Splenic Vein: Vein formed by the union (at the hilus of the spleen) of several small veins from the stomach, pancreas, spleen and mesentery.Esophageal and Gastric Varices: Dilated blood vessels in the ESOPHAGUS or GASTRIC FUNDUS that shunt blood from the portal circulation (PORTAL SYSTEM) to the systemic venous circulation. Often they are observed in individuals with portal hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PORTAL).Enbucrilate: A tissue adhesive that is applied as a monomer to moist tissue and polymerizes to form a bond. It is slowly biodegradable and used in all kinds of surgery, including dental.Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: Bleeding in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Hypertension, Portal: Abnormal increase of resistance to blood flow within the hepatic PORTAL SYSTEM, frequently seen in LIVER CIRRHOSIS and conditions with obstruction of the PORTAL VEIN.Balloon Occlusion: Use of a balloon CATHETER to block the flow of blood through an artery or vein.Hemostasis, Endoscopic: Control of bleeding performed through the channel of the endoscope. Techniques include use of lasers, heater probes, bipolar electrocoagulation, and local injection. Endoscopic hemostasis is commonly used to treat bleeding esophageal and gastrointestinal varices and ulcers.Portal Vein: A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.Tissue Adhesives: Substances used to cause adherence of tissue to tissue or tissue to non-tissue surfaces, as for prostheses.Cyanoacrylates: A group of compounds having the general formula CH2=C(CN)-COOR; it polymerizes on contact with moisture; used as tissue adhesive; higher homologs have hemostatic and antibacterial properties.Sclerotherapy: Treatment of varicose veins, hemorrhoids, gastric and esophageal varices, and peptic ulcer hemorrhage by injection or infusion of chemical agents which cause localized thrombosis and eventual fibrosis and obliteration of the vessels.Melena: The black, tarry, foul-smelling FECES that contain degraded blood.Portography: Examination of the portal circulation by the use of X-ray films after injection of radiopaque material.Mesenteric Veins: Veins which return blood from the intestines; the inferior mesenteric vein empties into the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein joins the splenic vein to form the portal vein.Hematemesis: Vomiting of blood that is either fresh bright red, or older "coffee-ground" in character. It generally indicates bleeding of the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Splenic Artery: The largest branch of the celiac trunk with distribution to the spleen, pancreas, stomach and greater omentum.Portasystemic Shunt, Surgical: Surgical venous shunt between the portal and systemic circulation to effect decompression of the portal circulation. It is performed primarily in the treatment of bleeding esophageal varices resulting from portal hypertension. Types of shunt include portacaval, splenorenal, mesocaval, splenocaval, left gastric-caval (coronary-caval), portarenal, umbilicorenal, and umbilicocaval.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Sclerosing Solutions: Chemical agents injected into blood vessels and lymphatic sinuses to shrink or cause localized THROMBOSIS; FIBROSIS, and obliteration of the vessels. This treatment is applied in a number of conditions such as VARICOSE VEINS; HEMORRHOIDS; GASTRIC VARICES; ESOPHAGEAL VARICES; PEPTIC ULCER HEMORRHAGE.Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.Splenic DiseasesHypersplenism: Condition characterized by splenomegaly, some reduction in the number of circulating blood cells in the presence of a normal or hyperactive bone marrow, and the potential for reversal by splenectomy.Varicose Veins: Enlarged and tortuous VEINS.Portal System: A system of vessels in which blood, after passing through one capillary bed, is conveyed through a second set of capillaries before it returns to the systemic circulation. It pertains especially to the hepatic portal system.Splenomegaly: Enlargement of the spleen.Renal Veins: Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Liver Cirrhosis: Liver disease in which the normal microcirculation, the gross vascular anatomy, and the hepatic architecture have been variably destroyed and altered with fibrous septa surrounding regenerated or regenerating parenchymal nodules.Iopamidol: A non-ionic, water-soluble contrast agent which is used in myelography, arthrography, nephroangiography, arteriography, and other radiological procedures.Splenectomy: Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.Femoral Vein: The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.Splenic RuptureSplenorenal Shunt, Surgical: Anastomosis of splenic vein to renal vein to relieve portal hypertension.Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Venous Thrombosis: The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.Ethiodized Oil: Ethyl ester of iodinated fatty acid of poppyseed oil. It contains 37% organically bound iodine and has been used as a diagnostic aid (radiopaque medium) and as an antineoplastic agent when part of the iodine is 131-I. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Portasystemic Shunt, Transjugular Intrahepatic: A type of surgical portasystemic shunt to reduce portal hypertension with associated complications of esophageal varices and ascites. It is performed percutaneously through the jugular vein and involves the creation of an intrahepatic shunt between the hepatic vein and portal vein. The channel is maintained by a metallic stent. The procedure can be performed in patients who have failed sclerotherapy and is an additional option to the surgical techniques of portocaval, mesocaval, and splenorenal shunts. It takes one to three hours to perform. (JAMA 1995;273(23):1824-30)Splenic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SPLEEN.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Gastroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the stomach.Pancreatectomy: Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)Pulmonary Veins: The veins that return the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Injections: Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Pancreatitis: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS. Pancreatitis is classified as acute unless there are computed tomographic or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic findings of CHRONIC PANCREATITIS (International Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis, Atlanta, 1992). The two most common forms of acute pancreatitis are ALCOHOLIC PANCREATITIS and gallstone pancreatitis.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Pancreatic Pseudocyst: Cyst-like space not lined by EPITHELIUM and contained within the PANCREAS. Pancreatic pseudocysts account for most of the cystic collections in the pancreas and are often associated with chronic PANCREATITIS.Pancreatitis, Chronic: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS that is characterized by recurring or persistent ABDOMINAL PAIN with or without STEATORRHEA or DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by the irregular destruction of the pancreatic parenchyma which may be focal, segmental, or diffuse.Pancreatitis, Acute Necrotizing: A severe form of acute INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS characterized by one or more areas of NECROSIS in the pancreas with varying degree of involvement of the surrounding tissues or organ systems. Massive pancreatic necrosis may lead to DIABETES MELLITUS, and malabsorption.Pancreatic Cyst: A true cyst of the PANCREAS, distinguished from the much more common PANCREATIC PSEUDOCYST by possessing a lining of mucous EPITHELIUM. Pancreatic cysts are categorized as congenital, retention, neoplastic, parasitic, enterogenous, or dermoid. Congenital cysts occur more frequently as solitary cysts but may be multiple. Retention cysts are gross enlargements of PANCREATIC DUCTS secondary to ductal obstruction. (From Bockus Gastroenterology, 4th ed, p4145)Pancreatitis, Alcoholic: Acute or chronic INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS due to excessive ALCOHOL DRINKING. Alcoholic pancreatitis usually presents as an acute episode but it is a chronic progressive disease in alcoholics.Cysts: Any fluid-filled closed cavity or sac that is lined by an EPITHELIUM. Cysts can be of normal, abnormal, non-neoplastic, or neoplastic tissues.
... which are dilated veins that occur in the setting of liver cirrhosis or thrombosis of the splenic vein. The gastric varices are ... Other sites of varices, including esophageal varices, duodenal varices and colonic varices. Gastric varices have also been ... In gastroenterology, butyl cyanoacrylate is used to treat bleeding gastric varices, ... randomized trial of butyl cyanoacrylate injection versus band ligation in the management of bleeding gastric varices". ...
... may also be found in patients with thrombosis of the splenic vein, into which the short gastric veins which ... Initial treatment of bleeding from gastric varices focuses on resuscitation, much as with esophageal varices. This includes ... As the short gastric veins of the fundus of the stomach drain into the splenic vein, thrombosis of the splenic vein will result ... both of these may worsen the bleeding from gastric varices. In very rare cases, gastric varices are caused by splenic vein ...
... leading to esophageal varices. Splenic vein thrombosis is a rare condition that causes esophageal varices without a raised ... gastric varices), duodenum (duodenal varices), and rectum (rectal varices). Treatment of these types of varices may differ. In ... Esophageal varices (sometimes spelled oesophageal varices) are extremely dilated sub-mucosal veins in the lower third of the ... These veins have no part in the development of esophageal varices. The lower one third of the esophagus is drained into the ...
... ligation of the gastric veins and pancreatic veins (that drain into the portal vein) and complete detachment of the splenic ... esophageal varices). It was developed by W. Dean Warren. DSRS is typically done with splenopancreatic and gastric disconnection ... is a surgical procedure in which the distal splenic vein (a part of the portal venous system) is attached to the left renal ... 2005). "Appraisal of DSRS with SPGD for esophagogastric varices: a retrospective comparative study according to the underlying ...
... esophageal varices, spider nevi, caput medusae, and palmar erythema. Pylephlebitis is infection of the portal vein, usually ... the portal vein is formed by the union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein. For this reason, the portal vein ... Other tributaries of the portal vein include the cystic and gastric veins. Immediately before reaching the liver, the portal ... The portal vein is usually formed by the confluence of the superior mesenteric and splenic veins and also receives blood from ...
Anorectal varices Swollen veins of the oesophagus (Oesophageal varices), which may bleed and cause vomiting of blood ( ... porto-systemic collateral veins (patent paraumbilical vein, spleno-renal collaterals and dilated left and short gastric veins ... This connects the splenic vein to the left renal vein thus reducing portal system pressure while minimizing any encephalopathy ... from the portal vein to the inferior vena cava) a graft, either synthetic or the preferred vein harvested from somewhere else ...
ethanolamine oleate - This permanent agent is used for sclerosing esophageal varices. It contains 2% benzyl alcohol, so it is ... Portal vein embolization prior to liver resection. Embolization is a minimally invasive surgical technique. The purpose is to ... bleeding Nosebleed Varicocele Primary post-partum bleeding Surgical hemorrhage traumatic hemorrhage such as splenic rupture or ... and anatomical integrity User dependent success rate Risk of emboli reaching healthy tissue potentially causing gastric, ...
ethanolamine oleate - This permanent agent is used for sclerosing esophageal varices. It contains 2% benzyl alcohol, so it is ... Traumatic bleeding such as splenic rupture or pelvic fracture. Growths[edit]. The treatment is used to slow or stop blood ... sotradecol - This agent is used for superficial lower extremity varicose veins. It has been around for a very long time and is ... Risk of emboli reaching healthy tissue potentially causing gastric, stomach or duodenal ulcers.[7] There are methods, ...
Varicose veins. *Gastric varices. *Portacaval anastomosis *Caput medusae. *Esophageal varices. *Hemorrhoid. *Varicocele ... Portal vein thrombosis. *Splenic vein thrombosis (thrombosis of the splenic vein). *Renal vein thrombosis (thrombosis of the ... that form in the deep veins of the legs or in the pelvic veins. Nevertheless, they can progress to the deep veins through the ... Since the veins return blood to the heart, if a piece of a blood clot formed in a vein breaks off it can be transported to the ...
Varices[edit]. Main article: Esophageal varices. Esophageal varices are swollen twisted branches of the azygous vein in the ... All these veins drain into the superior vena cava, with the exception of the left gastric vein, which is a branch of the portal ... Along with peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter relaxes.[8] Reducing gastric reflux[edit]. The stomach produces gastric ... which is a branch of the portal vein. Because of the extensive venous plexus that exists between this vein and other veins, if ...
Bleeding from gastric varices, though less common, has a higher mortality and morbidity compared to bleeding esophageal varices ... left gastric vein (LGV) and/or posterior gastric vein (PGV)/short gastric vein (SGV)) and efferent drainage veins (gastrorenal ... Proximal total splenic artery embolization for refractory hepatic encephalopathy.. Harufumi Maki, Junichi Kaneko, Junichi Arita ... While esophageal varices are more common, gastric varices are often more challenging to treat. Balloon-Occluded Retrograde ...
... splenic artery, superior mesenteric artery, portal vein, superior mesenteric vein and left gastric vein... ... It can produce digestive hemorrhage caused by rupture of esophageal and stomach varices or peptic gastroduodenal mucosal ... AIM: To study the effects of splenectomy and ligature of the left gastric vein on portohepatic hemodynamics. METHOD: Twenty- ... Angiografic and pressoric changes determined by splenectomy with left gastric vein ligature in mansoni schistosomiasis. ...
... which are dilated veins that occur in the setting of liver cirrhosis or thrombosis of the splenic vein. The gastric varices are ... Other sites of varices, including esophageal varices, duodenal varices and colonic varices. Gastric varices have also been ... In gastroenterology, butyl cyanoacrylate is used to treat bleeding gastric varices, ... randomized trial of butyl cyanoacrylate injection versus band ligation in the management of bleeding gastric varices". ...
Gastric varices may also be found in patients with thrombosis of the splenic vein, into which the short gastric veins which ... Initial treatment of bleeding from gastric varices focuses on resuscitation, much as with esophageal varices. This includes ... As the short gastric veins of the fundus of the stomach drain into the splenic vein, thrombosis of the splenic vein will result ... both of these may worsen the bleeding from gastric varices. In very rare cases, gastric varices are caused by splenic vein ...
... developed due to splenic vein occlusion. In one patient with occlusion of the main splenic artery, splenic embolization ... Two patients were treated for bleeding gastric varices, ... Esophageal and Gastric Varices / diagnosis, etiology*, therapy ... Two patients were treated for bleeding gastric varices, developed due to splenic vein occlusion. In one patient with occlusion ... bleeding from the gastric varices stopped after partial arterial splenic embolization performed via the accessory left gastric ...
Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is being recognized with increasing frequency with the use of ultrasonography. Reduced portal ... splenic artery catheterization is chosen. Injection of the left gastric artery consistently demonstrates esophageal varices. ... Plain radiographs may reveal hepatosplenomegaly, an enlarged azygos vein, and paraspinal varices. Esophageal varices that ... the splenic vein to outline the splenic and portal veins or superior artery to outline the superior mesenteric and portal veins ...
Esophageal and Gastric Varices Medicine & Life Sciences * Portal Vein Medicine & Life Sciences ... title = "Treatment of gastric varices with partial splenic embolization in a patient with portal vein thrombosis and a ... T1 - Treatment of gastric varices with partial splenic embolization in a patient with portal vein thrombosis and a ... Treatment of gastric varices with partial splenic embolization in a patient with portal vein thrombosis and a ...
ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Radiologic Management of Gastric Varices. Expert Panel on Interventional Radiology:, May 2020, In ...
In those patients with gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to esophageal or gastric varices, the diagnostic test of choice to ... superior to the splenic vein. These nodes lie adjacent to the pancreas and the splenic vein and compress the splenic vein when ... With a probable diagnosis of splenic vein thrombosis, Doppler ulrtrasonography was performed and there was splenic vein ... options and because isolated gastric varices have a greater potential for exsanguinating hemorrhage than esophageal varices 7 ...
Esophageal and gastric varices. Dilation of the remnant of the umbilical vein. Dilation of abdominal veins Hemorrhoidial venous ... Terminates in the hepatic sinusoids Formed by the confluence of the superior and inferior mesenteric veins and splenic vein ... Incredible high mortality Source of bleeding: esophageal varices 60%~80% gastric varices 7% congestive gastropathy 5%~20% ( ... Peptic ulcer, acute erosive gastritis, gastric cancer. and esophageal varices are four major sources of upper GI bleeding. In ...
Splenic vein thrombosis causes varices to form in the gastric fundus, usually without coexistent esophageal varices. These ... Splenic vein thrombosis produces a segmental portal hypertension that causes gastric varices in the absence of esophageal ... Splenectomy is curative and should be performed in any patient who has bled from gastric varices due to splenic vein thrombosis ... Many patients with chronic pancreatitis will develop splenic vein thrombosis due to inflammation of the splenic vein as it ...
cirrhosis, esophageal varices, gastric varices, splenomegaly, ascites 1. Description of the problem. What every clinician needs ... Portal vein is formed by the confluence of splenic vein and the superior mesenteric vein that carry blood from the splanchnic ... Varices may develop in the esophagus and less commonly in the gastric fundus and rectum. Less frequently, ectopic varices may ... Varices develop at a rate of 8% per year among cirrhotics without varices. Bleeding from varices occur at a rate of 5% to 15% ...
Gastric varices may also be found in patients with thrombosis of the splenic vein, into which the short gastric veins which ... Endoscopy of Gastric Varices Although gastric varices tend to bleed less frequently than esophageal varices, the morbidity and ... The inflow vein is the left gastric vein, posterior vein, or short gastric vein, while the outflow vein is the gastro-renal ... Varices of the Gastric Fundus.. More commonly, bleeding gastric varices are associated with large esophageal varices and are ...
... esophageal r gastric. 2° to portal HTN;. present in 40-60% cirrhotics; if isolated gastric need to r o splenic vein thrombosis ... or for gastric varices (main side effect: encephalopathy) surgery (portocaval splenorenal shunts. Sugiura procedure) ... Neoplastic disease: esophageal or gastric carcinoma. GIST Etiologies of lower Gl bleed (LGIB) ... 30-60 min prior to promote gastric emptying of blood and t Dx Rx yield) ...
ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Radiologic Management of Gastric Varices. Expert Panel on Interventional Radiology:, May 2020, In ... Analysis of weight changes after left gastric artery embolization in a cancer-naive population. Kim, D. J., Raman, H. S., ... Weight Loss after Left Gastric Artery Embolization: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Hafezi-Nejad, N., Bailey, C. R., ...
Splenic vein thrombosis is a rare condition that causes esophageal varices without a raised portal esophageal varices. Ileus ... schistosomiasis also leads to esophageal varices. Splenic vein thrombosis varices a rare condition that causes esophageal ... Splenic vein thrombosis is a rare condition that causes esophageal varices without a raised portal pressure. Esophageal ... Splenic vein thrombosis is a rare condition that causes esophageal varices without a raised portal pressure. N Engl J Med. ...
Splenic vein thrombosis occurs most common and may result in complications such as gastric or esophageal varices and ... In addition to vascular complications ranging from splenic artery pseudoaneurysm to splenic vein occlusion, pancreatic ... Splenic involvement by pancreatitis is not uncommon given the close relationship of pancreatic tail and the splenic hilum. ... Portal vein thrombus in necrotizing pancreatitis. Small intraluminal filling defect is noted in the portal vein (arrowhead) in ...
Splenic vein thrombosis (when there is gastric varices but no esophageal varices) ... Pancreatic pseudocyst (2 - 4 weeks later) - can be infected (abscess), cause gastric outlet obstruction, hemorrhage into cyst, ...
Out of eight patients, four patients had esophageal and gastric varices. Liver biopsy was done in four patients and revealed ... Eight patients had portal hypertension as evidenced by dilated caliber of portal and splenic veins. Two patients had periportal ... splenic and peripancreatic collaterals and one patient had cavernous transformation of portal vein. ...
... early detection of esophageal and gastric varices (EGV); stratification of patients in terms of their risk of... ... A case of portal and splenic vein thrombosis after Histoacryl injection therapy in gastric varices. Endoscopy. 1996;28:461. ... Large paraesophageal varices on endosonography predict recurrence of esophageal varices and rebleeding. Gastroenterology. 1997 ... Splenic infarction after histoacryl injection for bleeding gastric varices. Gastrointest Endosc. 1998;48:426-7.PubMedCrossRef ...
Splenic vein thrombosis is a rare condition that causes esophageal varices without a raised portal pressure. Esophageal ... of Gastric Varices. Gastritis Atrophic Ménétriers disease Gastroenteritis Esophageal gastric ulcer Cushing ulcer Dieulafoys ... Esophageal varices sometimes spelled oesophageal varices are esophageal dilated sub-mucosal veins in the lower third of the ... Esophageal varices sometimes spelled oesophageal varices are extremely dilated sub-mucosal veins in the lower third of the ...
Splenic Vein/surgery , Gastroscopy , Hemostasis , Splenectomy , Esophageal and Gastric Varices/complications , Splenic Vein/ ... Esophageal and Gastric Varices/complications , Esophageal and Gastric Varices/diagnostic imaging , Esophageal and Gastric ... Upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastric varices secondary to splenic vein thrombosis treated by splenectomy ... Characterized by an endoscopic appearance of fundal or isolated gastric varices, without esophageal involvement, a variable ...
When splenic vein thrombosis has occurred, angiography demonstrates the site of occlusion and the presence of gastric or ... esophageal varices.. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Pancreatic ductal anatomy is best delineated with ...
Rarely, splenic vein thrombosis results in left-sided portal hypertension, leading to splenomegaly and gastric varices. ... commonly resulting in oesophageal and gastric varices that can bleed profusely. The other major complication of portal ... Splenectomy with division of the short gastric vessels is an effective treatment for this situation. ... your body using a network of tubing called arteries and capillaries which return the blood back to your heart via your veins. ...
... report a 71-year-old man with pancreatic carcinoma presenting as gastric varices caused by an obstruction of the splenic vein ... Esophageal and Gastric Varices Medicine & Life Sciences * Portal Hypertension Medicine & Life Sciences ... After the resection, the gastric varices completely disappeared without any interventional therapy. The gastric varices ... After the resection, the gastric varices completely disappeared without any interventional therapy. The gastric varices ...
  • Although non-operative treatment is preferred upon splenic injury, early surgical or radiological intervention may be necessary in specific cases, for example in case of haemodynamic instability. (readbyqxmd.com)
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