Staphylococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.Staphylococcus aureus: Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.Staphylococcus: A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, coccoid bacteria. Its organisms occur singly, in pairs, and in tetrads and characteristically divide in more than one plane to form irregular clusters. Natural populations of Staphylococcus are found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals. Some species are opportunistic pathogens of humans and animals.Floxacillin: Antibiotic analog of CLOXACILLIN.Staphylococcal VaccinesFurunculosis: A persistent skin infection marked by the presence of furuncles, often chronic and recurrent. In humans, the causative agent is various species of STAPHYLOCOCCUS. In salmonid fish (SALMONIDS), the pathogen is AEROMONAS SALMONICIDA.Lincomycin: An antibiotic produced by Streptomyces lincolnensis var. lincolnensis. It has been used in the treatment of staphylococcal, streptococcal, and Bacteroides fragilis infections.Staphylococcus epidermidis: A species of STAPHYLOCOCCUS that is a spherical, non-motile, gram-positive, chemoorganotrophic, facultative anaerobe. Mainly found on the skin and mucous membrane of warm-blooded animals, it can be primary pathogen or secondary invader.Methicillin: One of the PENICILLINS which is resistant to PENICILLINASE but susceptible to a penicillin-binding protein. It is inactivated by gastric acid so administered by injection.Coagulase: Enzymes that cause coagulation in plasma by forming a complex with human PROTHROMBIN. Coagulases are produced by certain STAPHYLOCOCCUS and YERSINIA PESTIS. Staphylococci produce two types of coagulase: Staphylocoagulase, a free coagulase that produces true clotting of plasma, and Staphylococcal clumping factor, a bound coagulase in the cell wall that induces clumping of cells in the presence of fibrinogen.Staphylococcus haemolyticus: A species of STAPHYLOCOCCUS found on the skin of humans (and non-human primates), often causing hospital-acquired infections (CROSS INFECTION).Staphylococcal Skin Infections: Infections to the skin caused by bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Cloxacillin: A semi-synthetic antibiotic that is a chlorinated derivative of OXACILLIN.Abscess: Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.Methicillin Resistance: Non-susceptibility of a microbe to the action of METHICILLIN, a semi-synthetic penicillin derivative.Phagocyte Bactericidal Dysfunction: Disorders in which phagocytic cells cannot kill ingested bacteria; characterized by frequent recurring infection with formulation of granulomas.Vancomycin: Antibacterial obtained from Streptomyces orientalis. It is a glycopeptide related to RISTOCETIN that inhibits bacterial cell wall assembly and is toxic to kidneys and the inner ear.Fusidic Acid: An antibiotic isolated from the fermentation broth of Fusidium coccineum. (From Merck Index, 11th ed). It acts by inhibiting translocation during protein synthesis.OsteomyelitisLysostaphin: A 25-kDa peptidase produced by Staphylococcus simulans which cleaves a glycine-glcyine bond unique to an inter-peptide cross-bridge of the STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS cell wall. EC 3.4.24.75.Endocarditis, Bacterial: Inflammation of the ENDOCARDIUM caused by BACTERIA that entered the bloodstream. The strains of bacteria vary with predisposing factors, such as CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS; HEART VALVE DISEASES; HEART VALVE PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION; or intravenous drug use.Staphylococcus Phages: Viruses whose host is Staphylococcus.Skin Diseases, Infectious: Skin diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, parasites, or viruses.Nafcillin: A semi-synthetic antibiotic related to penicillin.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Bacteriophage Typing: A technique of bacterial typing which differentiates between bacteria or strains of bacteria by their susceptibility to one or more bacteriophages.Mupirocin: A topically used antibiotic from a strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens. It has shown excellent activity against gram-positive staphylococci and streptococci. The antibiotic is used primarily for the treatment of primary and secondary skin disorders, nasal infections, and wound healing.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Staphylococcal Protein A: A protein present in the cell wall of most Staphylococcus aureus strains. The protein selectively binds to the Fc region of human normal and myeloma-derived IMMUNOGLOBULIN G. It elicits antibody activity and may cause hypersensitivity reactions due to histamine release; has also been used as cell surface antigen marker and in the clinical assessment of B lymphocyte function.Arthritis, Infectious: Arthritis caused by BACTERIA; RICKETTSIA; MYCOPLASMA; VIRUSES; FUNGI; or PARASITES.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A strain of Staphylococcus aureus that is non-susceptible to the action of METHICILLIN. The mechanism of resistance usually involves modification of normal or the presence of acquired PENICILLIN BINDING PROTEINS.Penicillin Resistance: Nonsusceptibility of an organism to the action of penicillins.Rifampin: A semisynthetic antibiotic produced from Streptomyces mediterranei. It has a broad antibacterial spectrum, including activity against several forms of Mycobacterium. In susceptible organisms it inhibits DNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity by forming a stable complex with the enzyme. It thus suppresses the initiation of RNA synthesis. Rifampin is bactericidal, and acts on both intracellular and extracellular organisms. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1160)Teichoic Acids: Bacterial polysaccharides that are rich in phosphodiester linkages. They are the major components of the cell walls and membranes of many bacteria.Community-Acquired Infections: Any infection acquired in the community, that is, contrasted with those acquired in a health care facility (CROSS INFECTION). An infection would be classified as community-acquired if the patient had not recently been in a health care facility or been in contact with someone who had been recently in a health care facility.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Teicoplanin: Glycopeptide antibiotic complex from Actinoplanes teichomyceticus active against gram-positive bacteria. It consists of five major components each with a different fatty acid moiety.Acetamides: Derivatives of acetamide that are used as solvents, as mild irritants, and in organic synthesis.Oxazolidinones: Derivatives of oxazolidin-2-one. They represent an important class of synthetic antibiotic agents.Bacteremia: The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion.Catheters, Indwelling: Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.Penicillins: A group of antibiotics that contain 6-aminopenicillanic acid with a side chain attached to the 6-amino group. The penicillin nucleus is the chief structural requirement for biological activity. The side-chain structure determines many of the antibacterial and pharmacological characteristics. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1065)Nose: A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.Biofilms: Encrustations, formed from microbes (bacteria, algae, fungi, plankton, or protozoa) embedding in extracellular polymers, that adhere to surfaces such as teeth (DENTAL DEPOSITS); PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; and catheters. Biofilms are prevented from forming by treating surfaces with DENTIFRICES; DISINFECTANTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS; and antifouling agents.Erythromycin: A bacteriostatic antibiotic macrolide produced by Streptomyces erythreus. Erythromycin A is considered its major active component. In sensitive organisms, it inhibits protein synthesis by binding to 50S ribosomal subunits. This binding process inhibits peptidyl transferase activity and interferes with translocation of amino acids during translation and assembly of proteins.Drug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Leukocidins: Pore forming proteins originally discovered for toxic activity to LEUKOCYTES. They are EXOTOXINS produced by some pathogenic STAPHYLOCOCCUS and STREPTOCOCCUS that destroy leukocytes by lysis of the cytoplasmic granules and are partially responsible for the pathogenicity of the organisms.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Blood Bactericidal Activity: The natural bactericidal property of BLOOD due to normally occurring antibacterial substances such as beta lysin, leukin, etc. This activity needs to be distinguished from the bactericidal activity contained in a patient's serum as a result of antimicrobial therapy, which is measured by a SERUM BACTERICIDAL TEST.Superantigens: Microbial antigens that have in common an extremely potent activating effect on T-cells that bear a specific variable region. Superantigens cross-link the variable region with class II MHC proteins regardless of the peptide binding in the T-cell receptor's pocket. The result is a transient expansion and subsequent death and anergy of the T-cells with the appropriate variable regions.Bacterial Toxins: Toxic substances formed in or elaborated by bacteria; they are usually proteins with high molecular weight and antigenicity; some are used as antibiotics and some to skin test for the presence of or susceptibility to certain diseases.Carrier State: The condition of harboring an infective organism without manifesting symptoms of infection. The organism must be readily transmissible to another susceptible host.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Streptococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS.Enterotoxins: Substances that are toxic to the intestinal tract causing vomiting, diarrhea, etc.; most common enterotoxins are produced by bacteria.Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.

Clindamycin plus gentamicin as expectant therapy for presumed mixed infections. (1/7250)

The prevalence of obligate anaerobes was studied prospectively in 60 patients with severe sepsis of intra-abdominal, soft tissue, female genital or oropulmonary origin. In addition, the efficacy of clindamycin (for anaerobes) plus gentamicin (for aerobic bacteria, especially coliforms) as initial empiric therapy in these patients was evaluated. Among 54 patients with cultural proof of infection, anaerobic pathogens were recovered from 52%. Nineteen patients had bacteremia; Bacteroides fragilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae were the most prevalent pathogens, being isolated in five patients each. Infection was eradicated in 56 of the 60 patients (93%). Mortality related to sepsis was 7% in the entire group, 16% in patients with bacteremia and 2% in patients without bacteremia. Eighty-five percent of aerobic isolates tested were susceptible in vitro to either gentamicin or clindamycin; 97% of anaerobic isolates were inhibited by 5 mug/ml of clindamycin.  (+info)

Emergence of vancomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. Glycopeptide-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus Working Group. (2/7250)

BACKGROUND: Since the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, the glycopeptide vancomycin has been the only uniformly effective treatment for staphylococcal infections. In 1997, two infections due to S. aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin were identified in the United States. METHODS: We investigated the two patients with infections due to S. aureus with intermediate resistance to glycopeptides, as defined by a minimal inhibitory concentration of vancomycin of 8 to 16 microg per milliliter. To assess the carriage and transmission of these strains of S. aureus, we cultured samples from the patients and their contacts and evaluated the isolates. RESULTS: The first patient was a 59-year-old man in Michigan with diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure. Peritonitis due to S. aureus with intermediate resistance to glycopeptides developed after 18 weeks of vancomycin treatment for recurrent methicillin-resistant S. aureus peritonitis associated with dialysis. The removal of the peritoneal catheter plus treatment with rifampin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole eradicated the infection. The second patient was a 66-year-old man with diabetes in New Jersey. A bloodstream infection due to S. aureus with intermediate resistance to glycopeptides developed after 18 weeks of vancomycin treatment for recurrent methicillin-resistant S. aureus bacteremia. This infection was eradicated with vancomycin, gentamicin, and rifampin. Both patients died. The glycopeptide-intermediate S. aureus isolates differed by two bands on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. On electron microscopy, the isolates from the infected patients had thicker extracellular matrixes than control methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates. No carriage was documented among 177 contacts of the two patients. CONCLUSIONS: The emergence of S. aureus with intermediate resistance to glycopeptides emphasizes the importance of the prudent use of antibiotics, the laboratory capacity to identify resistant strains, and the use of infection-control precautions to prevent transmission.  (+info)

Alpha-toxin and gamma-toxin jointly promote Staphylococcus aureus virulence in murine septic arthritis. (3/7250)

Septic arthritis is a common and feared complication of staphylococcal infections. Staphylococcus aureus produces a number of potential virulence factors including certain adhesins and enterotoxins. In this study we have assessed the roles of cytolytic toxins in the development of septic arthritis by inoculating mice with S. aureus wild-type strain 8325-4 or isogenic mutants differing in the expression of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-toxin production patterns. Mice inoculated with either an alpha- or beta-toxin mutant showed degrees of inflammation, joint damage, and weight decrease similar to wild-type-inoculated mice. In contrast, mice inoculated with either double (alpha- and gamma-toxin-deficient)- or triple (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-toxin-deficient)-mutant S. aureus strains showed lower frequency and severity of arthritis, measured both clinically and histologically, than mice inoculated with the wild-type strain. We conclude that simultaneous production of alpha- and gamma-toxin is a virulence factor in S. aureus arthritis.  (+info)

Infective endocarditis due to Staphylococcus aureus: 59 prospectively identified cases with follow-up. (4/7250)

Fifty-nine consecutive patients with definite Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE) by the Duke criteria were prospectively identified at our hospital over a 3-year period. Twenty-seven (45.8%) of the 59 patients had hospital-acquired S. aureus bacteremia. The presumed source of infection was an intravascular device in 50.8% of patients. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed evidence of IE in 20 patients (33.9%), whereas transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) revealed evidence of IE in 48 patients (81.4%). The outcome for patients was strongly associated with echocardiographic findings: 13 (68.4%) of 19 patients with vegetations visualized by TTE had an embolic event or died of their infection vs. five (16.7%) of 30 patients whose vegetations were visualized only by TEE (P < .01). Most patients with S. aureus IE developed their infection as a consequence of a nosocomial or intravascular device-related infection. TEE established the diagnosis of S. aureus IE in many instances when TTE was nondiagnostic. Visualization of vegetations by TTE may provide prognostic information for patients with S. aureus IE.  (+info)

Infectious complications in 126 patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. (5/7250)

The effect of an extensive prophylactic antimicrobial regimen was prospectively assessed in 126 patients after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous PBSC. They received ciprofloxacin (500 mg/12 h), acyclovir (200 mg/6 h), and itraconazole (200 mg/12 h) orally until neutrophil recovery. Febrile patients received i.v. imipenem (500 mg/6 h) to which vancomycin and amikacin were added if fever persisted for 2-3 and 5 days, respectively. Amphotericin B lipid complex was further given on day 7 or 8 of fever. Median times for a neutrophil count of >0.5 x 10(9)/l and a platelet count of >20 x 10(9)/l were 9 and 11 days. Severe neutropenia (<0.1 x 10(9)/l) lasted for a median of 5 days in which 72% of febrile episodes and 50% of cases of bacteremia occurred. Gram-positive bacteria were isolated in 30 of 40 episodes of bacteremia, 25 of which were caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis. Clinical foci were the intravascular catheter in 35 cases, respiratory infection in 11, cellulitis in two, anal abscess in one, and neutropenic enterocolitis in one. The high incidence of febrile episodes (94%) and bacteremias (31%) may be due to the lack of efficacy of antimicrobial prophylaxis and the persistence of a 5-day period of severe neutropenia.  (+info)

Identification and characterization of SirA, an iron-regulated protein from Staphylococcus aureus. (6/7250)

The acquisition of iron by pathogenic bacteria is often a crucial step in establishing infection. To accomplish this, many bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, produce low-molecular-weight iron-chelating siderophores. However, the secretion and transport of these molecules in gram-positive organisms are poorly understood. The sequence, organization, and regulation of genes involved in siderophore transport are conserved among gram-negative bacteria. We used this information to identify a putative siderophore transport locus from an S. aureus genomic sequence database. This locus contains three predicted open reading frames with a high degree of homology to genes involved in siderophore uptake in several bacterial species, in particular the cbr locus of the plant pathogen Erwinia chrysanthemi. The first gene in the locus, which we have designated sir for staphylococcal iron regulated, encodes a putative lipoprotein with a molecular mass of 37 kDa. The open reading frame is preceded by a 19-bp region of dyad symmetry with homology for operator sequences controlling iron-regulated expression of genes in other bacteria. Fur titration experiments indicate that this region of dyad symmetry is sufficient for Fur-dependent regulation in Escherichia coli. The expression of this gene was repressed, in a dose-dependent manner, by the addition of iron to the S. aureus culture medium. sir-encoded proteins may be involved in iron acquisition in vivo and therefore may be targets for antimicrobial agents.  (+info)

Changing susceptibilities of coagulase-negative staphylococci to teicoplanin in a teaching hospital. (7/7250)

The susceptibility of two collections of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) isolated from clinical specimens for teicoplanin and vancomycin were compared. They comprised 91 and 101 isolates, collected in 1985 and 1994 respectively, from different departments of a teaching hospital. MICs of vancomycin and teicoplanin were determined by a modified Etest method. Additionally, a disc diffusion test was performed for teicoplanin. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin (MIC < or = 4 mg/L). Two of the 91 isolates collected in 1985 were intermediate to teicoplanin (MIC between 8 and 32 mg/L), whereas in 1994 the number of intermediate isolates was 20 out of 101 (P < 0.01). The correlation between MICs, as determined by the modified Etest assay, and disc diffusion zones was poor (r = -0.35). Results show that resistance to teicoplanin in CNS has increased in the study hospital over a period of 9 years. This increase is likely to be correlated with the introduction of teicoplanin. Furthermore, a disc diffusion method does not appear to be the first method of choice for detection of strains of CNS with diminished susceptibility to teicoplanin.  (+info)

The effect of reserpine, an inhibitor of multidrug efflux pumps, on the in-vitro activities of ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin and moxifloxacin against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus. (8/7250)

In Staphylococcus aureus, in addition to mutations in the grl and gyr gene loci, multidrug efflux pumps like NorA contribute to decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility. Efflux pumps can be inhibited by the plant alkaloid reserpine, which, at 20 mg/L, reduced sparfloxacin, moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin IC50s and MICs by up to four-fold in 11, 21 and 48 of the 102 unrelated clinical isolates tested, respectively. The effect was less pronounced with the hydrophobic drugs sparfloxacin and moxifloxacin than with the hydrophilic drug ciprofloxacin and was stable in all 25 clonally related isolates tested.  (+info)

  • The emergence of methicillin- and vancomycin- resistance among clinical isolates of S. aureus has made treatment of staphylococcal infections difficult and has revived research on vaccination and other strategies to prevent and treat staphylococcal infections especially in patients who are at high risk. (frontiersin.org)
  • Finally, a deeper evaluation of the role of neutrophils and macrophages subtypes as well as their cooperation in promoting extravasation and activation of neutrophils and a better knowledge of the function of cytokines and T cells in promoting staphylococcal killing represent a critical step for planning of clinical trials and future vaccine development. (frontiersin.org)
  • Management of infection is a major clinical problem. (springeropen.com)
  • The systematic use of genome-sequence databases, gene expression technology, x-ray crystallography and animal studies have increased our appreciation of the structure and function of these virulence factors and mechanisms underlying host-staphylococcal interactions. (frontiersin.org)
  • In conclusion, this Research Topic focuses on the role of staphylococcal virulence factors in adhesion, invasion and biofilm formation on one hand and on their interaction with innate immunity on the other. (frontiersin.org)
  • Invasive infections are more serious and usually treated in hospital with antibiotic injections. (your.md)
  • Rare in adults and most common in newborns and other children under the age of five, scalded skin syndrome originates with a localized skin infection. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Any S. aureus infection can cause the staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, a cutaneous reaction to exotoxin absorbed into the bloodstream. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several bullous lesions affected his hands and feet (Figure 1 ) without formal argument for a necrotizing fasciitis or a staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome. (hindawi.com)
  • Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS), which usually affects children less than five years old or rarely, adults with kidney failure. (bestonlinemd.com)
  • Severity of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome varies from a few blisters localized to the site of infection to a severe exfoliation affecting almost the entire body. (medscape.com)
  • Two types of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome are thought to exist: a localized form, in which there is only patchy involvement of the epidermis, and a generalized form, in which significant areas of are involved, remote from the initial site of infection. (medscape.com)
  • [ 3 , 4 , 5 ] The relative quantity of DG-1 in the skin differs with age and may partially explain the increased frequency of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in children younger than 5 years. (medscape.com)
  • The decrease in frequency of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) in adults is thought to be explained by the presence of antibodies specific for exotoxins and also improved renal clearance of toxins that are produced. (medscape.com)
  • Initial studies suggested that phage lytic group II S aureus (subtypes 3A, 3B, 3C, 55 and 71) were solely responsible for exfoliative toxin production, but it is now known that all phage groups are able to produce exfoliative toxin and cause staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome. (medscape.com)
  • Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome differs from bullous impetigo . (medscape.com)
  • In staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, the exfoliative toxins are spread hematogenously from a localized source potentially causing epidermal damage at distant sites. (medscape.com)
  • Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome differs from the more severe toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) , in that the cleavage site in staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome is intraepidermal, as opposed to TEN, which involves necrosis of the full epidermal layer (at the level of the basement membrane). (medscape.com)
  • Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) is most common in children and neonates. (medscape.com)
  • Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome is rarer in adults, but it has been described in adults with renal failure, immunologic deficiency, and other chronic illness. (medscape.com)
  • Daptomycin is a phosphatidylglycerol specific, calcium dependent membrane-active antibiotic that has been approved for the treatment of Gram-positive infections. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Due to widespread antibiotic resistance, it is better to prevent staphylococcal infections where possible. (bestonlinemd.com)
  • How to treat internal infections using a naturally occurring powerful antibiotic with a proven success rate. (aspeneducationgroup.com)
  • The receptors for human C5a anaphylatoxin, C5aR and C5L2, were recently shown to act as binding sites for both PVL and ?HL/HlgCB, and we hypothesize that small molecule antagonists of the C5a receptor will be useful in treating staphylococcal infections as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy. (grantome.com)
  • Based on this finding, we hypothesize that small molecule antagonists of the C5a receptor will be useful in treating Staphylococcal infections as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy. (grantome.com)
  • Skin infections are usually mild and can be treated using antibiotic tablets or creams. (your.md)
  • Invasive infections are more serious and usually treated in hospital with antibiotic injections. (your.md)
  • These findings hold implication for the development of therapeutics in treating antibiotic-resistant S. aureus infection. (jimmunol.org)
  • Immunotherapeutic strategies to combat staphylococcal infections. (nih.gov)
  • Taken together, these investigations will provide preclinical evidence for the therapeutic use of small molecule C5aR antagonists in man to combat staphylococcal infections. (grantome.com)
  • It is generally believed that the incidence of staphylococcal infection has increased since the introduction of antimicrobials, although only a few studies to document this impression have appeared in the literature. (annals.org)
  • Overall incidence is higher in developing countries and wherever the incidence of staphylococcal infections is higher. (medscape.com)
  • Periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) cause significant morbidity and a considerable claim on the health care resource utilization. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 68 Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET detected inflammation induced by S. epidermidis and S. aureus catheter-related bone infections (SUV ratio +58.1% and +41.7%, respectively). (utu.fi)
  • PET/CT imaging with novel 68 Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 tracer was able to detect inflammatory tissue response induced by catheter implantation and staphylococcal infections. (utu.fi)
  • The third experiment (Study III) demonstrated that positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with the novel 68Ga labelled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) CD33 related sialic-acid immunoglobulin like lectins (Siglec-9) tracer was able to detect inflammatory response to S. epidermidis and S. aureus peri-implant infections in an intraosseous polytetrafluoroethylene catheter model. (utupub.fi)
  • [ 8 ] Some recent reports show an increase in hospitalizations and prescriptions for staphylococcal disease, including SSSS, in England. (medscape.com)
THE CURRENT PROBLEM OF STAPHYLOCOCCAL INFECTIONS* | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians
THE CURRENT PROBLEM OF STAPHYLOCOCCAL INFECTIONS* | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians (annals.org)
Organizations by topic beginning with S: MedlinePlus
Organizations by topic beginning with S: MedlinePlus (medlineplus.gov)
Answers - The Most Trusted Place for Answering Life's Questions
Answers - The Most Trusted Place for Answering Life's Questions (answers.com)
Relationship of Staphylococcal Colonization to Infection - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Relationship of Staphylococcal Colonization to Infection - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov (clinicaltrials.gov)
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June 1959 - Volume 59 - Issue 6 : AJN The American Journal of Nursing (journals.lww.com)
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Staphylococcal Infection: Antitoxic Immunity | The BMJ (bmj.com)
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Health Topics: V: MedlinePlus (medlineplus.gov)
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Perirenal abscess: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia (medlineplus.gov)
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Https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321381.php (medicalnewstoday.com)
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