes of bipotential progenitors, several of which have not been described previously. (karger.com)
  • We performed gain and loss of function studies for leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and showed a depletion of NSCs, a subset of multipotential neural precursors and immature oligodendrocytes in LIF null mice. (karger.com)
  • One of the key areas in stem cell research is the identification of factors capable of promoting the expansion of Neural Stem Cell/Progenitor Cells (NSPCs) and understanding their molecular mechanisms for future use in clinical settings. (elsevierpure.com)
  • SCF may serve as guidance cues that direct hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to their stem cell niche (the microenvironment in which a stem cell resides), and it plays an important role in HSC maintenance. (wikipedia.org)
  • RUNX1-deficient mice fail to generate hematopoietic stem cells. (biolegend.com)
  • The transplant procedure requires the harvesting of hematopoietic stem cells from a donor. (medscape.com)
  • Reprogramming committed murine blood cells to induced hematopoietic stem cells with defined factors. (bvsalud.org)
  • leading to the release or mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells from the bone marrow into the periphery. (stemcell.com)
  • KIT protein signaling is important for the development and function of certain cell types, including reproductive cells (germ cells), early blood cells (hematopoietic stem cells), white blood cells called mast cells, cells in the gastrointestinal tract called interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), and cells called melanocytes. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Detection of galactomannan (a component of the Aspergillus cell wall) in serum or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid is recommended as an accurate marker for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis in adults and children, when used in certain patient subpopulations, such as hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients or patients with hematologic malignancies. (medscape.com)
  • SCF plays a role in the regulation of HSCs in the stem cell niche in the bone marrow. (wikipedia.org)
  • It causes a significant decrease in the number HSC and other hematopoietic progenitor cells in the bone marrow. (wikipedia.org)
  • The stem cell source may be bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood. (medscape.com)
  • This is a video of real surgery in which I harvest the patients stem cells from his bone marrow in the same shoulder were I am repairing his rotator cuff. (drlintner.com)
  • Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been reported to have a potential therapeutic role on SAP, but the specific mechanism is unclear. (drcalapai.com)
  • The objective of this article was to evaluate how these chemotherapeutic regimens affect the proportion of cancer stem cells and the expression of stemness markers. (isciii.es)
  • Following verification of a stem-like signature (upregulated expression of stemness markers, resistance to chemotherapy, increased spheroid formation, and tumorigenesis capabilities despite inoculation of a small number of cells), we analyzed the interaction of these cells with macrophages via direct and indirect coculture assays. (springer.com)
  • DAPI negative, single living cells were first separated with epithelial marker CD24 and hematopoietic and endothelial lineage marker CD45/31. (jci.org)
  • Our study also suggests that BMP antagonists are candidate signaling components that make up the intestinal epithelial stem cell niche. (utmb.edu)
  • NANOG regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition via AMPK/mTOR signalling pathway in ovarian cancer SKOV-3 and A2780 cells. (nih.gov)
  • The epitranscriptomic effect of Cr(VI) was determined in Cr(VI)-transformed human bronchial epithelial cells, chromate-exposed mouse and human lungs. (cdc.gov)
  • Novel Roles of Nanog in Cancer Cells and Their Extracellular Vesicles. (nih.gov)
  • A stochastic treatment of the network dynamics suggests that NANOG heterogeneity is the deciding factor for the stem cell fate. (lu.se)
  • In particular, our results show that the decision of staying in the ground state or commitment to a differentiated state is fundamentally stochastic, and can be modulated by the addition of external factors (2i/3i media), which have the effect of reducing fluctuations in NANOG expression. (lu.se)
  • Stem cell factor (also known as SCF, KIT-ligand, KL, or steel factor) is a cytokine that binds to the c-KIT receptor (CD117). (wikipedia.org)
  • Once the transcription factor binds to an enhancer region, this can cause stimulation or repression of gene transcription. (biolegend.com)
  • The KIT protein is found in the cell membrane of certain cell types where a specific protein, called stem cell factor, attaches (binds) to it. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Stem cells are unique due to their ability to limitlessly self-renew and differentiate into each cell type in the adult body. (biolegend.com)
  • Stem cells rely on extracellular signals produced by the niche, which dictate their ability to self-renew, expand and differentiate. (karger.com)
  • are biological cells that can divide and have the unique ability to differentiate into specialized cells, can self-renew and produce more stem cells. (beverlyhillsplasticsurgerygroup.com)
  • We have developed a robust and efficient method to differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into induced functional hepatocytes, which exhibits characteristics of mouse hepatocytes. (niscair.res.in)
  • A computational approach can be used as a framework to explore the dynamics of a simplified network of the ESC with the aim to understand how stem cells differentiate and also how they can be reprogrammed from somatic cells. (lu.se)
  • This feature on cell-cell communication is adapted from part of Chapter 4 of the 2023 Spatial and Single-cell Playbook. (frontlinegenomics.com)
  • Stem cell-based regenerative therapy is a promising treatment for head and neck cancer patients that suffer from chronic dry mouth (xerostomia) due to salivary gland injury from radiation therapy. (jci.org)
  • In both 2D and 3D cultures, stemness marker gene expression is higher in CD117+ cells. (biorxiv.org)
  • Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), distributed in many tissues in the human body, are multipotent cells capable of differentiating in specific directions. (wjgnet.com)
  • (C) Aggrecan-to-type II collagen gene-expression ratio in BM and AD-MSCs after culture in type I collagen hydrogels for 14 days with either no growth factor, TGF-β, GDF5, or GDF6. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Approximately 50 years have passed since MSC-like cells were first discovered, and many studies have been carried out to outline the characteristics of MSCs and to investigate their potential therapeutic implications in regenerative medicine and immunomodulation. (aibg.it)
  • Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown as a novel approach in tissue regeneration, the therapeutic potential of MSCs mediated by the interaction between MSC-derived paracrine mediators and Mφs remains elusive. (frontiersin.org)
  • In fact, fetal HSCs in cell culture are 6 times more sensitive to SCF than adult HSCs based on the concentration that allows maximum survival. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here, we identified and characterized a stem cell population from adult murine submandibular glands. (jci.org)
  • In addition to hematopoietic cells, G-CSF is also expressed in cardiomyocytes, neuronal cells, mesothelial cells, and endothelial cells. (stemcell.com)
  • In spermatogenesis, c-KIT is expressed in primordial germ cells, spermatogonia, and in primordial oocytes. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is also expressed in the primordial germ cells of females. (wikipedia.org)
  • So they made the decision to investigate what would happen if they altered the gene just in these germ cells. (justcarehealth.com)
  • In a second experiment, the researchers looked at what would happen if DOT1L was inactivated in germ cells throughout adulthood rather than at birth. (justcarehealth.com)
  • Wang and colleagues found that the identical progressive loss of sperm development they had seen in the mice born without DOT1L in their germ cells occurred as soon as the DOT1L loss was activated. (justcarehealth.com)
  • The idea is to generate germ cells from scratch. (justcarehealth.com)
  • Administration of GDNF improved saliva production and enriched the number of functional acini in submandibular glands of irradiated animals and enhanced salisphere formation in cultured salivary stem cells, but did not accelerate growth of head and neck cancer cells. (jci.org)
  • The "stem cell theory of cancer" states that a subpopulation of cells with stem cell-like properties plays a central role in the formation, sustainment, spread, and drug resistant characteristics of malignant tumors. (medscape.com)
  • These findings provide supporting evidence that enrichment for proteins involved in pluripotency is not restricted solely to malignant tumors as is suggested by the "stem cell theory of cancer", but additionally extends to common benign vascular tumors such as hemangiomas. (medscape.com)
  • Researchers have discovered that chromatin accessibility is heavily influenced by a key transcription factor that is linked to cancer. (frontlinegenomics.com)
  • To determine how CD117 expression and activation by its ligand stem cell factor (SCF, kit ligand, steel factor) alter prostate cancer aggressiveness, we used LNCaP-C4-2 and PC3-mm human prostate cancer cells, which contain a CD117+ subpopulation. (biorxiv.org)
  • Recurrence and chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer are largely related to cancer stem cells. (isciii.es)
  • Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to the underlying reason for cancer initiation, metastasis, and relapse. (springer.com)
  • However, due to their elusive character and differences in identification among different types of cancer, it remains a challenge to study such cells. (springer.com)
  • Here, we employ a fluorescent reporter system to track and isolate stem-like cancer cells of cholangiocarcinoma cell lines. (springer.com)
  • This thought may have occurred to scientists at the University of Colorado (CU) Cancer Center when they began looking at a population of cancer cells that, unlike most cancer cells, avoids downregulating MHC Class I molecules. (genengnews.com)
  • Cancer cells tend to deemphasize these molecules because they can display abnormal proteins and attract the immune system's attention. (genengnews.com)
  • Cancer cells that carry a normal number or a surplus of MHC Class I molecules are conspicuously, well, inconspicuous. (genengnews.com)
  • It is also a known marker of cancer stem cells, implicated in the development of more than 25 forms of the disease. (genengnews.com)
  • Chronic hexavalent chromium exposure upregulates the RNA methyltransferase METTL3 expression to promote cell transformation, cancer stem cell-like property, and tumorigenesis. (cdc.gov)
  • The epitranscriptomic effect and its role in Cr(VI)-induced cell transformation, cancer stem cell (CSC)-like property and tumorigenesis were determined by microarray analysis, soft agar colony formation, suspension spheroid formation and mouse xenograft tumorigenesis assays. (cdc.gov)
  • Based on statistical modelling, the authors suggested that "only a third of the variation in cancer risk among tissues is attributable to environmental factors or inherited predispositions. (cdc.gov)
  • Immediately, scientific and public health communities not only questioned the scientific methods and interpretation of the results of the paper but counteracted the notion of bad luck with the message that we can act to prevent many cancers by acting on what we already know from cancer risk factors. (cdc.gov)
  • Even for diseases with strong risk factors such as cigarette smoking and lung cancer, most smokers will not develop lung cancer. (cdc.gov)
  • When smokers develop lung cancer, is it because of bad luck or because they have other known risk factors (such as family history, radon exposure) or because of unknown factors? (cdc.gov)
  • The bottom line for cancer and for most human diseases, the notion of bad luck for each one of us should be reconciled with the evolving scientific knowledge on genetic and environmental factors associated with disease risk and progression. (cdc.gov)
  • RUNX1 regulates CD4 gene transcription during multiple stages of T cell development and represses the CD4 gene in CD4-CD8- (double negative) T cells. (biolegend.com)
  • The MHC Class I-high cells also expressed high levels of CDK1, a "normal" molecule that regulates the cell cycle. (genengnews.com)
  • Rb , or retinoblastoma protein, is a key regulator of the cell cycle, particularly during the transition from the G1 to S phases. (biolegend.com)
  • Within the brain, the protein is involved in the development of specialized cells that process smell. (biolegend.com)
  • This binding turns on (activates) the KIT protein, which then activates other proteins inside the cell by adding a cluster of oxygen and phosphorus atoms (a phosphate group) at specific positions. (medlineplus.gov)
  • KIT gene mutations associated with GISTs create a protein that no longer requires binding of the stem cell factor protein to be activated. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Measuring protein phosphorylation and expression in glioblastoma cells across 40 signaling pathway nodes in response to different drugs and for different oxygen tensions revealed that SHP2 antagonism has network-level, context-dependent signaling consequences that affect cell phenotypes (e.g., cell death) in unanticipated ways. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Rb homeostasis is also essential for self-renewal and survival of human embryonic stem cells 10 . (biolegend.com)
  • DESIGN AND METHODS: We have characterized pre- and post-transplant factors determining overall survival in 168 patients with acute myeloid leukemia transplanted using an alemtuzumab based reduced intensity conditioning regimen with a median duration of follow-up of 37 months. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Previous studies have juxtaposed and analyzed immune cell compartments between different CCA categorizations such as short or long-term overall survival (OS) [ 16 ]. (springer.com)
  • Dr. Sieck hypothesizes that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through the high-affinity TrkB receptor is involved in motor neuron survival, and that disruptions in this important signaling pathway underlie age-related death of larger phrenic motor neurons that comprise more-fatigable fast twitch diaphragm motor units. (mayo.edu)
  • The optimal stem cell (SC) mobilization strategy for patients with multiple myeloma (MM) remains a matter of debate. (univpm.it)
  • Stem cells compete for limited niche resources, but the mechanisms regulating competition are poorly understood. (lu.se)
  • Our results suggest that the influence of GSC competition may extend beyond individual stem cell niche dynamics to population-level allelic drift and evolution. (lu.se)
  • However, there remains a great deal of confusion about the differences between growth factors, stem cells, plant stem cells and other related technologies. (gcimagazine.com)
  • They are not making growth factors or activating wound-healing the way stem cell technology does. (gcimagazine.com)
  • Let's be clear: If you are simply using stem cells, the growth factors that might be made-and there's no guarantee a cell will make growth factors-are less likely to be skin-specific. (gcimagazine.com)
  • All cells are grown in an environment that is typically called "growth media. (gcimagazine.com)
  • It is the concentration of growth factors in the growth media, their stability, their delivery system and the amount of growth media used, that ultimately determine how effective a product can be. (gcimagazine.com)
  • What aging skin really needs are growth factors. (gcimagazine.com)
  • The research shows that growth factors have the potential to increase collagen production and improve wound-healing, among other improvements. (gcimagazine.com)
  • It is preferable that growth factors have a delivery system, such as liposomes, but there is promising new research on a process that creates growth factors that are enveloped in an exoskeleton that the cells naturally form. (gcimagazine.com)
  • Without a stability system, growth factors will fall apart in the bottle or on the skin. (gcimagazine.com)
  • Exoskeletons are a breakthrough, but there are other stabilized growth factors on the market. (gcimagazine.com)
  • Most growth factors made individually are created by programming Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. (gcimagazine.com)
  • This process can match the amino acids, creating a bioidentical version, but it cannot mimic the three-dimensionality of human cell-derived growth factors. (gcimagazine.com)
  • The other problem with E. coli-generated growth factors is that they force formulators to only use a few of the 150 different options the skin works with, and this can lead to abnormal wound-healing. (gcimagazine.com)
  • Research has shown that too much epidermal growth factor (EGF), for example, may push precancerous cells to become cancerous. (gcimagazine.com)
  • This has not been shown when the full complement of 150 growth factors has been applied topically. (gcimagazine.com)
  • Analysis of BM and AD-MSC response to growth-factor stimulation in pellet culture. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Relative gene expression was normalized to mean housekeeping-gene expression and cells without growth-factor stimulation and plotted on a log scale. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Peptides, Stem Cells & Growth Factors: What's All the Buzz About? (beverlyhillsplasticsurgerygroup.com)
  • Peptides, Stem Cells & Growth Factors-They are the biggest buzz words in the skin care world today- but are they actually benefiting you? (beverlyhillsplasticsurgerygroup.com)
  • On the subject, Dr John Layke had this to say, "Specific peptides and growth factors will be the next generation of improving the aesthetic appearance. (beverlyhillsplasticsurgerygroup.com)
  • There are many different growth factors that assign different functions. (beverlyhillsplasticsurgerygroup.com)
  • For example, some growth factors activate white blood cells, while others direct cells to generate collagen and elastin (these are the fibers responsible for keeping our skin plump and tight). (beverlyhillsplasticsurgerygroup.com)
  • Because growth factors assign specific functions to the cells, they are preferred over stem cells because they assign specific functions to the cells. (beverlyhillsplasticsurgerygroup.com)
  • but the growth factors have demonstrated greater improvement. (beverlyhillsplasticsurgerygroup.com)
  • Furthermore, human-derived growth factors are safer than human-derived stem cells because there is no risk of infection or rejection associated with them. (beverlyhillsplasticsurgerygroup.com)
  • Description: This is Double-antibody Sandwich Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Pig Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) in serum, plasma, tissue homogenates and other biological fluids. (stemcellcharter.org)
  • Description: This is Double-antibody Sandwich Chemiluminescent immunoassay for detection of Pig Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) in serum, plasma and other biological fluids. (stemcellcharter.org)
  • Packed with high-potency growth factors, these products promise to leave the skin looking and feeling youthful, fresh, and radiant. (singaporeherald.com)
  • Within their high-potency serums are ingredients such as retinoids and growth factors known to promote enduring skin health. (singaporeherald.com)
  • Or they weave a whopper that equates the marvels of human stem cells and the growth factors they make with swiss apple tree clippings and garden snail snot. (barefacedtruth.com)
  • As is often the case, there are those individuals and companies who will want to exploit that image to their economic advantage, and may even resort to painting it on a product that in reality has little or nothing to do with stem cells or growth factors. (barefacedtruth.com)
  • New surgical video on Rotator Cuff Repair Augmented with Stem Cells and Growth Factors. (drlintner.com)
  • We have the technology to prepare the stem cells and growth factors in the OR while the repair is being completed, then injecting them into the repair site to foster more rapid and thorough healing. (drlintner.com)
  • The treatment aims to release growth factors to stimulate stem cells and produce new cartilage cells. (lu.se)
  • Gene-expression analysis revealed that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor ( Gdnf ) is highly expressed in Lin - CD24 + c-Kit + Sca1 + stem cells. (jci.org)
  • Single-cell analysis revealed that iHSCs derived under optimal conditions exhibit a gene expression profile that is highly similar to endogenous HSCs. (bvsalud.org)
  • By chance, the researchers discovered DOT1L's function in stem cell self-renewal. (justcarehealth.com)
  • a number of lines of research suggested a connection between DOT1L and a lack of stem cell self-renewal. (justcarehealth.com)
  • We're in the early stages of envisioning how to accomplish this multi-step process, but identifying this self-renewal factor brings us one step closer. (justcarehealth.com)
  • Longer term objectives include employing DOT1L and other germline stem cell self-renewal factors to assist individuals with reproductive issues. (justcarehealth.com)
  • This article focuses on the common infections in patients who have undergone HSCT, the risk factors for these infections, and the approaches to their prevention and treatment. (medscape.com)
  • Our model also hosts reprogramming of a committed cell into an ESC by over-expressing OCT4. (lu.se)
  • Furthermore, the model (iv) provides a framework for reprogramming from somatic cells and conveys an understanding of reprogramming efficiency as a function of OCT4 over-expression. (lu.se)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Disease stage, presentation karyotype and post-transplant CsA exposure are important predictors of outcome in patients undergoing a T-cell depleted reduced intensity conditioning allograft for acute myeloid leukemia. (ox.ac.uk)
  • These data confirm the presence of a potent graft-versus-leukemia effect after a T-cell depleted reduced intensity conditioning allograft in acute myeloid leukemia and identify CsA exposure as a manipulable determinant of outcome in this setting. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Of particular relevance is to elucidate those molecular interactions which govern the reprogramming of somatic cells into ESC. (lu.se)
  • Cells with altered KIT proteins are more active than normal, leading to increased immune responses and signs and symptoms of systemic mastocytosis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • CD117 by immunohistochemical methods sion molecules, involved in cell-cell and in order to clarify the role of the infiltrating cell matrix interactions and thought to take inflammatory cells in the pathomechanisms part in cell motility [ 2,3 ]. (who.int)
  • The cell population displayed an immunophenotype compatible to the one of stem cells, with remarkable positive expression of CD117. (bvsalud.org)
  • The underphosphorylated, active form of Rb interacts directly with E2F1 , leading to cell cycle arrest, while the hyperphosphorylated form decouples from E2F1, thus promoting the transcription of genes promoting entry into the S phase. (biolegend.com)
  • Saito M. Cells, 2022 Dec 1. (nih.gov)
  • Nat Cell Biol, 2022 May. (nih.gov)
  • La información en esta página debería ser considerada como ejemplos de información de antecedentes para la temporada de influenza 2021-2022 para la práctica médica respecto del uso de medicamentos antivirales contra la influenza. (cdc.gov)
  • Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) incidence has increased over the past two decades. (hindawi.com)
  • Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 3% of human malignancies, and its incidence appears to be increasing globally [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • No risk factors of hospital stay prolongation were determined. (nature.com)
  • Healthcare providers should recognize underlying risk factors for severe disease, optimize immune function, and when appropriate, initiate medical countermeasures (such as tecovirimat and vaccinia immunoglobulin) early to prevent or mitigate severe disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Healthcare providers should be aware of risk factors for severe manifestations of monkeypox and should conduct HIV testing for people with confirmed or suspected monkeypox. (cdc.gov)
  • There is also increasing evidence that the interaction between genetic and environmental risk factors can increase risk for a wide variety of cancers. (cdc.gov)
  • Melanoblasts express the KIT receptor, and it is believed that SCF guides these cells to their terminal locations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mast cells are the only terminally differentiated hematopoietic cells that express the c-Kit receptor. (wikipedia.org)
  • The G-CSF receptor is expressed on a variety of hematopoietic cells, including myeloid-committed progenitor cells, neutrophils, granulocytes, and monocytes. (stemcell.com)
  • Receptor tyrosine kinases transmit signals from the cell surface into the cell through a process called signal transduction. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Rotator Cuff Repair can be improved by using the patient's own stem cells to stimulate healing. (drlintner.com)
  • Many companies offer plant stem cells, but they are not like human stem cells and do not provide any of the benefits of human stem cells. (gcimagazine.com)
  • Human stem cells are primarily being harvested from adults and have, therefore, become less controversial than in the past. (gcimagazine.com)
  • Mice with SCF or c-Kit mutations have severe defects in the production of mast cells, having less than 1% of the normal levels of mast cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systemic mastocytosis occurs when mast cells abnormally accumulate in tissues. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Mast cells normally trigger inflammation during an allergic reaction and signal an immune response when they are activated by an environmental trigger. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In most cases of systemic mastocytosis, the accumulated mast cells have a KIT gene mutation. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In systemic mastocytosis, the excess mast cells lead to an increased immune response and signs and symptoms similar to an allergic reaction, such as skin redness and warmth (flushing), nausea, abdominal pain, nasal congestion, low blood pressure (hypotension), and headache. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a life-threate- disorders and to shed a light on the role of ning blistering skin disease in which pa- mast cells in autoimmune diseases [ 7 ]. (who.int)
  • Results: In a cohort consisting of 442 HLA-matched sibling patient and donor pairs where the transplants were non T cell depleted, a strong association existed between clinical risk score and both the incidence of acute GvHD II-IV and chronic GvHD. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • It was established that the association between outcome and clinical risk score was still strong in a full cohort comprising of T cell replete and depleted patients (HLA matched siblings and unrelated donors). (ncl.ac.uk)
  • Conclusion: Preliminary analysis has demonstrated that a statistical model can be constructed to predict occurrence of acute GvHD II-IV and chronic GvHD using clinical factors. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • Genetic factors could improve the goodness of fit of a model when viewed alongside a clinical risk score, however, we were unable to confirm the result in a second cohort. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • Apparently, induction of functional hepatocytes will pave a better cellular therapy or effective cell source within a short timeline to facilitate the development of hepatocytes for future clinical applications of regenerative medicine. (niscair.res.in)
  • Our results raise the prospect that blood cell reprogramming may be a strategy for derivation of transplantable stem cells for clinical application. (bvsalud.org)
  • although it is derived from cells of the renal tubular epithelium, it has several histological subtypes which differ in their clinical outcome and biological features. (hindawi.com)
  • It relies on a combination of clinical, radiologic, and microbiological factors. (medscape.com)