Infections with bacteria of the order SPIROCHAETALES.
An order of slender, flexuous, helically coiled bacteria, with one or more complete turns in the helix.

PCR amplification from fixed tissue indicates frequent involvement of Brachyspira aalborgi in human intestinal spirochetosis. (1/141)

PCR procedures amplifying portions of the 16S rRNA and NADH oxidase genes of Brachyspira aalborgi and Serpulina pilosicoli were applied to DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded human colonic or rectal tissues from 30 Norwegian, Australian, and U.S. patients, 16 of whom had histologic evidence of intestinal spirochetosis (IS). B. aalborgi-specific sequences were identified by PCR in 10 of the IS patients (62.5%) but none of the others, while S. pilosicoli sequences were not detected in tissues from any patient. Direct sequencing of products from three of the positive samples provided further confirmation of the presence of B. aalborgi. B. aalborgi may be a more common cause of intestinal spirochetosis than has been previously thought.  (+info)

Analysis of Serpulina hyodysenteriae strain variation and its molecular epidemiology using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. (2/141)

Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was applied as a molecular typing tool for the spirochaete Serpulina hyodysenteriae, the agent of swine dysentery. Analysis of a collection of 40 mainly Australian isolates, previously characterized by other methods, divided these into 23 PFGE types. This confirmed that there are many strains of the spirochaete in Australia. PFGE was more discriminatory for strain typing than both multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and serotyping. It had similar discriminatory power to restriction endonuclease analysis, but the results of PFGE were easier to interpret. When applied to 29 isolates collected from 4 farms over periods of up to 8 years, 2 PFGE patterns were found on 3 farms, and a single pattern on the other. In each case a new strain had apparently emerged as a variant of an original parent strain. PFGE was found to be a powerful technique for investigating the molecular epidemiology of swine dysentery outbreaks.  (+info)

A comparison of the morphologic effects of Serpulina hyodysenteriae or its beta-hemolysin on the murine cecal mucosa. (3/141)

Studies were carried out to compare the early morphologic changes in the cecal mucosa of mice either infected with Serpulina hyodysenteriae or exposed to the beta-hemolysin of S. hyodysenteriae. Sixty-five 12-24-week-old C3H/HeOuJ mice were infected with S. hyodysenteriae by gastric intubation. Two mice were necropsied every hour for 30 hours following infection. S. hyodysenteriae was isolated from the cecal contents of each mouse at all time points. Macroscopic lesions were first apparent at 14 hours postinfection (PI), and light microscopic lesions were first apparent at 10 hours PI, earlier than has been previously reported. Ultrastructural changes, first evident at 6 hours PI, included disarray and loss of microvilli and terminal web, with dilatation of intercellular spaces. Luminal bacteria were translocated through epithelial cells to the lamina propria, where capillaries exhibited changes indicative of increased permeability. In another experiment, solutions containing between 2,500 and 25,000 hemolytic units of purified S. hyodysenteriae hemolysin were placed within the lumen of surgically closed murine ceca (n = 10); ceca were collected for examination 3 hours following treatment. Ultrastructural changes consisted of loss of microvilli and terminal web and marked vacuolation and exfoliation of epithelial cells. Significant numbers of necrotic and apoptotic epithelial cells were present, and epithelial cells internalized moderate numbers of bacteria. The hemolysin of S. hyodysenteriae induces some of the same early ultrastructural changes in the cecal epithelium of mice as occur following infection with S. hyodysenteriae. Based on the observed bacterial translocation, luminal bacteria also appear to play a unique role in lesion development in this model.  (+info)

Isolation, oxygen sensitivity, and virulence of NADH oxidase mutants of the anaerobic spirochete Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae, etiologic agent of swine dysentery. (4/141)

Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae, the etiologic agent of swine dysentery, uses the enzyme NADH oxidase to consume oxygen. To investigate possible roles for NADH oxidase in the growth and virulence of this anaerobic spirochete, mutant strains deficient in oxidase activity were isolated and characterized. The cloned NADH oxidase gene (nox; GenBank accession no. U19610) on plasmid pER218 was inactivated by replacing 321 bp of coding sequence with either a gene for chloramphenicol resistance (cat) or a gene for kanamycin resistance (kan). The resulting plasmids, respectively, pCmDeltaNOX and pKmDeltaNOX, were used to transform wild-type B. hyodysenteriae B204 cells and generate the antibiotic-resistant strains Nox-Cm and Nox-Km. PCR and Southern hybridization analyses indicated that the chromosomal wild-type nox genes in these strains had been replaced, through allelic exchange, by the inactivated nox gene containing cat or kan. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western immunoblot analysis revealed that both nox mutant cell lysates were missing the 48-kDa Nox protein. Soluble NADH oxidase activity levels in cell lysates of Nox-Cm and Nox-Km were reduced 92 to 96% compared to the activity level in parent strain B204. In an aerotolerance test, cells of both nox mutants were at least 100-fold more sensitive to oxygen exposure than were cells of the wild-type parent strain B204. In swine experimental infections, both nox mutants were less virulent than strain B204 in that fewer animals were colonized by the mutant cells and infected animals displayed mild, transient signs of disease, with no deaths. These results provide evidence that NADH oxidase serves to protect B. hyodysenteriae cells against oxygen toxicity and that the enzyme, in that role, contributes to the pathogenic ability of the spirochete.  (+info)

Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent in situ hybridization of experimental Brachyspira (Serpulina) pilosicoli infection in growing pigs. (5/141)

Two groups of six 8-week-old pigs were challenged with 1x10(9) cfu Brachyspira (Serpulina) pilosicoli or Serpulina intermedia daily for 3 consecutive days to study the pathology of porcine colonic spirochetosis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with oligonucleotide probes targeting ribosomal RNA specific for B. pilosicoli and the genus Brachyspira/Serpulina. Six pigs served as noninoculated controls. The animals were euthanatized successively between postinoculation days 14 and 24. B. pilosicoli was reisolated in feces from all of the inoculated pigs; however, only two pigs developed transient watery diarrhea. S. intermedia was reisolated from four of the inoculated pigs, but clinical signs were not observed. Gross examination of the B. pilosicoli-infected pigs revealed dilated large intestines with a hyperemic mucosa, whereas the large intestines of the S. intermedia-inoculated pigs and the control pigs appeared normal. SEM examination of B. pilosicoli-infected pigs revealed degenerated epithelial cells and spirochetal colonization of the colonic mucosa in four pigs. By FISH, B. pilosicoli cells were found colonizing and invading the surface epithelium and the crypts in all the pigs. Spirochetal crypt colonization markedly exceeded the occurrence of spirochetes on the mucosal surface. SEM examination of S. intermedia-inoculated pigs revealed no abnormalities, and Serpulina cells were detected only sporadically in the otherwise normal-appearing mucosa of four pigs by FISH. The results provide further evidence that B. pilosicoli is associated with colitis in pigs, although the gross lesions are mild. The spirochete is capable of colonizing the large intestine, inducing mucosal damage, invasion of the crypt and surface epithelium, and focal infiltration of the lamina propria. In addition, the study shows the applicability of FISH for specific identification of B. pilosicoli in formalin-fixed tissue.  (+info)

Papillomatous pastern dermatitis with spirochetes and Pelodera strongyloides in a Tennessee Walking Horse. (6/141)

Papillomatous digital dermatitis is a common disease in cattle. The pastern dermatitis observed in a horse shared many of the gross characteristics of papillomatous digital dermatitis in cattle. Lesions included a mixture of proliferative and erosive changes, with a verrucose appearance in some areas. Microscopic similarities included pseudoepitheliomatous and papillomatous epidermal hyperplasia with hyperkeratosis, spongiosis of the epidermis, and intraepidermal spirochetes. The horse was also concurrently infected with Pelodera strongyloides. Papillomatous digital dermatitis in cattle is associated with poor husbandry practices. The environment of the affected horse was heavily contaminated with urine, manure, and other organic debris. Verrucous pododermatitis of horses may be the same as or similar to bovine papillomatous digital dermatitis, and these conditions have similar etiologies.  (+info)

Cloning and DNA sequence analysis of an immunogenic glucose-galactose MglB lipoprotein homologue from Brachyspira pilosicoli, the agent of colonic spirochetosis. (7/141)

Colonic spirochetosis (CS) is a newly emerging infectious disease of humans and animals caused by the pathogenic spirochete Brachyspira (formerly Serpulina) pilosicoli. The purpose of this study was to characterize an antigen that was recognized by antibodies present in sera of challenge-exposed pigs. The gene encoding the antigen was identified by screening a plasmid library of human B. pilosicoli strain SP16 (ATCC 49776) genomic DNA with hyperimmune and convalescent swine sera. The predicted amino acid sequence encoded by the cloned B. pilosicoli gene had a high degree of similarity and identity to glucose-galactose MglB lipoprotein. Located 106 bp downstream of the putative mglB gene was a 3'-truncated open reading frame with 73.8% similarity and 66.3% identity to mglA of Escherichia coli, suggesting a gene arrangement within an operon which is similar to those of other bacteria. A single copy of the gene was present in B. pilosicoli, and homologous sequences were widely conserved among porcine intestinal spirochetes Serpulina intermedia, Brachyspira innocens, Brachyspira murdochii, and the avian Brachyspira alvinipulli, but not in porcine Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, human Brachyspira aalborgi, and porcine Treponema succinifaciens. The deduced molecular weight of the mature MglB lipoprotein was consistent with expression by the cloned gene of a polypeptide with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000, as determined by Western blot analysis and [(3)H]palmitate labeling. Because mucin is the principal constituent of the colonic mucus gel and consists of glycoproteins that can serve as the substrate for growth and chemotaxis of B. pilosicoli in vitro, a role for MglB in mucosal localization of the spirochete appears consistent with the pathogenesis of CS. However, the presence of homologous sequences in closely related but nonpathogenic commensal spirochetes suggests that other virulence determinants may be required for pathogenesis.  (+info)

Changes in bacterial community structure in the colon of pigs fed different experimental diets and after infection with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. (8/141)

Bacterial communities in the large intestines of pigs were compared using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis targeting the 16S ribosomal DNA. The pigs were fed different experimental diets based on either modified standard feed or cooked rice supplemented with dietary fibers. After feeding of the animals with the experimental diets for 2 weeks, differences in the bacterial community structure in the spiral colon were detected in the form of different profiles of terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs). Some of the T-RFs were universally distributed, i.e., they were found in all samples, while others varied in distribution and were related to specific diets. The reproducibility of the T-RFLP profiles between individual animals within the diet groups was high. In the control group, the profiles remained unchanged throughout the experiment and were similar between two independent but identical experiments. When the animals were experimentally infected with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, causing swine dysentery, many of the T-RFs fluctuated, suggesting a destabilization of the microbial community.  (+info)

Spirochaetales is an order of bacteria that includes several species known to cause infections in humans. The term "Spirochaetales infections" generally refers to diseases caused by these spirochete bacteria. The most well-known Spirochaetales infections include:

1. Syphilis - Caused by Treponema pallidum, syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection that can have serious consequences if left untreated. It progresses through several stages, with symptoms ranging from painless sores to rashes, and may eventually affect the heart, brain, and other organs.

2. Lyme disease - Caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted through tick bites, Lyme disease is an inflammatory illness that can cause a variety of symptoms, such as rash, fever, fatigue, and joint pain. In later stages, it may lead to neurological and cardiac complications if not treated promptly.

3. Leptospirosis - Caused by Leptospira spp., leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease that humans usually acquire through exposure to infected animal urine or contaminated water. Symptoms can range from mild flu-like illness to severe complications, such as kidney and liver failure, meningitis, and respiratory distress.

4. Relapsing fever - Caused by Borrelia recurrentis and transmitted through the bite of lice, relapsing fever is characterized by recurring episodes of high fever, chills, headache, and muscle aches. The disease can be severe and may lead to complications such as myocarditis, hepatitis, and neurological issues.

5. Pinta - Caused by Treponema carateum, pinta is a tropical skin infection that primarily affects the outer layers of the skin, causing lesions and discoloration. While not typically life-threatening, it can lead to significant disfigurement if left untreated.

Treatment for Spirochaetales infections generally involves antibiotics, such as penicillin or doxycycline, depending on the specific infection and its severity. Preventive measures include practicing good hygiene, using insect repellent to prevent insect bites, avoiding contact with potentially infected animals, and seeking prompt medical attention if symptoms develop after potential exposure.

Spirochaetales is an order of bacteria that are characterized by their unique spiral or corkscrew shape. This shape allows them to move in a flexing, twisting motion, which can be quite rapid. They are gram-negative, meaning they do not retain crystal violet stain in the Gram staining method, and they have a unique structure with endoflagella (also known as axial filaments) located inside their outer membrane.

The Spirochaetales order includes several families and genera of bacteria, some of which are free-living, while others are parasitic or symbiotic. The parasitic spirochetes can cause various diseases in humans and animals. For example, Treponema pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a serious sexually transmitted infection. Another species, Borrelia burgdorferi, causes Lyme disease, which is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected black-legged ticks.

It's important to note that spirochetes are a diverse group with varying characteristics and pathogenic potential. While some species can cause significant harm, others are not associated with diseases and play essential roles in various ecosystems.

Abundance and Infection Prevalence With Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae)". Environmental Entomology. ...
If the host animal has a blood-borne infection, the tick will ingest the pathogens with the blood. Small amounts of saliva from ... Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) (JDI strain) by Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae), Dermacentor variabilis, and Amblyomma ...
The taxonomic lineage of Treponema socranskii is Bacteria, Spirochaetes, Spirochaetia, Spirochaetales, Spirochaetaceae, ... Infection and Immunity. 46 (1): 1-6. doi:10.1128/IAI.46.1.1-6.1984. PMC 261412. PMID 6480100.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: ...
Categories: Spirochaetales Infections Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
Abundance and Infection Prevalence With Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae)". Environmental Entomology. ...
To improve knowledge of Leptospira infection in the region, we conducted a study in the Union of the Comoros to serologically ... Spirochaetales, Leptospiraceae). Most mammals can be infected, but rats are considered the main reservoir, maintaining ... Our data indicate that Leptospira infections do occur in humans in the Union of the Comoros; this finding is consistent with ... Our serologic findings showed evidence of Leptospira infection in humans on the 3 islands of the Union of the Comoros (MAT ...
DNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; RNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; BACTERIAL INFECTIONS; MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; SPIROCHAETALES INFECTIONS; fungal ... DNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; RNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; BACTERIAL INFECTIONS; MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; SPIROCHAETALES INFECTIONS; fungal ... CNS Infection CNS Infections Central Nervous System Infection Infection, CNS Infections, CNS Infections, Central Nervous System ... CNS Infection. CNS Infections. Central Nervous System Infection. Infection, CNS. Infections, CNS. Infections, Central Nervous ...
DNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; RNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; BACTERIAL INFECTIONS; MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; SPIROCHAETALES INFECTIONS; fungal ... "Central Nervous System Infections" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH ... This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Central Nervous System Infections" by people in this website ... Kilbride H, Jackson MA, Selvarangan R. Childhood Outcomes Following Parechovirus Infections in a US Young Infant Cohort. ...
Spirochaetales Infections [C01.252.847]. *Borrelia Infections [C01.252.847.193]. *Lyme Disease [C01.252.847.193.569] ...
Leptospirosis is a worldwide bacterial zoonosis caused by infection with pathogenic Leptospira. spp. (Spirochaetales, ... infection in the region, we conducted a study in the Union of the Comoros to serologically assess the presence or absence of ... infections, nor can these data be used to determine the severity of the disease in the Union of the Comoros. Nonetheless, the ... infection in humans on the 3 islands of the Union of the Comoros (MAT titers 100-1,600, geometric mean titer [GMT] 194). The ...
Spirochaetales Infections [C01.252.847]. *Borrelia Infections [C01.252.847.193]. *Lyme Disease [C01.252.847.193.569] ... Nervous system infections caused by tick-borne spirochetes of the BORRELIA BURGDORFERI GROUP. The disease may affect elements ... In the peripheral nervous system, B. burgdorferi infection is associated with mononeuritis multiplex and polyradiculoneuritis ...
Spirochaetales Infections ... Immunology and Infection * Stem Cells and Developmental Biology ...
Rickettsia rickettsii infection is associated with tick mortality raising the question as to the actual prevalence of infection ... Piroplasmida: Babesiidae) and Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) in Wisconsin. J. Med. Entomol. 2021, 58, ... and Borrelia burgdorferi based upon seasonal incidence of infections [10]. Co-infection of Ixodes scapularis with multiple ... Human risk of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease agent, in eastern United States. Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. ...
DNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; RNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; BACTERIAL INFECTIONS; MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; SPIROCHAETALES INFECTIONS; fungal ... Infezioni Da Spirochaetales 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the order SPIROCHAETALES. ... Listeriosis 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the genus LISTERIA. * Infezioni Da Staphylococcus 1 quesito Infections with ... Infezioni Da Bifidobacteriales 0 domande Infections with BACTERIA of the order Bifidobacteriales. This includes infections in ...
Bacterial Infections [C01.150.252] * Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections [C01.150.252.400] * Spirochaetales Infections [C01.150. ... Infections [C01] * Bacterial Infections and Mycoses [C01.150] * Bacterial Infections [C01.150.252] * Gram-Negative Bacterial ... Treponemal Infections [C01.150.252.400.840] * Syphilis [C01.150.252.400.840.500] * Chancre [C01.150.252.400.840.500.500] ... Treponemal Infections [C01.150.252.400.794.840] * Syphilis [C01.150.252.400.794.840.500] * Chancre [C01.150.252.400.794.840. ...
Spirochaetales Infections. *Vaginosis, Bacterial. Below are MeSH descriptors whose meaning is more specific than "Gram-Negative ... "Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH ... Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method. ... A case of infection-associated antiproteinase-3-negative cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody pauci-immune focal ...
Bacterial Infections [C01.150.252] * Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections [C01.150.252.400] * Spirochaetales Infections [C01.150. ... Infections [C01] * Bacterial Infections and Mycoses [C01.150] * Bacterial Infections [C01.150.252] * Gram-Negative Bacterial ... Infections [C01] * Bacterial Infections and Mycoses [C01.150] * Bacterial Infections [C01.150.252] * Skin Diseases, Bacterial [ ... Infections [C01] * Skin Diseases, Infectious [C01.800] * Skin Diseases, Bacterial [C01.800.720] * Actinomycosis, Cervicofacial ...
Co-infection occurs in up to 8% of cases. Leptospirosis may also co-infect with dengue and other regionally prevalent pathogens ... Leptospires belong to the order Spirochaetales and the family Leptospiraceae. Traditionally, the organisms are classified based ... Infection may occur via direct contact with infected animals or their tissues or urine or through contact with contaminated ... In uncomplicated infections that do not require hospitalization, oral doxycycline has been shown to decrease duration of fever ...
Spirochaetales: Borreliaceae) (31.6%), Borreliella Adeolu and Gupta 2015 (Spirochaetales: Borreliaceae) (0.6%), and Ehrlichia ... Borrelia miyamotoi Infection in Immunocompromised Man, California, USA, 2021. Rubio, Luis Alberto; Kjemtrup, Anne M; Marx, ... We conclude that the infection was acquired in California.. Assuntos. Infecções por Borrelia , Borrelia , Ixodes , Animais , ... Infection with Borrelia miyamotoi in California, USA, has been suggested by serologic studies. We diagnosed B. miyamotoi ...
Are presymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infections in nursing home residents unrecognized symptomatic infections? Sequence and metadata ... Detection of Genetic Variability in Borrelia miyamotoi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) Between and Within the Eastern and ... Earliest case of Candida auris infection imported in 2007 in Europe from India prior to the 2009 description in Japan. Desnos- ... Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases 2021 5 ...
Co-infection occurs in up to 8% of cases. Leptospirosis may also co-infect with dengue and other regionally prevalent pathogens ... Leptospires belong to the order Spirochaetales and the family Leptospiraceae. Traditionally, the organisms are classified based ... Infection may occur via direct contact with infected animals or their tissues or urine or through contact with contaminated ... In uncomplicated infections that do not require hospitalization, oral doxycycline has been shown to decrease duration of fever ...
Spirochaetales Infections [C01.150.252.400.794] Spirochaetales Infections * Treponemal Infections [C01.150.252.400.840] ... note BACTEROIDES INFECTIONS is also available. Allowable Qualifiers:. BL blood. CF cerebrospinal fluid. CI chemically induced. ... Infections with bacteria of the family BACTEROIDACEAE.. Annotation:. ... Infections à Bacteroidaceae Entry term(s):. Bacteroidaceae Infection. Infection, Bacteroidaceae. Infections, Bacteroidaceae. ...
A chaotic mix of microbial infection, oral hygiene and weakened immune system likely contribute to the development of oral ... Several OTUs in the Orders Erysipelotrichales, Clostridiales, Bacteroidales, and Spirochaetales were identified as indicators ... These lesions are a plausible entry point for unidentified microorganisms that trigger gangrenous facial infections. To catalog ... How to deal with Recurrent infection serge of corona virus. Hace 5 meses ...
Infection may occur via direct contact with infected animals or their tissues or urine or through contact with contaminated ... Leptospires belong to the order Spirochaetales and the family Leptospiraceae. Traditionally, the organisms are classified based ... Infection by leptospira ballum: a laboratory-associated case. South Med J. 1974 Feb. 67(2):155 passim. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ... In uncomplicated infections that do not require hospitalization, oral doxycycline has been shown to decrease duration of fever ...
Infection may occur via direct contact with infected animals or their tissues or urine or through contact with contaminated ... Leptospires belong to the order Spirochaetales and the family Leptospiraceae. Traditionally, the organisms are classified based ... Infection by leptospira ballum: a laboratory-associated case. South Med J. 1974 Feb. 67(2):155 passim. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ... In uncomplicated infections that do not require hospitalization, oral doxycycline has been shown to decrease duration of fever ...
Our patient was a case of possible pet-associated human Babesia infection. Babesiosis is a zoonotic protozoan disease of ... Prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae ... Severe infection generally occurs in those with an underlying immunosuppressed condition, particularly patients with previous ... A diagnosis of upper respiratory tract infection was made and he was given a course of piperacillin-tazobactam during ...
Passive tick surveillance: Exploring spatiotemporalassociations of Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae), ... Babesiamicroti (Piroplasmida: Babesiidae), and Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Rickettsiales:Anaplasmataceae) infection in Ixodes ...
Lyme disease, known commonly outside the U.S. as Lyme borreliosis, is caused by infection with tick-borne spirochetes of the ... Presence of Borrelia burgdorferi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) in southern Kettle Moraine State Forest, Wisconsin, and ... and March, when incident infection in Germany is exceedingly rare;19 and/or 3) the patient was asymptomatic or reported only ... We read with interest the brief report regarding the prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection in basic military trainee ...
Abundance and Infection Prevalence WithBorrelia burgdorferi(Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae). Available from http://dx.doi.org/ ... Further, in areas where barberry was controlled, infection prevalence was reduced (Ward et al. 2009). These results indicate ... Diseases spread by ticks include bacterial infections, viruses, parasites, and a syndrome that causes allergic reactions ( ... invasion control significantly reduces tick populations and infection prevalence (Lubelczyk et al. 2004). ...
TNF-α levels in cell culture media were induced as high as 2 μg/mL after infection with the lon mutant, a greater than sixfold ... Molecular Detection and Characterization of Borrelia garinii (Spirochaetales: Borreliaceae) in Ixodes nipponensis (Ixodida: ... From the mouse macrophage J774.A1 cells, total RNA was isolated at 0 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after infection ... Based on the information from the clinicians, the main symptoms of LB infection were rash and fever (66.0%), neurological ...
Concurrent infection of the human brain with multiple species of Lyme disease spirochetes International Journal of Molecular ... Spirochetes isolated from arthropods constitute a novel genus Entomospira genus novum within the order Spirochaetales ...
  • Infezioni Batteriche Del Sistema Nervoso Centrale 4 domande Bacterial infections of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges, including infections involving the perimeningeal spaces. (lookformedical.com)
  • Polmonite Batterica 1 quesito Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by bacterial infections. (lookformedical.com)
  • Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (rush.edu)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections" by people in this website by year, and whether "Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (rush.edu)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections" by people in Profiles. (rush.edu)
  • Sasidharan A, Banerjee D, Harrison CJ, Selvarangan R. Emergence of Parechovirus A3 as the Leading Cause of Central Nervous System Infection, Surpassing Any Single Enterovirus Type, in Children in Kansas City, Missouri, USA, from 2007 to 2016. (childrensmercy.org)
  • Clinical Markers and Outcomes of Neonates With Herpes Simplex Virus Deoxyribonucleic Acid Persistence in Cerebrospinal Fluid in Disseminated and Central Nervous System Infection. (childrensmercy.org)
  • Leptospirosis is a worldwide bacterial zoonosis caused by infection with pathogenic Leptospira spp. (cdc.gov)
  • Pathogenic infections of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges. (bvsalud.org)
  • Infezioni Batteriche 18 domande Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Batteriche Dell'Occhio 5 domande Infections in the inner or external eye caused by microorganisms belonging to several families of bacteria. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Batteri Gram-Negativi 1 quesito Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Batteri Gram-Positivi 2 domande Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Actinomycetales 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the order ACTINOMYCETALES. (lookformedical.com)
  • Actinomicosi 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the genus ACTINOMYCES. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Nocardia 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the genus NOCARDIA. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Staphylococcus 1 quesito Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Streptococcus 1 quesito Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infections with bacteria of the family BACTEROIDACEAE. (bvsalud.org)
  • These lesions are a plausible entry point for unidentified microorganisms that trigger gangrenous facial infections. (blogspot.com)
  • A systemic non-venereal infection of the tropics caused by TREPONEMA PALLIDUM subspecies pertenue. (nih.gov)
  • Doxycycline was added for treatment due to persistent fever and because it is known that Lyme's disease can be a concurrent infection. (hkmj.org)
  • Central Nervous System Infections" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (childrensmercy.org)
  • 107,000 (2015, global) [6] Syphilis ( / ˈsɪfəlɪs /) is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum. (daserotikportal.de)
  • To improve knowledge of Leptospira infection in the region, we conducted a study in the Union of the Comoros to serologically assess the presence or absence of leptospirosis in humans. (cdc.gov)
  • Leptospirosis ranges in severity from no symptoms to a mild illness suggesting a viral infection to a multisystemic syndrome with unique features. (medscape.com)
  • Lyme disease, known commonly outside the U.S. as Lyme borreliosis, is caused by infection with tick-borne spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. (health.mil)
  • Fournier gangrene is usually secondary to perirectal or periurethral infections associated with local trauma, operative procedures, or urinary tract disease. (lookformedical.com)
  • 2016 ) found that the pathways of focal adhesion and disease infection significantly increased in the diseased shrimp, while the antibacterial pathways decreased accompanied with the variety of intestinal microbial composition. (springeropen.com)
  • This includes infections in the genera BIFIDOBACTERIUM and GARDNERELLA, in the family Bifidobacteriaceae. (lookformedical.com)
  • Genomic analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from human lung resections reveal a high frequency of polyclonal infections. (cdc.gov)
  • TNF-α levels in cell culture media were induced as high as 2 μg/mL after infection with the lon mutant, a greater than sixfold change. (ophrp.org)
  • The infection is diagnosed with blood tests that detect proteins, called antibodies, that are produced by the body in response to the infection. (daserotikportal.de)
  • The objective of this study was to isolate a Brucella lon mutant and to analyze the cytokine response of B. lon mutant during macrophage infection. (ophrp.org)
  • At WC 400, Spirochete infections was changed to Spirochaetales infections . (nih.gov)
  • Chemotherapy of Trypanosome and Spirochete Infections: Chemical Series. (nih.gov)
  • Spirochaetales, Leptospiraceae). (cdc.gov)
  • Leptospira interrogans serovar ballum is a bacterium, order Spirochaetales, family Leptospiraceae. (nih.gov)
  • The spirochetes belong to the genus Leptospira, the family Leptospiraceae, and the order Spirochaetales. (wikifarming.org)
  • Detection of Genetic Variability in Borrelia miyamotoi (Spirochaetales: Spirochaetaceae) Between and Within the Eastern and Western United States. (cdc.gov)
  • Lyme disease, known commonly outside the U.S. as Lyme borreliosis, is caused by infection with tick-borne spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. (health.mil)
  • To improve knowledge of Leptospira infection in the region, we conducted a study in the Union of the Comoros to serologically assess the presence or absence of leptospirosis in humans. (cdc.gov)
  • Our serologic findings showed evidence of Leptospira infection in humans on the 3 islands of the Union of the Comoros (MAT titers 100-1,600, geometric mean titer [GMT] 194). (cdc.gov)
  • Home 1 / Guidelines 2 / Infections 3 / Bacterial 4 / GUIDELINE for Leptospira spp. (abcdcatsvets.org)
  • The Leptospira species infection in cats guideline was first published in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery 15 (7), 2013, 576-581. (abcdcatsvets.org)
  • Leptospira infection in cats is common, and cats usually acquire the infection from hunting rodents. (abcdcatsvets.org)
  • The disease leptospirosis in cats is considered rare, but the number of reports on field cats with clinical signs caused by Leptospira infection increases, and the disease has recently been seen more commonly. (abcdcatsvets.org)
  • In addition, the fact that cats can shed Leptospira with their urine, and thus serve as a potential source of infection, has gained increasing attention. (abcdcatsvets.org)
  • The genus Leptospira belongs to the order Spirochaetales . (abcdcatsvets.org)
  • Leptospira interrogans serovar ballum, an agent that causes renal infection, has been reported on a few occasions in laboratory mice. (nih.gov)
  • Leptospira interrogans serovar ballum has limited significance as a naturally occuring infection. (nih.gov)
  • Although its prevalence in contemporary stocks of mice is probably low, Leptospira interrogans serovar ballum has been reported as an indigenous infection in a few colonies of laboratory mice in the United States and Europe. (nih.gov)
  • Infections with bacteria of the order SPIROCHAETALES . (bvsalud.org)
  • A family of spiral bacteria of the order SPIROCHAETALES. (lookformedical.com)
  • The infection may also remain subclinical for several years. (curehunter.com)
  • It may also appear as an asymptomatic and subclinical infection. (wikifarming.org)
  • acute respiratory infections in felines, rabbit hemorrhagic disease, and some cases of gastroenteritis in humans. (doctorinternet.com)
  • The initial phase of infection usually causes a mild or asymptomatic meningeal reaction. (curehunter.com)
  • Subclinically infected wild and domestic animals serve as reservoir hosts and are a potential source of infection for incidental hosts, including humans. (abcdcatsvets.org)
  • These infective discharges, by contaminating the drinking water and food, can spread the infection to humans and animals. (wikifarming.org)
  • Only three agents cause primary infections of the genitourinary tract in mice and rats. (nih.gov)
  • Natural infections of M. pulmonis also occur in the genital tract of female rats. (nih.gov)
  • Intravenous penicillin G is also effective for mild to severe cases of infection. (wikifarming.org)
  • Infections of the central nervous system caused by TREPONEMA PALLIDUM which present with a variety of clinical syndromes. (curehunter.com)
  • Leptospires can cause infections in many animal species, and have been identified in more than 150 mammalian species as well as in bird, fish, amphibian, and reptile species (Everard et al. (abcdcatsvets.org)
  • Two mice were necropsied every hour for 30 hours following infection. (lookformedical.com)
  • In addition, L. interrogans serovar ballum infection has been found in pet mice on one occasion (Friedmann et al. (nih.gov)
  • Co-infection occurs in up to 8% of cases. (medscape.com)
  • Over 90% of human flea-borne rickettsioses cases in California are reported from suburban communities of Los Angeles and Orange counties and are presumed to be associated with either Rickettsia typhi or Rickettsia felis infection. (bioone.org)
  • Evidence of only limited numbers of R. typhi -infected cat fleas in the environment may indicate a very rare infection and explain why so few cases of flea-borne rickettsioses are reported each year in southern California relative to the population. (bioone.org)
  • Classify works on an infection which affects a single organ with the organ. (nih.gov)
  • Cotesting for Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Sexually Transmitted Infections in the Emergency Department. (ucdenver.edu)
  • Genomic analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from human lung resections reveal a high frequency of polyclonal infections. (cdc.gov)