A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.
A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.
Therapeutic approach tailoring therapy for genetically defined subgroups of patients.
A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.
A specialty field of radiology concerned with diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative use of radioactive compounds in a pharmaceutical form.
Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.
System of herbal medicine practiced in Japan by both herbalists and practitioners of modern medicine. Kampo originated in China and is based on Chinese herbal medicine (MEDICINE, CHINESE TRADITIONAL).
The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.
'History of Medicine' is a branch of knowledge that deals with the evolution, development, and progression of healthcare practices, medical theories, institutions, and personalities from ancient times to the present.
The study and practice of medicine by direct examination of the patient.
Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.
A field of medicine concerned with developing and using strategies aimed at repair or replacement of damaged, diseased, or metabolically deficient organs, tissues, and cells via TISSUE ENGINEERING; CELL TRANSPLANTATION; and ARTIFICIAL ORGANS and BIOARTIFICIAL ORGANS and tissues.
The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.
An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)
The traditional Hindu system of medicine which is based on customs, beliefs, and practices of the Hindu culture. Ayurveda means "the science of Life": veda - science, ayur - life.
Therapeutic practices which are not currently considered an integral part of conventional allopathic medical practice. They may lack biomedical explanations but as they become better researched some (PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES; DIET; ACUPUNCTURE) become widely accepted whereas others (humors, radium therapy) quietly fade away, yet are important historical footnotes. Therapies are termed as Complementary when used in addition to conventional treatments and as Alternative when used instead of conventional treatment.
The discipline concerned with using the combination of conventional ALLOPATHIC MEDICINE and ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE to address the biological, psychological, social, and spiritual aspects of health and illness.
A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.
The field of medicine concerned with physical fitness and the diagnosis and treatment of injuries sustained in exercise and sports activities.
Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.
A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.
A medical specialty concerned with the use of physical agents, mechanical apparatus, and manipulation in rehabilitating physically diseased or injured patients.
Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.
The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.
Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.
An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.
Drugs considered essential to meet the health needs of a population as well as to control drug costs.
Medical specialty concerned with environmental factors that may impinge upon human disease, and development of methods for the detection, prevention, and control of environmentally related disease.
Medical practice or discipline that is based on the knowledge, cultures, and beliefs of the people of KOREA.
Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.
A branch of medicine concerned with the total health of the individual within the home environment and in the community, and with the application of comprehensive care to the prevention and treatment of illness in the entire community.
The branch of medicine concerned with diseases, mainly of parasitic origin, common in tropical and subtropical regions.
Use for general articles concerning medical education.
A course of study offered by an educational institution.
A branch of medicine concerned with the role of socio-environmental factors in the occurrence, prevention and treatment of disease.
Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.
The interrelationship of medicine and religion.
A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.
A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of SLEEP WAKE DISORDERS and their causes.
Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.
The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.
The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.
Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.
Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
A medical specialty primarily concerned with prevention of disease (PRIMARY PREVENTION) and the promotion and preservation of health in the individual.
Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.
The alterations of modes of medical practice, induced by the threat of liability, for the principal purposes of forestalling lawsuits by patients as well as providing good legal defense in the event that such lawsuits are instituted.
Medical philosophy is a branch of philosophy that deals with the concepts, values, and nature of medicine, including its ethical implications, epistemological foundations, and societal impact, aimed at informing and improving medical practice, research, and education.
A branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the oral and paraoral structures and the oral management of systemic diseases. (Hall, What is Oral Medicine, Anyway? Clinical Update: National Naval Dental Center, March 1991, p7-8)
Selection of a type of occupation or profession.
Branch of medicine involved with management and organization of public health response to disasters and major events including the special health and medical needs of a community in a disaster.
Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.
The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
Material prepared from plants.
A medical-surgical specialty concerned with the morphology, physiology, biochemistry, and pathology of reproduction in man and other animals, and on the biological, medical, and veterinary problems of fertility and lactation. It includes ovulation induction, diagnosis of infertility and recurrent pregnancy loss, and assisted reproductive technologies such as embryo transfer, in vitro fertilization, and intrafallopian transfer of zygotes. (From Infertility and Reproductive Medicine Clinics of North America, Foreword 1990; Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, Notice to Contributors, Jan 1979)
Hospital department responsible for the administration and management of nuclear medicine services.
Health as viewed from the perspective that humans and other organisms function as complete, integrated units rather than as aggregates of separate parts.
Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.
A system of therapeutics founded by Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843), based on the Law of Similars where "like cures like". Diseases are treated by highly diluted substances that cause, in healthy persons, symptoms like those of the disease to be treated.
Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.
"Medicine in Art" refers to the depiction or use of medical themes, practices, or symbolism in various art forms, such as paintings, sculptures, literature, and performing arts, often serving educational, historical, or aesthetic purposes.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.
Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.
The interdisciplinary field concerned with the development and integration of behavioral and biomedical science, knowledge, and techniques relevant to health and illness and the application of this knowledge and these techniques to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.
Drugs intended for human or veterinary use, presented in their finished dosage form. Included here are materials used in the preparation and/or formulation of the finished dosage form.
Medicines that can be sold legally without a DRUG PRESCRIPTION.
The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.
Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.
Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.
A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM. It is especially concerned with diagnosis and treatment of diseases and defects of the lungs and bronchial tree.
Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.
Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.
The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.
Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.
The self administration of medication not prescribed by a physician or in a manner not directed by a physician.
Individuals licensed to practice medicine.
Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
Traditional Arabic methods used in medicine in the ARAB WORLD.
Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.
The educational process of instructing.
The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.
The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.
Laws concerned with manufacturing, dispensing, and marketing of drugs.
A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.
The interactions between physician and patient.
The effect of herbs, other PLANTS, or PLANT EXTRACTS on the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of drugs.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
A branch of medicine which deals with sexually transmitted disease.
A drugless system of therapy, making use of physical forces such as air, light, water, heat, massage. Treatments are often diet- and nutrition-oriented with attention given to the patient's personal history and lifestyle. (From Cassileth, Alternative Medicine Handbook, 1998, p329)
The field of medicine concerned with understanding the biochemical basis of health and disease and involved in developing diagnostic and therapeutic methods that utilize MOLECULAR BIOLOGY techniques.
Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.
The Nobel Prize is not a medical term, but a prestigious international award given annually in several categories, including Physiology or Medicine, for significant contributions to humanity that have conferred the greatest benefit to mankind.
Time period from 1401 through 1500 of the common era.
Women licensed to practice medicine.
A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.
Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.
Mystical, religious, or spiritual practices performed for health benefit.
The vital life force in the body, supposedly able to be regulated by acupuncture. It corresponds roughly to the Greek pneuma, the Latin spiritus, and the ancient Indian prana. The concept of life-breath or vital energy was formulated as an indication of the awareness of man, originally directed externally toward nature or society but later turned inward to the self or life within. (From Comparison between Concepts of Life-Breath in East and West, 15th International Symposium on the Comparative History of Medicine - East and West, August 26-September 3, 1990, Shizuoka, Japan, pp. ix-x)
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
Time period from 1501 through 1600 of the common era.
The application of medical knowledge to questions of law.
That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.
The branch of medicine concerned with the physiological and pathological aspects of the aged, including the clinical problems of senescence and senility.
Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.
Facilities for the preparation and dispensing of drugs.
"The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.
Treatment of disease by inserting needles along specific pathways or meridians. The placement varies with the disease being treated. It is sometimes used in conjunction with heat, moxibustion, acupressure, or electric stimulation.
The use of DRUGS to treat a DISEASE or its symptoms. One example is the use of ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS to treat CANCER.
Created 7 April 1992 as a result of the division of Yugoslavia.
Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.
The expected function of a member of the medical profession.
Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.
The application of scientific knowledge or technology to the field of radiology. The applications center mostly around x-ray or radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes but the technological applications of any radiation or radiologic procedure is within the scope of radiologic technology.
The study of plant lore and agricultural customs of a people. In the fields of ETHNOMEDICINE and ETHNOPHARMACOLOGY, the emphasis is on traditional medicine and the existence and medicinal uses of PLANTS and PLANT EXTRACTS and their constituents, both historically and in modern times.
Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.
The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.
The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.
Services providing pharmaceutic and therapeutic drug information and consultation.
Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.
The occupational discipline of the traditional Chinese methods of ACUPUNCTURE THERAPY for treating disease by inserting needles along specific pathways or meridians.
Great Britain is not a medical term, but a geographical name for the largest island in the British Isles, which comprises England, Scotland, and Wales, forming the major part of the United Kingdom.
A branch of genetics which deals with the genetic variability in individual responses to drugs and drug metabolism (BIOTRANSFORMATION).
The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.
Restoration of human functions to the maximum degree possible in a person or persons suffering from disease or injury.
The application of discoveries generated by laboratory research and preclinical studies to the development of clinical trials and studies in humans. A second area of translational research concerns enhancing the adoption of best practices.
The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).
A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Tibetan culture.
In Chinese philosophy and religion, two principles, one negative, dark, and feminine (yin) and one positive, bright, and masculine (yang), from whose interaction all things are produced and all things are dissolved. As a concept the two polar elements referred originally to the shady and sunny sides of a valley or a hill but it developed into the relationship of any contrasting pair: those specified above (female-male, etc.) as well as cold-hot, wet-dry, weak-strong, etc. It is not a distinct system of thought by itself but permeates Chinese life and thought. A balance of yin and yang is essential to health. A deficiency of either principle can manifest as disease. (Encyclopedia Americana)
Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.
Physicians who serve in a medical and administrative capacity as head of an organized medical staff and who also may serve as liaison for the medical staff with the administration and governing board.
Drugs manufactured and sold with the intent to misrepresent its origin, authenticity, chemical composition, and or efficacy. Counterfeit drugs may contain inappropriate quantities of ingredients not listed on the label or package. In order to further deceive the consumer, the packaging, container, or labeling, may be inaccurate, incorrect, or fake.
The period of history before 500 of the common era.
Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)
Drugs whose drug name is not protected by a trademark. They may be manufactured by several companies.
The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.
The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.
Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.
A historical and cultural entity dispersed across the wide geographical area of Europe, as opposed to the East, Asia, and Africa. The term was used by scholars through the late medieval period. Thereafter, with the impact of colonialism and the transmission of cultures, Western World was sometimes expanded to include the Americas. (Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)
A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.
Multidisciplinary field focusing on prevention of infectious diseases and patient safety during international TRAVEL. Key element of patient's pre-travel visit to the physician is a health risk assessment.
The granting of a license to practice medicine.
Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.
Disorders that result from the intended use of PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. Included in this heading are a broad variety of chemically-induced adverse conditions due to toxicity, DRUG INTERACTIONS, and metabolic effects of pharmaceuticals.
Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis.
Physicians who are employed to work exclusively in hospital settings, primarily for managed care organizations. They are the attending or primary responsible physician for the patient during hospitalization.
The branch of pharmacology that deals directly with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in humans.
The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.
The relation between the mind and the body in a religious, social, spiritual, behavioral, and metaphysical context. This concept is significant in the field of alternative medicine. It differs from the relationship between physiologic processes and behavior where the emphasis is on the body's physiology ( = PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY).
Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.
A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
Major administrative divisions of the hospital.
Historically, the treatment of disease by the administration of animal organs or their extracts (after Brown-Sequard). At present synthetic preparations substitute for the extracts of a gland. (From Stedman, 26th ed)
Conferences, conventions or formal meetings usually attended by delegates representing a special field of interest.
Process that is gone through in order for a drug to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required pre-clinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance of the drug.
Educational programs designed to ensure that students attain prespecified levels of competence in a given field or training activity. Emphasis is on achievement or specified objectives.
The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.
The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.
Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.
The specialty related to the performance of techniques in clinical pathology such as those in hematology, microbiology, and other general clinical laboratory applications.
Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.
The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.
Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.
Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.
Musculoskeletal manipulation based on the principles of OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE developed in 1874 by Dr Andrew Taylor Still.
'Medical Libraries' are repositories or digital platforms that accumulate, organize, and provide access to a wide range of biomedical information resources including but not limited to books, journals, electronic databases, multimedia materials, and other evidence-based health data for the purpose of supporting and advancing clinical practice, education, research, and administration in healthcare.
Organizations which certify physicians and dentists as specialists in various fields of medical and dental practice.
A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.
The exchange of students or professional personnel between countries done under the auspices of an organization for the purpose of further education.
The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.
The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.
A medical-surgical specialty concerned with management and care of women during pregnancy, parturition, and the puerperium.
A modified Greco-Arabic medical system flourishing today as unani medicine. It was the product of Arab physicians and scholars captivated by Greek philosophy, science, and medicine. It is practiced today in India and Pakistan, largely as a type of herbal medicine. (From Magner, A History of Medicine, 1992, p136)
The aggregate of various economic, political, and social policies by which an imperial power maintains or extends its control over other areas or peoples. It includes the practice of or belief in acquiring and retaining colonies. The emphasis is less on its identity as an ideological political system than on its designation in a period of history. (Webster, 3d ed; from Dr. J. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)
Those persons legally qualified by education and training to engage in the practice of pharmacy.
Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.
The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Economic aspects of the field of medicine, the medical profession, and health care. It includes the economic and financial impact of disease in general on the patient, the physician, society, or government.
A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.
A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.
The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.
Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative activities associated with the provision and utilization of radiology services and facilities.

A comparison of three methods of setting prescribing budgets, using data derived from defined daily dose analyses of historic patterns of use. (1/1980)

BACKGROUND: Prescribing matters (particularly budget setting and research into prescribing variation between doctors) have been handicapped by the absence of credible measures of the volume of drugs prescribed. AIM: To use the defined daily dose (DDD) method to study variation in the volume and cost of drugs prescribed across the seven main British National Formulary (BNF) chapters with a view to comparing different methods of setting prescribing budgets. METHOD: Study of one year of prescribing statistics from all 129 general practices in Lothian, covering 808,059 patients: analyses of prescribing statistics for 1995 to define volume and cost/volume of prescribing for one year for 10 groups of practices defined by the age and deprivation status of their patients, for seven BNF chapters; creation of prescribing budgets for 1996 for each individual practice based on the use of target volume and cost statistics; comparison of 1996 DDD-based budgets with those set using the conventional historical approach; and comparison of DDD-based budgets with budgets set using a capitation-based formula derived from local cost/patient information. RESULTS: The volume of drugs prescribed was affected by the age structure of the practices in BNF Chapters 1 (gastrointestinal), 2 (cardiovascular), and 6 (endocrine), and by deprivation structure for BNF Chapters 3 (respiratory) and 4 (central nervous system). Costs per DDD in the major BNF chapters were largely independent of age, deprivation structure, or fundholding status. Capitation and DDD-based budgets were similar to each other, but both differed substantially from historic budgets. One practice in seven gained or lost more than 100,000 Pounds per annum using DDD or capitation budgets compared with historic budgets. The DDD-based budget, but not the capitation-based budget, can be used to set volume-specific prescribing targets. CONCLUSIONS: DDD-based and capitation-based prescribing budgets can be set using a simple explanatory model and generalizable methods. In this study, both differed substantially from historic budgets. DDD budgets could be created to accommodate new prescribing strategies and raised or lowered to reflect local intentions to alter overall prescribing volume or cost targets. We recommend that future work on setting budgets and researching prescribing variations should be based on DDD statistics.  (+info)

Rubella immunisation and contraception--a case for re-examining the policy of the Department of Health and Social Security. (2/1980)

Now that immunisation against rubella is available, it would at first sight seem reasonable to identify all potential mothers susceptible to this disease and immunise them. Preliminary screening, however, carried out in order to restrict vaccination to seronegative subjects, not only serves no useful purpose, but is counter-productive.  (+info)

The cost of a general practitioner in the national health service. (3/1980)

This paper estimates the cost to the National Health Service of decisions made by a trainee general practitioner during two consecutive weeks. By extrapolation of the cost of these actions (issuing prescriptions, issuing National Insurance certificates, requesting investigations, and initiating hospital referrals), the annual cost of a general practitioner in the National Health Service is at least pound43,000.  (+info)

The just provision of health care: a reply to Elizabeth Telfer. (4/1980)

Dr Hillel Steiner in this reply to Elizabeth Telfer takes each of her arguments for different arrangements of a health service and examines them--'four positions which can be located on a linear ideological spectrum'--and adds a fifth which could have the effect of 'turning the alleged linear spectrum into a circle'. Underlying both Elizabeth Telfer's article and Dr Steiner's reply, the base is inescapably a 'political' one, but cannot be abandoned in favour of purely philosophical concepts. Whatever the attitude of mind of the reader of these two papers to the provision of a health service, the stimulus to more careful assessments of our own National Health Service and its problems can only be good.  (+info)

Screening Mammography Program of British Columbia: pattern of use and health care system costs. (5/1980)

BACKGROUND: The use of mammography for screening asymptomatic women has increased dramatically in the past decade. This report describes the changes that have occurred in the use of bilateral mammography in British Columbia since the provincial breast cancer screening program began in 1988. METHODS: Using province-wide databases from both the breast cancer screening program and the provincial health insurance plan in BC, the authors determined the number and costs of bilateral mammography services for women aged 40 years or older between Apr. 1, 1986, and Mar. 31, 1997. Unilateral mammography was excluded because it is used for investigating symptomatic disease and screening abnormalities, and for follow-up of women who have undergone mastectomy for cancer. RESULTS: As the provincial breast cancer screening program expanded from 1 site in 1988 to 23 in 1997, it provided an increasing proportion of the bilateral mammographic examinations carried out each year in BC. In fiscal year 1996/97, 65% of bilateral mammographic examinations were performed through the screening program. The cost per examination within the screening program dropped as volume increased. Thirty percent more bilateral mammography examinations were done in 1996/97 than in 1991/92, but health care system expenditures for these services increased by only 4% during the same period. In calendar year 1996, 21% of new breast cancers were diagnosed as a result of a screening program visit. INTERPRETATION: Substantial increases in health care expenditures have been avoided by shifting bilateral mammography services to the provincial screening program, which has a lower cost per screening visit.  (+info)

'Should a mammographic screening programme carry the warning: screening can damage your health!'? (6/1980)

The balanced presentation afforded by convening a Citizens' Jury when considering a major question such as the introduction of a breast screening programme is advocated. This method would enable account to be taken of all the costs, both human and financial, to all those affected, both participating and organizing, as well as the benefits. Provision of such a democratic opportunity enables consideration to be given to a broad range of factors, by selection of an appropriate range of witnesses, with the advantage of involving the lay public in this decision-making process. Attendance by health correspondents, medical journalists and other media representatives enables publicization of a democracy in action whilst helping to inform the wider debate. Such an exercise could inform whether the NHS BSP should continue in its current form.  (+info)

Agreeing criteria for audit of the management of induced abortion: an approach by national consensus survey. (7/1980)

OBJECTIVE: To obtain a national consensus view of suggested criteria for good quality care in induced abortion to serve as a basis for standards for audit to assess current clinical practice. DESIGN: Postal, questionnaire survey assessing consensus agreement with criteria identified from a literature review and refined by an invited panel of four gynaecologists and the gynaecology audit project in Scotland (GAPS) committee. SETTING: Scotland. SUBJECTS: All 132 practising consultant gynaecologists. MAIN MEASURES: Overall level of agreement with each of 20 suggested audit criteria. RESULTS: 121 completed questionnaires were received (response rate 92%), of which 119 were returned in time for analysis; 107 came from consultants who practised abortion routinely and were included in the analysis. Nineteen of 20 suggested criteria were validated by an overall balance of agreement. The most strongly supported criterion (agreement score +93) was for ascertaining rhesus status of the woman and prophylaxis after abortion, if indicated. The only criterion to elicit a negative agreement score (-27) was that dilatation and evacuation is the best method of abortion at 12-15 weeks' gestation. The ranked and prioritised criteria resulting from this exercise are being used within a national audit project. CONCLUSIONS: A postal questionnaire survey among interested clinicians resulted in a good response rate and enabled the audit criteria to be validated and ranked more objectively and among more clinicians, than would have been possible by group discussion.  (+info)

An audit of distribution and use of guidelines for management of head injury. (8/1980)

Ensuring effective distribution of guidelines is an important step towards their implementation. To examine the effectiveness of dissemination of a guidelines card on management of head injury and determine its usefulness to senior house officers (SHOs), a questionnaire survey was performed in May 1990, after distribution of the cards in induction packs for new doctors and at postgraduate lectures and displaying the guidelines in accident and emergency departments and wards. A further survey, in March 1992, assessed the impact of modifying the distribution. All (175) SHOs working in general surgery, accident and emergency medicine, orthopaedics, and neurosciences on 1 February 1990 in 19 hospitals including two neurosurgical units in Northern region were sent self completion questionnaires about awareness, receipt, use, and perceived usefulness of the guidelines. 131 of 163(80%) SHOs in post responded (median response from hospitals 83% (range 50%-100%)). Over three quarters (103, 79%) of SHOs were aware of the guidelines and 82(63%) had ever possessed a guidelines card. Only 36(44%) acquired the card in the induction pack. 92%(98/107) found them useful and 81% (89/110) referred to them to some extent. Owning and carrying the card and referring to guidelines were associated with departmental encouragement to use the guidelines. Increasing the displays of guidelines in wards and departments and the supply of cards to consultants in accident and emergency medicine as a result of this survey did not increase the number of SHOs who received cards (52/83, 63%), but more (71/83, 86%) were aware of the guidelines. The guidelines were welcomed by SHOs and used in treating patients with head injury, but their distribution requires improvement. Increased use of the guidelines may be achieved by introducing other distribution methods and as a result of encouragement by senior staff.  (+info)

"State Medicine" is not a term that has a widely accepted or specific medical definition. However, in general terms, it can refer to the organization, financing, and delivery of healthcare services and resources at the national or regional level, overseen and managed by the government or state. This can include public health initiatives, regulation of healthcare professionals and institutions, and the provision of healthcare services through publicly funded programs.

In some contexts, "State Medicine" may also refer to the practice of using medical treatments or interventions as a means of achieving political or social objectives, such as reducing crime rates or improving economic productivity. However, this usage is less common and more controversial.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is a system of medicine that has been developed in China over thousands of years. It is based on the philosophy that the body's vital energy (Qi) circulates through a network of channels called meridians, and that disease results from an imbalance or blockage in this flow of Qi.

TCM uses a variety of treatments to restore balance and promote health, including acupuncture, herbal medicine, moxibustion (the burning of herbs near the skin), cupping, dietary therapy, and tuina (Chinese massage). The use of Chinese herbal medicines is a major component of TCM, with formulas often consisting of combinations of several different herbs tailored to the individual patient's needs.

In addition to these treatments, TCM practitioners may also use diagnostic techniques such as pulse diagnosis and tongue examination to assess a person's overall health and determine the underlying cause of their symptoms. The goal of TCM is not only to treat specific symptoms or diseases but to address the root causes of illness and promote overall wellness.

Individualized medicine, also known as personalized medicine, is a medical model that uses molecular profiling and various diagnostic tests to understand the genetic and environmental variations affecting an individual's health and disease susceptibility. It aims to tailor medical treatments, including prevention strategies, diagnostics, therapies, and follow-up care, to each person's unique needs and characteristics. By incorporating genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and other "omics" data into clinical decision-making, individualized medicine strives to improve patient outcomes, reduce adverse effects, and potentially lower healthcare costs.

Internal Medicine is a medical specialty that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of internal diseases affecting adults. It encompasses a wide range of medical conditions, including those related to the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, hematological, endocrine, infectious, and immune systems. Internists, or general internists, are trained to provide comprehensive care for adult patients, managing both simple and complex diseases, and often serving as primary care physicians. They may also subspecialize in various fields such as cardiology, gastroenterology, nephrology, or infectious disease, among others.

Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material, called radiopharmaceuticals, to diagnose and treat various diseases. The radiopharmaceuticals are taken internally, usually through injection or oral administration, and accumulate in specific organs or tissues. A special camera then detects the radiation emitted by these substances, which helps create detailed images of the body's internal structures and functions.

The images produced in nuclear medicine can help doctors identify abnormalities such as tumors, fractures, infection, or inflammation. Additionally, some radiopharmaceuticals can be used to treat certain conditions, like hyperthyroidism or cancer, by delivering targeted doses of radiation directly to the affected area. Overall, nuclear medicine provides valuable information for the diagnosis, treatment planning, and monitoring of many medical conditions.

Traditional medicine (TM) refers to health practices, approaches, knowledge and beliefs incorporating plant, animal and mineral-based medicines, spiritual therapies, manual techniques and exercises, applied singularly or in combination to treat, diagnose and prevent illnesses or maintain well-being. Although traditional medicine has been practiced since prehistoric times, it is still widely used today and may include:

1. Traditional Asian medicines such as acupuncture, herbal remedies, and qigong from China; Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani and Siddha from India; and Jamu from Indonesia.
2. Traditional European herbal medicines, also known as phytotherapy.
3. North American traditional indigenous medicines, including Native American and Inuit practices.
4. African traditional medicines, such as herbal, spiritual, and manual techniques practiced in various African cultures.
5. South American traditional medicines, like Mapuche, Curanderismo, and Santo Daime practices from different countries.

It is essential to note that traditional medicine may not follow the scientific principles, evidence-based standards, or quality control measures inherent to conventional (also known as allopathic or Western) medicine. However, some traditional medicines have been integrated into modern healthcare systems and are considered complementary or alternative medicines (CAM). The World Health Organization encourages member states to develop policies and regulations for integrating TM/CAM practices into their healthcare systems, ensuring safety, efficacy, and quality while respecting cultural diversity.

Kampo medicine is a traditional Japanese herbal medicine that has been officially integrated into the Japanese healthcare system since the late 19th century. It is based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) principles and theories, but it has evolved independently in Japan over centuries to reflect local medical needs, cultural preferences, and pharmacological research.

Kampo medicine typically involves the use of complex formulas containing multiple herbs, rather than single herbs, to address various health conditions and restore balance within the body. The formulas are often adjusted based on individual patient's symptoms, constitution, and physical condition. Kampo practitioners receive extensive training in both modern Western medicine and traditional Japanese medicine, allowing them to integrate both approaches for a more holistic treatment strategy.

Kampo has been recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a valuable component of traditional medicine and is increasingly being studied in clinical trials to evaluate its efficacy and safety for various health issues, including gastrointestinal disorders, menopausal symptoms, and mental health conditions.

Medicine is a branch of healthcare that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, injury, and illness. It encompasses a variety of health profession practices, including but not limited to, the services provided by physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, and allied health professionals.

Medicine can also refer to the substances or compounds used in the treatment and prevention of disease, often referred to as medications or drugs. These substances can be administered in various forms, such as oral (pills, liquids), topical (creams, ointments), injectable (shots, IVs), or inhaled (aerosols, nebulizers).

Overall, medicine is a multidisciplinary field that combines scientific research, clinical expertise, and patient values to promote health, prevent disease, and provide treatment for individuals and communities.

The "History of Medicine" refers to the evolution and development of medical knowledge, practices, and institutions over time. It includes the study of key figures, discoveries, theories, treatments, and societal attitudes that have shaped the way medicine is practiced and understood in different cultures and historical periods. This can encompass various fields such as clinical medicine, public health, medical ethics, and healthcare systems. The history of medicine provides valuable insights into the advances and setbacks in medical knowledge and offers lessons for addressing current and future medical challenges.

Clinical medicine is a branch of medical practice that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in patients. It is based on the direct examination and evaluation of patients, including taking medical histories, performing physical examinations, ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests, and formulating treatment plans. Clinical medicine encompasses various specialties such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and neurology, among others. The goal of clinical medicine is to provide evidence-based, compassionate care to patients to improve their health outcomes and quality of life.

Chinese herbal drugs, also known as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), refer to a system of medicine that has been practiced in China for thousands of years. It is based on the belief that the body's vital energy, called Qi, must be balanced and flowing freely for good health. TCM uses various techniques such as herbal therapy, acupuncture, dietary therapy, and exercise to restore balance and promote healing.

Chinese herbal drugs are usually prescribed in the form of teas, powders, pills, or tinctures and may contain one or a combination of herbs. The herbs used in Chinese medicine are typically derived from plants, minerals, or animal products. Some commonly used Chinese herbs include ginseng, astragalus, licorice root, and cinnamon bark.

It is important to note that the use of Chinese herbal drugs should be under the guidance of a qualified practitioner, as some herbs can interact with prescription medications or have side effects. Additionally, the quality and safety of Chinese herbal products can vary widely depending on the source and manufacturing process.

Regenerative medicine is a branch of medicine that deals with the repair or replacement of damaged or diseased cells, tissues, and organs using various strategies, including the use of stem cells, tissue engineering, gene therapy, and biomaterials. The goal of regenerative medicine is to restore normal function and structure to tissues and organs, thereby improving the patient's quality of life and potentially curing diseases that were previously considered incurable.

Regenerative medicine has shown promise in a variety of clinical applications, such as the treatment of degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis, spinal cord injuries, heart disease, diabetes, and liver failure. It also holds great potential for use in regenerative therapies for wound healing, tissue reconstruction, and cosmetic surgery.

The field of regenerative medicine is rapidly evolving, with new discoveries and advances being made regularly. As our understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms that drive tissue repair and regeneration continues to grow, so too will the potential clinical applications of this exciting and promising field.

Emergency medicine is a medical specialty that focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of acute illnesses or injuries that require immediate medical attention. This can include conditions such as severe trauma, cardiac arrest, stroke, respiratory distress, and other life-threatening situations. Emergency medicine physicians, also known as emergency doctors or ER doctors, are trained to provide rapid assessment, diagnosis, and treatment in a fast-paced and often unpredictable environment. They work closely with other healthcare professionals, such as nurses, paramedics, and specialists, to ensure that patients receive the best possible care in a timely manner. Emergency medicine is a critical component of the healthcare system, providing essential services for patients who require immediate medical attention, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is a medical approach that combines the best available scientific evidence with clinical expertise and patient values to make informed decisions about diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. It emphasizes the use of systematic research, including randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses, to guide clinical decision making. EBM aims to provide the most effective and efficient care while minimizing variations in practice, reducing errors, and improving patient outcomes.

Ayurvedic medicine, also known as Ayurveda, is a traditional system of medicine that has been practiced in India for thousands of years. It is based on the belief that health and wellness depend on a delicate balance between the mind, body, and spirit. The goal of Ayurvedic medicine is to promote good health, rather than fight disease.

In Ayurveda, each person has a unique constitution, or dosha, that is determined by the balance of three energies: Vata (air and space), Pitta (fire and water), and Kapha (water and earth). These doshas are believed to govern all physical and mental processes and to be responsible for an individual's physical and mental health.

Ayurvedic treatments may include herbal remedies, special diets, detoxification programs, meditation, yoga, and massage therapy. The aim of Ayurvedic medicine is to cleanse the body of toxins, balance the doshas, and promote good health and well-being.

It's important to note that while some people find Ayurvedic practices helpful for maintaining their overall health, there is limited scientific evidence supporting the safety and effectiveness of many Ayurvedic treatments. Additionally, some Ayurvedic products may contain harmful levels of heavy metals, such as lead, mercury, and arsenic, which can be toxic if ingested or absorbed through the skin. It's important to consult with a qualified healthcare provider before starting any new treatment regimen, including Ayurvedic medicine.

Complementary therapies refer to a group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not presently considered an integral part of conventional allopathic medicine. They are often used in conjunction with conventional treatments and are intended to facilitate the physical and emotional well-being of the patient. Complementary therapies can include a wide range of interventions such as acupuncture, chiropractic care, massage therapy, herbal medicine, yoga, meditation, guided imagery, hypnotherapy, and homeopathy, among others. It is important to note that while some complementary therapies have been shown to be effective for certain conditions, others lack scientific evidence of their safety and efficacy. Therefore, it is always recommended to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any new complementary therapy.

Integrative Medicine (IM) is a comprehensive, whole-person approach to healthcare that combines conventional medicine with evidence-based complementary and alternative therapies. The goal of IM is to achieve optimal health and healing by addressing the physical, emotional, mental, social, and spiritual aspects of an individual's life.

The principles of Integrative Medicine include:

1. Patient-centered care: Treating each patient as a unique individual and considering their personal needs, values, and preferences in the treatment plan.
2. Collaboration: Working together with patients, families, and other healthcare providers to create a coordinated and comprehensive care plan.
3. Evidence-informed practice: Using the best available evidence from both conventional and complementary medicine to inform clinical decision making.
4. Incorporation of lifestyle modifications: Encouraging patients to make lifestyle changes that promote health and wellness, such as diet, exercise, stress management, and sleep hygiene.
5. Use of both conventional and complementary therapies: Utilizing a range of treatments, including pharmaceuticals, surgery, acupuncture, herbs, nutrition, and mind-body techniques, to address the root causes of illness and promote healing.
6. Attention to all aspects of health: Addressing physical, emotional, mental, social, and spiritual factors that contribute to health and wellness.
7. Focus on prevention and wellness: Emphasizing the importance of preventing illness and promoting overall health and well-being.
8. Continuous learning and improvement: Staying up-to-date with the latest research and best practices in both conventional and complementary medicine, and using this knowledge to improve patient care.

Osteopathic medicine is a system of medical care that focuses on the unity of the mind, body, and spirit in the diagnosis and treatment of illness. It was founded in the United States in 1874 by Andrew Taylor Still, MD, who developed a philosophy of medicine based on principles of preventive medicine, holistic patient care, and the interrelationship of all body systems.

Osteopathic physicians (DOs), also known as osteopaths, are trained to diagnose and treat medical conditions using a variety of treatment modalities, including manual manipulation of the musculoskeletal system. They receive the same basic medical education as MDs, but also complete additional training in osteopathic principles and practices.

Osteopathic medicine emphasizes the importance of preventive care, lifestyle modifications, and patient education in maintaining health and preventing illness. DOs are trained to use their hands to diagnose and treat structural and functional problems in the body, with a focus on the musculoskeletal system. They believe that the body has an inherent ability to heal itself, and that manipulation of the bones, muscles, and other tissues can help promote this natural healing process.

DOs are licensed to practice medicine and surgery in all 50 states and are recognized as fully qualified physicians. They may choose to specialize in any area of medicine, including family practice, internal medicine, pediatrics, surgery, psychiatry, and neurology, among others.

Sports medicine is a branch of healthcare that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries and illnesses related to sports and exercise. It involves a multidisciplinary approach, including medical doctors, orthopedic surgeons, physical therapists, athletic trainers, and other healthcare professionals who work together to help athletes and active individuals return to their desired level of activity as quickly and safely as possible.

The scope of sports medicine includes the management of acute injuries such as sprains, strains, fractures, and dislocations, as well as chronic overuse injuries like tendinitis, stress fractures, and bursitis. It also addresses medical conditions that can affect athletic performance or overall health, including concussions, asthma, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

Preventive care is an essential component of sports medicine, with healthcare providers educating athletes on proper warm-up and cool-down techniques, nutrition, hydration, and injury prevention strategies to reduce the risk of future injuries. Additionally, sports medicine professionals may work with coaches, trainers, and athletes to develop safe training programs that promote optimal performance while minimizing the risk of injury.

Internship: In medical terms, an internship is a supervised program of hospital-based training for physicians and surgeons who have recently graduated from medical school. The duration of an internship typically ranges from one to three years, during which the intern engages in a variety of clinical rotations in different departments such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and neurology. The primary aim of an internship is to provide newly graduated doctors with hands-on experience in patient care, diagnosis, treatment planning, and communication skills under the close supervision of experienced physicians.

Residency: A residency is a structured and intensive postgraduate medical training program that typically lasts between three and seven years, depending on the specialty. Residents are licensed physicians who have completed their internship and are now receiving advanced training in a specific area of medicine or surgery. During this period, residents work closely with experienced attending physicians to gain comprehensive knowledge and skills in their chosen field. They are responsible for managing patient care, performing surgical procedures, interpreting diagnostic tests, conducting research, teaching medical students, and participating in continuing education activities. Residency programs aim to prepare physicians for independent practice and board certification in their specialty.

African traditional medicine (ATM) refers to the practices and beliefs regarding both physical and spiritual health and well-being that are indigenous to Africa. It includes various forms of healing, such as herbalism, spiritualism, and ancestral veneration, which may be practiced by traditional healers, including herbalists, diviners, and traditional birth attendants. These practices are often closely intertwined with the cultural, religious, and social beliefs of the community. It's important to note that the specific practices and beliefs can vary widely among different African cultures and communities.

Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM), also known as Physiatry, is a medical specialty that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with disabilities or functional limitations related to musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurologic, and other systems. The main goal of this discipline is to restore optimal function, reduce symptoms, and improve the overall quality of life for individuals who have experienced injuries, illnesses, or disabling conditions.

PRM physicians use a variety of techniques, including physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, assistive devices, medications, and various types of injections to manage pain and spasticity. They also perform electrodiagnostic studies to diagnose neuromuscular disorders and provide comprehensive rehabilitation plans tailored to each patient's unique needs and goals.

In addition to direct patient care, PRM specialists often work as part of multidisciplinary teams in hospitals, rehabilitation centers, and outpatient clinics, collaborating with other healthcare professionals such as nurses, therapists, psychologists, and social workers to provide coordinated, holistic care for patients.

Occupational medicine is a branch of clinical medicine that deals with the prevention and management of diseases and injuries that may arise in the workplace or as a result of work-related activities. It involves evaluating the health risks associated with various jobs, recommending measures to reduce these risks, providing medical care for workers who become ill or injured on the job, and promoting overall health and wellness in the workplace. Occupational medicine physicians may also be involved in developing policies and procedures related to workplace safety, disability management, and return-to-work programs. The ultimate goal of occupational medicine is to help ensure that workers are able to perform their jobs safely and effectively while maintaining their overall health and well-being.

Veterinary medicine is the branch of medical science that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases, disorders, and injuries in non-human animals. The profession of veterinary medicine is dedicated to the care, health, and welfare of animals, as well as to the promotion of human health through animal research and public health advancements. Veterinarians employ a variety of diagnostic methods including clinical examination, radiography, laboratory testing, and ultrasound imaging. They use a range of treatments, including medication, surgery, and dietary management. In addition, veterinarians may also advise on preventative healthcare measures such as vaccination schedules and parasite control programs.

Phytotherapy is the use of extracts of natural origin, especially plants or plant parts, for therapeutic purposes. It is also known as herbal medicine and is a traditional practice in many cultures. The active compounds in these plant extracts are believed to have various medicinal properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, or sedative effects. Practitioners of phytotherapy may use the whole plant, dried parts, or concentrated extracts to prepare teas, capsules, tinctures, or ointments for therapeutic use. It is important to note that the effectiveness and safety of phytotherapy are not always supported by scientific evidence, and it should be used with caution and preferably under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

"Essential drugs" is a term used in the medical and public health fields to refer to a list of medications that are considered necessary to meet the most important needs of a healthcare system. The concept of essential drugs was first introduced by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1977, with the aim of promoting access to affordable, effective, and safe medicines for all people, particularly those in low- and middle-income countries.

The WHO's Model List of Essential Medicines (EML) is regularly updated and contains a core list of essential medicines that should be available at all times in adequate quantities, in the appropriate dosage forms, and at a price that the majority of the population can afford. The list includes drugs for a wide range of medical conditions, from infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria to chronic conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

The selection of essential medicines is based on several criteria, including the burden of disease in a population, the safety and efficacy of the drug, its cost-effectiveness, and its place in the overall treatment strategy for a particular condition. The goal is to ensure that healthcare systems have access to a basic set of medicines that can address the most common health needs of their populations, while also allowing for flexibility to meet the specific needs of individual countries and regions.

In summary, essential drugs are a list of medications considered necessary to meet the most important healthcare needs of a population, selected based on criteria such as disease burden, safety, efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and treatment strategy. The concept is promoted by the World Health Organization to improve access to affordable, effective, and safe medicines for all people, particularly those in low- and middle-income countries.

Environmental medicine is a branch of medicine that focuses on the study of how various environmental factors, including physical, chemical, and biological agents, can impact human health. It involves understanding and addressing the causes and effects of environmental exposures on individual health and disease. This may include assessing and managing exposure to pollutants, allergens, infectious agents, and other environmental stressors in order to prevent or treat related health issues. Additionally, environmental medicine also considers how individual susceptibility, such as genetic factors or pre-existing health conditions, can influence the impact of environmental exposures on health.

Korean traditional medicine (KTM) is a system of medicine that has been practiced in Korea for thousands of years. It is also known as Hanbang medicine or Han-ui. KTM is based on the principles of Daoism and the concept of Yin and Yang, and it emphasizes the balance and harmony between the body, mind, and environment.

Korean traditional medicine includes a variety of treatments such as acupuncture, herbal medicine, moxibustion, cupping, and dietary therapy. The use of herbs is a major component of KTM, with thousands of different herbs being used to treat various health conditions. These herbs can be taken in the form of teas, powders, pills, or decoctions.

Acupuncture is also an important part of KTM and involves the insertion of fine needles into specific points on the body to stimulate the flow of Qi (vital energy) and restore balance. Moxibustion involves burning herbs near the skin to warm the area and promote healing, while cupping uses suction cups to increase circulation and relieve pain.

Korean traditional medicine places great emphasis on prevention and encourages individuals to maintain a healthy lifestyle through proper diet, exercise, stress management, and other self-care practices. Practitioners of KTM undergo rigorous training and must pass national exams in order to become licensed.

"Medical Schools" is a term that refers to educational institutions specifically designed to train and educate future medical professionals. These schools offer comprehensive programs leading to a professional degree in medicine, such as the Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree. The curriculum typically includes both classroom instruction and clinical training, covering topics like anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, medical ethics, and patient care. Medical schools aim to equip students with the necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes to become competent, compassionate, and ethical healthcare providers. Admission to medical schools usually requires a bachelor's degree and completion of specific prerequisite courses, as well as a strong performance on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT).

Community medicine, also known as social medicine or public health medicine, is a branch of medical science that deals with the health of populations and communities rather than individual patients. It focuses on preventing diseases and promoting health through organized community efforts, including education, advocacy, and policy development. Community medicine aims to improve the overall health status of a population by addressing the social determinants of health, such as poverty, housing, education, and access to healthcare services. It involves collaboration between various stakeholders, including healthcare professionals, community members, policical leaders, and organizations, to identify and address the health needs of the community.

Tropical medicine is a branch of medicine that deals with health problems that are prevalent in or unique to tropical and subtropical regions. These regions are typically characterized by hot and humid climates, and often have distinct ecological systems that can contribute to the spread of infectious diseases.

The field of tropical medicine encompasses a wide range of health issues, including:

1. Infectious diseases: Many tropical diseases are caused by infectious agents such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi. Some of the most common infectious diseases in the tropics include malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, chikungunya, Zika virus, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, and Chagas disease.
2. Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs): A group of chronic infectious diseases that primarily affect poor and marginalized populations in the tropics. NTDs include diseases such as human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), leprosy, Buruli ulcer, and dracunculiasis (guinea worm disease).
3. Zoonotic diseases: Diseases that are transmitted between animals and humans, often through insect vectors or contaminated food and water. Examples of zoonotic diseases in the tropics include rabies, leptospirosis, and Rift Valley fever.
4. Environmental health issues: The tropical environment can pose unique health challenges, such as exposure to toxic chemicals, heat stress, and poor air quality. Tropical medicine also addresses these environmental health issues.
5. Travel medicine: As global travel increases, there is a growing need for medical professionals who are knowledgeable about the health risks associated with traveling to tropical destinations. Tropical medicine physicians often provide pre-travel consultations and post-travel evaluations for international travelers.

Overall, tropical medicine is an essential field that addresses the unique health challenges faced by populations living in or traveling to tropical and subtropical regions.

Medical education is a systematic process of acquiring knowledge, skills, and values necessary for becoming a healthcare professional, such as a doctor, nurse, or allied health professional. It involves a combination of theoretical instruction, practical training, and experiential learning in clinical settings. The goal of medical education is to produce competent, compassionate, and ethical practitioners who can provide high-quality care to patients and contribute to the advancement of medicine. Medical education typically includes undergraduate (pre-medical) studies, graduate (medical) school, residency training, and continuing medical education throughout a healthcare professional's career.

In the context of medical education, a curriculum refers to the planned and organized sequence of experiences and learning opportunities designed to achieve specific educational goals and objectives. It outlines the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that medical students or trainees are expected to acquire during their training program. The curriculum may include various components such as lectures, small group discussions, clinical rotations, simulations, and other experiential learning activities. It is typically developed and implemented by medical education experts and faculty members in consultation with stakeholders, including learners, practitioners, and patients.

Social medicine is a branch of medicine that focuses on the social determinants of health and illness, and the organization and delivery of healthcare services. It emphasizes the role of socio-economic factors such as poverty, education, housing, employment, and social support networks in shaping population health outcomes. Social medicine also examines how healthcare systems can be designed and implemented to reduce health disparities and promote equity in health.

The field of social medicine draws on a range of disciplines including epidemiology, sociology, anthropology, health policy, and medical ethics. It seeks to understand the complex interplay between individual biology, behavior, and social context in shaping health and illness, and to develop evidence-based policies and interventions that can improve population health and reduce health inequities.

Social medicine is concerned not only with treating individual patients but also with promoting the health of communities and populations. It recognizes that healthcare is just one factor in determining health outcomes, and that social and economic policies have a profound impact on health and wellbeing. As such, social medicine advocates for a comprehensive approach to improving health that includes addressing the root causes of health disparities and working towards greater social justice and equity.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "History, 20th Century" is a broad and complex topic that refers to the events, developments, and transformations that occurred throughout the world during the 1900s. It is not a medical term or concept. If you're interested in learning more about this historical period, I would recommend consulting a history textbook, reputable online resources, or speaking with a historian. They can provide detailed information about the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that took place during the 20th century.

Religion and medicine are two distinct fields that can intersect in various ways. While religion can be defined as a set of beliefs, practices, and rituals related to the divine or supernatural, medicine is concerned with the maintenance of health and the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and cure of disease, illness, and other physical and mental impairments in humans.

A medical definition of "Religion and Medicine" might refer to the study of the relationship between religious beliefs, practices, and experiences, and health outcomes, healthcare delivery, and medical decision-making. This can include exploring how religious beliefs and practices influence health behaviors, coping mechanisms, social support networks, and access to care, as well as how they shape attitudes towards medical interventions, end-of-life decisions, and bioethical issues.

Religion can also play a role in the provision of healthcare services, such as through faith-based organizations that operate hospitals, clinics, and other health facilities. Additionally, religious leaders and communities may provide spiritual care and support to patients and their families, complementing the medical care provided by healthcare professionals.

Overall, the intersection of religion and medicine is a complex and multifaceted area of study that requires an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on insights from fields such as anthropology, sociology, psychology, theology, and public health.

Family practice, also known as family medicine, is a medical specialty that provides comprehensive and continuous care to patients of all ages, genders, and stages of life. Family physicians are trained to provide a wide range of services, including preventive care, diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses, management of complex medical conditions, and providing health education and counseling.

Family practice emphasizes the importance of building long-term relationships with patients and their families, and takes into account the physical, emotional, social, and psychological factors that influence a person's health. Family physicians often serve as the primary point of contact for patients within the healthcare system, coordinating care with other specialists and healthcare providers as needed.

Family practice is a broad and diverse field, encompassing various areas such as pediatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, geriatrics, and behavioral health. The goal of family practice is to provide high-quality, patient-centered care that meets the unique needs and preferences of each individual patient and their family.

Sleep medicine is a medical specialty or subspecialty devoted to the diagnosis and therapy of sleep disturbances and disorders. Sleep-related problems such as snoring, sleep apnea, insomnia, narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome, parasomnias, circadian rhythm disorders, and unusual behaviors during sleep are among the conditions that sleep medicine physicians diagnose and treat.

Sleep medicine specialists often work in multidisciplinary teams that include other healthcare professionals such as neurologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, pulmonologists, otolaryngologists, and dentists to provide comprehensive care for patients with sleep disorders. They use various diagnostic tools, including polysomnography (sleep studies), actigraphy, and multiple sleep latency tests, to evaluate patients' sleep patterns and diagnose their conditions accurately. Based on the diagnosis, they develop individualized treatment plans that may include lifestyle modifications, pharmacological interventions, medical devices, or surgery.

To become a sleep medicine specialist, physicians typically complete a residency in a related field such as neurology, pulmonology, psychiatry, or internal medicine and then pursue additional training and certification in sleep medicine. The American Board of Medical Specialties recognizes sleep medicine as a subspecialty, and the American Board of Sleep Medicine offers certification to qualified physicians who pass a rigorous examination.

Medical education, graduate refers to the post-baccalaureate programs of study leading to a doctoral degree in medicine (MD) or osteopathic medicine (DO). These programs typically include rigorous coursework in the basic medical sciences, clinical training, and research experiences. The goal of medical education at this level is to prepare students to become competent, caring physicians who are able to provide high-quality medical care to patients, conduct research to advance medical knowledge, and contribute to the improvement of health care systems.

Graduate medical education (GME) typically includes residency programs, which are postgraduate training programs that provide specialized clinical training in a particular field of medicine. Residency programs typically last three to seven years, depending on the specialty, and provide hands-on experience in diagnosing and treating patients under the supervision of experienced physicians.

Medical education at the graduate level is designed to build upon the foundational knowledge and skills acquired during undergraduate medical education (UME) and to prepare students for licensure and certification as practicing physicians. Graduates of GME programs are eligible to take licensing exams and apply for certification in their chosen specialty through professional organizations such as the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS).

Clinical competence is the ability of a healthcare professional to provide safe and effective patient care, demonstrating the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for the job. It involves the integration of theoretical knowledge with practical skills, judgment, and decision-making abilities in real-world clinical situations. Clinical competence is typically evaluated through various methods such as direct observation, case studies, simulations, and feedback from peers and supervisors.

A clinically competent healthcare professional should be able to:

1. Demonstrate a solid understanding of the relevant medical knowledge and its application in clinical practice.
2. Perform essential clinical skills proficiently and safely.
3. Communicate effectively with patients, families, and other healthcare professionals.
4. Make informed decisions based on critical thinking and problem-solving abilities.
5. Exhibit professionalism, ethical behavior, and cultural sensitivity in patient care.
6. Continuously evaluate and improve their performance through self-reflection and ongoing learning.

Maintaining clinical competence is essential for healthcare professionals to ensure the best possible outcomes for their patients and stay current with advances in medical science and technology.

The term "Faculty, Medical" generally refers to the faculty members who are involved in medical education and training within a medical school or academic institution. These individuals are responsible for teaching and instructing medical students, residents, and fellows in various areas of medical knowledge and clinical skills. They may hold positions such as professor, associate professor, assistant professor, or instructor, and they may specialize in a particular area of medicine such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, or psychiatry. Medical faculty members may also be involved in research, patient care, and administrative duties within the institution.

"Medicine in Literature" is not a medical term per se, but rather a field of study that explores the representation and interpretation of medicine, health, and illness in literature. It is an interdisciplinary approach that combines literary analysis with medical humanities to understand the cultural, historical, and social contexts of medical practices, theories, and experiences as depicted in various forms of literature. This field often examines how literature reflects and shapes societal attitudes towards health, disease, and medical care, and how it can contribute to medical education and empathic understanding of patients' experiences.

I'm assuming you are asking for a definition of "medical students." Here it is:

Medical students are individuals who are enrolled in a program of study to become medical doctors. They typically complete four years of undergraduate education before entering a medical school, where they spend another four years studying basic sciences and clinical medicine. After completing medical school, they become physicians (M.D.) and continue their training through residency programs in their chosen specialties. Some medical students may choose to pursue a research career and complete a Ph.D. during or after medical school.

A plant extract is a preparation containing chemical constituents that have been extracted from a plant using a solvent. The resulting extract may contain a single compound or a mixture of several compounds, depending on the extraction process and the specific plant material used. These extracts are often used in various industries including pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, and food and beverage, due to their potential therapeutic or beneficial properties. The composition of plant extracts can vary widely, and it is important to ensure their quality, safety, and efficacy before use in any application.

Preventive medicine, also known as preventive medicine or prophylaxis, refers to measures taken to prevent diseases or injuries rather than curing them or treating their symptoms. This can include various strategies such as vaccination, regular screenings and check-ups, early detection and intervention for medical issues, lifestyle modifications, and environmental changes.

The goal of preventive medicine is to protect, promote, and maintain health and well-being and to prevent disease, disability, and death. It is a proactive approach to healthcare that focuses on keeping people healthy and minimizing the negative impact of diseases or injuries when they do occur. Preventive medicine can be practiced by various healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, physician assistants, and public health practitioners.

Medicinal plants are defined as those plants that contain naturally occurring chemical compounds which can be used for therapeutic purposes, either directly or indirectly. These plants have been used for centuries in various traditional systems of medicine, such as Ayurveda, Chinese medicine, and Native American medicine, to prevent or treat various health conditions.

Medicinal plants contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, including alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, terpenes, and saponins, among others. These compounds have been found to possess various pharmacological properties, such as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities.

Medicinal plants can be used in various forms, including whole plant material, extracts, essential oils, and isolated compounds. They can be administered through different routes, such as oral, topical, or respiratory, depending on the desired therapeutic effect.

It is important to note that while medicinal plants have been used safely and effectively for centuries, they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Some medicinal plants can interact with prescription medications or have adverse effects if used inappropriately.

Defensive medicine is a term used in the medical field to describe the practice of healthcare providers ordering tests, treatments, or procedures primarily to reduce their risk of liability, rather than to provide the most appropriate care for the patient's medical condition. This behavior can be driven by fear of malpractice lawsuits and the desire to avoid any potential legal consequences.

Defensive medicine can take two main forms:

1. **Offensive defensive medicine**: This refers to the practice of ordering additional tests, consultations, or treatments that go beyond what is medically necessary to confirm a diagnosis or guide treatment. The goal here is to create a more comprehensive medical record that could help defend against potential malpractice claims in the future.
2. **Defensive defensive medicine**: This involves avoiding high-risk procedures or patients and may even lead to the denial of care for certain individuals due to fear of legal repercussions. Healthcare providers might also refrain from treating patients with complex medical conditions or those who have a history of suing physicians.

While defensive medicine is intended to protect healthcare providers, it can result in unnecessary costs, overtreatment, and potentially even patient harm due to additional procedures or treatments that may not be medically indicated. The practice remains controversial, as some argue that it is necessary to protect providers from frivolous lawsuits, while others believe it contributes to the rising healthcare costs without improving patient outcomes.

Medical philosophy is a branch of philosophy that deals with the concepts, issues, and arguments specific to medicine and healthcare. It involves the application of philosophical inquiry and reasoning to various aspects of medicine, such as:

1. Ethics: Examining moral principles and values that guide medical practice, including patient autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice. This includes issues related to end-of-life care, informed consent, research ethics, and resource allocation.
2. Epistemology: Exploring the nature of knowledge in medicine, including how medical knowledge is acquired, validated, and disseminated. It also involves examining the limitations and uncertainties of medical knowledge.
3. Metaphysics: Examining the fundamental nature of reality as it relates to medicine, such as the nature of disease, health, and the human body. This includes exploring questions about the mind-body relationship and the role of emergent properties in understanding health and illness.
4. Logic and Rationality: Applying logical reasoning and critical thinking skills to medical decision making, including the evaluation of evidence, the assessment of risks and benefits, and the formulation of clinical guidelines.
5. Aesthetics: Exploring the role of values and subjective experience in medicine, such as the importance of empathy, compassion, and communication in the patient-physician relationship. This also includes examining the ethical implications of medical aesthetics, such as cosmetic surgery and enhancement technologies.

Medical philosophy is an interdisciplinary field that draws on insights from a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, medicine, ethics, law, psychology, and sociology. It seeks to provide a deeper understanding of the complex issues that arise in medical practice and to inform the development of evidence-based, ethical, and compassionate healthcare policies and practices.

Oral medicine is a specialized branch of dentistry that focuses on the diagnosis, management, and treatment of oral diseases and disorders. These may include conditions that affect the oral mucosa (the lining of the mouth), salivary glands, jaw joints, and other oral structures. Oral medicine also deals with the oral manifestations of systemic diseases, such as diabetes or HIV/AIDS, and the oral side effects of medications. Practitioners of oral medicine often work closely with other healthcare professionals, including medical doctors, dentists, and pharmacists, to provide comprehensive care for their patients.

A career choice refers to the decision or selection of a job or profession that an individual makes, typically based on their interests, skills, values, and personal goals. It involves considering various factors such as education and training requirements, job outlook, salary potential, and work-life balance. A well-informed career choice can lead to long-term job satisfaction, success, and fulfillment. It is essential to note that career choices can change over time due to various reasons, including personal growth, industry trends, or changes in life circumstances.

Disaster medicine is a branch of medical science that deals with the prevention, preparedness, response, and recovery from disasters, including natural disasters (such as earthquakes, hurricanes, and floods), technological disasters (such as chemical spills and radiation exposure), and human-made disasters (such as terrorism and mass shootings). It involves a multidisciplinary approach that includes medical and public health professionals, emergency responders, and other stakeholders working together to provide effective medical care and support to affected populations during and after a disaster. The goal of disaster medicine is to minimize the impact of disasters on human health and well-being, reduce morbidity and mortality, and promote resilience in communities.

"History, 19th Century" is not a medical term or concept. It refers to the historical events, developments, and figures related to the 1800s in various fields, including politics, culture, science, and technology. However, if you are looking for medical advancements during the 19th century, here's a brief overview:

The 19th century was a period of significant progress in medicine, with numerous discoveries and innovations that shaped modern medical practices. Some notable developments include:

1. Edward Jenner's smallpox vaccine (1796): Although not strictly within the 19th century, Jenner's discovery laid the foundation for vaccination as a preventive measure against infectious diseases.
2. Germ theory of disease: The work of Louis Pasteur, Robert Koch, and others established that many diseases were caused by microorganisms, leading to the development of antiseptic practices and vaccines.
3. Anesthesia: In 1842, Crawford Long first used ether as an anesthetic during surgery, followed by the introduction of chloroform in 1847 by James Simpson.
4. Antisepsis and asepsis: Joseph Lister introduced antiseptic practices in surgery, significantly reducing postoperative infections. Later, the concept of asepsis (sterilization) was developed to prevent contamination during surgical procedures.
5. Microbiology: The development of techniques for culturing and staining bacteria allowed for better understanding and identification of pathogens.
6. Physiology: Claude Bernard's work on the regulation of internal body functions, or homeostasis, contributed significantly to our understanding of human physiology.
7. Neurology: Jean-Martin Charcot made significant contributions to the study of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.
8. Psychiatry: Sigmund Freud developed psychoanalysis, a new approach to understanding mental illnesses.
9. Public health: The 19th century saw the establishment of public health organizations and initiatives aimed at improving sanitation, water quality, and vaccination programs.
10. Medical education reforms: The Flexner Report in 1910 led to significant improvements in medical education standards and practices.

Medical education, undergraduate, refers to the initial formal educational phase in which students learn the basic sciences and clinical skills required to become a physician. In the United States, this typically involves completing a four-year Bachelor's degree followed by four years of medical school. The first two years of medical school are primarily focused on classroom instruction in subjects such as anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, and pathology. The final two years involve clinical rotations, during which students work directly with patients under the supervision of licensed physicians. After completing medical school, graduates must then complete a residency program in their chosen specialty before they are eligible to practice medicine independently.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

"Plant preparations" is not a term with a specific medical definition in the field of medicine or pharmacology. However, it is commonly used to refer to various forms of plant material that have been prepared for medicinal use. This can include dried and powdered plant parts, such as leaves, roots, or flowers, as well as extracts or concentrates made from plants. These preparations may be used in traditional medicine or as the basis for modern pharmaceuticals. It is important to note that the safety, effectiveness, and quality of plant preparations can vary widely, and they should only be used under the guidance of a qualified healthcare provider.

Reproductive medicine is a branch of medicine that deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and management of reproductive health disorders, including infertility, sexual dysfunction, and other reproductive system-related issues. It involves a multidisciplinary approach, combining expertise from various medical specialties such as obstetrics, gynecology, endocrinology, urology, and genetics.

Reproductive medicine encompasses several areas of focus, including:

1. Infertility treatment: Utilizing assisted reproductive technologies (ART) like in vitro fertilization (IVF), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and other techniques to help individuals or couples conceive.
2. Contraception: Providing various methods for family planning, including hormonal contraceptives, barrier methods, and permanent sterilization procedures.
3. Sexual dysfunction: Addressing issues related to sexual desire, arousal, orgasm, and pain through medical interventions, counseling, or surgical treatments.
4. Reproductive endocrinology: Managing hormonal imbalances affecting reproductive health, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), premature ovarian failure, and hypogonadism.
5. Genetic counseling and testing: Assessing the risk of inheritable genetic disorders and providing guidance on family planning options.
6. Menopause management: Offering treatments for symptoms associated with menopause, such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness, and mood changes.
7. Fertility preservation: Providing options for individuals facing cancer treatment or other medical conditions that may impact their future fertility, including egg, sperm, and embryo freezing.
8. Adolescent reproductive health: Addressing the unique needs of adolescents related to sexual and reproductive health, including education, counseling, and preventative care.
9. Andrology: Focusing on male reproductive health, including issues related to sperm production, function, and genital abnormalities.

A Nuclear Medicine Department in a hospital is a specialized unit that uses small amounts of radioactive materials, called radiopharmaceuticals, to diagnose and treat various medical conditions. These radiopharmaceuticals are introduced into the body through different routes (such as injection, inhalation, or ingestion) and accumulate in specific organs or cells, where they emit gamma rays that can be detected by external imaging devices.

The Nuclear Medicine Department performs various diagnostic procedures, including:

1. Imaging studies: These tests produce images of the body's internal structures and functions to help diagnose and monitor diseases. Examples include bone scans, lung scans, heart scans (such as myocardial perfusion imaging), brain scans, and kidney scans.
2. Therapeutic procedures: Nuclear medicine also offers treatments for certain medical conditions using radioactive materials. For example, radioiodine therapy is used to treat thyroid cancer and hyperthyroidism.

The department typically consists of a team of healthcare professionals, including nuclear medicine physicians, radiologists, technologists, nurses, and support staff, who work together to provide high-quality care for patients undergoing nuclear medicine procedures.

Holistic health is a concept in medicine that considers the whole person, including their physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual well-being, in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of illness. It emphasizes the importance of these different aspects of an individual's life in maintaining optimal health and preventing disease.

The goal of holistic health is to achieve a state of balance and harmony within the body, mind, and spirit, and to empower individuals to take responsibility for their own health and well-being. Holistic healthcare practitioners may use a variety of treatments, including conventional medical therapies, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approaches, lifestyle modifications, and self-care techniques, to help patients achieve this balance and improve their overall quality of life.

It's important to note that while the concept of holistic health is gaining popularity, it is not a substitute for conventional medical care and should be used in conjunction with, not instead of, evidence-based medical treatments.

The "attitude of health personnel" refers to the overall disposition, behavior, and approach that healthcare professionals exhibit towards their patients or clients. This encompasses various aspects such as:

1. Interpersonal skills: The ability to communicate effectively, listen actively, and build rapport with patients.
2. Professionalism: Adherence to ethical principles, confidentiality, and maintaining a non-judgmental attitude.
3. Compassion and empathy: Showing genuine concern for the patient's well-being and understanding their feelings and experiences.
4. Cultural sensitivity: Respecting and acknowledging the cultural backgrounds, beliefs, and values of patients.
5. Competence: Demonstrating knowledge, skills, and expertise in providing healthcare services.
6. Collaboration: Working together with other healthcare professionals to ensure comprehensive care for the patient.
7. Patient-centeredness: Focusing on the individual needs, preferences, and goals of the patient in the decision-making process.
8. Commitment to continuous learning and improvement: Staying updated with the latest developments in the field and seeking opportunities to enhance one's skills and knowledge.

A positive attitude of health personnel contributes significantly to patient satisfaction, adherence to treatment plans, and overall healthcare outcomes.

Homeopathy is a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) system, developed in the late 18th century by Samuel Hahnemann, based on the principle of "like cures like." This concept suggests that a substance that causes symptoms in a healthy person can be used in very dilute quantities to treat similar symptoms in illness. The dilutions are so extreme that no molecules of the original substance remain, leading to significant controversy and skepticism over any potential therapeutic effect. Homeopathic remedies are typically made from plants, minerals, or animals, and are often highly individualized for each patient based on their specific symptoms, mental and emotional state, and overall constitution. Despite its widespread use, homeopathy lacks robust scientific evidence supporting its efficacy beyond placebo effects, and it is not considered a mainstream medical practice in most countries.

Biomedical research is a branch of scientific research that involves the study of biological processes and diseases in order to develop new treatments and therapies. This type of research often involves the use of laboratory techniques, such as cell culture and genetic engineering, as well as clinical trials in humans. The goal of biomedical research is to advance our understanding of how living organisms function and to find ways to prevent and treat various medical conditions. It encompasses a wide range of disciplines, including molecular biology, genetics, immunology, pharmacology, and neuroscience, among others. Ultimately, the aim of biomedical research is to improve human health and well-being.

"Medicine in Art" is not a medical term per se, but rather a term used to describe the intersection and representation of medical themes, practices, or symbols in various art forms. It can include but is not limited to:

1. The depiction of medical scenes, practitioners, or patients in paintings, sculptures, or photographs.
2. The use of medical imagery such as X-rays, MRIs, or anatomical drawings in mixed media works.
3. The exploration of medical issues, diseases, or treatments in conceptual art.
4. The creation of art by artists with medical conditions, which can provide insight into their experiences.
5. The use of art therapy as a healing modality in medical settings.

This term is often used in the context of art history, visual culture, and medical humanities to analyze and understand the complex relationships between art, medicine, and society.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

In the context of medicine, specialization refers to the process or state of a physician, surgeon, or other healthcare professional acquiring and demonstrating expertise in a particular field or area of practice beyond their initial general training. This is usually achieved through additional years of education, training, and clinical experience in a specific medical discipline or subspecialty.

For instance, a doctor who has completed medical school and a general residency program may choose to specialize in cardiology, dermatology, neurology, orthopedics, psychiatry, or any other branch of medicine. After completing a specialized fellowship program and passing the relevant certification exams, they become certified as a specialist in that field, recognized by professional medical organizations such as the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) or the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC).

Specialization allows healthcare professionals to provide more focused, expert care for patients with specific conditions or needs. It also contributes to the development and advancement of medical knowledge and practice, as specialists often conduct research and contribute to the evidence base in their respective fields.

Academic medical centers (AMCs) are institutions that combine medical care, research, and education in a single setting. They are typically affiliated with a medical school and often serve as teaching hospitals for medical students, residents, and fellows. AMCs are dedicated to providing high-quality patient care while also advancing medical knowledge through research and training the next generation of healthcare professionals.

AMCs often have a strong focus on cutting-edge medical technology, innovative treatments, and clinical trials. They may also be involved in community outreach programs and provide specialized care for complex medical conditions that may not be available at other hospitals or healthcare facilities. Additionally, AMCs often have robust research programs focused on developing new drugs, therapies, and medical devices to improve patient outcomes and advance the field of medicine.

Overall, academic medical centers play a critical role in advancing medical knowledge, improving patient care, and training future healthcare professionals.

Behavioral medicine is a field of healthcare that focuses on the development and integration of behavioral and biomedical sciences in the promotion of health, prevention of illness, and treatment of disorders. It is an interdisciplinary approach that involves the collaboration of professionals from various fields, including psychology, psychiatry, medicine, nursing, social work, and public health.

Behavioral medicine recognizes that behavior plays a critical role in health outcomes and seeks to understand how behaviors such as diet, physical activity, sleep, stress management, and substance use can impact physical health. It also examines the psychological factors that can influence health, such as thoughts, emotions, and social support.

The goal of behavioral medicine is to develop interventions that target these modifiable risk factors to prevent or treat illness, improve quality of life, and reduce healthcare costs. These interventions may include individual counseling, group therapy, lifestyle modification programs, stress management techniques, and other evidence-based practices.

In summary, behavioral medicine is a medical specialty that focuses on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders that result from the interaction of biological, behavioral, and environmental factors. It aims to promote health and well-being by addressing modifiable risk factors through evidence-based interventions.

Pharmaceutical preparations refer to the various forms of medicines that are produced by pharmaceutical companies, which are intended for therapeutic or prophylactic use. These preparations consist of an active ingredient (the drug) combined with excipients (inactive ingredients) in a specific formulation and dosage form.

The active ingredient is the substance that has a therapeutic effect on the body, while the excipients are added to improve the stability, palatability, bioavailability, or administration of the drug. Examples of pharmaceutical preparations include tablets, capsules, solutions, suspensions, emulsions, ointments, creams, and injections.

The production of pharmaceutical preparations involves a series of steps that ensure the quality, safety, and efficacy of the final product. These steps include the selection and testing of raw materials, formulation development, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, and storage. Each step is governed by strict regulations and guidelines to ensure that the final product meets the required standards for use in medical practice.

Nonprescription drugs, also known as over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, are medications that can be legally purchased without a prescription from a healthcare professional. They are considered safe and effective for treating minor illnesses or symptoms when used according to the directions on the label. Examples include pain relievers like acetaminophen and ibuprofen, antihistamines for allergies, and topical treatments for skin conditions. It is still important to follow the recommended dosage and consult with a healthcare provider if there are any concerns or questions about using nonprescription drugs.

Educational measurement is a field of study concerned with the development, administration, and interpretation of tests, questionnaires, and other assessments for the purpose of measuring learning outcomes, abilities, knowledge, skills, and attitudes in an educational context. The goal of educational measurement is to provide valid, reliable, and fair measures of student achievement and growth that can inform instructional decisions, guide curriculum development, and support accountability efforts.

Educational measurement involves a variety of statistical and psychometric methods for analyzing assessment data, including classical test theory, item response theory, and generalizability theory. These methods are used to establish the reliability and validity of assessments, as well as to score and interpret student performance. Additionally, educational measurement is concerned with issues related to test fairness, accessibility, and bias, and seeks to ensure that assessments are equitable and inclusive for all students.

Overall, educational measurement plays a critical role in ensuring the quality and effectiveness of educational programs and policies, and helps to promote student learning and achievement.

"Materia Medica" is a term that comes from the Latin language, where "materia" means "substance" or "material," and "medica" refers to "medical." In a medical context, Materia Medica historically refers to a collection of detailed descriptions of substances that are used for medicinal purposes.

It is essentially a comprehensive reference book that describes the properties, actions, uses, dosages, potential side effects, and contraindications of various drugs or medicinal agents. The information in a Materia Medica is typically based on historical use, experimental pharmacological data, clinical trials, and other scientific research.

Modern Materia Medica has evolved to become more specialized, with separate references for different types of medicinal substances, such as botanical (herbal) medicine, homeopathic remedies, or conventional pharmaceuticals. These resources are often used by healthcare professionals, including physicians, pharmacists, and nurses, to guide their prescribing decisions and ensure the safe and effective use of medications for their patients.

Medical societies are professional organizations composed of physicians, surgeons, and other healthcare professionals who share a common purpose of promoting medical research, education, and patient care. These societies can focus on specific medical specialties, such as the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) for cancer specialists or the American College of Surgeons (ACS) for surgeons. They may also address broader issues related to healthcare policy, advocacy, and ethics. Medical societies often provide resources for continuing medical education, publish scientific journals, establish clinical practice guidelines, and offer networking opportunities for members.

Pulmonary medicine is a medical specialty that deals with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases and conditions affecting the respiratory system, including the lungs, trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli. Pulmonologists are specialists who treat a wide range of respiratory disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, lung cancer, sleep-disordered breathing, tuberculosis, and interstitial lung diseases. They use various diagnostic techniques including chest X-rays, CT scans, pulmonary function tests, bronchoscopy, and sleep studies to evaluate and manage respiratory disorders. Pulmonologists also provide care for patients who require long-term mechanical ventilation or oxygen therapy.

A clinical clerkship is a phase of medical education where medical students participate in supervised direct patient care in a clinical setting as part of their training. It typically occurs during the third or fourth year of medical school and serves to provide students with practical experience in diagnosing and treating patients under the guidance of experienced physicians.

During a clinical clerkship, students work directly with patients in hospitals, clinics, or other healthcare facilities, taking medical histories, performing physical examinations, ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests, formulating treatment plans, and communicating with patients and their families. They may also participate in patient rounds, conferences, and other educational activities.

Clinical clerkships are designed to help students develop clinical skills, build confidence, and gain exposure to different medical specialties. They provide an opportunity for students to apply the knowledge and skills they have learned in the classroom to real-world situations, helping them to become competent and compassionate healthcare providers.

I believe there might be a bit of confusion in your question. "History" is a subject that refers to events, ideas, and developments of the past. It's not something that has a medical definition. However, if you're referring to the "21st century" in a historical context, it relates to the period from 2001 to the present. It's an era marked by significant advancements in technology, medicine, and society at large. But again, it doesn't have a medical definition. If you meant something else, please provide more context so I can give a more accurate response.

Medical ethics is a branch of ethics that deals with moral issues in medical care, research, and practice. It provides a framework for addressing questions related to patient autonomy, informed consent, confidentiality, distributive justice, beneficentia (doing good), and non-maleficence (not doing harm). Medical ethics also involves the application of ethical principles such as respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice to specific medical cases and situations. It is a crucial component of medical education and practice, helping healthcare professionals make informed decisions that promote patient well-being while respecting their rights and dignity.

I believe there might be a bit of confusion in your question. A "history" in medical terms usually refers to the detailed account of a patient's symptoms, illnesses, and treatments received, which is used by healthcare professionals to understand their health status and provide appropriate care. It is not typically associated with a specific century like the 18th century.

If you are asking for information about the medical practices or significant developments in the field of medicine during the 18th century, I would be happy to provide some insight into that! The 18th century was a time of great advancement and change in the medical field, with many notable discoveries and innovations. Some examples include:

* The development of smallpox vaccination by Edward Jenner in 1796
* The discovery of oxygen by Joseph Priestley in 1774
* The invention of the thermometer by Gabriel Fahrenheit in 1714
* The publication of "An Inquiry into the Causes and Effects of the Variolae Vaccinae" by Edward Jenner in 1798, which helped to establish the concept of vaccination
* The founding of the Royal Society of Medicine in London in 1773
* The development of new surgical techniques and instruments, such as the use of tourniquets and catgut sutures.

Self-medication is the use of medications or other healthcare products by individuals to treat self-diagnosed disorders or symptoms, without consulting a healthcare professional. This may include using leftover prescription medications, over-the-counter drugs, or alternative therapies. While it might seem convenient and cost-effective, self-medication can lead to incorrect diagnosis, inappropriate treatment, masking of serious conditions, potential drug interactions, dependency, and complications, which may result in further health issues. It is always recommended to seek professional medical advice before starting any medication or therapy.

A physician is a healthcare professional who practices medicine, providing medical care and treatment to patients. Physicians may specialize in various fields of medicine, such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, psychiatry, or radiology, among others. They are responsible for diagnosing and treating illnesses, injuries, and disorders; prescribing medications; ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests; providing counseling and education to patients; and collaborating with other healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive care. Physicians may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, private practices, and academic medical centers. To become a physician, one must complete a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree program and pass licensing exams to practice medicine in their state.

Research, in the context of medicine, is a systematic and rigorous process of collecting, analyzing, and interpreting information in order to increase our understanding, develop new knowledge, or evaluate current practices and interventions. It can involve various methodologies such as observational studies, experiments, surveys, or literature reviews. The goal of medical research is to advance health care by identifying new treatments, improving diagnostic techniques, and developing prevention strategies. Medical research is typically conducted by teams of researchers including clinicians, scientists, and other healthcare professionals. It is subject to ethical guidelines and regulations to ensure that it is conducted responsibly and with the best interests of patients in mind.

Data collection in the medical context refers to the systematic gathering of information relevant to a specific research question or clinical situation. This process involves identifying and recording data elements, such as demographic characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies, from various sources including patient interviews, medical records, and diagnostic tests. The data collected is used to support clinical decision-making, inform research hypotheses, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. It is essential that data collection is performed in a standardized and unbiased manner to ensure the validity and reliability of the results.

The term "Arabic Medicine" refers to the medical knowledge and practices that were developed by scholars in the Islamic world, which stretched from Spain to Persia during the Middle Ages (approximately 8th to 15th centuries). This period saw a flourishing of intellectual activity in many fields, including medicine.

Arabic medicine was heavily influenced by ancient Greek and Roman medical texts, particularly those of Galen and Hippocrates. These texts were translated into Arabic and studied by Islamic scholars, who built upon this foundation to make significant contributions of their own.

One of the most famous Arabic physicians was Avicenna (Ibn Sina), who wrote the Canon of Medicine, a comprehensive medical text that was widely used in Europe and the Middle East for centuries. Other notable Arabic physicians include Al-Razi (Rhazes) and Ibn al-Nafis, who made important discoveries in anatomy and physiology.

Arabic medicine encompassed a wide range of topics, including anatomy, pharmacology, surgery, and public health. It emphasized the importance of observation, experimentation, and critical thinking in medical practice, and placed a strong emphasis on the use of rational methods to diagnose and treat illness.

Overall, Arabic medicine played a crucial role in preserving and advancing medical knowledge during the Middle Ages, and its influence can still be seen in modern medical practices today.

I believe there might be a bit of confusion in your question. A "history" in medical terms usually refers to the detailed account of a patient's symptoms, illnesses, and treatments received, which is used by healthcare professionals to understand their health status and provide appropriate care. It is not typically associated with a specific century like the 17th century.

If you are asking for information about the medical practices or significant developments in the field of medicine during the 17th century, I would be happy to provide some insight into that. The 17th century was a time of great advancement in medical knowledge and practice, with several key figures and events shaping the course of medical history.

Some notable developments in medicine during the 17th century include:

1. William Harvey's discovery of the circulation of blood (1628): English physician William Harvey published his groundbreaking work "De Motu Cordis" (On the Motion of the Heart and Blood), which described the circulatory system and the role of the heart in pumping blood throughout the body. This discovery fundamentally changed our understanding of human anatomy and physiology.
2. The development of the microscope (1600s): The invention of the microscope allowed scientists to observe structures that were previously invisible to the naked eye, such as cells, bacteria, and other microorganisms. This technology opened up new avenues of research in anatomy, physiology, and pathology, paving the way for modern medical science.
3. The establishment of the Royal Society (1660): The Royal Society, a prominent scientific organization in the UK, was founded during this century to promote scientific inquiry and share knowledge among its members. Many notable scientists and physicians, including Robert Hooke and Christopher Wren, were part of the society and contributed significantly to the advancement of medical science.
4. The Smallpox Vaccination (1796): Although this occurred near the end of the 18th century, the groundwork for Edward Jenner's smallpox vaccine was laid during the 17th century. Smallpox was a significant public health issue during this time, and Jenner's development of an effective vaccine marked a major milestone in the history of medicine and public health.
5. The work of Sylvius de le Boe (1614-1672): A Dutch physician and scientist, Sylvius de le Boe made significant contributions to our understanding of human anatomy and physiology. He was the first to describe the circulation of blood in the lungs and identified the role of the liver in metabolism.

These are just a few examples of the many advancements that took place during the 17th century, shaping the course of medical history and laying the foundation for modern medicine.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "teaching" is a general term that refers to the act of imparting knowledge or skills to others and is not a medical term. However, in the context of medical education, teaching refers to the instruction and training of medical students, residents, fellows, and other healthcare professionals to develop their knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for providing high-quality patient care. This can take place in various settings such as classrooms, clinical wards, simulation centers, or online platforms, and can involve a range of teaching methods including lectures, small group discussions, bedside teaching, case-based learning, and hands-on training.

"Military medicine" is a specific branch of medical practice that deals with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases and injuries in military populations. It encompasses the provision of healthcare services to military personnel, both in peacetime and during times of conflict or emergency situations. This may include providing care in combat zones, managing mass casualties, delivering preventive medicine programs, conducting medical research, and providing medical support during peacekeeping missions and humanitarian assistance efforts. Military medicine also places a strong emphasis on the development and use of specialized equipment, techniques, and protocols to ensure the best possible medical care for military personnel in challenging environments.

A "Medical History, Medieval" typically refers to the study and documentation of medical practices, knowledge, and beliefs during the Middle Ages, which spanned approximately from the 5th to the 15th century. This era saw significant developments in medicine, including the translation and dissemination of ancient Greek and Roman medical texts, the establishment of hospitals and medical schools, and the growth of surgical techniques.

During this time, medical theories were heavily influenced by the works of Hippocrates and Galen, who believed that diseases were caused by an imbalance in the four bodily fluids or "humors" (blood, phlegm, black bile, and yellow bile). Treatments often involved attempts to restore this balance through diet, lifestyle changes, and various medical interventions such as bloodletting, purgatives, and herbal remedies.

The Medieval period also saw the rise of monastic medicine, in which monasteries and convents played a crucial role in providing medical care to the sick and poor. Monks and nuns often served as healers and were known for their knowledge of herbs and other natural remedies. Additionally, during this time, Islamic medicine flourished, with physicians such as Avicenna and Rhazes making significant contributions to the field, including the development of new surgical techniques and the creation of comprehensive medical texts that were widely translated and studied in Europe.

Overall, the Medieval period was a critical time in the development of medical knowledge and practice, laying the groundwork for many modern medical concepts and practices.

'Drug legislation' refers to the laws and regulations that govern the production, distribution, sale, possession, and use of medications and pharmaceutical products within a given jurisdiction. These laws are designed to protect public health and safety by establishing standards for drug quality, ensuring appropriate prescribing and dispensing practices, preventing drug abuse and diversion, and promoting access to necessary medications. Drug legislation may also include provisions related to clinical trials, advertising, packaging, labeling, and reimbursement. Compliance with these regulations is typically enforced through a combination of government agencies, professional organizations, and legal penalties for non-compliance.

A "periodical" in the context of medicine typically refers to a type of publication that is issued regularly, such as on a monthly or quarterly basis. These publications include peer-reviewed journals, magazines, and newsletters that focus on medical research, education, and practice. They may contain original research articles, review articles, case reports, editorials, letters to the editor, and other types of content related to medical science and clinical practice.

As a "Topic," periodicals in medicine encompass various aspects such as their role in disseminating new knowledge, their impact on clinical decision-making, their quality control measures, and their ethical considerations. Medical periodicals serve as a crucial resource for healthcare professionals, researchers, students, and other stakeholders to stay updated on the latest developments in their field and to share their findings with others.

Physician-patient relations, also known as doctor-patient relationships, refer to the interaction and communication between healthcare professionals and their patients. This relationship is founded on trust, respect, and understanding, with the physician providing medical care and treatment based on the patient's needs and best interests. Effective physician-patient relations involve clear communication, informed consent, shared decision-making, and confidentiality. A positive and collaborative relationship can lead to better health outcomes, improved patient satisfaction, and increased adherence to treatment plans.

Herb-drug interactions (HDIs) refer to the pharmacological or clinical consequences that occur when a patient takes a herbal product concurrently with a prescribed medication. These interactions can result in various outcomes, such as decreased, increased, or altered drug effects due to changes in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of the drug.

Herbs may contain various bioactive compounds that can interact with drugs and affect their pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics. For example, some herbs may induce or inhibit drug-metabolizing enzymes, such as cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes, leading to altered drug metabolism and potentially increased or decreased drug concentrations in the body.

Similarly, herbs can also affect drug transporters, such as P-glycoprotein, which can further alter drug absorption, distribution, and excretion. Moreover, some herbs may have pharmacodynamic interactions with drugs, leading to additive or synergistic effects, or antagonism of the drug's therapeutic action.

Therefore, healthcare providers should be aware of potential HDIs when prescribing medications to patients who use herbal products and consider monitoring their patients' medication responses closely. Patients should also be advised to inform their healthcare providers about any herbal products they are taking, including dosage and frequency of use.

"Health Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices" (HKAP) is a term used in public health to refer to the knowledge, beliefs, assumptions, and behaviors that individuals possess or engage in that are related to health. Here's a brief definition of each component:

1. Health Knowledge: Refers to the factual information and understanding that individuals have about various health-related topics, such as anatomy, physiology, disease processes, and healthy behaviors.
2. Attitudes: Represent the positive or negative evaluations, feelings, or dispositions that people hold towards certain health issues, practices, or services. These attitudes can influence their willingness to adopt and maintain healthy behaviors.
3. Practices: Encompass the specific actions or habits that individuals engage in related to their health, such as dietary choices, exercise routines, hygiene practices, and use of healthcare services.

HKAP is a multidimensional concept that helps public health professionals understand and address various factors influencing individual and community health outcomes. By assessing and addressing knowledge gaps, negative attitudes, or unhealthy practices, interventions can be designed to promote positive behavior change and improve overall health status.

Venereology is a branch of medicine that deals with the study, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or venereal diseases. The term "venereal" comes from Venus, the Roman goddess of love, due to the association of these diseases with sexual activity.

A medical professional who specializes in venereology is called a venereologist. They are trained to diagnose and manage various types of STIs, including chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, herpes, HIV/AIDS, and genital warts, among others.

Venereologists work in various settings, such as hospitals, clinics, and public health departments. They often collaborate with other healthcare professionals, including primary care physicians, nurses, and counselors, to provide comprehensive care for patients with STIs. Additionally, venereologists play a crucial role in promoting sexual health education and advocating for policies that help prevent the spread of STIs.

Naturopathy, also known as naturopathic medicine, is a system of healthcare that focuses on the use of natural remedies and treatments to promote self-healing and prevent disease. It is based on the belief that the body has an inherent ability to heal itself, and that the role of the naturopathic doctor is to support and facilitate this process.

Naturopathic medicine combines traditional healing methods with modern scientific knowledge, and may include a variety of treatments such as nutrition and lifestyle counseling, herbal medicine, homeopathy, acupuncture, hydrotherapy, and physical therapy. The goal of naturopathic treatment is to address the underlying causes of illness and promote overall health and well-being, rather than simply treating symptoms.

Naturopathic doctors (NDs) are trained in both conventional and naturopathic medicine, and are licensed as primary care providers in some states. They typically complete a four-year graduate level medical education at an accredited naturopathic medical school, including clinical training under the supervision of licensed professionals.

It's important to note that while naturopathy can be a valuable complementary approach to conventional medicine, it should not be used as a substitute for necessary medical treatments or care. Patients are encouraged to work with their healthcare providers to determine the most appropriate course of treatment for their individual needs and health conditions.

Molecular medicine is a branch of medicine that uses molecular biology and genetics to understand, diagnose, and treat various diseases and disorders. It involves the study of biological molecules such as DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids to identify abnormalities at the molecular level that can lead to disease. This information is then used to develop targeted therapies that can specifically address these molecular targets, with the goal of improving patient outcomes while minimizing side effects. Molecular medicine also encompasses the use of genetic testing and personalized medicine, which tailors treatments to an individual's specific genetic makeup.

Physician's practice patterns refer to the individual habits and preferences of healthcare providers when it comes to making clinical decisions and managing patient care. These patterns can encompass various aspects, such as:

1. Diagnostic testing: The types and frequency of diagnostic tests ordered for patients with similar conditions.
2. Treatment modalities: The choice of treatment options, including medications, procedures, or referrals to specialists.
3. Patient communication: The way physicians communicate with their patients, including the amount and type of information shared, as well as the level of patient involvement in decision-making.
4. Follow-up care: The frequency and duration of follow-up appointments, as well as the monitoring of treatment effectiveness and potential side effects.
5. Resource utilization: The use of healthcare resources, such as hospitalizations, imaging studies, or specialist consultations, and the associated costs.

Physician practice patterns can be influenced by various factors, including medical training, clinical experience, personal beliefs, guidelines, and local availability of resources. Understanding these patterns is essential for evaluating the quality of care, identifying potential variations in care, and implementing strategies to improve patient outcomes and reduce healthcare costs.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Nobel Prize" is not a medical definition. The Nobel Prize is an international award given annually in several categories, and one of those categories is physiology or medicine. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine is awarded to individuals who have made significant discoveries of outstanding importance in the fields of life sciences and medicine. It is one of the most prestigious awards in these fields.

I believe there might be a bit of confusion in your question. A "medical definition" refers to the explanation of a medical term or concept. On the other hand, "15th century" is a historical time period and does not have a medical definition per se. However, I can provide you with some context regarding the medical advancements and practices during the 15th century.

The 15th century was marked by significant developments in medicine, particularly in Europe, as it transitioned from medieval to early modern medicine. Some key aspects of 15th-century medicine include:

1. Universities and medical education: Universities became more prominent centers for medical education, with institutions like the University of Bologna, Padua, Montpellier, and Salamanca playing crucial roles in shaping medical thought. Medical faculties taught subjects such as anatomy, physiology, pathology, surgery, and pharmacology based on ancient Greek and Roman texts, mainly Galen and Hippocrates.

2. Anatomical studies: The 15th century saw the beginning of a more accurate understanding of human anatomy. Italian anatomist and physician Mondino de Luzzi (c. 1270–1326) is known for his influential anatomy textbook, "Anathomia," which was widely used during this period. Later in the century, Andreas Vesalius (1514–1564), often regarded as the founder of modern human anatomy, began his groundbreaking work on detailed dissections and accurate representations of the human body.

3. Renaissance of medical illustrations: The 15th century marked a revival in medical illustrations, with artists like Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519) creating highly accurate anatomical drawings based on dissections. These detailed images helped physicians better understand the human body and its functions.

4. Development of hospitals: Hospitals during this time became more organized and specialized, focusing on specific medical conditions or patient populations. For example, mental health institutions, known as "madhouses" or "asylums," were established to treat individuals with mental illnesses.

5. Plague and public health: The ongoing threat of the bubonic plague (Black Death) led to increased efforts in public health, including improved sanitation practices and the establishment of quarantine measures for infected individuals.

6. Humoral theory: Although challenged by some during this period, the ancient Greek humoral theory—which posited that the balance of four bodily fluids or "humors" (blood, phlegm, black bile, and yellow bile) determined a person's health—remained influential in medical practice.

7. Surgery: Barber-surgeons continued to perform various surgical procedures, including bloodletting, tooth extraction, and amputations. However, anesthesia was still not widely used, and pain management relied on opium or alcohol-based preparations.

8. Pharmacology: The use of herbal remedies and other natural substances to treat illnesses remained popular during the 15th century. Physicians like Nicholas Culpeper (1616–1654) compiled extensive lists of medicinal plants and their uses, contributing to the development of modern pharmacology.

9. Astrology and medicine: Despite growing skepticism among some scholars, astrological beliefs continued to influence medical practice in the 15th century. Physicians often consulted astrological charts when diagnosing and treating patients.

10. Medical education: Universities across Europe offered formal medical education, with students studying anatomy, physiology, pathology, and pharmacology. However, many practitioners still learned their trade through apprenticeships or self-study.

"Physicians, Women" refers to medical doctors who identify as female. They have completed the required education and training to provide medical diagnosis, treatment, and preventive care to patients. They can specialize in various fields such as cardiology, pediatrics, psychiatry, surgery, etc. Their role is to promote and restore health by providing comprehensive medical care to individuals, families, and communities.

Pediatrics is a branch of medicine that deals with the medical care and treatment of infants, children, and adolescents, typically up to the age of 18 or sometimes up to 21 years. It covers a wide range of health services including preventive healthcare, diagnosis and treatment of physical, mental, and emotional illnesses, and promotion of healthy lifestyles and behaviors in children.

Pediatricians are medical doctors who specialize in this field and have extensive training in the unique needs and developmental stages of children. They provide comprehensive care for children from birth to young adulthood, addressing various health issues such as infectious diseases, injuries, genetic disorders, developmental delays, behavioral problems, and chronic conditions like asthma, diabetes, and cancer.

In addition to medical expertise, pediatricians also need excellent communication skills to build trust with their young patients and their families, and to provide education and guidance on various aspects of child health and well-being.

Certification is the act of granting a formal warranty or guarantee (a certificate) that a product, process, or service conforms to specified requirements. In the medical field, certification often refers to the process by which a regulatory body or professional organization grants recognition to a healthcare professional, institution, or program that meets certain predetermined standards.

For example, in the United States, physicians can become certified in a particular medical specialty through the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) after completing residency training and passing a rigorous examination. Similarly, hospitals and other healthcare facilities may be certified by organizations such as The Joint Commission to demonstrate that they meet established quality and safety standards.

Medical certification serves several purposes, including:

1. Ensuring competence: Certification helps establish that the certified individual or organization possesses the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities to provide safe and effective care in their area of expertise.
2. Protecting patients: By setting and enforcing standards, certification organizations aim to protect patients from harm and ensure they receive high-quality care.
3. Promoting continuous improvement: Certification programs often require ongoing professional development and continuing education, encouraging healthcare professionals and institutions to stay current with best practices and advancements in their field.
4. Enhancing public trust: Certification can help build public confidence in the competence and expertise of healthcare providers and organizations, making it easier for patients to make informed decisions about their care.

Spiritual therapies are a type of complementary and alternative medicine that aim to treat the spirit or soul rather than the body. They are based on the belief that illness has a spiritual cause or a spiritual component, and that healing can be achieved by addressing this aspect of a person's experience. Spiritual therapies can take many forms, including prayer, meditation, guided imagery, spiritual counseling, and energy healing.

It is important to note that while some people find spiritual therapies helpful in managing their health and well-being, these approaches are not typically considered mainstream medical treatments. They should not be used as a substitute for conventional medical care, but rather as a complement to it. As with any therapy, it is important to discuss the potential benefits and risks of spiritual therapies with a qualified healthcare provider before beginning treatment.

"Qi" is a concept in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and martial arts that refers to a vital energy or life force that is believed to flow through the body. It is considered to be essential for maintaining good health and can be influenced by various factors such as diet, exercise, emotions, and environment. However, it's important to note that "Qi" is not a term recognized in modern Western medicine and its definition and significance are based on cultural and philosophical beliefs rather than scientific evidence.

I apologize, but "Canada" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in North America, known for its vast wilderness, multicultural cities, and significant natural resources. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terms, I would be happy to help answer those!

I believe there might be a bit of confusion in your question. A "history" in medical terms usually refers to the detailed account of a patient's symptoms, illnesses, and treatments over time. It is a crucial part of the medical record and helps healthcare professionals understand the patient's health status and inform their care plans.

On the other hand, "16th century" refers to a specific period in history, spanning from 1501 to 1600 AD.

There isn't a direct medical definition for 'History, 16th Century.' However, if you are interested in learning about the medical advancements and practices during that time, I would be happy to provide some information. The 16th century was marked by significant developments in anatomy, surgery, and pharmacology, thanks to pioneers like Andreas Vesalius, Ambroise Paré, and William Shakespeare, who incorporated medical themes into his plays.

Forensic medicine, also known as legal medicine or medical jurisprudence, is a branch of medicine that deals with the application of medical knowledge to legal issues and questions. It involves the examination, interpretation, and analysis of medical evidence for use in courts of law. This may include determining the cause and manner of death, identifying injuries or diseases, assessing the effects of substances or treatments, and evaluating the competency or capacity of individuals. Forensic medicine is often used in criminal investigations and court cases, but it can also be applied to civil matters such as personal injury claims or medical malpractice suits.

The "drug industry" is also commonly referred to as the "pharmaceutical industry." It is a segment of the healthcare sector that involves the research, development, production, and marketing of medications or drugs. This includes both prescription and over-the-counter medicines used to treat, cure, or prevent diseases and medical conditions in humans and animals.

The drug industry comprises various types of organizations, such as:

1. Research-based pharmaceutical companies: These are large corporations that focus on the research and development (R&D) of new drugs, clinical trials, obtaining regulatory approvals, manufacturing, and marketing their products globally. Examples include Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, Roche, and Merck.

2. Generic drug manufacturers: After the patent for a brand-name drug expires, generic drug manufacturers can produce and sell a similar version of the drug at a lower cost. These companies must demonstrate that their product is bioequivalent to the brand-name drug in terms of safety, quality, and efficacy.

3. Biotechnology companies: These firms specialize in developing drugs using biotechnological methods, such as recombinant DNA technology, gene therapy, or monoclonal antibodies. Many biotech companies focus on specific therapeutic areas, like oncology, immunology, or neurology.

4. Contract research organizations (CROs): CROs provide various services to the drug industry, including clinical trial management, data analysis, regulatory affairs support, and pharmacovigilance. They work with both large pharmaceutical companies and smaller biotech firms to help streamline the drug development process.

5. Drug delivery system companies: These organizations focus on developing innovative technologies for delivering drugs more effectively and safely to patients. Examples include transdermal patches, inhalers, or long-acting injectables.

6. Wholesalers and distributors: Companies that purchase drugs from manufacturers and distribute them to pharmacies, hospitals, and other healthcare providers.

The drug industry plays a crucial role in improving public health by discovering, developing, and delivering new treatments for various diseases and medical conditions. However, it is also subject to criticism and regulation due to concerns about high drug prices, marketing practices, and the potential for conflicts of interest between industry and healthcare professionals.

Geriatrics is a branch of medicine focused on the health care and well-being of older adults, typically defined as those aged 65 years and older. It deals with the physiological, psychological, social, and environmental aspects of aging and addresses the medical, functional, and cognitive issues that are common in this population. The goal of geriatric medicine is to promote health, independence, and quality of life for older adults by preventing and managing diseases and disabilities, coordinating care, and supporting optimal functioning in their daily lives.

Geriatricians, who specialize in geriatrics, receive additional training beyond medical school and residency to develop expertise in the unique needs and challenges of older adults. They often work as part of interdisciplinary teams that include nurses, social workers, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and other healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive care for their patients.

"Family Physicians" are medical doctors who provide comprehensive primary care to individuals and families of all ages. They are trained to diagnose and treat a wide range of medical conditions, from minor illnesses to complex diseases. In addition to providing acute care, family physicians also focus on preventive medicine, helping their patients maintain their overall health and well-being through regular checkups, screenings, and immunizations. They often serve as the patient's main point of contact within the healthcare system, coordinating care with specialists and other healthcare professionals as needed. Family physicians may work in private practices, community health centers, hospitals, or other healthcare settings.

A pharmacy is a retail store or a healthcare facility where medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, are sold or dispensed. Pharmacies are staffed by professional pharmacists who provide medication therapy management services, including reviewing the patient's medication history, checking for potential drug interactions, dosage adjustments, and providing education to patients on the safe and effective use of their medications.

Pharmacies may also offer other health-related products such as medical supplies, vitamins, and personal care items. Some pharmacies are part of a larger healthcare system, such as hospitals or clinics, while others are standalone retail stores. In addition to traditional brick-and-mortar locations, there are also online pharmacies that operate over the internet.

It's important for patients to only obtain medications from licensed and reputable pharmacies to ensure their safety and the effectiveness of their treatment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "publishing" is not a term that has a medical definition. Publishing typically refers to the process of preparing and disseminating information, such as books, journals, or articles, to the public or a specific audience. It could involve both print and digital media. If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

Acupuncture therapy is a form of traditional Chinese medicine that involves the insertion of thin needles into specific points on the body to stimulate the flow of energy (Qi), balance the vital force (Chi), and promote healing. It is based on the concept of meridians, or pathways, through which this energy flows. Acupuncture therapy is used to treat a variety of conditions, including pain, stress, anxiety, insomnia, digestive disorders, and reproductive health issues. According to Western medicine, acupuncture may work by stimulating the nervous system, increasing blood flow, and releasing natural pain-relieving chemicals called endorphins. It is generally considered safe when performed by a qualified practitioner using sterile needles.

Drug therapy, also known as pharmacotherapy, refers to the use of medications to treat, cure, or prevent a disease or disorder. It is a crucial component of medical treatment and involves the prescription, administration, and monitoring of drugs to achieve specific therapeutic goals. The choice of drug therapy depends on various factors, including the patient's age, sex, weight, overall health status, severity of the condition, potential interactions with other medications, and personal preferences.

The goal of drug therapy is to alleviate symptoms, reduce the risk of complications, slow down disease progression, or cure a disease. It can be used as a standalone treatment or in combination with other therapies such as surgery, radiation therapy, or lifestyle modifications. The effectiveness of drug therapy varies depending on the condition being treated and the individual patient's response to the medication.

Drug therapy requires careful monitoring to ensure its safety and efficacy. Patients should be informed about the potential benefits and risks associated with the medication, including side effects, contraindications, and interactions with other drugs or foods. Regular follow-up appointments with healthcare providers are necessary to assess the patient's response to the therapy and make any necessary adjustments.

In summary, drug therapy is a medical intervention that involves the use of medications to treat, cure, or prevent diseases or disorders. It requires careful consideration of various factors, including the patient's individual needs and preferences, and ongoing monitoring to ensure its safety and effectiveness.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Croatia" is not a medical term or condition. It is a country located in Central and Southeastern Europe. If you have any questions about Croatian healthcare or medical practices, I would be happy to try to help answer those for you.

Health care surveys are research tools used to systematically collect information from a population or sample regarding their experiences, perceptions, and knowledge of health services, health outcomes, and various other health-related topics. These surveys typically consist of standardized questionnaires that cover specific aspects of healthcare, such as access to care, quality of care, patient satisfaction, health disparities, and healthcare costs. The data gathered from health care surveys are used to inform policy decisions, improve healthcare delivery, identify best practices, allocate resources, and monitor the health status of populations. Health care surveys can be conducted through various modes, including in-person interviews, telephone interviews, mail-in questionnaires, or online platforms.

A physician's role is defined as a licensed healthcare professional who practices medicine, diagnoses and treats injuries or illnesses, and promotes health and wellness. Physicians may specialize in various fields such as cardiology, dermatology, psychiatry, surgery, etc., requiring additional training and certification beyond medical school. They are responsible for providing comprehensive medical care to patients, including:

1. Obtaining a patient's medical history and performing physical examinations
2. Ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests
3. Developing treatment plans based on their diagnosis
4. Prescribing medications or performing procedures as necessary
5. Coordinating with other healthcare professionals for multidisciplinary care
6. Providing counseling and education to patients about their health, disease prevention, and wellness promotion
7. Advocating for their patients' rights and ensuring quality of care
8. Maintaining accurate medical records and staying updated on the latest medical research and advancements in their field.

Interdisciplinary communication in a medical context refers to the exchange of information and ideas between professionals from different healthcare disciplines, such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists, social workers, and therapists. This form of communication is essential for coordinating patient care, making informed treatment decisions, and ensuring that all members of the healthcare team are aware of the patient's needs, goals, and progress. Effective interdisciplinary communication can help to improve patient outcomes, increase patient satisfaction, and reduce medical errors. It typically involves clear, concise, and respectful communication, often through regular meetings, shared documentation, and collaborative decision-making processes.

Radiologic technology is a medical term that refers to the use of imaging technologies to diagnose and treat diseases. It involves the application of various forms of radiation, such as X-rays, magnetic fields, sound waves, and radioactive substances, to create detailed images of the internal structures of the body.

Radiologic technologists are healthcare professionals who operate the imaging equipment and work closely with radiologists, who are medical doctors specializing in interpreting medical images. Radiologic technology includes various imaging modalities such as:

1. X-ray radiography: produces images of internal structures by passing X-rays through the body onto a detector.
2. Computed tomography (CT): uses X-rays to create detailed cross-sectional images of the body.
3. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce detailed images of internal structures without using radiation.
4. Ultrasound: uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of internal structures, such as fetuses during pregnancy or organs like the heart and liver.
5. Nuclear medicine: uses small amounts of radioactive substances to diagnose and treat diseases by creating detailed images of the body's internal structures and functions.

Radiologic technology plays a crucial role in modern medicine, enabling healthcare providers to make accurate diagnoses, plan treatments, and monitor patient progress.

Ethnobotany is the scientific study of the traditional knowledge, practices, and beliefs about plants held by a particular group of people or culture. It involves the documentation and analysis of the ways in which people use plants for medicinal, food, shelter, clothing, dye, ritual, and other purposes. The field of ethnobotany draws on anthropology, botany, ecology, chemistry, and geography to understand the complex relationships between human cultures and their plant resources.

Ethnobotanists may conduct fieldwork with communities to learn about their traditional plant use, documenting this knowledge through interviews, observations, and collections of plant specimens. They may also study the ecological and cultural factors that shape plant use and management, as well as the impacts of globalization, environmental change, and other forces on traditional plant knowledge and practices.

The information gathered through ethnobotanical research can have important implications for conservation, human health, and sustainable development. For example, traditional plant remedies may provide leads for the development of new drugs or therapies, while understanding the cultural significance of plants can help inform efforts to protect biodiversity and support the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities.

Fellowships and scholarships in the medical context are awards given to individuals to support their education, training, or research in a specific medical field. Here are the definitions for each:

1. Fellowship: A fellowship is a competitive award given to a highly qualified individual, usually a physician or researcher, to pursue advanced training, education, or research in a specialized area of medicine. Fellowships can last from one to several years and often involve working in an academic medical center or research institution. They may include a stipend, tuition support, and other benefits.
2. Scholarship: A scholarship is a financial award given to an individual to support their education, typically for undergraduate or graduate studies. In the medical context, scholarships are often granted to students who demonstrate academic excellence, leadership potential, and a commitment to a career in medicine. Scholarships can cover tuition, fees, books, and living expenses and may be awarded by universities, professional organizations, or other entities.

Both fellowships and scholarships can provide valuable opportunities for individuals to advance their knowledge, skills, and careers in the medical field. They are often highly competitive, with selection based on a variety of factors including academic achievement, research experience, leadership potential, and personal qualities.

Professional competence, in the context of medicine, refers to the possession of the necessary skills, knowledge, and behaviors required for the provision of high-quality healthcare services. It involves the ability to apply medical knowledge and clinical skills effectively in practice, make informed and evidence-based decisions, communicate clearly and effectively with patients and colleagues, demonstrate professionalism and ethical behavior, and engage in continuous learning and improvement.

Professional competence is evaluated through various means, including assessments of clinical skills, knowledge tests, patient feedback, and peer reviews. It is an ongoing process that requires healthcare professionals to continually update their knowledge and skills, adapt to changes in medical practice, and strive for excellence in patient care. Maintaining professional competence is essential for ensuring the safety and quality of healthcare services and is a key component of medical regulation and licensure.

The "delivery of health care" refers to the process of providing medical services, treatments, and interventions to individuals in order to maintain, restore, or improve their health. This encompasses a wide range of activities, including:

1. Preventive care: Routine check-ups, screenings, immunizations, and counseling aimed at preventing illnesses or identifying them at an early stage.
2. Diagnostic services: Tests and procedures used to identify and understand medical conditions, such as laboratory tests, imaging studies, and biopsies.
3. Treatment interventions: Medical, surgical, or therapeutic treatments provided to manage acute or chronic health issues, including medications, surgeries, physical therapy, and psychotherapy.
4. Acute care services: Short-term medical interventions focused on addressing immediate health concerns, such as hospitalizations for infections, injuries, or complications from medical conditions.
5. Chronic care management: Long-term care and support provided to individuals with ongoing medical needs, such as those living with chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, or cancer.
6. Rehabilitation services: Programs designed to help patients recover from illnesses, injuries, or surgeries, focusing on restoring physical, cognitive, and emotional function.
7. End-of-life care: Palliative and hospice care provided to individuals facing terminal illnesses, with an emphasis on comfort, dignity, and quality of life.
8. Public health initiatives: Population-level interventions aimed at improving community health, such as disease prevention programs, health education campaigns, and environmental modifications.

The delivery of health care involves a complex network of healthcare professionals, institutions, and systems working together to ensure that patients receive the best possible care. This includes primary care physicians, specialists, nurses, allied health professionals, hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and public health organizations. Effective communication, coordination, and collaboration among these stakeholders are essential for high-quality, patient-centered care.

Drug Information Services (DIS) are specialized resources within healthcare systems, typically staffed by clinical pharmacists and pharmacy residents, that provide evidence-based information and analysis about medications to healthcare professionals and patients. The primary goal of DIS is to optimize medication use and improve patient outcomes through the provision of accurate, unbiased, and timely information on drug therapy.

DIS commonly provide a range of services, including:

1. Answering medication-related questions from healthcare providers, such as physicians, nurses, and other pharmacists, regarding drug interactions, dosing, adverse effects, and therapeutic alternatives.
2. Developing and maintaining formulary management systems to ensure the safe and cost-effective use of medications within a healthcare institution or system.
3. Providing patient education materials and resources on medication therapy, including proper administration techniques, potential side effects, and storage requirements.
4. Conducting ongoing literature evaluations and synthesizing evidence-based recommendations for medication use in various clinical scenarios.
5. Collaborating with healthcare teams to develop and implement guidelines, policies, and procedures related to medication management and safety.
6. Offering educational programs and resources for healthcare professionals and students to enhance their knowledge of pharmacotherapy and medication safety practices.
7. Participating in multidisciplinary committees focused on improving medication use processes, reducing medication errors, and promoting patient safety.

DIS are essential components of modern healthcare systems, as they help ensure the safe, effective, and efficient use of medications for improved patient outcomes.

Continuing medical education (CME) refers to the process of ongoing learning and professional development that healthcare professionals engage in throughout their careers. The goal of CME is to enhance knowledge, skills, and performance in order to provide better patient care and improve health outcomes.

CME activities may include a variety of formats such as conferences, seminars, workshops, online courses, journal clubs, and self-study programs. These activities are designed to address specific learning needs and objectives related to clinical practice, research, or healthcare management.

Healthcare professionals are required to complete a certain number of CME credits on a regular basis in order to maintain their licensure, certification, or membership in professional organizations. The content and quality of CME activities are typically overseen by accreditation bodies such as the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) in the United States.

Overall, continuing medical education is an essential component of maintaining competence and staying up-to-date with the latest developments in healthcare.

Acupuncture is a form of traditional Chinese medicine that involves the insertion of thin needles into specific points on the body to stimulate the body's natural healing processes. According to traditional Chinese medicine theory, energy (known as "qi" or "chi") flows through the body along pathways called meridians. Acupuncture is believed to help restore the flow of qi and improve the balance of the body's energy.

In modern medical practice, acupuncture is often used to treat pain, including chronic pain, muscle stiffness, and headaches. It is also sometimes used to treat conditions such as nausea and vomiting, insomnia, and addiction. The precise mechanism by which acupuncture works is not fully understood, but it is thought to involve the release of natural pain-relieving chemicals called endorphins, as well as other physiological changes in the body. Acupuncture is generally considered safe when performed by a qualified practitioner, and side effects are typically mild and temporary.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Great Britain" is not a medical concept or condition. It is a geographical and political term referring to the largest island in the British Isles, on which the majority of England, Scotland, and Wales are located. It's also used to refer to the political union of these three countries, which is called the United Kingdom. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.

Pharmacogenetics is a branch of pharmacology that deals with the study of genetic factors that influence an individual's response to drugs. It involves the examination of how variations in genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes, transporters, receptors, and other targets affect drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and efficacy, as well as the incidence and severity of adverse reactions.

The goal of pharmacogenetics is to optimize drug therapy by tailoring it to an individual's genetic makeup, thereby improving treatment outcomes, reducing adverse effects, and minimizing healthcare costs. This field has significant implications for personalized medicine, as it may help identify patients who are more likely to benefit from certain medications or who are at increased risk of toxicity, allowing for more informed prescribing decisions.

"Forecasting" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a general term used in various fields, including finance, economics, and meteorology, to describe the process of making predictions or estimates about future events or trends based on historical data, trends, and other relevant factors. In healthcare and public health, forecasting may be used to predict the spread of diseases, identify potential shortages of resources such as hospital beds or medical equipment, or plan for future health care needs. However, there is no medical definition for "forecasting" itself.

Rehabilitation is a process that aims to optimize an individual's health, functional ability, and quality of life through the diagnosis and treatment of health conditions, including injuries, diseases, or disabilities. This multidisciplinary approach often involves a team of healthcare professionals such as physicians, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, psychologists, and social workers.

Rehabilitation programs are tailored to the unique needs and goals of each patient and may include various interventions, such as:

1. Physical therapy to improve strength, flexibility, balance, and mobility
2. Occupational therapy to help individuals perform daily activities and maintain independence
3. Speech-language therapy to address communication and swallowing difficulties
4. Psychological counseling and support to cope with emotional challenges and stress related to the health condition
5. Vocational rehabilitation to assist with job training, education, and employment opportunities
6. Case management to coordinate care and ensure access to necessary resources and services
7. Pain management to alleviate discomfort and improve functional ability
8. Use of assistive devices and technology to facilitate independence and safety

Rehabilitation is an essential component of healthcare that focuses on restoring function, reducing disability, and promoting overall well-being for individuals with various health challenges.

Translational medical research, also known as "translational research," refers to the process of turning basic scientific discoveries into clinical interventions that improve human health and well-being. This type of research aims to "translate" findings from laboratory, animal, or cellular studies into practical applications for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human diseases.

Translational medical research typically involves a multidisciplinary approach, bringing together researchers from various fields such as biology, chemistry, engineering, genetics, and medicine to work collaboratively on solving complex health problems. The process often includes several stages, including:

1. Identifying basic scientific discoveries that have the potential to be translated into clinical applications.
2. Developing and optimizing new diagnostic tools, drugs, or therapies based on these discoveries.
3. Conducting preclinical studies in the laboratory or with animal models to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these interventions.
4. Designing and implementing clinical trials to test the effectiveness and safety of the new interventions in human patients.
5. Disseminating research findings to the scientific community, healthcare providers, and the public to facilitate the adoption of new practices or treatments.

Translational medical research is essential for bridging the gap between basic scientific discoveries and clinical applications, ultimately improving patient care and outcomes.

Naval medicine, also known as marine medicine or maritime medicine, is a branch of medicine that deals with the prevention and treatment of diseases and injuries that occur in naval or maritime environments. This can include conditions related to sea travel, such as motion sickness, decompression sickness, and infectious diseases spread through contaminated water or food. It also covers occupational health concerns for naval personnel, including hearing loss from exposure to loud noises, respiratory problems from inhaling fumes, and musculoskeletal injuries from heavy lifting. Additionally, naval medicine may address the unique mental health challenges faced by naval personnel, such as those related to isolation, stress, and combat.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Program Development" is not a medical term. It is a general term that refers to the process of creating, planning, and implementing a new program or project, typically in a business, education, or community setting. In a healthcare context, it might refer to the development of a new healthcare service, treatment program, or educational initiative.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to try and help!

Tibetan traditional medicine, also known as Sowa Rigpa, is a form of traditional healing practiced in Tibet, Mongolia, Bhutan, India, Nepal, and parts of Russia for over 2500 years. It is a holistic medical system that combines spiritual, philosophical, and religious principles with an empirical understanding of the body, diseases, and natural remedies.

Tibetan traditional medicine recognizes three main energies or "nyespa" in the human body: lung (wind), tripa (bile), and peken (phlegm). These energies are responsible for maintaining balance and health in the body. Illness occurs when there is an imbalance or blockage of these energies, leading to physical or mental disorders.

The treatment methods used in Tibetan traditional medicine include a variety of therapies such as herbal remedies, dietary recommendations, lifestyle changes, external therapies (such as moxibustion, cupping, and acupuncture), and spiritual practices. The medicines are derived from natural sources such as plants, minerals, and animals.

The diagnosis in Tibetan traditional medicine is based on a detailed examination of the patient's pulse, urine, tongue, and physical appearance, as well as their medical history and lifestyle factors. This comprehensive approach allows practitioners to identify the underlying causes of illness and develop personalized treatment plans for each individual.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the concept of Yin and Yang does not have a medical definition. It is a philosophical concept from Chinese culture, often used in traditional Chinese medicine, that describes how seemingly opposite or contrary forces may actually be interconnected and interdependent in the natural world. In this context, yin and yang are used to describe the complementary aspects of and interdependence between various phenomena.

Yin is characterized as feminine, passive, receptive, and associated with night, darkness, and cold. Yang, on the other hand, is characterized as masculine, active, creative, and associated with day, light, and warmth. The concept of yin and yang is often used to describe the balance and harmony in health and well-being, and any imbalance between these two forces is believed to cause disease or illness. However, it's important to note that this concept is not a medical diagnosis or treatment approach and should not be considered as such.

Program Evaluation is a systematic and objective assessment of a healthcare program's design, implementation, and outcomes. It is a medical term used to describe the process of determining the relevance, effectiveness, and efficiency of a program in achieving its goals and objectives. Program evaluation involves collecting and analyzing data related to various aspects of the program, such as its reach, impact, cost-effectiveness, and quality. The results of program evaluation can be used to improve the design and implementation of existing programs or to inform the development of new ones. It is a critical tool for ensuring that healthcare programs are meeting the needs of their intended audiences and delivering high-quality care in an efficient and effective manner.

Physician executives are medical doctors who hold senior leadership positions within healthcare organizations, such as hospitals, health systems, or insurance companies. They are responsible for making strategic decisions that affect the overall operations and financial performance of the organization, while also ensuring high-quality patient care.

Physician executives may have titles such as Chief Medical Officer (CMO), Chief Executive Officer (CEO), or Vice President of Medical Affairs. Their duties can include developing clinical policies and procedures, overseeing medical staff affairs, managing risk and compliance issues, and leading quality improvement initiatives.

To become a physician executive, one typically needs to have significant experience as a practicing physician, as well as additional training in leadership, management, and business administration. Many physician executives hold advanced degrees such as an MBA or a Master's in Health Administration.

Counterfeit drugs are defined as medicines that are produced and sold with the intent to deceptively represent its origin, authenticity, or identity, generally made to resemble a genuine drug, in order to mislead the consumer into believing that they are buying an authentic product. These drugs may contain incorrect ingredients, improper dosages, or potentially harmful substances, and can pose serious health risks to consumers. Counterfeit drugs can be found in various forms, including pills, capsules, injectables, and topical creams, and can be purchased through illegal channels such as street vendors, online marketplaces, or unauthorized websites. It is important for consumers to obtain their medications from reputable sources, such as licensed pharmacies and healthcare providers, to ensure that they are receiving safe and effective treatments.

I'm not a medical professional, but the term "History, Ancient" is not a medical term per se. However, in a broader context, it could refer to the study of ancient medical practices, theories, and beliefs that existed in civilizations prior to the Middle Ages or Classical Antiquity. This might include the examination of ancient texts, artifacts, and archaeological evidence to understand how illnesses were treated and viewed in these historical periods. It forms an essential part of the evolution of medical knowledge and practices over time.

Primary health care is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as:

"Essential health care that is based on practical, scientifically sound and socially acceptable methods and technology made universally accessible to individuals and families in the community through their full participation and at a cost that the community and country can afford. It forms an integral part both of the country's health system, of which it is the central function and main focus, and of the overall social and economic development of the community. It is the first level of contact of individuals, the family and community with the national health system bringing health care as close as possible to where people live and work, and constitutes the first element of a continuing health care process."

Primary health care includes a range of services such as preventive care, health promotion, curative care, rehabilitation, and palliative care. It is typically provided by a team of health professionals including doctors, nurses, midwives, pharmacists, and other community health workers. The goal of primary health care is to provide comprehensive, continuous, and coordinated care to individuals and families in a way that is accessible, affordable, and culturally sensitive.

A generic drug is a medication that contains the same active ingredients as an originally marketed brand-name drug, known as its "innovator" or "reference listed" drug. The active ingredient is the component of the drug that is responsible for its therapeutic effect. Generic drugs are required to have the same quality, strength, purity, and stability as their brand-name counterparts. They must also meet the same rigorous Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards regarding safety, effectiveness, and manufacturing.

Generic drugs are typically less expensive than their brand-name equivalents because generic manufacturers do not have to repeat the costly clinical trials that were required for the innovator drug. Instead, they demonstrate through bioequivalence studies that their product is therapeutically equivalent to the reference listed drug. This means that the generic drug delivers the same amount of active ingredient into a patient's bloodstream in the same timeframe as the brand-name drug.

In summary, generic drugs are copies of brand-name drugs with the same active ingredients, dosage forms, strengths, routes of administration, and intended uses. They must meet FDA regulations for safety, efficacy, and manufacturing standards, ensuring that they provide patients with the same therapeutic benefits as their brand-name counterparts at a more affordable price.

Interprofessional relations, in the context of healthcare, refers to the interactions and collaborative practices between different healthcare professionals (such as physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists, social workers, etc.) when providing care for patients. It involves developing and maintaining positive and effective communication, respect, trust, and collaboration among various healthcare disciplines to ensure coordinated, safe, and high-quality patient care. The goal of interprofessional relations is to enhance collaborative practice, improve patient outcomes, and promote a supportive work environment.

Professional practice in the context of medicine refers to the responsible and ethical application of medical knowledge, skills, and judgement in providing healthcare services to patients. It involves adhering to established standards, guidelines, and best practices within the medical community, while also considering individual patient needs and preferences. Professional practice requires ongoing learning, self-reflection, and improvement to maintain and enhance one's competence and expertise. Additionally, it encompasses effective communication, collaboration, and respect for colleagues, other healthcare professionals, and patients. Ultimately, professional practice is aimed at promoting the health, well-being, and autonomy of patients while also safeguarding their rights and dignity.

'Medical Staff, Hospital' is a general term that refers to the group of licensed physicians and other healthcare professionals who are responsible for providing medical care to patients in a hospital setting. The medical staff may include attending physicians, residents, interns, fellows, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other advanced practice providers.

The medical staff is typically governed by a set of bylaws that outline the structure, authority, and responsibilities of the group. They are responsible for establishing policies and procedures related to patient care, quality improvement, and safety. The medical staff also plays a key role in the hospital's credentialing and privileging process, which ensures that healthcare professionals meet certain standards and qualifications before they are allowed to practice in the hospital.

The medical staff may work in various departments or divisions within the hospital, such as internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and radiology. They may also participate in teaching and research activities, as well as hospital committees and leadership roles.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Western World" is a geopolitical and cultural term, rather than a medical one. It generally refers to societies or countries in Europe, North America, Australia, and New Zealand that share common cultural and historical roots. It does not have a specific medical definition. However, it is often used in medical literature to compare and contrast health statistics, disease prevalence, and healthcare systems between Western and non-Western countries.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Internet" is a term that pertains to the global network of interconnected computers and servers that enable the transmission and reception of data via the internet protocol (IP). It is not a medical term and does not have a specific medical definition. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I'd be happy to try to help answer them for you!

Travel medicine, also known as tropical medicine or geographic medicine, is a branch of medicine that deals with the prevention and management of health issues and diseases that can occur during international travel or in certain geographical areas. This may include vaccinations, malaria prophylaxis, advice on food and water safety, and education about insect-borne diseases. Travel medicine specialists also provide care for travelers who become ill while abroad and offer post-travel evaluation and treatment for those who return home with a travel-related illness.

Medical licensure is a legal process by which a government agency grants permission to a physician or other healthcare professional to practice medicine within a certain geographical area. In order to obtain a medical license, an individual must typically meet certain educational and training requirements, pass examinations that test their knowledge and skills, and demonstrate good moral character. The specific requirements for licensure vary from one jurisdiction to another, but the overall goal is to ensure that healthcare professionals have the necessary competencies to provide safe and effective care to patients. It's important to note that maintaining a medical license typically requires ongoing professional development and adherence to ethical standards.

Public health is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "the art and science of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts of society." It focuses on improving the health and well-being of entire communities, populations, and societies, rather than individual patients. This is achieved through various strategies, including education, prevention, surveillance of diseases, and promotion of healthy behaviors and environments. Public health also addresses broader determinants of health, such as access to healthcare, housing, food, and income, which have a significant impact on the overall health of populations.

Drug-related side effects and adverse reactions refer to any unintended or harmful outcome that occurs during the use of a medication. These reactions can be mild or severe and may include predictable, known responses (side effects) as well as unexpected, idiosyncratic reactions (adverse effects). Side effects are typically related to the pharmacologic properties of the drug and occur at therapeutic doses, while adverse reactions may result from allergic or hypersensitivity reactions, overdoses, or interactions with other medications or substances.

Side effects are often dose-dependent and can be managed by adjusting the dose, frequency, or route of administration. Adverse reactions, on the other hand, may require discontinuation of the medication or treatment with antidotes or supportive care. It is important for healthcare providers to monitor patients closely for any signs of drug-related side effects and adverse reactions and to take appropriate action when necessary.

Accreditation is a process in which a healthcare organization, facility, or program is evaluated and certified as meeting certain standards and criteria established by a recognized accrediting body. The purpose of accreditation is to ensure that the organization, facility, or program provides safe, high-quality care and services to its patients or clients.

Accreditation typically involves a thorough review of an organization's policies, procedures, practices, and outcomes, as well as an on-site survey by a team of experts from the accrediting body. The evaluation focuses on various aspects of the organization's operations, such as leadership and management, patient safety, infection control, clinical services, quality improvement, and staff competence.

Accreditation is voluntary, but many healthcare organizations seek it as a way to demonstrate their commitment to excellence and continuous improvement. Accreditation can also be a requirement for licensure, reimbursement, or participation in certain programs or initiatives.

Examples of accrediting bodies in the healthcare field include The Joint Commission, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF), and the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA).

A hospitalist is a specialized medical doctor who practices hospital medicine, focusing on the general medical care of hospitalized patients. Hospitalists are trained in internal medicine or pediatrics and are experts in managing acute illnesses, coordinating care between different specialists, and ensuring timely and safe transitions of care between inpatient and outpatient settings. They typically do not have outpatient clinical responsibilities and are available to manage patient issues around the clock while they are hospitalized. Hospitalists play a crucial role in improving the quality, safety, and efficiency of inpatient medical care.

Clinical pharmacology is a branch of medicine that deals with the study of drugs and their interactions with living organisms. It involves understanding how drugs are absorbed, distributed, metabolized, and excreted by the body, as well as their therapeutic effects, side effects, and toxicity. Clinical pharmacology also encompasses the design and conduct of clinical trials to evaluate the safety and efficacy of new drugs in human subjects. The ultimate goal of clinical pharmacology is to optimize drug therapy for individual patients by considering factors such as age, sex, genetics, lifestyle, and comorbidities. In summary, clinical pharmacology is the application of pharmacological principles to the practice of medicine for the benefit of patients.

Bibliometrics is the use of statistical methods to analyze books, articles, and other publications. In the field of information science, bibliometrics is often used to measure the impact of scholarly works or authors by counting the number of times that a work has been cited in other publications. This can help researchers identify trends and patterns in research output and collaboration, as well as assess the influence of individual researchers or institutions.

Bibliometric analyses may involve a variety of statistical measures, such as citation counts, author productivity, journal impact factors, and collaborative networks. These measures can be used to evaluate the performance of individual researchers, departments, or institutions, as well as to identify areas of research strength or weakness.

It is important to note that while bibliometrics can provide useful insights into research trends and impact, they should not be the sole basis for evaluating the quality or significance of scholarly work. Other factors, such as the rigor of the research design, the clarity of the writing, and the relevance of the findings to the field, are also important considerations.

A patent, in the context of medicine and healthcare, generally refers to a government-granted exclusive right for an inventor to manufacture, use, or sell their invention for a certain period of time, typically 20 years from the filing date. In the medical field, patents may cover a wide range of inventions, including new drugs, medical devices, diagnostic methods, and even genetic sequences.

The purpose of patents is to provide incentives for innovation by allowing inventors to profit from their inventions. However, patents can also have significant implications for access to medical technologies and healthcare costs. For example, a patent on a life-saving drug may give the patent holder the exclusive right to manufacture and sell the drug, potentially limiting access and driving up prices.

It's worth noting that the patent system is complex and varies from country to country. In some cases, there may be ways to challenge or circumvent patents in order to increase access to medical technologies, such as through compulsory licensing or generic substitution.

I'm happy to help! However, I would like to clarify that the term "Metaphysical" in this context might be misleading. Mind-body relations is a well-established field within psychology, neuroscience, and medicine, while "metaphysical" generally refers to philosophical questions beyond the physical world or the realm of scientific inquiry. Therefore, I will provide a definition for "Mind-Body Relations" without the metaphysical aspect.

Mind-Body Relations:
Mind-body relations is an interdisciplinary field that investigates the connection and interaction between mental processes (thoughts, emotions, beliefs, attitudes) and physical health or bodily functions. It explores how psychological factors can influence physiological responses and contribute to health outcomes, as well as how physical conditions can impact mental states.

Some key concepts within mind-body relations include:

1. Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI): The study of the interaction between psychological processes, the nervous system, and the immune system, examining how stress and emotions affect immunity and susceptibility to illness.
2. Placebo effects: Positive therapeutic outcomes resulting from patients' beliefs or expectations in a treatment, even when the treatment itself has no active ingredients or specific mechanisms of action.
3. Biofeedback: A technique that uses electronic monitoring of bodily functions (e.g., heart rate, skin temperature, brain waves) to train individuals to consciously control these processes, often used to manage stress and improve health outcomes.
4. Mindfulness-based interventions: Practices derived from meditation and yoga that aim to cultivate non-judgmental awareness of the present moment, which have been shown to reduce stress, anxiety, and depression while improving overall well-being.

While there is a metaphysical aspect to mind-body relations in some philosophical or spiritual contexts (e.g., mind-body dualism, holistic approaches), these perspectives are not typically considered part of the medical definition.

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be some confusion in your question. "Interviews" is a broad topic that isn't typically a medical term or subject. However, interviews can certainly be a part of medical settings and procedures, such as job interviews for healthcare positions, patient interviews during medical consultations, or research interviews in clinical studies.

In the context of medical education, an interview might refer to the process by which medical schools evaluate applicants for admission, known as the medical school interview. This is a critical component of the application process and typically involves one-on-one conversations between the applicant and an admissions committee member or a series of multiple mini-interviews (MMIs) with various evaluators.

If you could provide more context or clarify what you mean by "Interviews as Topic" in a medical setting, I'd be happy to help further!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "philosophy" is not a medical term. It is a branch of study that deals with fundamental questions about existence, knowledge, ethics, and reality. In contrast, medical terms typically refer to concepts within the field of medicine, such as diseases, treatments, or anatomical structures. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

Neoplasms are abnormal growths of cells or tissues in the body that serve no physiological function. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms are aggressive, invasive, and can metastasize to distant sites.

Neoplasms occur when there is a dysregulation in the normal process of cell division and differentiation, leading to uncontrolled growth and accumulation of cells. This can result from genetic mutations or other factors such as viral infections, environmental exposures, or hormonal imbalances.

Neoplasms can develop in any organ or tissue of the body and can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Treatment options for neoplasms include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, among others.

There seems to be a misunderstanding in your question. "Hospital Departments" is not a medical term or diagnosis, but rather an organizational structure used by hospitals to divide their services and facilities into different units based on medical specialties or patient populations. Examples of hospital departments include internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, emergency medicine, radiology, and pathology. Each department typically has its own staff, equipment, and facilities to provide specialized care for specific types of patients or medical conditions.

Organotherapy is a form of treatment that involves the use of animal organs or their extracts to treat various medical conditions in humans. The concept behind this therapy is based on the idea that extracts from specific organs of animals can have therapeutic effects on corresponding organs in humans due to similarities in biological structures and functions.

For example, a preparation made from the thyroid gland of a pig might be used to treat hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) in humans. Similarly, pancreatic extracts from animals have been used to treat diabetes. However, organotherapy is not widely practiced today due to advancements in modern medicine and the development of more effective and targeted treatments like synthetic hormones and gene therapy.

The term "Congresses as Topic" refers to large, formal meetings that are held to discuss and exchange information on a specific topic or field, usually academic or professional in nature. In the context of medical science, a congress is an event where healthcare professionals, researchers, and experts gather to present and discuss the latest research, developments, and innovations in their field. Medical congresses can cover a wide range of topics, including specific diseases, treatments, medical specialties, public health issues, or healthcare policies. These events often include keynote speeches, panel discussions, workshops, poster sessions, and networking opportunities for attendees. Examples of well-known medical congresses are the annual meetings of the American Medical Association, the American Heart Association, and the European Society of Cardiology.

"Drug approval" is the process by which a regulatory agency, such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), grants formal authorization for a pharmaceutical company to market and sell a drug for a specific medical condition. The approval process is based on rigorous evaluation of clinical trial data to ensure that the drug is safe and effective for its intended use.

The FDA's approval process typically involves several stages, including preclinical testing in the lab and animal studies, followed by three phases of clinical trials in human subjects. The first phase tests the safety of the drug in a small group of healthy volunteers, while the second and third phases test the drug's efficacy and side effects in larger groups of patients with the medical condition for which the drug is intended.

If the results of these studies demonstrate that the drug is safe and effective, the pharmaceutical company can submit a New Drug Application (NDA) or Biologics License Application (BLA) to the FDA for review. The application includes data from the clinical trials, as well as information about the manufacturing process, labeling, and proposed use of the drug.

The FDA reviews the application and may seek input from independent experts before making a decision on whether to approve the drug. If approved, the drug can be marketed and sold to patients with the medical condition for which it was approved. The FDA continues to monitor the safety and efficacy of approved drugs after they reach the market to ensure that they remain safe and effective for their intended use.

Competency-based education (CBE) is a teaching and learning approach that focuses on measuring and demonstrating specific skills, abilities, or knowledge competencies rather than solely on the amount of time spent in class or completing coursework. In this model, students progress through their education by mastering a series of clearly defined competencies at their own pace.

In medical education, CBE aims to ensure that healthcare professionals possess the necessary skills and knowledge to provide safe and effective patient care. Competency-based medical education often involves the use of direct assessments, such as objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), standardized patients, and workplace-based assessments, to evaluate students' competencies in various domains, including medical knowledge, communication, professionalism, and clinical skills.

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has identified six core competencies that residents must achieve during their training: patient care, medical knowledge, practice-based learning and improvement, interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, and systems-based practice. Competency-based medical education helps to ensure that these competencies are systematically assessed and developed throughout a trainee's educational journey.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Science" is a broad field that refers to a systematic and logical process used to discover how things in the universe work. It's not typically used as a medical term. However, within the context of medicine, "science" often refers to evidence-based practices, which are treatments and preventions that have been scientifically researched and proven to be effective. This could include areas like pharmacology (the study of drugs), pathophysiology (the study of changes in the body due to disease), or clinical trials (studies used to test new treatments). If you're looking for a specific medical term, could you please provide more context?

Career mobility, in a medical context, refers to the ability of healthcare professionals to advance or move between different roles, positions, or departments within a healthcare organization or field. It can include lateral moves (changing to a similar position in another department) or vertical moves (promotion to a higher-level position). Career mobility is often facilitated by continuing education, professional development opportunities, and the acquisition of new skills and experiences. High career mobility can lead to better job satisfaction, increased compensation, and improved patient care.

A drug prescription is a written or electronic order provided by a licensed healthcare professional, such as a physician, dentist, or advanced practice nurse, to a pharmacist that authorizes the preparation and dispensing of a specific medication for a patient. The prescription typically includes important information such as the patient's name and date of birth, the name and strength of the medication, the dosage regimen, the duration of treatment, and any special instructions or precautions.

Prescriptions serve several purposes, including ensuring that patients receive the appropriate medication for their medical condition, preventing medication errors, and promoting safe and effective use of medications. They also provide a legal record of the medical provider's authorization for the pharmacist to dispense the medication to the patient.

There are two main types of prescriptions: written prescriptions and electronic prescriptions. Written prescriptions are handwritten or printed on paper, while electronic prescriptions are transmitted electronically from the medical provider to the pharmacy. Electronic prescriptions are becoming increasingly common due to their convenience, accuracy, and security.

It is important for patients to follow the instructions provided on their prescription carefully and to ask their healthcare provider or pharmacist any questions they may have about their medication. Failure to follow a drug prescription can result in improper use of the medication, which can lead to adverse effects, treatment failure, or even life-threatening situations.

Medical Laboratory Science, also known as Clinical Laboratory Science, is a healthcare profession that involves the performance and interpretation of laboratory tests to detect, diagnose, monitor, and treat diseases. Medical Laboratory Scientists (MLS) work in various settings such as hospitals, clinics, research institutions, and diagnostic laboratories. They analyze body fluids, tissues, and cells using sophisticated instruments and techniques to provide accurate and timely results that aid in the clinical decision-making process.

MLS professionals perform a range of laboratory tests including hematology, clinical chemistry, microbiology, immunology, molecular biology, urinalysis, and blood banking. They follow standardized procedures and quality control measures to ensure the accuracy and reliability of test results. MLS professionals also evaluate complex data, correlate test findings with clinical symptoms, and communicate their findings to healthcare providers.

MLS education typically requires a bachelor's degree in Medical Laboratory Science or a related field, followed by a clinical internship or residency program. Many MLS professionals are certified or licensed by professional organizations such as the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) and the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS).

Practice guidelines, also known as clinical practice guidelines, are systematically developed statements that aim to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available scientific evidence, consensus of expert opinion, and consideration of patient preferences. Practice guidelines can cover a wide range of topics, including diagnosis, management, prevention, and treatment options for various medical conditions. They are intended to improve the quality and consistency of care, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote evidence-based medicine. However, they should not replace clinical judgment or individualized patient care.

In the medical context, communication refers to the process of exchanging information, ideas, or feelings between two or more individuals in order to facilitate understanding, cooperation, and decision-making. Effective communication is critical in healthcare settings to ensure that patients receive accurate diagnoses, treatment plans, and follow-up care. It involves not only verbal and written communication but also nonverbal cues such as body language and facial expressions.

Healthcare providers must communicate clearly and empathetically with their patients to build trust, address concerns, and ensure that they understand their medical condition and treatment options. Similarly, healthcare teams must communicate effectively with each other to coordinate care, avoid errors, and provide the best possible outcomes for their patients. Communication skills are essential for all healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, therapists, and social workers.

A randomized controlled trial (RCT) is a type of clinical study in which participants are randomly assigned to receive either the experimental intervention or the control condition, which may be a standard of care, placebo, or no treatment. The goal of an RCT is to minimize bias and ensure that the results are due to the intervention being tested rather than other factors. This design allows for a comparison between the two groups to determine if there is a significant difference in outcomes. RCTs are often considered the gold standard for evaluating the safety and efficacy of medical interventions, as they provide a high level of evidence for causal relationships between the intervention and health outcomes.

Health policy refers to a set of decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific healthcare goals within a population. It is formulated by governmental and non-governmental organizations with the objective of providing guidance and direction for the management and delivery of healthcare services. Health policies address various aspects of healthcare, including access, financing, quality, and equity. They can be designed to promote health, prevent disease, and provide treatment and rehabilitation services to individuals who are sick or injured. Effective health policies require careful consideration of scientific evidence, ethical principles, and societal values to ensure that they meet the needs of the population while being fiscally responsible.

Osteopathic manipulation, also known as osteopathic manual medicine (OMM), is a hands-on approach to diagnosing, treating, and preventing illness and injury. It is a system of manual therapy that was developed by Andrew Taylor Still, the founder of osteopathic medicine. OMM uses a variety of techniques to move, stretch, and massage the muscles, joints, and other tissues. The goal of osteopathic manipulation is to restore normal function and balance to the body, allowing it to heal itself.

Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) is a series of manual techniques that are used to diagnose and treat a variety of medical conditions. These techniques may include stretching, gentle pressure, or resistance to improve the mobility and function of joints, muscles, and other tissues. OMT can be used to treat a wide range of conditions, including back pain, headaches, neck pain, and other musculoskeletal problems. It is also used to help relieve the symptoms of various internal disorders, such as asthma, sinus disorders, and digestive problems.

It's important to note that Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) should be performed by a qualified healthcare professional with training in osteopathic manipulation, like an osteopathic physician (DO). It is generally considered safe when performed by a trained and licensed practitioner. However, as with any medical treatment, it is not without risks and potential complications. Therefore, it's important to discuss the potential benefits and risks of OMT with your healthcare provider before undergoing treatment.

Medical libraries are collections of resources that provide access to information related to the medical and healthcare fields. They serve as a vital tool for medical professionals, students, researchers, and patients seeking reliable and accurate health information. Medical libraries can be physical buildings or digital platforms that contain various types of materials, including:

1. Books: Medical textbooks, reference books, and monographs that cover various topics related to medicine, anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, and clinical specialties.
2. Journals: Print and electronic peer-reviewed journals that publish the latest research findings, clinical trials, and evidence-based practices in medicine.
3. Databases: Online resources that allow users to search for and access information on specific topics, such as PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library.
4. Multimedia resources: Audio and video materials, such as lectures, webinars, podcasts, and instructional videos, that provide visual and auditory learning experiences.
5. Electronic resources: E-books, databases, and other digital materials that can be accessed remotely through computers, tablets, or smartphones.
6. Patient education materials: Brochures, pamphlets, and other resources that help patients understand their health conditions, treatments, and self-care strategies.
7. Archives and special collections: Rare books, historical documents, manuscripts, and artifacts related to the history of medicine and healthcare.

Medical libraries may be found in hospitals, medical schools, research institutions, and other healthcare settings. They are staffed by trained librarians and information specialists who provide assistance with locating, accessing, and evaluating information resources. Medical libraries play a critical role in supporting evidence-based medicine, continuing education, and patient care.

Specialty boards, also known as medical specialty boards or certifying boards, are organizations that grant certification to physicians who have completed specialized training and passed an examination in a particular area of medical practice. In the United States, these boards are responsible for establishing the standards and requirements for specialty training and for evaluating the knowledge, skills, and experience of physicians seeking board certification. The American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) recognizes 24 member boards that cover various medical specialties, including internal medicine, surgery, psychiatry, pediatrics, and radiology, among others. Board certification is a voluntary process that demonstrates a physician's expertise and commitment to maintaining high standards of care in their area of practice.

"Quality control" is a term that is used in many industries, including healthcare and medicine, to describe the systematic process of ensuring that products or services meet certain standards and regulations. In the context of healthcare, quality control often refers to the measures taken to ensure that the care provided to patients is safe, effective, and consistent. This can include processes such as:

1. Implementing standardized protocols and guidelines for care
2. Training and educating staff to follow these protocols
3. Regularly monitoring and evaluating the outcomes of care
4. Making improvements to processes and systems based on data and feedback
5. Ensuring that equipment and supplies are maintained and functioning properly
6. Implementing systems for reporting and addressing safety concerns or errors.

The goal of quality control in healthcare is to provide high-quality, patient-centered care that meets the needs and expectations of patients, while also protecting their safety and well-being.

In the context of medicine, 'knowledge' refers to the understanding and comprehension of medical facts, principles, theories, and practices that are acquired through education, training, research, and experience. This encompasses a deep familiarity with anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, clinical guidelines, and evidence-based practices. It also includes awareness of current research developments, emerging trends, and best practices in the field. Medical knowledge is constantly evolving and requires healthcare professionals to engage in lifelong learning to maintain their expertise and provide high-quality care to patients.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "International Educational Exchange" is not a medical term. It is a broader term used in the field of education and international relations, referring to the exchange of students, teachers, and educational materials between different countries. This can include various academic activities such as student exchanges, faculty exchanges, joint research, and cultural immersion programs. The purpose of these exchanges is to promote international understanding, cooperation, and intellectual development.

Decision-making is the cognitive process of selecting a course of action from among multiple alternatives. In a medical context, decision-making refers to the process by which healthcare professionals and patients make choices about medical tests, treatments, or management options based on a thorough evaluation of available information, including the patient's preferences, values, and circumstances.

The decision-making process in medicine typically involves several steps:

1. Identifying the problem or issue that requires a decision.
2. Gathering relevant information about the patient's medical history, current condition, diagnostic test results, treatment options, and potential outcomes.
3. Considering the benefits, risks, and uncertainties associated with each option.
4. Evaluating the patient's preferences, values, and goals.
5. Selecting the most appropriate course of action based on a careful weighing of the available evidence and the patient's individual needs and circumstances.
6. Communicating the decision to the patient and ensuring that they understand the rationale behind it, as well as any potential risks or benefits.
7. Monitoring the outcomes of the decision and adjusting the course of action as needed based on ongoing evaluation and feedback.

Effective decision-making in medicine requires a thorough understanding of medical evidence, clinical expertise, and patient preferences. It also involves careful consideration of ethical principles, such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. Ultimately, the goal of decision-making in healthcare is to promote the best possible outcomes for patients while minimizing harm and respecting their individual needs and values.

"Terminology as a topic" in the context of medical education and practice refers to the study and use of specialized language and terms within the field of medicine. This includes understanding the meaning, origins, and appropriate usage of medical terminology in order to effectively communicate among healthcare professionals and with patients. It may also involve studying the evolution and cultural significance of medical terminology. The importance of "terminology as a topic" lies in promoting clear and accurate communication, which is essential for providing safe and effective patient care.

Obstetrics is a branch of medicine and surgery concerned with the care of women during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postnatal period. It involves managing potential complications that may arise during any stage of pregnancy or delivery, as well as providing advice and guidance on prenatal care, labor and delivery, and postpartum care. Obstetricians are medical doctors who specialize in obstetrics and can provide a range of services including routine check-ups, ultrasounds, genetic testing, and other diagnostic procedures to monitor the health and development of the fetus. They also perform surgical procedures such as cesarean sections when necessary.

Unani medicine, also known as Unani Tibb or Arabic medicine, is a traditional system of medicine that originated in ancient Greece and was later developed and refined by Islamic physicians. The term "Unani" is derived from the Arabic word "Yunani," which means "Greek."

The fundamental principles of Unani medicine are based on the teachings of Hippocrates, Galen, and Ibn Sina (also known as Avicenna), who wrote the famous book "The Canon of Medicine" in the 10th century. According to Unani philosophy, good health is achieved by maintaining a balance between the four humors or bodily fluids: blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and black bile.

Unani medicine uses a variety of therapies, including herbal remedies, dietary modifications, lifestyle changes, exercise, and massages to restore this balance and promote healing. It also emphasizes the use of natural and organic substances in its treatments.

In India, Unani medicine is recognized as one of the national systems of medicine and is regulated by the Central Council of Indian Medicine (CCIM). There are several institutions and colleges that offer education and training in Unani medicine, and many practitioners of Unani medicine practice throughout the country.

Colonialism, in a medical context, can refer to the process by which colonial powers imposed their own medical practices and systems upon the colonized peoples. This could include the introduction of new diseases (through forced contact or migration), the spread of infectious diseases due to poor living conditions and lack of access to healthcare, and the imposition of Western medical theories and treatments on non-Western cultures. Colonialism also had a profound impact on the social determinants of health, such as poverty, education, and housing, which further exacerbated health disparities between colonizers and the colonized. Additionally, colonial powers often used medicine as a tool of control and domination, for example by forcing indigenous peoples to undergo medical procedures or experiments without their consent.

A Pharmacist is a healthcare professional who practices in the field of pharmacy, focusing on the safe and effective use of medications. They are responsible for dispensing medications prescribed by physicians and other healthcare providers, as well as providing information and counseling to patients about their medications. This includes explaining how to take the medication, potential side effects, and any drug interactions. Pharmacists may also be involved in medication therapy management, monitoring patient health and adjusting medication plans as needed. They must have a deep understanding of the properties and actions of drugs, including how they are absorbed, distributed, metabolized, and excreted by the body, as well as their potential interactions with other substances and treatments. In addition to a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree, pharmacists must also be licensed in the state where they practice.

I believe you may have made a typo in your question. The term you're asking about should be "mentor" instead of "mentors." A mentor is not a medical term per se, but I can certainly provide a general definition.

A mentor is a experienced and trusted advisor or guide who provides support, shares knowledge, and helps in the personal and professional development of an individual, often in a specific field or industry. In a medical context, a mentor could be a senior physician or researcher who guides and supports a medical student, resident, or fellow in their learning and career progression.

Medline is not a medical condition or term, but rather a biomedical bibliographic database, which is a component of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM)'s PubMed system. It contains citations and abstracts from scientific literature in the fields of life sciences, biomedicine, and clinical medicine, with a focus on articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Medline covers a wide range of topics, including research articles, reviews, clinical trials, and case reports. The database is updated daily and provides access to over 26 million references from the years 1946 to the present. It's an essential resource for healthcare professionals, researchers, and students in the biomedical field.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Medical economics is a branch of economics that deals with the application of economic principles and concepts to issues related to health and healthcare. It involves the study of how medical care is produced, distributed, consumed, and financed, as well as the factors that influence these processes. The field encompasses various topics, including the behavior of healthcare providers and consumers, the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare systems, the impact of health policies on outcomes, and the allocation of resources within the healthcare sector. Medical economists may work in academia, government agencies, healthcare organizations, or consulting firms, contributing to research, policy analysis, and program evaluation.

A research design in medical or healthcare research is a systematic plan that guides the execution and reporting of research to address a specific research question or objective. It outlines the overall strategy for collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data to draw valid conclusions. The design includes details about the type of study (e.g., experimental, observational), sampling methods, data collection techniques, data analysis approaches, and any potential sources of bias or confounding that need to be controlled for. A well-defined research design helps ensure that the results are reliable, generalizable, and relevant to the research question, ultimately contributing to evidence-based practice in medicine and healthcare.

'Guidelines' in the medical context are systematically developed statements or sets of recommendations designed to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available evidence, including scientific studies, expert opinions, and patient values. Guidelines may cover a wide range of topics, such as diagnosis, treatment, prevention, screening, and management of various diseases and conditions. They aim to standardize care, improve patient outcomes, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote efficient use of healthcare resources.

Cooperative behavior, in a medical or healthcare context, refers to the actions and attitudes displayed by individuals or groups working together to achieve a common goal related to health and well-being. This may involve patients following their healthcare providers' advice, healthcare professionals collaborating to diagnose and treat medical conditions, or communities coming together to promote healthy behaviors and environments. Cooperative behavior is essential for positive health outcomes, as it fosters trust, communication, and shared decision-making between patients and healthcare providers, and helps to ensure that everyone involved in the care process is working towards the same goal.

Health services accessibility refers to the degree to which individuals and populations are able to obtain needed health services in a timely manner. It includes factors such as physical access (e.g., distance, transportation), affordability (e.g., cost of services, insurance coverage), availability (e.g., supply of providers, hours of operation), and acceptability (e.g., cultural competence, language concordance).

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), accessibility is one of the key components of health system performance, along with responsiveness and fair financing. Improving accessibility to health services is essential for achieving universal health coverage and ensuring that everyone has access to quality healthcare without facing financial hardship. Factors that affect health services accessibility can vary widely between and within countries, and addressing these disparities requires a multifaceted approach that includes policy interventions, infrastructure development, and community engagement.

An "attitude to health" is a set of beliefs, values, and behaviors that an individual holds regarding their own health and well-being. It encompasses their overall approach to maintaining good health, preventing illness, seeking medical care, and managing any existing health conditions.

A positive attitude to health typically includes:

1. A belief in the importance of self-care and taking responsibility for one's own health.
2. Engaging in regular exercise, eating a balanced diet, getting enough sleep, and avoiding harmful behaviors such as smoking and excessive alcohol consumption.
3. Regular check-ups and screenings to detect potential health issues early on.
4. Seeking medical care when necessary and following recommended treatment plans.
5. A willingness to learn about and implement new healthy habits and lifestyle changes.
6. Developing a strong support network of family, friends, and healthcare professionals.

On the other hand, a negative attitude to health may involve:

1. Neglecting self-care and failing to take responsibility for one's own health.
2. Engaging in unhealthy behaviors such as sedentary lifestyle, poor diet, lack of sleep, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption.
3. Avoidance of regular check-ups and screenings, leading to delayed detection and treatment of potential health issues.
4. Resistance to seeking medical care or following recommended treatment plans.
5. Closed-mindedness towards new healthy habits and lifestyle changes.
6. Lack of a support network or reluctance to seek help from others.

Overall, an individual's attitude to health can significantly impact their physical and mental well-being, as well as their ability to manage and overcome any health challenges that may arise.

A Radiology Information System (RIS) is a type of healthcare software specifically designed to manage medical imaging data and related patient information. It serves as a centralized database and communication platform for radiology departments, allowing the integration, storage, retrieval, and sharing of patient records, orders, reports, images, and other relevant documents.

The primary functions of a RIS typically include:

1. Scheduling and tracking: Managing appointments, scheduling resources, and monitoring workflow within the radiology department.
2. Order management: Tracking and processing requests for imaging exams from referring physicians or other healthcare providers.
3. Image tracking: Monitoring the movement of images throughout the entire imaging process, from acquisition to reporting and storage.
4. Report generation: Assisting radiologists in creating structured, standardized reports based on the interpreted imaging studies.
5. Results communication: Sending finalized reports back to the referring physicians or other healthcare providers, often through integration with electronic health records (EHRs) or hospital information systems (HIS).
6. Data analytics: Providing tools for analyzing and reporting departmental performance metrics, such as turnaround times, equipment utilization, and patient satisfaction.
7. Compliance and security: Ensuring adherence to regulatory requirements related to data privacy, protection, and storage, while maintaining secure access controls for authorized users.

By streamlining these processes, a RIS helps improve efficiency, reduce errors, enhance communication, and support better patient care within radiology departments.

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United States Air Force, United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, United States Air Force military education and ... Military medicine in the United States, Aviation medicine organizations, 1918 establishments in the United States, Wright- ... The United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine (USAFSAM) is the United States Air Force (USAF) organization focused ... The United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine began operations on January 19, 1918 at Hazelhurst Field, Mineola, ...
Of Environmental Medicine Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division Technical Report (USARIEM-TN03-04). Archived from the original ... The U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) is the U.S Army's main institution and facility for ... Forte, V (2003). "Water Immersion and Re-Warming Facility of the Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division". US Army Research Inst ... Products include individual soldier equipment and rations; guidelines pertaining to training policy and preventive medicine; ...
Medicine Rocks State Park is a park owned by the state of Montana in the United States. It is located about 25 miles (40 km) ... Medicine Rocks State Park Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Medicine Rocks State Park Map Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (Articles ... United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior. "Medicine Rocks State Park". Montana Fish, Wildlife ... The state eliminated the fee in 1993, but also declared Medicine Rocks a "primitive" park which the state would not improve or ...
State of community medicine Br Med J 1979; 1 :503 doi:10.1136/bmj.1.6161.503 ... State of community medicine. Br Med J 1979; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.6161.503 (Published 17 February 1979) Cite ...
... the Penn State College of Medicine held a memorial for individuals who have given their bodies for one final service to ... WHTM) - Thursday afternoon, the Penn State College of Medicine held a memorial for individuals who have given their bodies for ... The College of Medicine has around 190 students, and many were at the ceremony. ...
... studies at Angelo State offers a series of courses designed to qualify you for entrance to schools of veterinary medicine. ... Angelo State University offers a series of courses designed to qualify students for entrance to schools of veterinary medicine ... If a student desires to earn a degree before entering a school of veterinary medicine, the student is advised to major in ... Before enrolling in the pre-veterinary medicine curriculum, the student should report to the Agriculture Department for ...
... as well as admission requirements for the Nuclear Medicine programs professional sequence. ... Admission requirements for new and transfer students interested in the Nuclear Medicine program, ...
Translational Regenerative Medicine Market Forecast 2019-2029: Stem Cell Therapies, Tissue Engineered... ... Translational Regenerative Medicine Market Forecast 2019-2029: Stem Cell Therapies, Tissue Engineered... ... Visiongain states that "Translational regenerative medicine market set to grow to $76bn by 2023".. Visiongain has launched a ... Next Generation Technologies Therapeutic Drugs Regenerative Medicine Pharma Data Pharma Market Stem Cell Therapies ...
For finding e-books and e-book collections specific to podiatry, please visit the Podiatric Medicine E-books page. Please ... The following e-books and e-book collections are useful resources to consult when researching topics pertaining to medicine. ... For finding e-books and e-book collections specific to podiatry, please visit the Podiatric Medicine E-books page. Please ... The following e-books and e-book collections are useful resources to consult when researching topics pertaining to medicine. ...
The field of medicine incorporates concepts from a range of different disciplines including ethics, business, and even ... The Coppin State University Academic Catalog has a wide variety of skill-building courses designed to inspire and prepare you ... The Pre-Medicine focus of this program is designed to help students apply biological science theories, principles, and ... The field of medicine incorporates concepts from a range of different disciplines including ethics, business, and even ...
Archives for Washington State Acupuncture Chinese Medicine Clinic. Cause of Chinatown fire remains undetermined - buildings ... Washington State Acupuncture Chinese Medicine Clinic, Yuan Sheng Hang ...
Learn more about specializing in urology at the Ohio State College of Medicine. ... In summary, urology is a rapidly changing and exciting area of medicine which requires practicing urologists to be actively ... Although urology is classified as a surgical specialty, a knowledge of internal medicine, pediatrics, gynecology, and other ...
For nearly 150 years, the Wayne State School of Medicine has prepared students to be health care leaders and advocates who go ... Wayne State University School of Medicine provides a distinct experiential advantage that sets you apart from your peers at ... The Warrior M.D. program at Wayne State University School of Medicine is rigorous and innovative. Learn from and serve diverse ... Wayne State provides a distinct advantage through hands-on clinical education in the heart of Detroit. ...
Medicine is changing. At The Ohio State University College of Medicine, we are leading the way. Our new strategic plan provides ... Ohio States College of Medicine was established, beginning a century of leadership in medical research, education and patient ... In response to World War IIs demand for more doctors, Ohio States College of Medicine established a two-year pathway to a ... With that in mind, leaders at The Ohio State University opened our College of Medicine in 1914. Since that time, over 20,000 ...
Penn State College of Medicine has created a new Department of Radiation Oncology and named Dr. Rickhesvar Mahraj, professor of ...
Sam Houston State University College of Osteopathic Medicine (SHSU-COM) is proud to announce a significant improvement in its ... According to Mohr, more than 96 percent of SHSU-COM students are Texans who plan to remain in the state to complete their ... SHSU-COM is only the seventh public College of Osteopathic Medicine in the country and the first new school to be established ... Established in 2019, SHSU-COM is poised to make a lasting impact in osteopathic medicine and will graduate its first class of ...
State regulations are updated quarterly; we currently have two versions available. Below is a comparison between our most ... As of July 1, 2020, IDAPA 22 Administrative Rules of the Board of Medicine have been redesignated as IDAPA 24.33.01 through ...
... high-skills careers in health and medicine. It brings students to health professions early on in their academic career through ... 2023 Cleveland State University , 2121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44115-2214 , (216) 687-2000. Cleveland State University is ... Camp Introduces High School Students to Careers in Health, Medicine. Posted on August 3, 2022 at 10:23 AM, updated August 8, ... Its a perfect companion to Cleveland State Universitys Pathways to Practice Program, which provides four unique pathways to ...
"Why medicine/doctor? Why FSU COM? If there was one thing you would want me to know remember you by, what would it be? If you ... "How and when do you think research/being a scientist plays into practicing medicine?" Report Response , I was asked this ... I used this as an opporutnity to provide a general discussion of who I was and how I got into medicine and what Ive done to ...
See the FREE topo map of Medicine Rocks State Park a Park in Carter County Montana on the Medicine Rocks State Park USGS quad ... Medicine Rocks State Park is listed in the Parks Category for Carter County in the state of Montana. Medicine Rocks State Park ... Medicine Rocks State Park USGS topo map quad. Anyone who is interested in visiting Medicine Rocks State Park can view and ... Medicine Rocks State Park Information. Coordinates: 46.0444439°N, -104.4713374°W. Approx. Elevation: 3,445 feet (1,050 meters) ...
... such as not sharing medicine discounts directly with patients or steering them to pharmacies that PBMs own. As a result, there ... troubled when they learn that PBMs are behind practices that make it harder for them to access and afford their medicines, ... A new survey of over 20,000 Americans in all 50 states and 435 congressional districts shows that Americans are deeply ... It means the government decides what your medicines are worth and what diseases are worth investing in, leading to restricted ...
Oregon State Ecampus offers 100+ accredited online degrees, undergraduate and graduate, including business, computer science, ... Categories: All Stories, Ecampus OER, Videos Tags: Oregon State Open Educational Resources Unit, Veterinary medicine , Comments ... Veterinary medicine. Open-source module helps alleviate financial burden on VetMed students July 24, 2018 Tyler Hansen Sarah ... Nemanic worked with Open Oregon State to develop an open-source module that is freely accessible to learners all over the world ...
Personalized Medicine vs. Precision Medicine. Personalized medicine implies the development of medicines for an individual, ... The State of Cystic Fibrosis and Precision Medicine. EDITORS NOTE: This article is reprinted with permission from ... During President Obamas State of the Union address earlier this year, a cystic fibrosis patient named Bill Elder sat beside ... Precision medicine plays the hero by identifying the exact effect these underlying mutations have on CTFR, and designing ...
"Reviewed website, read books about careers in osteopathic medicine, reviewed application." Report Response ...
"United States National Library of Medicine. Retrieved May 28, 2013.. *^ "NCBI Educational Resources". United States National ... The United States National Library of Medicine (NLM), operated by the United States federal government, is the worlds largest ... The United States National Library of Medicine Radiation Emergency Management System[13] provides: *Guidance for health care ... a b "National Library of Medicine Welcomes New Director Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan". National Library of Medicine. August 15 ...
Browse Business Listings in Delaware State for Health & Medicine ... Home,Browse,Delaware,Delaware,Health & Medicine Browse Health ... Browse Business Listings in Delaware State for Health & Medicine. ... Naturopathic Medicine Nursing Services Nutritionists Opticians Oral Surgeon Orthodontist Orthopedics Osteopaths and Osteopathic ... Internal Medicine Lasik & Laser Eye Surgery Marriage & Family Counselors Massage Therapists Mental Health Specialists Midwife ...
Other Features of Medicine Wheel Park. Be sure to explore the other attractions in Medicine Wheel Park - youll experience a ... Valley City State University. 101 College Street SW. Valley City, North Dakota 58072 800.532.8641 US/Canada Contact Report ... Walking Tour of the Solar System: A model of the solar system stretches from the Sun (the center of the Medicine Wheel) to one ... The Medicine Wheels large circle measures 213 feet around. The 28 spokes radiating from its center represent the number of ...
We got to sit down with Orr and talk to her about her motivation for this project and how her background at Boise State ... On top of her final semester as a marketing student, she also is changing the perception of women in STEM, medicine and law ... She came to Boise State on a scholarship and began studying marketing after taking a class and "realizing how fun, creative, ... "I learned how to handle different crises and to be able to correctly state and convey my messages." ...
Medicine, Periodicals, Colorado. Publisher. Denver, Colo.: Colorado State Medical Society. Collection. nyamlibrary; ... The New York Academy of Medicine Library State Medical Society Journals The Medical Heritage Library American Libraries ... The New York Academy of Medicine, Library. Language. English. Volume. 13, (1916). ...
... an associate professor at The Rockefeller University and professor of internal medicine at Wright State University. Paul has ... Boonshoft School of Medicine Oral History Project(Off-site resource). *College of Nursing and Health Oral History Project(Off- ... Paul completed a fellowship at Harvard Medical School and was an instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, ...
... contacting our naturopathic medicine professionals here in Delaware State can introduce you to a whole ... Browse Business Listings in Delaware State for Naturopathic Medicine. Home,Browse,Delaware,Health & Medicine,Naturopathic ... Delaware State Alternative Medicine. There are many kinds of naturopathic practitioners in Delaware State: clinical ... Alternative medicine practitioners in Delaware State have cures and remedies for just about everything. Alternative medicine ...
Copyright © 2023 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and the College of Emergency Medicine. All rights reserved. ...
  • Newswise - PHILADELPHIA - The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (PSOM) has been ranked #3 among the nation's medical schools, marking 23 consecutive years the school garnered honors among the top 10 research-oriented medical schools. (newswise.com)
  • The Perelman School of Medicine has an international reputation for unique training programs and a groundbreaking curriculum which combines basic sciences and clinical experience, preparing students for a future of innovative research and patient-centered care," said J. Larry Jameson, MD, PhD , dean of PSOM and executive vice president of the University of Pennsylvania for the Health System. (newswise.com)
  • The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top medical schools in the United States for more than 20 years, according to U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. (newswise.com)
  • WHTM) - Thursday afternoon, the Penn State College of Medicine held a memorial for individuals who have given their bodies for one final service to humanity. (yahoo.com)
  • The declining number of veterinarians supporting the production animal industry poses a significant food security threat," said Dr. Justin Brown, assistant teaching professor of veterinary diagnostic and production animal medicine and the director of the program. (iastate.edu)
  • Yale New Haven Hospital will be the first hospital in the state to use this new robotic bronchoscopy technology when the program launches in October 2022. (yale.edu)
  • Penn Medicine is one of the world's leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. (newswise.com)
  • PLOS Medicine publishes research and commentary of general interest with clear implications for patient care, public policy or clinical research agendas. (plos.org)
  • The authors of this manuscript have read the journal's policy and have the following competing interests: ACT receives a stipend as a Specialty Consulting Editor for PLOS Medicine and serves on the journal's Editorial Board. (plos.org)
  • ACT and SS are Guest Editors for the PLOS Medicine Special Issue on Substance Use, Misuse and Dependence. (plos.org)
  • Although urology is classified as a surgical specialty, a knowledge of internal medicine, pediatrics, gynecology, and other specialties is required by the urologist because of the wide variety of clinical problems encountered. (osu.edu)
  • Paul completed a fellowship at Harvard Medical School and was an instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, an associate professor at The Rockefeller University and professor of internal medicine at Wright State University. (wright.edu)
  • PSOM also ranked among the nation's top medical schools in eight areas of specialty training, including a #1 ranking in Pediatrics and honors in Internal Medicine (#4), OB-GYN (#4), Radiology (#4), Anesthesiology (#5), Psychiatry (#6), Surgery (#6), and Family Medicine (#12). (newswise.com)
  • The other interventional pulmonologists are Kyle Bramley, MD , and Erin DeBiasi, MD , and Christopher Morton, MD , of the section of Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine (Yale-PCCSM) in the Department of Internal Medicine at Yale School of Medicine. (yale.edu)
  • The Section of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine is one of the eleven sections within YSM's Department of Internal Medicine. (yale.edu)
  • Mills SD, Hao Y, Elliott AM, Wiesen CA. State-Level Patterns and Trends in Cigarette Smoking Across Racial and Ethnic Groups in the United States, 2011-2018. (cdc.gov)
  • Trends in smoking prevalence varied across racial/ethnic groups in only 4 states from 2011 to 2018. (cdc.gov)
  • We investigated disparities in cigarette use by race/ethnicity, as well as trends in cigarette use across racial/ethnic groups from 2011 to 2018 in 50 US states and the District of Columbia. (cdc.gov)
  • The Lassa fever outbreak in Ondo State in 2018 recorded high morbidity and mortality . (bvsalud.org)
  • The National Library of Medicine runs the National Center for Biotechnology Information , which houses biological databases (PubMed among them) that are freely accessible on the Internet through the Entrez search engine [8] and Lister Hill National Center For Biomedical Communications . (wikipedia.org)
  • Wright State University: Boonshoft School of Medicine. (bvsalud.org)
  • Wayne State University School of Medicine provides a distinct experiential advantage that sets you apart from your peers at other colleges. (wayne.edu)
  • The Warrior M.D. program at Wayne State University School of Medicine is rigorous and innovative. (wayne.edu)
  • She holds an MS in clinical behavioral psychology, is a licensed attorney, and is working on a PhD in the Dept of Political Science at Wayne State University. (researchgate.net)
  • Join your fellow Warriors to cheer on the Detroit Tigers against the Cincinnati Reds at Wayne State University Night at Comerica Park! (wayne.edu)
  • Governments are also concerned about obtaining a share in the global healthcare market of the future, when TRM products may be expected to overtake other types of treatment in the field of medicine, delivering both improved clinical outcomes and cost savings. (globenewswire.com)
  • Naturopathic medicine is a holistic healthcare profession in Delaware State combining natural and non-toxic therapies with current health and medical advances. (myhuckleberry.com)
  • based RCCH HealthCare Partners and Seattle-based UW Medicine will form a public-private partnership to own and operate community hospitals in Washington, Alaska and Idaho, the health systems announced Feb. 8. (beckershospitalreview.com)
  • 2. Under the deal, RCCH HealthCare will operate and manage the facilities, while UW Medicine will provide clinical and quality expertise. (beckershospitalreview.com)
  • 5. UW Medicine and RCCH HealthCare have maintained an existing relationship for several years. (beckershospitalreview.com)
  • The recently proposed US precision medicine initiative promises a new era of healthcare with targeted disease treatment and prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • Folk medicine is crucial to healthcare delivery in the underdeveloped countries. (bvsalud.org)
  • Plans to set up the joint procurement initiative began in 2017 in Seychelles during a meeting of health ministers from five Small Island Developing States who expressed commitment to implement the programme, particularly for medicines for noncommunicable diseases. (who.int)
  • According to Ed Belt, retired professor of geology at Amherst College, the Medicine Rocks sandstone is almost unique. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sarah Nemanic, an associate professor of diagnostic imaging in the College of Veterinary Medicine, recently led the creation of a self-study computer module for students, veterinarians and faculty to learn, review and be tested on normal veterinary radiographic anatomy. (oregonstate.edu)
  • A unique and scenic landmark on VCSU's campus , Medicine Wheel Park began in 1992 as a class project by Professor Joe Stickler and his students. (vcsu.edu)
  • Adjunct Professor, Department of Basic Sciences, Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. (cdc.gov)
  • Indigenous medicinal plants used in folk medicine for malaria treatment in Kwara State, Nigeria: an ethnobotanical study. (bvsalud.org)
  • The study was aimed at documenting the medicinal plants used for malaria treatment in folk medicine in Kwara State , Nigeria . (bvsalud.org)
  • Contact our expert naturopathic practitioners in Delaware State and take the holistic approach. (myhuckleberry.com)
  • Alternative medicine practitioners in Delaware State have cures and remedies for just about everything. (myhuckleberry.com)
  • Ethnobotanical information was collected from selected consenting registered traditional medicine practitioners (TMPs) through oral face -to- face interviews using in-depth, semi-structured interview guide. (bvsalud.org)
  • If a student desires to earn a degree before entering a school of veterinary medicine, the student is advised to major in animal science and take a minor in biology and chemistry. (angelo.edu)
  • The Viking CHAMPS (Careers in Health and Medical Professions) camp introduces high school students to a wide variety of high-wage, high-skills careers in health and medicine. (csuohio.edu)
  • It's a perfect companion to Cleveland State University's Pathways to Practice Program , which provides four unique pathways to medical school for students who have a passion for medicine and for serving urban communities. (csuohio.edu)
  • This program will allow students to have a clear path forward to veterinary school, allowing them to build community amongst their peers and with faculty members, while helping prepare them for a career in veterinary medicine," Brown said. (iastate.edu)
  • In 1916 Columbus Children's Hospital affiliated itself with Ohio State's College of Medicine. (osu.edu)
  • The Pre-Medicine focus of this program is designed to help students apply biological science theories, principles, and techniques to careers and professional programs related to medicine, pharmacy, and physician assistantships. (coppin.edu)
  • Learn more about the program courses you may take as part of the Pre-medicine track within the Applied Sciences concentration of the Biology major. (coppin.edu)
  • Ohio State began an innovative program of medical education based on independent study. (osu.edu)
  • A rehabilitation visionary, Dr. Johnson established the nation's premier program in physical medicine and rehabilitation at Ohio State. (osu.edu)
  • The Toxicology and Environmental Health Program was established at the National Library of Medicine in 1967 and is charged with developing computer databases compiled from the medical literature and from the files of governmental and nongovernmental organizations. (wikipedia.org)
  • A joint program between the College of Veterinary Medicine and the Department of Animal Science in Iowa State University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences has been established with the goal of educating more veterinarians who wish to practice production animal medicine. (iastate.edu)
  • The program, Production Animal - Veterinary Early Acceptance Program (PA-VEAP), will recruit and retain future veterinarians to practice production animal medicine, primarily in underserved areas in Iowa and throughout the United States. (iastate.edu)
  • PA-VEAP is an undergraduate program for students majoring in animal science or dairy science at Iowa State. (iastate.edu)
  • Students can apply to the program during their second semester of their first year at Iowa State after completing or being enrolled in a Biology I or II and Chemistry I with the appropriate labs. (iastate.edu)
  • To remain in the program, students must earn a minimum grade point average of 3.4 while completing all prerequisite courses for admission into the College of Veterinary Medicine. (iastate.edu)
  • Once enrolled in the program, students will be assigned a program advisor from both the Department of Animal Science and the College of Veterinary Medicine. (iastate.edu)
  • A family medicine resident in a "clinic-first" training program shares how an emphasis on continuity of care developed in him a sense of responsibility for caring for his patients, noting that "relationships are the cornerstone of our learning. (annfammed.org)
  • The Veterinary Preventive Medicine Certificate is an online coursework distance program. (iastate.edu)
  • Candidates are encouraged to discuss this possibility with the Director of Certificate Education and the Director of Graduate Education for the Master's degree program in Veterinary Preventive Medicine to fully understand the circumstances when this is possible. (iastate.edu)
  • The purpose of this program is to provide undergraduate students interested in shelter medicine the opportunity to experience all aspects of care of shelter animals. (ncsu.edu)
  • Upon completion of the program the student will have a better understanding of shelter husbandry, animal behavior in a shelter environment, and shelter Veterinary medicine. (ncsu.edu)
  • The Idaho Board of Medicine will use ACCME's Program and Activity Reporting System, or PARS, to verify that physicians who are renewing their medical license have fulfilled Idaho's CME participation requirements in the prior four years. (accme.org)
  • In collaboration with Dr. Binienda, Director of the Division of Health Sciences, eligible M3 students will have the opportunity to complete a one-year MPH within our own Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences. (wayne.edu)
  • Thank you for your interest in spreading the word on American Board of Family Medicine. (jabfm.org)
  • Message Body (Your Name) thought you would like to see the American Board of Family Medicine web site. (jabfm.org)
  • Visiongain has launched a new pharma report: Translational Regenerative Medicine Market Forecast 2019-2029: Stem Cell Therapies, Tissue Engineered Products, Gene Therapies. (globenewswire.com)
  • London, UK, March 28, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The high potential earning for companies from products aimed at repairing organs and tissues has led to an increase in the attention given to regenerative medicine research. (globenewswire.com)
  • In fiscal year 2019, Penn Medicine provided more than $583 million to benefit our community. (newswise.com)
  • 2019) Stigma as a fundamental hindrance to the United States opioid overdose crisis response. (plos.org)
  • Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care;31(2): 26-35, 2019. (bvsalud.org)
  • This approach, referred to by the President as precision medicine , is the focus of new federal investments to speed the development of targeted therapeutics - drugs designed for a subset of patients with a specific genetic defect rather than for the "average" patient. (healthwellfoundation.org)
  • But for now, a better term is "stratified" or precision medicine - dividing patient groups into specific populations and designing new drugs for those subtypes. (healthwellfoundation.org)
  • Precision medicine plays the hero by identifying the exact effect these underlying mutations have on CTFR, and designing treatments to overcome the disease. (healthwellfoundation.org)
  • Department of Emergency Medicine, Michigan Medicine (RT, NT). (jabfm.org)
  • The implementation of the Poisons Standard, as it affects access to and supply of medicines and poisons, is given legal effect through relevant State and Territory drugs, poisons and controlled substances legislation. (tga.gov.au)
  • The current United States opioid overdose crisis is a complex, multifaceted, public health emergency that urgently requires the implementation of evidence-based primary, secondary, and tertiary preventive interventions. (plos.org)
  • Title : The current state of implementation science in genomic medicine: opportunities for improvement Personal Author(s) : Roberts, Megan C.;Kennedy, Amy E.;Chambers, David A.;Khoury, Muin J. (cdc.gov)
  • This year, 184 rising Spartan MDs at seven MSU College of Human Medicine community campuses statewide (Flint, Grand Rapids, Lansing, Midland, Southeast Michigan, Traverse City, Upper Peninsula Region) learned where they matched for residency this summer. (msu.edu)
  • Is the Subject Area "Medicine and health sciences" applicable to this article? (plos.org)
  • The United States National Library of Medicine ( NLM ), operated by the United States federal government , is the world's largest medical library . (wikipedia.org)
  • Its collections include more than seven million books , journals , technical reports , manuscripts , microfilms , photographs , and images on medicine and related sciences, including some of the world's oldest and rarest works. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angelo State University offers a series of courses designed to qualify students for entrance to schools of veterinary medicine. (angelo.edu)
  • The Coppin State University Academic Catalog has a wide variety of skill-building courses designed to inspire and prepare you to be in-demand professionals and transformational leaders. (coppin.edu)
  • With that in mind, leaders at The Ohio State University opened our College of Medicine in 1914. (osu.edu)
  • Lisa Todd currently works with a public health research group at Michigan State University. (researchgate.net)
  • Iowa State University of Science and Technology. (iastate.edu)
  • A graduate certificate is an additional qualification awarded by Iowa State University after successful completion of 15 graduate level credits. (iastate.edu)
  • A graduate certificate is different from continuing education as the certificate includes an academic transcript from Iowa State University. (iastate.edu)
  • Applicants trained outside the U.S. should hold equivalent degrees from a recognized institution whose requirements for the baccalaureate or professional degrees are substantially equivalent to those at Iowa State University. (iastate.edu)
  • I graduated from Oklahoma State University College of Veterinary Medicine in 2006 and have been an associate veterinarian since that time at VCA Spring Animal Hospital in Spring, TX. (about.me)
  • The International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, with the support of Cochrane and Humanity & Inclusion, urges you to prioritize Agenda Item 13.4. (who.int)
  • The Crow called the Medicine Rocks area Inyan-oka-lo-ka, or "rock with a hole in it. (wikipedia.org)
  • White settlers first moved into the area near Medicine Rocks in the 1880s. (wikipedia.org)
  • The lead analyst of the report commented 'Regenerative medicine has become an area of competition between many national governments, particularly in Asia-Pacific. (globenewswire.com)
  • In summary, urology is a rapidly changing and exciting area of medicine which requires practicing urologists to be actively involved in continuing education. (osu.edu)
  • Ohio State's Board of Trustees took a visionary step by dedicating the area along Neil Avenue, between 10th and 11th avenues, as an expansion site for the College of Medicine. (osu.edu)
  • Veterinary Preventive Medicine is a very diverse area. (iastate.edu)
  • The precursor of the National Library of Medicine, established in 1836, was the Library of the Surgeon General's Office , a part of the office of the Surgeon General of the United States Army . (wikipedia.org)
  • The state office of insurance is primarily responsible for examining and addressing issues with the plans offered within the state Exchange (Marketplace), and the companies that offer them. (aahivm.org)
  • Ohio State went on to become one of the few campuses in the nation with medical research, education and patient care within walking distance of other world-class health and science research and education facilities. (osu.edu)
  • The ministers from Cabo Verde, Comoros, Guinea-Bissau, Madagascar, Mauritius, Sao Tome & Principe and Seychelles that form the Small Island Developing States signed the Pooled Procurement agreement to take advantage of economies of scale and collective bargaining. (who.int)
  • In 1956, the library collection was transferred from the control of the U.S. Department of Defense to the Public Health Service of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare and renamed the National Library of Medicine, through the instrumentality of Frank Bradway Rogers , who was the director from 1956 to 1963. (wikipedia.org)
  • DDT is a pesticide banned in the United States except in public health emergencies. (cdc.gov)
  • Interested in pursuing undergraduate education at Penn State? (psu.edu)
  • Before enrolling in the pre-veterinary medicine curriculum, the student should report to the Agriculture Department for advisement. (angelo.edu)
  • It means the government decides what your medicines are worth and what diseases are worth investing in, leading to restricted access to medicines. (phrma.org)
  • The Idaho Board of Medicine will have access to this data to more easily determine that physicians have fulfilled their CME requirements for relicensure. (accme.org)
  • Brazzaville - Ministers of Health from seven small African island states today signed an agreement to jointly procure drugs and vaccines in a bid to improve quality and access to medicines and other health products. (who.int)
  • By creating a larger stream of demand, we can look forward to better access to quality and competitively-priced medicines. (who.int)
  • Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. (newswise.com)
  • Reducing racial/ethnic disparities in smoking is a priority for state tobacco control programs. (cdc.gov)
  • The application window for the Summer 2024 Shelter Medicine Internship is February 19th, 2024, through March 4th, 2024. (ncsu.edu)
  • The College of Medicine has around 190 students, and many were at the ceremony. (yahoo.com)
  • This shortage also presents an opportunity for students interested in production animal medicine to become a resource for underserved areas. (iastate.edu)
  • A surgical giant, Dr. Robert Zollinger redefined surgery at Ohio State and was known for being as challenging to residents as he was kind to patients. (osu.edu)
  • On rare occasions, naturopathic medicine can even suggest an alternative to surgery. (myhuckleberry.com)
  • Arthur G. James, MD, began a personal quest to create the first freestanding cancer center in the Midwest at Ohio State. (osu.edu)
  • The Illinois Health Insurance Exchanges is a Partnership Marketplace jointly administered by the State and federal government, under the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). (aahivm.org)
  • In response to World War II's demand for more doctors, Ohio State's College of Medicine established a two-year pathway to a medical degree. (osu.edu)
  • Currently, there is a nationwide shortage of veterinarians in all sectors of the profession," said Dr. Dan Grooms, the Dr. Stephen G. Juelsgaard Dean of Veterinary Medicine. (iastate.edu)
  • Medicine Rocks is part of the Fort Union Formation, a geologic unit containing coal, sandstone, and shale in Montana, Wyoming, and other adjacent states. (wikipedia.org)
  • The design of this rock sculpture was inspired by the Big Horn Medicine Wheel in Wyoming and reflects the magnificence of the Earth's journey around the Sun and the grand cycle of the seasons. (vcsu.edu)
  • Epidemiologists also study the costs of epidemic and endemic diseases of animals, disease control or eradication by public veterinary services, relationships between veterinary medicine and animal production, and development of new techniques in diagnosing, recording, evaluating and controlling diseases in animal populations. (iastate.edu)
  • Examining trends in state-level smoking prevalence across racial/ethnic groups provides insight into which demographic groups may benefit from targeted tobacco control efforts. (cdc.gov)
  • If medicines do not control your symptoms, your provider may suggest a pelvic laparoscopy procedure. (medlineplus.gov)