Listeria monocytogenes: A species of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. It has been isolated from sewage, soil, silage, and from feces of healthy animals and man. Infection with this bacterium leads to encephalitis, meningitis, endocarditis, and abortion.Listeriosis: Infections with bacteria of the genus LISTERIA.Listeria: A genus of bacteria which may be found in the feces of animals and man, on vegetation, and in silage. Its species are parasitic on cold-blooded and warm-blooded animals, including man.Meningitis, Listeria: Inflammation of the meninges caused by LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES infection, usually occurring in individuals under the age of 3 years or over the age of 50 years. It may occur at any age in individuals with IMMUNOLOGIC DEFICIENCY SYNDROMES. Clinical manifestations include FEVER, altered mentation, HEADACHE, meningeal signs, focal neurologic signs, and SEIZURES. (From Medicine 1998 Sep;77(5):313-36)Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Hemolysin Proteins: Proteins from BACTERIA and FUNGI that are soluble enough to be secreted to target ERYTHROCYTES and insert into the membrane to form beta-barrel pores. Biosynthesis may be regulated by HEMOLYSIN FACTORS.Foodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Cheese: A nutritious food consisting primarily of the curd or the semisolid substance formed when milk coagulates.Meat Products: Articles of food which are derived by a process of manufacture from any portion of carcasses of any animal used for food (e.g., head cheese, sausage, scrapple).Meningitis, Bacterial: Bacterial infections of the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space, frequently involving the cerebral cortex, cranial nerves, cerebral blood vessels, spinal cord, and nerve roots.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Hepatopancreas: A primitive form of digestive gland found in marine ARTHROPODS, that contains cells similar to those found in the mammalian liver (HEPATOCYTES), and the PANCREAS.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Aquaculture: Cultivation of natural faunal resources of water. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Xanthomonas: A genus in the family XANTHOMONADACEAE whose cells produce a yellow pigment (Gr. xanthos - yellow). It is pathogenic to plants.Heat-Shock Proteins: Proteins which are synthesized in eukaryotic organisms and bacteria in response to hyperthermia and other environmental stresses. They increase thermal tolerance and perform functions essential to cell survival under these conditions.Bacterial Toxins: Toxic substances formed in or elaborated by bacteria; they are usually proteins with high molecular weight and antigenicity; some are used as antibiotics and some to skin test for the presence of or susceptibility to certain diseases.Spleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.Immunity, Innate: The capacity of a normal organism to remain unaffected by microorganisms and their toxins. It results from the presence of naturally occurring ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS, constitutional factors such as BODY TEMPERATURE and immediate acting immune cells such as NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Peptide Termination Factors: Proteins that are involved in the peptide chain termination reaction (PEPTIDE CHAIN TERMINATION, TRANSLATIONAL) on RIBOSOMES. They include codon-specific class-I release factors, which recognize stop signals (TERMINATOR CODON) in the MESSENGER RNA; and codon-nonspecific class-II release factors.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Macrophages: The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Nisin: A 34-amino acid polypeptide antibiotic produced by Streptococcus lactis. It has been used as a food preservative in canned fruits and vegetables, and cheese.Food-Processing Industry: The productive enterprises concerned with food processing.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Bacteremia: The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion.Mice, Inbred C57BLBacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Mice, Inbred BALB CPolymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Pneumococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.Pseudomonas syringae: A species of gram-negative, fluorescent, phytopathogenic bacteria in the genus PSEUDOMONAS. It is differentiated into approximately 50 pathovars with different plant pathogenicities and host specificities.Bacteriocins: Substances elaborated by specific strains of bacteria that are lethal against other strains of the same or related species. They are protein or lipopolysaccharide-protein complexes used in taxonomy studies of bacteria.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Food Preservation: Procedures or techniques used to keep food from spoiling.Cucumis melo: A plant species of the family CUCURBITACEAE, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae known for the melon fruits with reticulated (net) surface including cantaloupes, honeydew, casaba, and Persian melons.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Ribotyping: RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM analysis of rRNA genes that is used for differentiating between species or strains.Virulence Factors: Those components of an organism that determine its capacity to cause disease but are not required for its viability per se. Two classes have been characterized: TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL and surface adhesion molecules that effect the ability of the microorganism to invade and colonize a host. (From Davis et al., Microbiology, 4th ed. p486)Streptococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS.Pregnancy Complications, Infectious: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.Immunity, Cellular: Manifestations of the immune response which are mediated by antigen-sensitized T-lymphocytes via lymphokines or direct cytotoxicity. This takes place in the absence of circulating antibody or where antibody plays a subordinate role.Drug Resistance, Bacterial: The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field: Gel electrophoresis in which the direction of the electric field is changed periodically. This technique is similar to other electrophoretic methods normally used to separate double-stranded DNA molecules ranging in size up to tens of thousands of base-pairs. However, by alternating the electric field direction one is able to separate DNA molecules up to several million base-pairs in length.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Hemolysin Factors: Plasmids controlling the synthesis of hemolysin by bacteria.Food Preservatives: Substances capable of inhibiting, retarding or arresting the process of fermentation, acidification or other deterioration of foods.Streptococcus pneumoniae: A gram-positive organism found in the upper respiratory tract, inflammatory exudates, and various body fluids of normal and/or diseased humans and, rarely, domestic animals.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Interferon-gamma: The major interferon produced by mitogenically or antigenically stimulated LYMPHOCYTES. It is structurally different from TYPE I INTERFERON and its major activity is immunoregulation. It has been implicated in the expression of CLASS II HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in cells that do not normally produce them, leading to AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Ampicillin: Semi-synthetic derivative of penicillin that functions as an orally active broad-spectrum antibiotic.Microbial Viability: Ability of a microbe to survive under given conditions. This can also be related to a colony's ability to replicate.Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Phagosomes: Membrane-bound cytoplasmic vesicles formed by invagination of phagocytized material. They fuse with lysosomes to form phagolysosomes in which the hydrolytic enzymes of the lysosome digest the phagocytized material.Lethal Dose 50: The dose amount of poisonous or toxic substance or dose of ionizing radiation required to kill 50% of the tested population.CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes: A critical subpopulation of regulatory T-lymphocytes involved in MHC Class I-restricted interactions. They include both cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and CD8+ suppressor T-lymphocytes.Caco-2 Cells: Human colonic ADENOCARCINOMA cells that are able to express differentiation features characteristic of mature intestinal cells, such as ENTEROCYTES. These cells are valuable in vitro tools for studies related to intestinal cell function and differentiation.Bacterial Vaccines: Suspensions of attenuated or killed bacteria administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious bacterial disease.Phagocytosis: The engulfing and degradation of microorganisms; other cells that are dead, dying, or pathogenic; and foreign particles by phagocytic cells (PHAGOCYTES).Apium graveolens: A plant species of the family APIACEAE. The stalks are a food source.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Immunization, Passive: Transfer of immunity from immunized to non-immune host by administration of serum antibodies, or transplantation of lymphocytes (ADOPTIVE TRANSFER).Bacterial Adhesion: Physicochemical property of fimbriated (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) and non-fimbriated bacteria of attaching to cells, tissue, and nonbiological surfaces. It is a factor in bacterial colonization and pathogenicity.Benzalkonium Compounds: A mixture of alkylbenzyldimethylammonium compounds. It is a bactericidal quaternary ammonium detergent used topically in medicaments, deodorants, mouthwashes, as a surgical antiseptic, and as a as preservative and emulsifier in drugs and cosmetics.Peritoneal Cavity: The space enclosed by the peritoneum. It is divided into two portions, the greater sac and the lesser sac or omental bursa, which lies behind the STOMACH. The two sacs are connected by the foramen of Winslow, or epiploic foramen.Food Service, Hospital: Hospital department that manages and supervises the dietary program in accordance with the patients' requirements.Abortion, Septic: Any type of abortion, induced or spontaneous, that is associated with infection of the UTERUS and its appendages. It is characterized by FEVER, uterine tenderness, and foul discharge.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Environmental Microbiology: The study of microorganisms living in a variety of environments (air, soil, water, etc.) and their pathogenic relationship to other organisms including man.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Sigma Factor: A protein which is a subunit of RNA polymerase. It effects initiation of specific RNA chains from DNA.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Immunologic Memory: The altered state of immunologic responsiveness resulting from initial contact with antigen, which enables the individual to produce antibodies more rapidly and in greater quantity in response to secondary antigenic stimulus.Immunity, Active: Resistance to a disease agent resulting from the production of specific antibodies by the host, either after exposure to the disease or after vaccination.Macrophage Activation: The process of altering the morphology and functional activity of macrophages so that they become avidly phagocytic. It is initiated by lymphokines, such as the macrophage activation factor (MAF) and the macrophage migration-inhibitory factor (MMIF), immune complexes, C3b, and various peptides, polysaccharides, and immunologic adjuvants.Betaine: A naturally occurring compound that has been of interest for its role in osmoregulation. As a drug, betaine hydrochloride has been used as a source of hydrochloric acid in the treatment of hypochlorhydria. Betaine has also been used in the treatment of liver disorders, for hyperkalemia, for homocystinuria, and for gastrointestinal disturbances. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1341)Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Central Nervous System Bacterial Infections: Bacterial infections of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges, including infections involving the perimeningeal spaces.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Infectious Disease Incubation Period: The amount time between exposure to an infectious agent and becoming symptomatic.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Hypersensitivity, Delayed: An increased reactivity to specific antigens mediated not by antibodies but by cells.Pediococcus: A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria whose growth is dependent on the presence of a fermentable carbohydrate. No endospores are produced. Its organisms are found in fermenting plant products and are nonpathogenic to plants and animals, including humans.Phosphoinositide Phospholipase C: A type C phospholipase with specificity towards PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOLS that contain INOSITOL 1,4,5-TRISPHOSPHATE. Many of the enzymes listed under this classification are involved in intracellular signaling.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Refrigeration: The mechanical process of cooling.
... is a bacterial infection most commonly caused by Listeria monocytogenes,[1] although L. ivanovii and L. grayi have ... "Listeria". Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy. University of Minnesota.. *^ European Food Safety Authority, ... but cardiac manifestations are usually sporadic and may rely on a combination of bacterial factors and host predispositions, as ... CauseEdit. Listeria monocytogenes is ubiquitous in the environment. The main route of acquisition of Listeria is through the ...
... is a bacterial infection most commonly caused by Listeria monocytogenes, although L. ivanovii and L. grayi have ... www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/listeriosis-now-a-notifiable-disease-as-death-toll-rises-to-61-20180108 CDC Listeriosis site. ... but cardiac manifestations are usually sporadic and may rely on a combination of bacterial factors and host predispositions, as ... Listeria monocytogenes is ubiquitous in the environment. The main route of acquisition of Listeria is through the ingestion of ...
Invasive infection by L. monocytogenes causes the disease listeriosis. When the infection is not invasive, any illness as a ... Listeria monocytogenes Public Health Agency of Canada Type strain of Listeria monocytogenes at BacDive - the Bacterial ... L. monocytogenes serotype 4b strains are responsible for 33 to 5% of sporadic human cases worldwide and for all major foodborne ... Listeria monocytogenes is the species of pathogenic bacteria that causes the infection listeriosis. It is a facultative ...
"Listeria (Listeriosis)". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 22 October 2015. Archived from the original on 19 December ... of bacterial meningitis cases. Risk of infection with Listeria monocytogenes is increased in persons over 50 years old.[3][8] ... Listeria monocytogenes (serotype IVb) is transmitted by the mother before birth and may cause meningitis in the newborn.[22] ... the cause of syphilis) and Borrelia burgdorferi (known for causing Lyme disease). Meningitis may be encountered in cerebral ...
In addition to disease caused by direct bacterial infection, some foodborne illnesses are caused by enterotoxins (exotoxins ... Listeria monocytogenes Shigella spp. Staphylococcus aureus Staphylococcal enteritis Streptococcus Vibrio cholerae, including O1 ... The vast majority of reported cases of foodborne illness occur as individual or sporadic cases. The origin of most sporadic ... This ranges from hours to days (and rarely months or even years, such as in the case of listeriosis or bovine spongiform ...
Listeriosis Listeria monocytogenes Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia garinii, and Borrelia afzelii ... Bacterial diseases: BV4 non-proteobacterial G- (primarily A00-A79, 001-041, 080-109) ... Clostridium botulinum; Note: Botulism is not an infection by Clostridium botulinum but caused by the intake of botulinum toxin ... Intestinal disease by Capillaria philippinensis, hepatic disease by Capillaria hepatica and pulmonary disease by Capillaria ...
The pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is the third most common cause of bacterial meningitis in neonates, and causes ... Additionally, sporadic outbreaks of listeriosis continue to claim lives, particularly in the very young and the elderly. Here, ... Shedding light on chronic Listeria infection Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from Disease Models & ... Review - Intestinal epithelial cell polarity defects in disease: lessons from microvillus inclusion disease. ...
... host preference and pathogenic potential to cause infectious disease. The species of Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative ... Two of these lineages predominantly cause human sporadic and epidemic infections, whereas the third lineage has never been ... intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of human listeriosis, consists of at least three distinct genetic lineages. ... Application of our method to the pan-genome of L. monocytogenes sheds new insights into the intraspecific niche expansion and ...
Listeriosis is a sporadic bacterial infection of the brain due to Listeria monocytogenes. The infection results in encephalitis ... and occasionally causes abortion or systemic infection. Listeriosis usually occurs in cold climates or conditions, especially ... one can be reasonably confident of listeriosis. Confirmation depends on histopathology and culture. Laboratory confirmation ...
Listeria monocytogenes is a gram-positive bacterial pathogen that is capable of causing significant morbidity and mortality in ... Listeriosis is primarily a food-borne disease that has a significant impact on specific risk groups, including pregnant women ... Epidemiological investigation of epidemic and sporadic cases of listeriosis requires molecular characterization to allow the ... Genetic characterization of clones of the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes causing epidemic disease. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA ...
Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne, opportunistic, bacterial pathogen causing a wide spectrum of diseases, including ... most major food-borne outbreaks and a majority of sporadic cases of listeriosis are caused by serovar 4b strains (1, 28, 30, 43 ... Genetic characterization of clones of the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes causing epidemic disease. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA ... Bacterial strains, growth conditions, and RNA extraction.The Listeria monocytogenes strains used in this study are described in ...
Listeriosis, caused by the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, is spread in soft cheeses, undercooked meats, and prepared foods ... See also food‐borne disease.. The commonest bacterial contamination is due to species of Salmonella, Staphylococcus, ... Symptoms include bloody diarrhea, nausea, and sporadic vomiting, with or without fever. It can progress to kidney failure and ... The latter is the cause of "hamburger disease." A virus known as calcivirus or Norwalk-like virus also is a common cause of ...
A whole genome single-nucleotide-variants phylogeny revealed sporadic distribution of tolerant isolates and closely related ... monocytogenes genotypes and food-related stress tolerance phenotypes. To accomplish this, 166 L. monocytogenes isolates were ... monocytogenes genotypes and food-related stress tolerance phenotypes. To accomplish this, 166 L. monocytogenes isolates were ... We also identified nine new L. monocytogenes sequence types, a new inlA PMSC, and several connections between CCs and the ...
... of Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated in Denmark during 2002-2012. We performed 2-enzyme PFGE and serotyping on 559 ... These 2 types were the main cause of a peak in incidence of invasive listeriosis during 2005-2009, possibly representing an ... Denmark has a high incidence of invasive listeriosis (0.9 cases/100,000 population in 2012). We analyzed patient data, clinical ... Distribution of lineages of Listeria monocytogenes isolates by disease manifestation, Denmark, 2002-2012. Only blood stream ...
Listeriosis is an infectious disease of bacterial origin. It is an infection caused by the bacteria: Listeria monocytogenes . ... Cases of Listeria monocytogenes infections are usually sporadic cases, which mean that the disease affects only certain people ... Listeriosis is an infectious disease of bacterial origin. It is an infection caused by the bacteria: Listeria monocytogenes . ... listeriosis foods, listeriosis treatment, what is listeria monocytogenes, what is listeriosis disease, where does listeria come ...
South Africa have launched an investigation to find the food source that has resulted in an unprecedented increase in listeria ... Listeriosis is a serious bacterial infection caused by the rod shaped bacteria listeria monocytogenes. The bacterium is spread ... Kerrigan McCarthy, National Institute for Communicable Diseases Author. * Kerrigan McCarthy Head of the Outbreak Response Unit ... Since then, sporadic cases have occurred throughout the country. For example, between January 2015 and September 2015 seven ...
What is listeria meningitis? Meaning of listeria meningitis medical term. What does listeria meningitis mean? ... Looking for online definition of listeria meningitis in the Medical Dictionary? listeria meningitis explanation free. ... Listeria monocytogenes. Listeriosis. Definition. Listeriosis is an illness caused by the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes that ... A sporadic disease of animals and humans, particularly those who are immunocompromised or pregnant, caused by the bacterium, ...
... contaminated with listeria. It is a sporadic bacterial infection. The bacteria appear to be soil and mammalian GI tracts. ... Listeriosis - a disease of the nervous system of mammals, birds, and occasionally humans that can cause fever, meningitis, ... Listeria monocytogenes is susceptible to high doses of penicillin, the treatment of choice.. ... Anthrax - an infectious bacterial disease of mammals that causes skin ulcers and is transmittable to humans by inhalation and ...
... in a patient who probably consumed a prepackaged romaine lettuce-containing product recalled for Listeria monocytogenes ... To our knowledge, this is the first time prepackaged lettuce has been identified as a likely source for listeriosis. This ... National Center for Infectious Diseases (U.S.). Division of Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases. ... Listeriosis, a serious infection caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, has recently ...
Listeriosis is caused by Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive bacillus common in the environment and acquired by humans ... After cantaloupe was implicated, PulseNet, the national molecular subtyping network for foodborne bacterial disease ... 60 years with sporadic listeriosis identified during August of the years 2004--2010 indicated that cantaloupe consumption was ... Number of infections with outbreak-associated strains of Listeria monocytogenes (n = 83), by date of illness onset* --- United ...
Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that infects the placenta and can cause pregnancy complications. Listeriosis ... Genetic characterization of clones of the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes causing epidemic disease. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ... monocytogenes infection represent infections caused by bacterial strains that are more virulent generally or more specifically ... Almost all strains were from sporadic cases of listeriosis. Four strains were from three different outbreaks of listeriosis ...
Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne bacterial pathogen that causes a wide spectrum of diseases, such as meningitis, ... all major food-borne outbreaks of listeriosis, as well as the majority of sporadic cases, have been caused by serovar 4b ... Genetic characterization of clones of the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes causing epidemic disease. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA ... monocytogenes as well as disease- and non-disease-related isolates. A total of 93 L. monocytogenes strains from 12 different ...
Listeriosis is a bacterial infection most commonly caused by Listeria monocytogenes,[1] although L. ivanovii and L. grayi have ... "Listeria". Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy. University of Minnesota.. *^ European Food Safety Authority, ... but cardiac manifestations are usually sporadic and may rely on a combination of bacterial factors and host predispositions, as ... CauseEdit. Listeria monocytogenes is ubiquitous in the environment. The main route of acquisition of Listeria is through the ...
acute illness following the eating of foods contaminated by bacteria, bacterial toxins, natural poisons, or harmful chemical ... Listeriosis, caused by the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, is spread in soft cheeses, undercooked meats, and prepared foods ... coli is a leading cause of travelers diarrhea. See Escherichia. Viruses that cause food-borne disease generally emanate from ... The most common bacterial causes of food poisoning are Salmonella (see salmonellosissalmonellosis. , any of a group of ...
Listeriosis is an infection caused by L. monocytogenes and is transmitted through the ingestion of contaminated food, aided by ... Most cases of listeriosis are apparently sporadic, but foodborne outbreaks occur, and health care-associated listeriosis ... Listeria was detected in seven environmental samples from Company Xs premises, and L. monocytogenes was detected in a further ... Listeriosis is a notifiable disease in NSW, and cases are investigated in accordance with NSW Health control guidelines.1All ...
Listeriosis is a disease that causes septicemia or encephalitis in humans, animals and birds. Although, the disease is rare and ... is Listeria monocytogenes. The organism is capable to infect almost all animals and poultry; however, outbreaks of listeriosis ... Tuberculosis, an infectious bacterial disease that affects the lungs is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). It is the ... sporadic in poultry but if occurs then causes septicemia or sometimes localized encephalitis. Occasionally, the disease is seen ...
Listeriosis *. Listeriosis is caused by the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. Cattle, sheep, and goats are commonly affected. ... Dermatophilosis is a bacterial skin disease caused by Dermatophilus congolensis, and is also known as rain rot, lumpy wool, and ... There is a pocket of brucellosis in the bison and elk herds of Yellowstone National Park, and sporadic outbreaks of animal ... Anthrax is a bacterial disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, which forms spores that survive for years in the environment. ...
... of collaboration between veterinarians and public health departments and the possible implications of zoonotic diseases. ... Listeria monocytogenes was detected by real time PCR from formalin fixed heart and spleen, and was isolated from fresh lung, ... This isolate was identified as L. monocytogenes serotype 4b by 16S rDNA sequencing and by PCR-based serotyping assay. This is ... This report describes an outbreak of L. monocytogenes in a backyard poultry flock. Also, it points out the importance ...
Listeriosis is a bacterial infection most commonly caused by Listeria monocytogenes, although L. ivanovii and L. grayi have ... www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/listeriosis-now-a-notifiable-disease-as-death-toll-rises-to-61-20180108 CDC Listeriosis site. ... but cardiac manifestations are usually sporadic and may rely on a combination of bacterial factors and host predispositions, as ... Listeria monocytogenes is ubiquitous in the environment. The main route of acquisition of Listeria is through the ingestion of ...
Listeria, and Vibrio species, and Yersinia enterocolitica, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium ... Prior to the 1980s, listeriosis, the disease caused predominantly by Listeria monocytogenes, was primarily of veterinary ... The pathogenic (disease-causing) bacteria discussed in this summary cause most of the known bacterial foodborne illness in ... While association of listeriosis with raw milk consumption is not rare, it is infrequent and sporadic. The results of surveys ...
Update: multinational listeriosis outbreak due to "Quargel," a sour milk curd cheese, caused by two different L. monocytogenes ... Bacterial strains and growth conditions.Strains of L. monocytogenes were routinely grown in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth or ... Since then, L. monocytogenes isolates that formed clusters according to their PFGE profiles and selected sporadic isolates were ... Listeria monocytogenes is a zoonotic pathogen causing disease in humans, with symptoms ranging from gastroenteritis to ...
  • L monocytogenes is a motile, non-spore-forming, gram-positive bacillus that has aerobic and facultatively anaerobic characteristics. (medscape.com)
  • 6 L monocytogenes is a non-spore-forming, gram-positive bacillus that is cultured in blood agar. (uspharmacist.com)
  • A total of fresh thirty raw common carp ( Cyprinus carpio ) were purchased from fish sellers of various local markets in Baghdad city from (December 2017 to March 2018) The viscera was removed aseptically, the bacterial isolation and identification was conducted by a conventional culture method using Listeria selective media, biochemical tests and Vitek 2 for gram-positive. (vetmedmosul.com)
  • Listeria is an organism that contaminates food and can result in pregnant women going into premature labour or even losing their babies. (theconversation.com)
  • Although L. monocytogenes is actively motile by means of peritrichous flagella at room temperature (20−25 °C), the organism does not synthesize flagella at body temperatures (37 °C). The genus Listeria belongs to the class Bacilli and the order Bacillales, which also includes Bacillus and Staphylococcus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Uncontrollable factors including the physiological state of the organism and the presence and type of microflora on the product will affect the potential for growth of L. monocytogenes . (fao.org)
  • Birds are the host organism and mosquitos, via their salivary glands, the vector of disease transmission. (radiopaedia.org)
  • However, control programmes on CBPP also brought a significant reduction in the incidence of the disease but eradication status is yet to be declared. (scialert.net)
  • An endemic disease is a disease that is always present, usually at low incidence, in a population. (infohio.org)
  • As uniform case definitions are adopted, the incidence of reported diseases in different geographic areas may be more meaningfully compared. (cdc.gov)
  • The incidence of listeriosis has recently been reported to be higher among the elderly than in other groups [ 4 , 5 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • This article, through focus on issues such as reexamination of zero-tolerance policies, improvements in detection and enumeration procedures, the impact of epidemiologic innovations, and measures needed to further reduce the incidence of listeriosis will highlight why L monocytogenes remains a continuing challenge for the food industry. (arctichealth.org)
  • We are likely to see an increase in the incidence of listeriosis as the numbers of susceptible individuals and vulnerable groups increase over the next decades. (fao.org)
  • Incidence is used as a way to understand risk factors, such as the cause of a health-related event or concern for disease spread. (geneseo.edu)
  • The National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System monitors the incidence of an agreed list of communicable diseases in Australia. (health.gov.au)
  • The severity of maternal listeriosis lies in that-especially in the third trimester and even more so, if pregnancy is multiple-usually follows: abortion, intrauterine fetal death, a higher rate of cesareans, prematurity, sepsis, and neonatal death. (epainassist.com)
  • There have been recent media reports about deaths from Listeriosis in people in South Africa. (nahf.co.za)
  • The Texas-company submitted information about how it plans to correct the problems to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which inspected Blue Bell plants after the company's ice cream was linked to listeria illnesses in four states and three deaths in Kansas. (medworm.com)
  • It has been estimated that in children alone there may be between 3.5 to 18 million deaths per year worldwide from diarrhoeal disease . (who.int)
  • In the United States, L monocytogenes is estimated to cause 1,600 illnesses, more than 1,400 hospitalizations, and 250 deaths per year. (uspharmacist.com)
  • Listeriosis contributed to at least three of these deaths. (foodhaccp.com)
  • The total annual estimated cost of listeriosis illnesses and deaths in Canada was estimated to be between 11.1 and 12.6 million dollars. (arctichealth.org)
  • The objective of this study was to use a combination of phenotypic analyses and whole genome sequencing to elucidate potential relationships between L. monocytogenes genotypes and food-related stress tolerance phenotypes. (frontiersin.org)
  • Whole genome sequencing has become a routine part of assessing L. monocytogenes isolated from patients, and the frequency of different genetic subtypes associated with listeriosis is now being reported. (springer.com)
  • In the immunocompromised population however, V. vulnificus can trigger further complications and has the potential to invade the bloodstream from an open wound or from the gastrointestinal tract, causing primary septicemia - a severe and life-threatening illnesses. (ubc.ca)
  • The emergence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in human populations sparked a global pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). (bvsalud.org)
  • A confirmed case was defined as any resident or that can help foodborne disease investigators distinguish visitor to NSW with laboratory-confirmed Salmonella ser. (who.int)
  • Its robust physiological characteristics, coupled with its ubiquity in food processing, distribution and retail environments, have made L. monocytogenes difficult to manage in food manufacturing, particularly for ready-to-eat food products. (biomedcentral.com)
  • L. monocytogenes is capable of surviving and replicating under a wide range of environmental conditions, and this, as well as its widespread distribution, makes it particularly hard to eradicate from food-processing plants ( 11 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Environmental toxins (heavy metals) in foods or water, and poisonous substances in certain foods such mushrooms and shellfish are other causes of food poisoning. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Travel to countries where less attention is paid to sanitation, water purification, and good food-handling practices may expose individuals to bacterial contaminants. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The main source of L. monocytogenes contamination is food. (mediologiest.com)
  • Outbreaks of listeria in food are common across the world. (theconversation.com)
  • In 1996, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) began a nationwide food-borne disease surveillance program called 'FoodNet,' in which seven states were participating by January 1997. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • As noted, persons become infected with Listeria monocytogenes by eating contaminated food. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Staphylococcal food poisoning is actually caused by the potent toxins that they produce. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Foods known to pose a risk of transmitting listeriosis, as well as food items consumed by all three patients during the overlapping periods of their admissions (20-26 March) were identified from hospital menus. (mja.com.au)
  • Although the USDA and FDA have a zero-tolerance policy for L. monocytogenes in RTE food products, numerous listeriosis outbreaks have been reported in recent years ( 30 ). (asm.org)
  • In the following pages, you will learn about the major causes of food poisoning, what happens when you are poisoned, and the steps you can take to protect yourself and your family. (vivausa.org)
  • The peeled eggs were packaged in plastic pails by Almark Foods in Gainesville, Georgia, according the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which along with the US Food and Drug Administration is investigating. (medworm.com)
  • This summary demonstrates the serious nature of foodborne disease and supports the move to risk-based food safety interventions focusing on mass catering and hospital and aged care facilities. (cancerscreening.gov.au)
  • 1 Contaminated food causes serious outbreaks that can result in significant societal costs. (cancerscreening.gov.au)
  • It was found that L. monocytogenes can grow in a wide variety of potential reservoirs and sources within food-processing plants and contaminate ready-to-eat foods ( 9 ). (asm.org)
  • For more than 20 years, PulseNet has helped detect, investigate, and stop outbreaks and improve our food safety system nationwide, reducing the overall burden of enteric disease in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • The disease is usually vertically transmitted during pregnancy or acquired by the consumption of contaminated food, particularly fresh and ready-to-eat products that are not heated before consumption [ 10 , 11 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • A European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) baseline study focusing on ready-to-eat (RTE) food indicated that smoked and marinated fish products carried the highest risk of L. monocytogenes contamination [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Listeriosis is caused by eating food contaminated with Listeria . (ourmed.org)
  • Babies can be born with listeriosis if their mothers eat contaminated food during pregnancy. (ourmed.org)
  • Los dispositivos Amplatzer fueron los primeros aprobados por la Food and Drug Administration, y su colocación se ha convertido en un procedimiento habitual en cardiología pediátrica. (bvsalud.org)
  • The Consultation was opened by Dr G. Rodier, Director, Department of Communicable Disease Surveillance and Response (CSR) and Dr Jörgen Schlundt, Coordinator, Food Safety Programme (FOS), Protection of the Human Environment (PHE). (who.int)
  • In recent years it has gained notoriety for causing outbreaks of food poisoning of some importance throughout the world. (epainassist.com)
  • Although outbreaks are cause for concern, they serve only as examples of how the production system has not been appropriately managed to mitigate food safety risks. (colostate.edu)