Spondylolisthesis: Forward displacement of a superior vertebral body over the vertebral body below.Spondylolysis: Deficient development or degeneration of a portion of the VERTEBRA, usually in the pars interarticularis (the bone bridge between the superior and inferior facet joints of the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE) leading to SPONDYLOLISTHESIS.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Sacrum: Five fused VERTEBRAE forming a triangle-shaped structure at the back of the PELVIS. It articulates superiorly with the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE, inferiorly with the COCCYX, and anteriorly with the ILIUM of the PELVIS. The sacrum strengthens and stabilizes the PELVIS.Spinal Stenosis: Narrowing of the spinal canal.Lordosis: The anterior concavity in the curvature of the lumbar and cervical spine as viewed from the side. The term usually refers to abnormally increased curvature (hollow back, saddle back, swayback). It does not include lordosis as normal mating posture in certain animals ( = POSTURE + SEX BEHAVIOR, ANIMAL).Zygapophyseal Joint: The joint that occurs between facets of the interior and superior articular processes of adjacent VERTEBRAE.Decompression, Surgical: A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)AxisBone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Laminectomy: A surgical procedure that entails removing all (laminectomy) or part (laminotomy) of selected vertebral lamina to relieve pressure on the SPINAL CORD and/or SPINAL NERVE ROOTS. Vertebral lamina is the thin flattened posterior wall of vertebral arch that forms the vertebral foramen through which pass the spinal cord and nerve roots.Internal Fixators: Internal devices used in osteosynthesis to hold the position of the fracture in proper alignment. By applying the principles of biomedical engineering, the surgeon uses metal plates, nails, rods, etc., for the correction of skeletal defects.Lumbosacral Region: Region of the back including the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE, SACRUM, and nearby structures.Spinal DiseasesSpine: The spinal or vertebral column.Intervertebral Disc Degeneration: Degenerative changes in the INTERVERTEBRAL DISC due to aging or structural damage, especially to the vertebral end-plates.Intervertebral Disc: Any of the 23 plates of fibrocartilage found between the bodies of adjacent VERTEBRAE.Intervertebral Disc Displacement: An INTERVERTEBRAL DISC in which the nucleus pulposus has protruded through surrounding fibrocartilage. This occurs most frequently in the lower lumbar region.Orthopedic Fixation Devices: Devices which are used in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases.Spinal Curvatures: Deformities of the SPINE characterized by abnormal bending or flexure in the vertebral column. They may be bending forward (KYPHOSIS), backward (LORDOSIS), or sideway (SCOLIOSIS).Spinal Canal: The cavity within the SPINAL COLUMN through which the SPINAL CORD passes.Radiculopathy: Disease involving a spinal nerve root (see SPINAL NERVE ROOTS) which may result from compression related to INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; SPINAL CORD INJURIES; SPINAL DISEASES; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations include radicular pain, weakness, and sensory loss referable to structures innervated by the involved nerve root.Low Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain in the lumbar or sacral regions, which may be associated with musculo-ligamentous SPRAINS AND STRAINS; INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; and other conditions.Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain located in the posterior regions of the THORAX; LUMBOSACRAL REGION; or the adjacent regions.Ilium: The largest of three bones that make up each half of the pelvic girdle.Spina Bifida Occulta: A common congenital midline defect of fusion of the vertebral arch without protrusion of the spinal cord or meninges. The lesion is also covered by skin. L5 and S1 are the most common vertebrae involved. The condition may be associated with an overlying area of hyperpigmented skin, a dermal sinus, or an abnormal patch of hair. The majority of individuals with this malformation are asymptomatic although there is an increased incidence of tethered cord syndrome and lumbar SPONDYLOSIS. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p34)Scoliosis: An appreciable lateral deviation in the normally straight vertical line of the spine. (Dorland, 27th ed)Synovial Cyst: Non-neoplastic tumor-like lesions at joints, developed from the SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE of a joint through the JOINT CAPSULE into the periarticular tissues. They are filled with SYNOVIAL FLUID with a smooth and translucent appearance. A synovial cyst can develop from any joint, but most commonly at the back of the knee, where it is known as POPLITEAL CYST.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Kyphosis: Deformities of the SPINE characterized by an exaggerated convexity of the vertebral column. The forward bending of the thoracic region usually is more than 40 degrees. This deformity sometimes is called round back or hunchback.Pelvis: The space or compartment surrounded by the pelvic girdle (bony pelvis). It is subdivided into the greater pelvis and LESSER PELVIS. The pelvic girdle is formed by the PELVIC BONES and SACRUM.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Osteoarthritis, Spine: A degenerative joint disease involving the SPINE. It is characterized by progressive deterioration of the spinal articular cartilage (CARTILAGE, ARTICULAR), usually with hardening of the subchondral bone and outgrowth of bone spurs (OSTEOPHYTE).Pseudarthrosis: A pathologic entity characterized by deossification of a weight-bearing long bone, followed by bending and pathologic fracture, with inability to form normal BONY CALLUS leading to existence of the "false joint" that gives the condition its name. (Dorland, 27th ed)Causality: The relating of causes to the effects they produce. Causes are termed necessary when they must always precede an effect and sufficient when they initiate or produce an effect. Any of several factors may be associated with the potential disease causation or outcome, including predisposing factors, enabling factors, precipitating factors, reinforcing factors, and risk factors.Sciatica: A condition characterized by pain radiating from the back into the buttock and posterior/lateral aspects of the leg. Sciatica may be a manifestation of SCIATIC NEUROPATHY; RADICULOPATHY (involving the SPINAL NERVE ROOTS; L4, L5, S1, or S2, often associated with INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT); or lesions of the CAUDA EQUINA.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Braces: Orthopedic appliances used to support, align, or hold parts of the body in correct position. (Dorland, 28th ed)Collagen Type IX: A fibril-associated collagen usually found crosslinked to the surface of COLLAGEN TYPE II fibrils. It is a heterotrimer containing alpha1(IX), alpha2(IX) and alpha3(IX) subunits.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Bone Malalignment: Displacement of bones out of line in relation to joints. It may be congenital or traumatic in origin.Spinal Fractures: Broken bones in the vertebral column.Cervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Neurofibromatoses: A group of disorders characterized by an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with high rates of spontaneous mutation and multiple neurofibromas or neurilemmomas. NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1 (generalized neurofibromatosis) accounts for approximately 95% of cases, although multiple additional subtypes (e.g., NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2, neurofibromatosis 3, etc.) have been described. (From Neurochirurgie 1998 Nov;44(4):267-72)Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic: Dysfunction of the URINARY BLADDER due to disease of the central or peripheral nervous system pathways involved in the control of URINATION. This is often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, but may also be caused by BRAIN DISEASES or PERIPHERAL NERVE DISEASES.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.

Spondylolytic fractures. (1/301)

A method is described whereby fractures of the neural arch similar to those in spondylolysis are produced experimentally. The forces, bending moments and displacements required to initiate the fractures are given; The mechanical aspects in the aetiology of spondylolysis are explained by a simplified two-dimensional force analysis.  (+info)

Spondyloptosis and multiple-level spondylolysis. (2/301)

An unusual case of a combination of multiple bilateral spondylolyses (L2, 3 and 4), spondylolisthesis at L3/4, spondyloptosis at L4/5 and sacralization of L5 in a teenage female is described. The patient had severely increasing lower back pain radiating to the left lower limb. Radiography identified the abnormalities and myelography revealed complete obstruction and compression of the thecal sac at the L4/5 level. The case was treated surgically by posterior decompression, corpectomy and fusion in a three-stage operation. The follow-up was extended to 2 years with no complications. No similar case has previously been reported.  (+info)

The assessment of appropriate indications for laminectomy. (3/301)

We have developed criteria to determine the appropriate indications for lumbar laminectomy, using the standard procedure developed at the RAND corporation and the University of California at Los Angeles (RAND-UCLA). A panel of five surgeons and four physicians individually assessed 1000 hypothetical cases of sciatica, back pain only, symptoms of spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, miscellaneous indications or the need for repeat laminectomy. For the first round each member of the panel used a scale ranging from 1 (extremely inappropriate) to 9 (extremely appropriate). After discussion and condensation of the results into three categories laminectomy was considered appropriate in 11% of the 1000 theoretical scenarios, equivocal in 26% and inappropriate in 63%. There was some variation between the six categories of malalignment, but full agreement in 64% of the hypothetical cases. We applied these criteria retrospectively to the records of 196 patients who had had surgical treatment for herniated discs in one Swiss University hospital. We found that 48% of the operations were for appropriate indications, 29% for equivocal reasons and that 23% were inappropriate. The RAND-UCLA method is a feasible, useful and coherent approach to the study of the indications for laminectomy and related procedures, providing a number of important insights. Our conclusions now require validation by carefully designed prospective clinical trials, such as those which are used for new medical techniques.  (+info)

MR imaging for early complications of transpedicular screw fixation. (4/301)

This series comprises ten patients treated with transpedicular screw fixation, who suffered early postoperative problems such as radicular pain or motor weakness. Besides plain radiographs, all patients were also evaluated with MR imaging. Three patients were reoperated for either repositioning or removal of the screws. MR images, especially T1-weighted ones, were very helpful for visualizing the problem and verifying the positions of the screws. In cases of wide areas of signal void around the screws, the neighboring axial MR images at either side, which have fewer artifacts, gave more information about the screws and the vertebrae.  (+info)

Degenerative spondylolisthesis. Developmental or acquired? (5/301)

Degenerative spondylolisthesis is four times more common in women than in men. Although this gender difference has long been recognised there has been no explanation for it. We have examined the radiographs and CT scans of 118 patients over the age of 55 years and of a control group under the age of 46 years. Our findings confirmed the presence of more sagittally-orientated facet joints in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis but did not show that the gender difference can be explained by the morphology of the facet joint. Furthermore, we conclude that the increased angle of the facet joint is the result of arthritic remodelling and not the primary cause of degenerative spondylolisthesis. It is more likely to be due to loss of soft-tissue resilience with subsequent failure of the facet joints which are acting as the last restraints to subluxation.  (+info)

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome associated with multiple spinal meningeal cysts--case report. (6/301)

A 40-year-old female with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was admitted because of a large pelvic mass. Radiological examination revealed multiple spinal meningeal cysts. The first operation through a laminectomy revealed that the cysts originated from dilated dural sleeves containing nerve roots. Packing of dilated sleeves was inadequate. Finally the cysts were oversewed through a laparotomy. The cysts were reduced, but the postoperative course was complicated by poor wound healing and diffuse muscle atrophy. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome associated with spinal cysts may be best treated by endoscopic surgery.  (+info)

Traumatic L5-S1 spondylolisthesis: report of three cases and a review of the literature. (7/301)

The literature reports that traumatic spondylolisthesis of L5 is an uncommon lesion. The authors report their experience of three cases of this particular fracture-dislocation of the lumbosacral spine. They stress the importance of certain radiographic signs in the diagnosis: namely, the presence of unilateral multiple fracture of the transverse lumbar apophysis. As far as the treatment is concerned, they state the need for an open reduction and an internal segmental fixation by posterior approach. A preoperative MRI study appears mandatory in order to evaluate the integrity of the L5-S1 disc. In the event of a traumatic disruption of the disc, they state the importance of posterior interbody fusion by means of a strut graft carved from the ilium or, in case of iliac wing fracture (which is not uncommon in these patients), by means of interbody cages.  (+info)

Traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis: treatment rationale based on the stability of the different fracture types. (8/301)

Thirty-nine consecutive patients, 22 male and 17 female with an average age of 37.6 years, with traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis were reviewed. The cause of injury in 75% of the patients was a road traffic accident. The fractures were classified according to Effendi et al., the type II fractures were further divided into three subgroups: flexion, extension and listhesis injuries. There were 10 type I (25.7%) and 29 type II fractures (74.4%); of these, 12 (30.8%) were classified as flexion-type, 2 (5.1%) as extension-type and 15 (38.5%) as listhesis-type. We did not identify any case of type III injury. Overall, 43.5% of the patients had sustained a significant head or chest trauma, with the highest incidence for type II listhesis injuries. Significant neurological deficits occurred in four patients (10.3%); in all four,the fracture was classified as a type II listhesis. All ten type I injuries were successfully treated with a cervical orthosis. Ten of the 12 type II flexion injuries demonstrated significant angulation. Two were treated with internal stabilisation, in seven with a halo device and one with a minerva plaster of Paris (PoP). Healing was uneventful in all ten patients. For the remaining two stable type II flexion injuries, application of a hard collar was adequate, as was the case for the two stable type II extension injuries. Six of the 15 type II spondylolisthesis injuries underwent primary internal stabilisation, and healing was uneventful in all cases. In four (44.4%) of the nine injuries that were primarily treated with a halo device/minerva PoP, secondary operative stabilisation had to be performed. The classification of Effendi et al. provides a complete description of the different fractures. However, further distinction of the type II injuries regarding their stability is mandatory. Type II spondylolisthesis injuries are unstable, with a high number of associated injuries, a great potential for neurological compromise and significant complications associated with non-operative treatment. The majority of type II extension and type II flexion injuries can be successfully treated with nonrigid external immobilisation.  (+info)

  • Previous studies have suggested that if we rely solely on conventional supine MRIs to diagnosis spondylolisthesis, we may not have the full picture and could miss opportunities to quickly identify their source of pain," says Charles Reitman, professor and vice chairman of Orthopaedic Surgery at Baylor College of Medicine and NASS Annual Meeting Program Chair. (spinalnewsinternational.com)
  • What are the Treatments for Spondylolisthesis? (texasback.com)
  • There are a wide range of treatments for spondylolisthesis, depending on the severity of the condition and how much pain it is causing. (discoverchiropracticwa.com)
  • There are numerous surgical procedures that exist for the treatment of adult spondylolisthesis. (springer.com)
  • This chapter reviews the most common complications associated with the surgical treatment of adult spondylolisthesis and their management. (springer.com)
  • Morbidity and mortality in the surgical treatment of 10,242 patients with spondylolisthesis. (springer.com)
  • Abbed K., Neway W.E. (2015) Complications Associated with Surgical Treatment of Adult Spondylolisthesis. (springer.com)
  • Spondylolytic spondylolisthesis alone is a disabling, painful condition and many times thought to be a surgical issue needing fusion. (mostchiropractic.com)
  • Spondylolisthesis can cause pain in the lower back. (healthdirect.gov.au)
  • Spondylolisthesis is a problem with the back that can cause pain. (healthdirect.gov.au)
  • Spondylolisthesis may result in back or neck pain, but extremities can be involved if the spinal cord or nerve roots are compressed or irritated. (texasback.com)
  • Back Pain in Surgically Treated Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis: What can we tell our patients? (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Spondylolisthesis, when a vertebra slides forward over the adjacent bone causing back and leg pain, is often treated with anti-inflammatory drugs. (laspine.com)
  • Nagging lower back pain or aching in the buttocks can be a sign of a very common spinal condition called spondylolisthesis. (phoenixspinesurgeon.com)
  • Treatment for spondylolisthesis might include activity modification, medication, physical therapy, injections to reduce pain and inflammation, and/or a back brace. (phoenixspinesurgeon.com)
  • Spondylolisthesis is a common cause of back pain, affecting some 3 million people. (physicianpartnersofamerica.com)
  • BioSkin Back Braces are designed to treat Spondylolisthesis through targeted, vectored compression that alleviates pain and reduces pressure placed on the lumbar nerves. (bioskin.com)
  • Mild to moderate (subluxation ≤ 50%) spondylolisthesis , especially in young people, may be accompanied by mild pain or remain asymptomatic. (issaboston2012.org)
  • Cox Technic has specific protocols for degenerative spondylolisthesis pain relief. (docshay.com)
  • A highly uncomfortable condition, spondylolisthesis has grown to become increasingly common, with several cases being reported each year in the U.S. With frequent stimulants of pain, enduring a chronic condition such as this one can not only be distressing but also a major annoyance. (massapequapainmanagementandrehabilitation.com)
  • Chiropractic care can effectively treat your spondylolisthesis, so consider the experts over at Massapequa Pain Management & Rehabilitation for the treatment of back and other pain-related conditions. (massapequapainmanagementandrehabilitation.com)
  • When these noninvasive methods fail to resolve pain and dysfunction from spondylolisthesis, Dr. Bederman will recommend surgery. (orangecountyscoliosis.com)
  • September 2020 Healthy News from Most Chiropractic Clinic: Cox Technic Eases Back Pain due to Disc Extrusion with Spondylolytic Spondylolisthesis and Eat an Apple! (mostchiropractic.com)
  • Listen to this PODCAST with chiropractic back pain specialist, Dr. Casey Bearden on The Back Doctors Podcast with Dr. Michael Johnson as he shared how spondylolisthesis with disc bulges positively responded to his treatment utilizing the Cox® Technic System of Spinal Pain Management . (mostchiropractic.com)
  • Chiropractic care is a holistic, non-invasive form of treatment that has been shown to be effective in the treatment of spondylolisthesis. (discoverchiropracticwa.com)
  • Often people with spondylolisthesis don't notice anything. (healthdirect.gov.au)
  • Most people with spondylolisthesis get better with exercises that stretch and strengthen lower back muscles. (healthdirect.gov.au)
Spondylolisthesis News, Research
Spondylolisthesis News, Research (news-medical.net)
Yoga Poses for Spondylolisthesis • Yoga Basics
Yoga Poses for Spondylolisthesis • Yoga Basics (yogabasics.com)
InterFuse® S and T for the Treatment of Scoliosis, Spondylolisthesis and Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) - Full Text View -...
InterFuse® S and T for the Treatment of Scoliosis, Spondylolisthesis and Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) - Full Text View -... (clinicaltrials.gov)
Spondylolisthesis (for Parents) - The Barbara Bush Children's Hospital
Spondylolisthesis (for Parents) - The Barbara Bush Children's Hospital (kidshealth.org)
Neural foraminal stenosis: Definition, causes, and treatment
Neural foraminal stenosis: Definition, causes, and treatment (medicalnewstoday.com)
Marfan syndrome - Symptoms - NHS
Marfan syndrome - Symptoms - NHS (nhs.uk)
Deformity of spine: Causes, Symptoms and Diagnosis
Deformity of spine: Causes, Symptoms and Diagnosis (healthline.com)
Spondylolisthesis Imaging: Practice Essentials, Radiography, Computed Tomography
Spondylolisthesis Imaging: Practice Essentials, Radiography, Computed Tomography (emedicine.medscape.com)
Spondylolysis & Spondylolisthesis, Spine Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery - Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
Spondylolysis & Spondylolisthesis, Spine Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery - Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (massgeneral.org)
Novel Imaging Technique for Joint Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis
Novel Imaging Technique for Joint Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis (medindia.net)
Children With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Can Achieve Inactive Disease Faster Using Aggressive Combination Therapy
Children With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Can Achieve Inactive Disease Faster Using Aggressive Combination Therapy (medindia.net)
Naproxen - Side effect(s)
Naproxen - Side effect(s) (medindia.net)
Key Protein Behind Arthritis Identified
Key Protein Behind Arthritis Identified (medindia.net)
Peptide Shows Extraordinary Promise for Treating Spinal Cord Injury
Peptide Shows Extraordinary Promise for Treating Spinal Cord Injury (medindia.net)
Low Back Pain Treatment With Mild Electric Current
Low Back Pain Treatment With Mild Electric Current (medindia.net)
Mild Electric Current Reduces Side Effects of Spinal Cord Injury
Mild Electric Current Reduces Side Effects of Spinal Cord Injury (medindia.net)
Scorpion Venom Reduces Severity of Rheumatoid Arthritis
Scorpion Venom Reduces Severity of Rheumatoid Arthritis (medindia.net)
Ask the Community about Nutrition
Ask the Community about Nutrition (spineuniverse.com)
Brodalumab can Lead to Significant Clinical Response in Psoriatic Arthritis Patients
Brodalumab can Lead to Significant Clinical Response in Psoriatic Arthritis Patients (medindia.net)
Recent Infections May be Associated With a Decreased Risk of Developing Rheumatoid Arthritis
Recent Infections May be Associated With a Decreased Risk of Developing Rheumatoid Arthritis (medindia.net)
Genome s Role in Rheumatoid Arthritis Identified
Genome s Role in Rheumatoid Arthritis Identified (medindia.net)
Heart Disease and Arthritis Risk Increased By Genetic Changes in Blood
Heart Disease and Arthritis Risk Increased By Genetic Changes in Blood (medindia.net)
New Method of Evaluating Joint Damage in Rheumatoid Arthritis Highlighted
New Method of Evaluating Joint Damage in Rheumatoid Arthritis Highlighted (medindia.net)
Motivational Texts, Counseling Boost Health of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients
Motivational Texts, Counseling Boost Health of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients (medindia.net)
Impact of Rheumatoid Arthritis on Joint Replacement Surgery
Impact of Rheumatoid Arthritis on Joint Replacement Surgery (medindia.net)
Spondylolisthesis - Symptoms, Causes, Treatment and Rehabilitation
Spondylolisthesis - Symptoms, Causes, Treatment and Rehabilitation (sportsinjuryclinic.net)
Lives of Spinal Cord Injury Victims at Risk in Care Homes: Loughborough Varsity Research
Lives of Spinal Cord Injury Victims at Risk in Care Homes: Loughborough Varsity Research (medindia.net)
Varied Symptoms of Psoriatic Arthritis Makes Diagnosis Difficult
Varied Symptoms of Psoriatic Arthritis Makes Diagnosis Difficult (medindia.net)
Bacteria in Milk may cause Rheumatoid Arthritis
Bacteria in Milk may cause Rheumatoid Arthritis (medindia.net)
Biological Mechanisms That Trigger Rheumatoid Arthritis Identified
Biological Mechanisms That Trigger Rheumatoid Arthritis Identified (medindia.net)
Quitting Statin Therapy Raises Death Risk in Arthritis Patients
Quitting Statin Therapy Raises Death Risk in Arthritis Patients (medindia.net)
Arthritis drugs are causing skin problems
Arthritis drugs are causing skin problems (medindia.net)
Advances In Rheumatoid Arthritis Have Not Increased Lifespan Of Sufferers
Advances In Rheumatoid Arthritis Have Not Increased Lifespan Of Sufferers (medindia.net)
Ask the Community about Chronic Pain - Page 11
Ask the Community about Chronic Pain - Page 11 (spineuniverse.com)
Wheeless' Textbook of Orthopaedics
Wheeless' Textbook of Orthopaedics (wheelessonline.com)
How are traumatic spondylolisthesis C2 fractures treated?
How are traumatic spondylolisthesis C2 fractures treated? (medscape.com)