Spinal Cord Compression: Acute and chronic conditions characterized by external mechanical compression of the SPINAL CORD due to extramedullary neoplasm; EPIDURAL ABSCESS; SPINAL FRACTURES; bony deformities of the vertebral bodies; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations vary with the anatomic site of the lesion and may include localized pain, weakness, sensory loss, incontinence, and impotence.Spinal Nerves: The 31 paired peripheral nerves formed by the union of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots from each spinal cord segment. The spinal nerve plexuses and the spinal roots are also included.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Spinal NeoplasmsSpinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Spinal Cord Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms which occur within the substance of the spinal cord (intramedullary neoplasms) or in the space between the dura and spinal cord (intradural extramedullary neoplasms). The majority of intramedullary spinal tumors are primary CNS neoplasms including ASTROCYTOMA; EPENDYMOMA; and LIPOMA. Intramedullary neoplasms are often associated with SYRINGOMYELIA. The most frequent histologic types of intradural-extramedullary tumors are MENINGIOMA and NEUROFIBROMA.Laminectomy: A surgical procedure that entails removing all (laminectomy) or part (laminotomy) of selected vertebral lamina to relieve pressure on the SPINAL CORD and/or SPINAL NERVE ROOTS. Vertebral lamina is the thin flattened posterior wall of vertebral arch that forms the vertebral foramen through which pass the spinal cord and nerve roots.Spinal Nerve Roots: Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Cervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.Epidural Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the space between the vertebral PERIOSTEUM and DURA MATER surrounding the SPINAL CORD. Tumors in this location are most often metastatic in origin and may cause neurologic deficits by mass effect on the spinal cord or nerve roots or by interfering with blood supply to the spinal cord.Spinal Cord Diseases: Pathologic conditions which feature SPINAL CORD damage or dysfunction, including disorders involving the meninges and perimeningeal spaces surrounding the spinal cord. Traumatic injuries, vascular diseases, infections, and inflammatory/autoimmune processes may affect the spinal cord.Decompression, Surgical: A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Spinal DiseasesParaplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness.Myelography: X-ray visualization of the spinal cord following injection of contrast medium into the spinal arachnoid space.Hematopoiesis, Extramedullary: The formation and development of blood cells outside the BONE MARROW, as in the SPLEEN; LIVER; or LYMPH NODES.Spinal Canal: The cavity within the SPINAL COLUMN through which the SPINAL CORD passes.Epidural Space: Space between the dura mater and the walls of the vertebral canal.Scheuermann Disease: A type of juvenile osteochondrosis affecting the fibrocartilaginous disc (INTERVERTEBRAL DISC) in the thoracic or thoracolumbar region of the SPINE. It is characterized by a forward concave SPINAL CURVATURE or KYPHOSIS.Hematoma, Epidural, Spinal: A rare epidural hematoma in the spinal epidural space, usually due to a vascular malformation (CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM VASCULAR MALFORMATIONS) or TRAUMA. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is a neurologic emergency due to a rapidly evolving compressive MYELOPATHY.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Injections, Spinal: Introduction of therapeutic agents into the spinal region using a needle and syringe.Neuralgia: Intense or aching pain that occurs along the course or distribution of a peripheral or cranial nerve.Paraparesis: Mild to moderate loss of bilateral lower extremity motor function, which may be a manifestation of SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; MUSCULAR DISEASES; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; parasagittal brain lesions; and other conditions.Hyperostosis: Increase in the mass of bone per unit volume.Rheumatic Nodule: A small round or oval, mostly subcutaneous nodule made up chiefly of a mass of Aschoff bodies and seen in cases of rheumatic fever. It is differentiated from the RHEUMATOID NODULE which appears in rheumatoid arthritis, most frequently over bony prominences. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Nerve Compression Syndromes: Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.Osteochondroma: A cartilage-capped benign tumor that often appears as a stalk on the surface of bone. It is probably a developmental malformation rather than a true neoplasm and is usually found in the metaphysis of the distal femur, proximal tibia, or proximal humerus. Osteochondroma is the most common of benign bone tumors.Balloon Embolectomy: The use of balloon CATHETERS to remove emboli by retraction of the balloon that is inflated behind the EMBOLUS.Odontoid Process: The toothlike process on the upper surface of the axis, which articulates with the CERVICAL ATLAS above.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Quadriplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in all four limbs which may result from BRAIN DISEASES; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or rarely MUSCULAR DISEASES. The locked-in syndrome is characterized by quadriplegia in combination with cranial muscle paralysis. Consciousness is spared and the only retained voluntary motor activity may be limited eye movements. This condition is usually caused by a lesion in the upper BRAIN STEM which injures the descending cortico-spinal and cortico-bulbar tracts.Tuberculosis, Spinal: Osteitis or caries of the vertebrae, usually occurring as a complication of tuberculosis of the lungs.Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.Epidural Abscess: Circumscribed collections of suppurative material occurring in the spinal or intracranial EPIDURAL SPACE. The majority of epidural abscesses occur in the spinal canal and are associated with OSTEOMYELITIS of a vertebral body; ANALGESIA, EPIDURAL; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations include local and radicular pain, weakness, sensory loss, URINARY INCONTINENCE, and FECAL INCONTINENCE. Cranial epidural abscesses are usually associated with OSTEOMYELITIS of a cranial bone, SINUSITIS, or OTITIS MEDIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p710 and pp1240-1; J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1998 Aug;65(2):209-12)Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Hyperalgesia: An increased sensation of pain or discomfort produced by mimimally noxious stimuli due to damage to soft tissue containing NOCICEPTORS or injury to a peripheral nerve.Lumbosacral Region: Region of the back including the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE, SACRUM, and nearby structures.Exostoses, Multiple Hereditary: Hereditary disorder transmitted by an autosomal dominant gene and characterized by multiple exostoses (multiple osteochondromas) near the ends of long bones. The genetic abnormality results in a defect in the osteoclastic activity at the metaphyseal ends of the bone during the remodeling process in childhood or early adolescence. The metaphyses develop benign, bony outgrowths often capped by cartilage. A small number undergo neoplastic transformation.Ligation: Application of a ligature to tie a vessel or strangulate a part.Arachnoid Cysts: Intracranial or spinal cavities containing a cerebrospinal-like fluid, the wall of which is composed of arachnoidal cells. They are most often developmental or related to trauma. Intracranial arachnoid cysts usually occur adjacent to arachnoidal cistern and may present with HYDROCEPHALUS; HEADACHE; SEIZURES; and focal neurologic signs. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1994, Ch44, pp105-115)Arachnoid: A delicate membrane enveloping the brain and spinal cord. It lies between the PIA MATER and the DURA MATER. It is separated from the pia mater by the subarachnoid cavity which is filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID.Ganglia, Spinal: Sensory ganglia located on the dorsal spinal roots within the vertebral column. The spinal ganglion cells are pseudounipolar. The single primary branch bifurcates sending a peripheral process to carry sensory information from the periphery and a central branch which relays that information to the spinal cord or brain.Diphosphonates: Organic compounds which contain P-C-P bonds, where P stands for phosphonates or phosphonic acids. These compounds affect calcium metabolism. They inhibit ectopic calcification and slow down bone resorption and bone turnover. Technetium complexes of diphosphonates have been used successfully as bone scanning agents.Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Hemangioma: A vascular anomaly due to proliferation of BLOOD VESSELS that forms a tumor-like mass. The common types involve CAPILLARIES and VEINS. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the SKIN and SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE. (from Stedman, 27th ed, 2000)Data Compression: Information application based on a variety of coding methods to minimize the amount of data to be stored, retrieved, or transmitted. Data compression can be applied to various forms of data, such as images and signals. It is used to reduce costs and increase efficiency in the maintenance of large volumes of data.Spinal Fractures: Broken bones in the vertebral column.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Spinal Cord Ischemia: Reduced blood flow to the spinal cord which is supplied by the anterior spinal artery and the paired posterior spinal arteries. This condition may be associated with ARTERIOSCLEROSIS, trauma, emboli, diseases of the aorta, and other disorders. Prolonged ischemia may lead to INFARCTION of spinal cord tissue.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Fractures, Spontaneous: Fractures occurring as a result of disease of a bone or from some undiscoverable cause, and not due to trauma. (Dorland, 27th ed)Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Nerve Fibers: Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Motor Neurons: Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.Peripheral Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the peripheral nerves external to the brain and spinal cord, which includes diseases of the nerve roots, ganglia, plexi, autonomic nerves, sensory nerves, and motor nerves.Spinal Osteophytosis: Outgrowth of immature bony processes or bone spurs (OSTEOPHYTE) from the VERTEBRAE, reflecting the presence of degenerative disease and calcification. It commonly occurs in cervical and lumbar SPONDYLOSIS.Spinal Stenosis: Narrowing of the spinal canal.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Nerve Regeneration: Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.Posterior Horn Cells: Neurons in the SPINAL CORD DORSAL HORN whose cell bodies and processes are confined entirely to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. They receive collateral or direct terminations of dorsal root fibers. They send their axons either directly to ANTERIOR HORN CELLS or to the WHITE MATTER ascending and descending longitudinal fibers.Anesthesia, Spinal: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected directly into the spinal cord.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Umbilical Cord: The flexible rope-like structure that connects a developing FETUS to the PLACENTA in mammals. The cord contains blood vessels which carry oxygen and nutrients from the mother to the fetus and waste products away from the fetus.Intervertebral Disc: Any of the 23 plates of fibrocartilage found between the bodies of adjacent VERTEBRAE.Stockings, Compression: Tight coverings for the foot and leg that are worn to aid circulation in the legs, and prevent the formation of EDEMA and DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS. PNEUMATIC COMPRESSION STOCKINGS serve a similar purpose especially for bedridden patients, and following surgery.Radiculopathy: Disease involving a spinal nerve root (see SPINAL NERVE ROOTS) which may result from compression related to INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; SPINAL CORD INJURIES; SPINAL DISEASES; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations include radicular pain, weakness, and sensory loss referable to structures innervated by the involved nerve root.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Axons: Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Cancer Care Facilities: Institutions specializing in the care of cancer patients.Pain Threshold: Amount of stimulation required before the sensation of pain is experienced.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Fractures, Compression: Crumbling or smashing of cancellous BONE by forces acting parallel to the long axis of bone. It is applied particularly to vertebral body fractures (SPINAL FRACTURES). (Blauvelt and Nelson, A Manual of Orthopedic Terminology, 1994, p4)Neurons, Afferent: Neurons which conduct NERVE IMPULSES to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Physical Stimulation: Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.Spinal Cord Regeneration: Repair of the damaged neuron function after SPINAL CORD INJURY or SPINAL CORD DISEASES.Spinal Injuries: Injuries involving the vertebral column.Optic Nerve: The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Ligamentum Flavum: The paired bands of yellow elastic tissue that connect adjoining laminae of the vertebrae. With the laminae, it forms the posterior wall of the spinal canal and helps hold the body erect.Analgesics: Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.Cervical Atlas: The first cervical vertebra.Osteochondromatosis: A condition marked by the presence of multiple osteochondromas. (Dorland, 27th ed)Hyperesthesia: Increased sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation due to a diminished threshold or an increased response to stimuli.Axotomy: Transection or severing of an axon. This type of denervation is used often in experimental studies on neuronal physiology and neuronal death or survival, toward an understanding of nervous system disease.Intervertebral Disc Displacement: An INTERVERTEBRAL DISC in which the nucleus pulposus has protruded through surrounding fibrocartilage. This occurs most frequently in the lower lumbar region.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Rhizotomy: Surgical interruption of a spinal or cranial nerve root. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.
The only treatment for this disorder is surgery to reduce the compression of cranial nerves and spinal cord. However, bone ... The condition is characterized abnormal facial features, impairment of cranial nerves, and malformation of the long bones in ... Once spotted treatment is soon suggested to prevent further compression of the foramen magnum and disabling conditions.[ ...
The nerves are primarily from the sacral spinal cord roots S1 and S2. Compression of S1 roots may result in weakness in ... which are innervated by the superficial fibular nerve. Some sources also state that the fibularis tertius everts. Peroneus ... plantarflexion; these nerves run from the lower back to the bottom of the foot.[citation needed] Pronation at the forearm is a ...
... is a surgical procedure to treat nerve root or spinal cord compression by decompressing the spinal cord and nerve roots of the ... The disc material, pressing on the spinal nerve or spinal cord, is then completely removed. The intervertebral foramen, the ... bone channel through which the spinal nerve runs, is then enlarged with a drill giving the nerve more room to exit the spinal ... ACDF is used to treat serious pain from a nerve root that has become inflamed. This can be caused by: 1. a herniated disc when ...
A primary focus of surgery is to remove "pressure" or reduce mechanical compression on a neural element: either the spinal cord ... including residual or recurrent spinal disc herniation, persistent post-operative pressure on a spinal nerve, altered joint ... spinal arachnoiditis). Its diagnosis and treatment by spinal cord stimulation". Spine. 8 (6): 593-603. doi:10.1097/00007632- ... Chronic compression of the nerve root by a persistent agent such as disc, bone (osteophyte) or scarring can also permanently ...
Compression of the long tracts of the cord itself produces funicular pain and compression of a spinal nerve root (fig. 5) ... Spinal cord compression About three percent of cancer patients experience spinal cord compression, usually from expansion of ... Spinal cord damage If radiotherapy includes the spinal cord, changes may occur which do not become apparent until some time ... Nerve infiltration or compression Infiltration or compression of a nerve by a primary tumor causes peripheral neuropathy in one ...
A surgical treatment of nerve root or spinal cord compression by decompressing the spinal cord and nerve roots of the cervical ... MRIs are helpful at showing exactly what is causing spinal nerve compression. A spinal tap is performed in the low back with ... Spinal stenosis is an abnormal narrowing of the spinal canal or neural foramen that results in pressure on the spinal cord or ... the sac of nerves, or the spinal cord. The most common forms are cervical spinal stenosis, which are at the level of the neck, ...
... is a surgical procedure intended to relieve pressure on the spinal cord or on one or more compressed nerve ... In the cervical and thoracic spine it is used to treat myelopathy caused by compression of the spinal cord itself. Spinal ... and is usually labeled according to the specific nerve root compressed (hence compression of the nerve root exiting the spinal ... When a single spinal nerve root is compressed, the resulting clinical outcome is termed radiculopathy, ...
A surgical treatment of nerve root or spinal cord compression by decompressing the spinal cord and nerve roots of the cervical ... Cervical spinal stenosis can be far more dangerous by compressing the spinal cord. Cervical canal stenosis may lead to serious ... Such severe spinal stenosis symptoms are virtually absent in lumbar stenosis, however, as the spinal cord terminates at the top ... Cervical spinal stenosis is one of the most common forms of spinal stenosis, along with lumbar spinal stenosis (which occurs at ...
The cause is often compression, e.g. by a ruptured intervertebral disk or tumor. Since the nerves damaged in CES are actually ... At each level of the spinal column, spinal nerves branch off from either side of the spinal cord and exit between a pair of ... Thus it is not a true spinal cord syndrome since it is nerve roots that are damaged and not the cord itself; however it is ... The part of the spinal cord that was damaged corresponds to the spinal nerves at that level and below. Injuries can be cervical ...
This results from compression of nerves or nerve roots in the spinal cord or in the peripheral nervous system, the part of the ... Neurological complications include spinal nerve and nerve root compression resulting from extreme, progressive skeletal changes ... the membrane that surrounds and protects the brain and spinal cord), and pain caused by compressed or traumatized nerves and ... Other problems include carpal tunnel syndrome or other nerve compression, stiff joints, claw hands and deformed feet, a short ...
This may lead to compression of the nerve root of the spinal cord and result in pain of the lower back and lower extremities. ... Primary spinal tumors begin in either the spinal cord or spinal column, whereas secondary spinal tumors begin elsewhere and ... A spinal tumor is when unusual tissue begins growing and spreading in the spinal columns or spinal cords. The unusual tissue ... spinal cord, or even tumors in the kidneys. The Neuroflibromatosis 2 is a non-cancerous tumor that usually affects the nerves ...
This may lead to compression of the nerve root of the spinal cord and result in pain of the lower back and lower extremities. ... Primary spinal tumors begin in either the spinal cord or spinal column, whereas secondary spinal tumors begin elsewhere and ... A spinal tumor is when unusual tissue begins growing and spreading in the spinal columns or spinal cords. The unusual tissue ... Lumbar spinal stenosisEdit. Lumbar spinal stenosis is classified as a narrowing of the spinal canal in the lumbar region of the ...
Surgery is usually not indicated for "pinched nerves" or herniated discs unless there is spinal cord compression or pain and ... Spondylosis - degenerative arthritis and osteophytes Spinal stenosis - a narrowing of the spinal canal The more common and ... Neck pain may arise due to muscular tightness in both the neck and upper back, or pinching of the nerves emanating from the ... Neck pain may come from any of the structures in the neck including: vascular, nerve, airway, digestive, and musculature / ...
Sensory and motor nerve pathways may be affected by interruption or compression of nerves. This disorder is associated with ... a syrinx limited to the spinal cord. Syrinx "Syringobulbia". 14-182d. at Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy Professional ... This may affect one or more cranial nerves, resulting in various kinds of facial palsies. ...
... or L5 or sacral nerves S1, S2, or S3, or by compression of the sciatic nerve itself. A portion of the spinal cord, showing its ... The spinal cord with dura cut open, showing the exits of the spinal nerves. The spinal cord showing how the anterior and ... Projections of the spinal cord into the nerves (red motor, blue sensory). Projections of the spinal cord into the nerves (red ... Spinal nerves. Spinal cord and vertebral canal. Deep dissection. "Spinal Nerves". National Library of Medicine. Retrieved 12 ...
... are generally considered warning signs of spinal cord compression by the tumor. Other symptoms of spinal cord compression ... The symptoms seen are due to spinal nerve compression and weakening of the vertebral structure. Incontinence and decreased ... Spinal cord compression is commonly found in patients with metastatic malignancy. Back pain is a primary symptom of spinal cord ... often causing spinal cord compression, is key to maintaining quality of life in patients. The diagnosis of primary spinal cord ...
In the cervical spinal cord, a symptomatic posterolateral herniation between two vertebrae will impinge on the nerve which ... A primary focus of surgery is to remove pressure or reduce mechanical compression on a neural element- either the spinal cord, ... It can show the spinal cord, nerve roots, and surrounding areas, as well as enlargement, degeneration, and tumors. It shows ... Compression of the cauda equina can cause permanent nerve damage or paralysis. The nerve damage can result in loss of bowel and ...
"Compression of the Spinal Cord". Merck Manual. Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. Retrieved 25 November 2014.. ... Symptoms can also include numbness or pins and needles when nerve irritation or compression is involved. Weakness in the legs ... or loss of bowel or bladder control in the presence of thoracic spine pain can indicate spinal cord compression and should be ... "Acute Thoracic Spinal Pain" (PDF). National Health and Medical Research Council. The Australian Government. 2003. Retrieved 25 ...
The following year he received a grant from the United States Public Health Service to study spinal cord compression. He ... Tarlov, I.M. (1950). Plasma clot suture of peripheral nerves and nerve roots; rationale and technique. Springfield, Illinois: C ... Tarlov, I.M. (1957). Spinal Cord Compression; Mechanism of Paralysis and Treatment. Springfield, Ill.: C.C. Thomas. Tarlov, I.M ... "Tarlov Cyst and Infertility". Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine. 32 (2): 191-197. 2009. PMC 2678291 . PMID 19569467. ...
... other causes of abrupt paralysis should be excluded such as cord compression, transverse myelitis (inflammation of the spinal ... underactive nerve responses) turns into hyperreflexia (overactive nerve responses) and extensor plantar nerve responses. ... Vascular myelopathy (vascular disease of the spinal cord) refers to an abnormality of the spinal cord in regard to its blood ... Both the posterior and anterior spinal arteries run the entire length of the spinal cord and receive anastomotic (conjoined) ...
Nerve compression hypothesis: suggests that when the vertebrae are out of alignment, the nerve roots and/or spinal cord can ... of a spinal vertebra presses on a nerve interfering with the passage of energy down that nerve causing disease to organs ... "pinched nerves" "nerve impingement" "spinal fixations" or others mechanisms of action explain how subluxations affect the ... considered disease the result of spinal nerve dysfunction caused by misplaced (subluxated) vertebrae. Although rejected by ...
Others though can cause compression of the spinal cord. Wedge-shaped vertebrae, called hemivertebrae can cause an angle to form ... These foramina are the entry and exit conducts for the spinal nerves. The body of the vertebra and the vertebral arch form the ... Severe cases can cause spinal cord compression. Block vertebrae where some vertebrae have become fused can cause problems. ... Vertebrae contain a vertebral foramen for the passage of the spinal canal and its enclosed spinal cord and covering meninges. ...
... central cord syndrome MeSH C21.866.819.678 --- spinal cord compression MeSH C21.866.831.600 --- spinal fractures MeSH C21.866. ... abducens nerve injury MeSH C21.866.260.237.325 --- facial nerve injuries MeSH C21.866.260.237.650 --- optic nerve injuries MeSH ... cranial nerve injuries MeSH C21.866.915.300.400.100 --- abducens nerve injury MeSH C21.866.915.300.400.300 --- facial nerve ... ulnar nerve compression syndromes MeSH C21.866.844.150.957.200 --- cubital tunnel syndrome MeSH C21.866.874.800 --- ...
Finally, radicular pain, loss of bowel or bladder control (due to involvement of spinal cord leading to cord compression) or ... Red arrows: lesion; green arrow: normal contralateral facial nerve canal. The lesions are consistent with a myeloma deposit. CT ... Involvement of the vertebrae may lead to spinal cord compression or kyphosis. Myeloma bone disease is due to the overexpression ... and petrous temporal bones involving the mastoid segment of the facial nerve canal. ...
Rubin, Michael (October 2014). "Compression of the Spinal Cord". Merck Manual. Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. Retrieved 25 November ... Symptoms can also include numbness or pins and needles when nerve irritation or compression is involved. Weakness in the legs ... or loss of bowel or bladder control in the presence of thoracic spine pain can indicate spinal cord compression and should be ... a spontaneous vertebral compression fracture is possible. Other, less common causes of thoracic back pain include a spinal disc ...
... describes any neurologic deficit related to the spinal cord. When due to trauma, it is known as (acute) spinal cord injury. When inflammatory, it is known as myelitis. Disease that is vascular in nature is known as vascular myelopathy. The most common form of myelopathy in human, cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), is caused by arthritic changes (spondylosis) of the cervical spine, which result in narrowing of the spinal canal (spinal stenosis) ultimately causing compression of the spinal cord. In Asian populations, spinal cord compression often occurs due to a different, inflammatory process affecting the posterior longitudinal ligament. Clinical signs and symptoms depend on which ...
... (OPLL) is a process of fibrosis, calcification, and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine, that may involve the spinal dura. Once considered a disorder unique to people of Asian heritage, it is now recognized as an uncommon disorder in a variety of patients with myelopathy. The causes of OPLL are unknown. However, genetic and environmental factors appear to play a role in pathogenesis. OPLL may also be associated with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis Myeolography, including post-myelographic CT is likely the most effective imaging study an accurate diagnosis. Surgical management options include extensive cervical laminectomy with or without an additional posterior arthrodesis, anterior decompression and arthrodesis, and posterior cervical laminoplasty. Treatment decisions can be made based on a grading systems devised by Hirabayashi et al., supplemented by the Nurick myelopathy classification system. Most ...
Testosterone promotes growth of many prostate tumors and therefore reducing circulating testosterone to very low (castration) levels is often the treatment goal in the management of men with advanced prostate cancer. GnRH antagonists are used to provide fast suppression of testosterone without the surge in testosterone levels that is seen when treating patients with GnRH agonists.[1] In patients with advanced disease, this surge in testosterone can lead to a flare-up of the tumour, which can precipitate a range of clinical symptoms such as bone pain, urethral obstruction, and spinal cord compression. Drug agencies have issued warnings regarding this phenomenon in the prescribing information for GnRH agonists. As testosterone surge does not occur with GnRH antagonists, there is no need for patients to receive an antiandrogen as flare protection during prostate cancer treatment. GnRH agonists also induce an increase in testosterone levels ...
... is bleeding into the epidural space in the spine. These may arise spontaneously (e.g. during childbirth), or as a rare complication of epiduralanaesthesia or of surgery (such as laminectomy).[citation needed] Symptoms usually include back pain which radiates to the arms or the legs. They may cause pressure on the spinal cord or cauda equina, which may present as pain, muscle weakness, or dysfunction of the bladder and bowel. The best way to confirm the diagnosis is MRI. Risk factors include anatomical abnormalities and bleeding disorders. Treatment is generally with emergency surgery. The risk following epidural anaesthesia is difficult to quantify; estimates vary from 1 per 10,000 to 1 per 100,000 epidural anaesthetics.[citation needed] The anatomy of the epidural space is such that spinal epidural hematoma has a different presentation from intracranial epidural hematoma. In the spine, the epidural space contains loose ...
... is an orthopaedic/neurosurgical surgical procedure for treating spinal stenosis by relieving pressure on the spinal cord. The procedure involves cutting the lamina on both sides of the affected vertebrae (cutting through on one side and merely cutting a groove on the other) and then "swinging" the freed flap of bone open thus relieving the pressure on the spinal cord. The spinous process may be removed to allow the lamina bone flap to be swung open. The bone flap is then propped open using small wedges or pieces of bone such that the enlarged spinal canal will remain in place. This technique contrasts with vertebral laminectomy in the amount of bone and muscle tissue that has to be removed, displaced, or dissected in the procedure. Animated Cervical ...
A spinal tumor is when unusual tissue begins growing and spreading in the spinal columns or spinal cords. The unusual tissue builds up from abnormal cells that multiply quickly in a specific region. Tumors generally are broken down into categories known as benign, meaning non-cancerous, or malignant, meaning cancerous, and also primary or secondary. Primary spinal tumors begin in either the spinal cord or spinal column, whereas secondary spinal tumors begin elsewhere and spread to the spinal region.[9] Symptoms for spinal tumors may vary due to factors such as the type of tumor, the region of the spine, and the health of the patient. Back pain is the most common symptom and ...
A spinal cord injury (SCI) is damage to the spinal cord that causes changes in its function, either temporary or permanent. These changes translate into loss of muscle function, sensation, or autonomic function in parts of the body served by the spinal cord below the level of the lesion. Injuries can occur at any level of the spinal cord and can be classified as complete injury, a total loss of sensation and muscle function, or incomplete, meaning some nervous signals are able to travel past the injured area of the cord. Depending on the location and severity of damage along the spinal cord, the symptoms can vary widely, from pain or numbness to paralysis to incontinence. The prognosis also ranges widely, from full recovery in rare cases to ...
... s are illnesses that affect the cervical spine, which is made up of the upper first seven vertebrae, encasing and shielding the spinal cord. This fragment of the spine starts from the region above the shoulder blades and ends by supporting and connecting the Skull. The cervical spine contains many different anatomic compositions, including muscles, bones, ligaments, and joints. All of these structures have nerve endings that can detect painful problems when they occur. Such nerves supply muscular control and sensations to the skull and arms while correspondingly providing our bodies with flexibility and motion.[1] However, if the cervical spine is injured it can cause many minor or traumatic problems, and although these injuries vary specifically they are more commonly known as "cervical spine disorders" as a whole.[1] It is through upper frontal chest discomfort (also known as cervical angina) and scapular pains which ...
A compression lock, muscle lock, muscle slicer or muscle crusher, is a grappling hold which causes severe pain by pressing a muscle into a bone. A compression lock can cause a joint lock in a nearby joint when it is applied by squeezing a limb over a fulcrum. A forceful compression lock may damage muscles and tendons, and if accompanied by a joint lock, may also result in torn ligaments, dislocation or bone fractures. Compression locks can be used as pain compliance holds, and are sometimes featured in combat sports as submission holds. An Achilles lock (also called an Achilles hold or Achilles squeeze or Ashi-Hishigi in judo) is a compression lock that involves pressing the Achilles tendon into the back of the ankle or lower leg. It is typically performed by wedging a forearm, especially a bony part of it, into the Achilles tendon, while leveraging the foot and the leg over the forearm serving as a fulcrum. This causes ...
The cervical spinal nerve 6 (C6) is a spinal nerve of the cervical segment.[1] It originates from the spinal column from above the cervical vertebra 6 (C6). The C6 nerve root shares a common branch from C5, and has a role in innervating many muscles of the rotator cuff and distal arm,[2] including: ...
A dermatome is an area of skin that is mainly supplied by a single spinal nerve.[1] There are 8 cervical nerves (C1 being an exception with no dermatome), 12 thoracic nerves, 5 lumbar nerves and 5 sacral nerves. Each of these nerves relays sensation (including pain) from a particular region of skin to the brain.. A dermatome also refers to the part of an embryonic somite.. Along the thorax and abdomen the dermatomes are like a stack of discs forming a human, each supplied by a different spinal nerve. Along the arms and the legs, the pattern is different: the dermatomes run longitudinally along the limbs. Although the general pattern is similar in all people, the precise areas of innervation are as unique to an individual as fingerprints.. A similar area innervated by peripheral nerves is called a peripheral ...
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The general somatic afferent fibers (GSA, or somatic sensory fibers) afferent fibers arise from cells in the spinal ganglia and are found in all the spinal nerves, except occasionally the first cervical, and conduct impulses of pain, touch and temperature from the surface of the body through the dorsal roots to the spinal cord and impulses of muscle sense, tendon sense and joint sense from the deeper structures.[1] ...
Malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) is an uncommon condition that affects people with cancer that has spread to or started ... The spinal cord. The spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs from the brain down the back. It plays a vital role in many ... What is malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC)?. Malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) can happen when cancer grows in the ... Malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) happens when cancer grows in, or near, the spine and presses on the spinal cord and ...
He was found to have a metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC), a PSA exceeding 27,000, and biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer ... Cranial nerves, II-XII, were normal. The remainder of the examination was non-contributory. ... Metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) occurs in 5-14% of patients with cancer during the course of their disease [1-2]. ... Tazi H, Manunta A, Rodriguez A, Patard JJ, Lobel B, Guillé F: Spinal cord compression in metastatic prostate cancer. Eur Urol. ...
... are the most common causes of spinal cord and nerve root compression. ...
Up to now, many treatment methods are available for these different spinal canal cysts. One operation method can be applied in ... However, same principle should be obeyed in surgical treatment despite of difference among spinal canal cysts, given open ... A variety of cystic lesions may develop in spinal canal. These cysts can be divided into intramedullary, intradural, extradural ... Extradural giant multiloculated arachnoid cyst causing spinal cord compression in a child. J Spinal Cord Med. 2008;31(3):306-8. ...
Physiology of spinal cord, nerve root and peripheral nerve compression.. GELFAN S, TARLOV IM. ...
traumatalogical disease of spinal cord, fracture and dislocation of C4, C5 vertebra with compression spinal cord. - subdural ... Spinal cord is compressed and infiltrated. - Spinal cord is at level VC4-6: multi-focal cysts formation 2.2 cm and full ... De compressive laminectomy C5, C4 at the right side, puncture and emptying cysts of spinal cord, sewing electrodes to dura ... Width of spinal canal: sagittal 1.2 cm, frontal 1.5 cm. - Posterior longitudinal ligament is saved. - Ligomentium flava VC3, ...
... cord compression is caused by any situation that places pressure on your spinal cord which is which is connected to the nerves. ... Causes of Spinal Cord Compression. There are multiple causes of spinal cord compression. In diverse cases, the compression can ... These nerves are named as Lumbar and Sacral nerves.. Spinal Cord Compression happens when a mass puts pressure on the spinal ... Symptoms of Spinal Cord Compression may vary. They rely on how severe the compression is and on what part of the spinal cord ...
Your spinal cord, spinal nerves, and arteries that supply blood travel through the protective cervical spinal canal. The spinal ... Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease - Spinal Cord and Nerve Compression Introduction , Anatomy , Causes , Symptoms , Diagnosis , ... The narrowed spinal canal can compress the spinal cord and nerves, resulting in pain and loss of function. This condition is ... The structural changes can put pressure on the spinal cord or spinal nerves, resulting in pain and loss of function. ...
Read More About Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease - Spinal Cord and Nerve Compression ... The structural changes can put pressure on the spinal cord or spinal nerves, resulting in pain and loss of function. ... Cervical degenerative disc disease is a condition that can compress the spinal cord and nerves in the neck. Intervertebral ...
Your spinal cord, spinal nerves, and arteries that supply blood travel through the protective cervical spinal canal. The spinal ... The narrowed spinal canal can compress the spinal cord and nerves, resulting in pain and loss of function. This condition is ... Read more about Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease - Spinal Cord and Nerve Compression. *Introduction ... Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease - Spinal Cord and Nerve Compression. Back to Patient Education ...
Read More About Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease - Spinal Cord and Nerve Compression ... The structural changes can put pressure on the spinal cord or spinal nerves, resulting in pain and loss of function. ... Cervical degenerative disc disease is a condition that can compress the spinal cord and nerves in the neck. Intervertebral ...
cervical cord compression over a year ago. pending anterior cervical coptectomy surgery for compression around C4, 5, 6 over a ... Pending Cervical Surgery, 2 levels I have DDD & Spinal Stenosis - Help over a year ago. ...
Compression fractures of the back are broken vertebrae. Vertebrae are the bones of the spine. ... Spinal cord or nerve root compression When to Contact a Medical Professional. ... Most compression fractures are seen in older people with osteoporosis. These fractures often do not cause injury to the spinal ... Compression fractures can occur suddenly. This can cause severe back pain. *The pain is most commonly felt in the middle or ...
Read More About Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease - Spinal Cord and Nerve Compression ... The structural changes can put pressure on the spinal cord or spinal nerves, resulting in pain and loss of function. ... Cervical degenerative disc disease is a condition that can compress the spinal cord and nerves in the neck. Intervertebral ...
Read More About Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease - Spinal Cord and Nerve Compression ... The structural changes can put pressure on the spinal cord or spinal nerves, resulting in pain and loss of function. ... Cervical degenerative disc disease is a condition that can compress the spinal cord and nerves in the neck. Intervertebral ...
... diagnosis and management of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) in adults with cancer ... Adults with suspected and diagnosed spinal cord and nerve root compression due to metastatic malignant disease. ... Adults with spinal cord compression due to primary tumours of the spinal cord and meninges. ... Adults with metastatic spinal disease at risk of developing metastatic spinal cord compression. ...
... model for experimental spinal cord compression that closely approximates neoplastic epidural compression of the spinal cord in ... Spinal Cord Compression / pathology*, surgery*. Spinal Nerves / physiopathology. From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. ... model for experimental spinal cord compression that closely approximates neoplastic epidural compression of the spinal cord in ... The spinal cord was thus increasingly compressed in a circular and dynamic manner. Neurological deficits of various degrees ...
51 Nerve injuries, spinal cord compression and peripheral nerve entrapments.. Vascular Surgery. ...
This can identify any compression of the spinal cord or nerves. If you have any chest pain or shortness of breath, your ... stenosis and compression of the spinal cord, a large opening under the skull, lordosis, kyphosis, spinal stenosis, ... In rare cases, this can lead to compression of the spinal cord with neurologic symptoms including weakness, loss of sensation, ... The goals of surgery are to partially correct the deformity of the kyphosis, relieve pain, and improve your overall spinal ...
There are many reports of serious complications during and after spinal manipulation (particularly with cervical spine/neck ... Spinal cord/nerve root compression & disc herniation: Spinal cord injury, cord compression/cauda equina syndrome, and nerve ... and ankylosing spondylitis may be at increased risk of fracture or spinal damage leading to nerve disorders or spinal cord ... and ankylosing spondylitis may be at increased risk of fracture or spinal damage leading to nerve disorders or spinal cord ...
Spinal cord and nerve compression. Metastatic disease in the bones of the spine can cause pain that radiates down your arm or ... Spinal cord compression can also occur; the most common symptoms of spinal cord compression in metastatic breast cancer are ... This can happen if the nerves coming out of the spine are compressed by the metastatic cancer. The pain is usually worse at ... We can also send patients to pain management specialists who can use treatments like nerve blocks. In most cases we can find a ...
Deadlift injury...herniated disc with nerve compression. Started by Backqueen666 on 04/04/2019 6:32am ... Swollen cervical spinal cord at C3-6. Started by sophiaho_vn on 10/20/2012 4:43am ... What is a spinal cord injury?. Started by AHambleton on 10/26/2011 3:29pm ... SPINAL CORD INJURY. Started by SAMUEL ELIJAH on 09/24/2015 2:48pm ...
Read more about Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease - Spinal Cord and Nerve Compression. *Introduction ... Your spinal cord, spinal nerves, and arteries that supply blood travel through the protective cervical spinal canal. The spinal ... The narrowed spinal canal can compress the spinal cord and nerves, resulting in pain and loss of function. This condition is ... Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease - Spinal Cord and Nerve Compression. Back to Patient Education ...
Spinal cord injury (SCI) is made up of two parts: the primary and secondary injury. A neurosurgeon explains what happens to the ... injury to the nerves and/or spinal cord) can occur from:. *physical compression of the spinal cord or nerves: Trauma can cause ... nerve regeneration. Evaluating Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury Treatment of spinal cord injury aims to reduce the effects of ... Traumatic Spinal Cord Injurys Secondary Injury Cascade. Within a few hours after spinal cord injury, a series of changes ...
... progression such as spinal cord compression, nerve root compression, or pathologic fracture. ,br /,Trial End Points:,br /, ...
  • Studies were excluded if they 1) included patients with different types of primary cancers (not exclusively prostate cancers), 2) included patients treated surgically for their MSCC, 3) were abstracts or review articles, or 4) did not address patients' outcomes after treatment of the spinal cord compression. (cureus.com)
  • This strategy fills a critical need for an improved classification of spinal arachnoid cyst patients, and potentially improve treatment selection and overall prognosis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Similarly, the interruption of sensory signals traveling back into the cord from the periphery can lead to numbness. (bleacherreport.com)
  • Thus, depending on which angle the spinal cord is compressed from, a person could experience numbness versus a loss of the ability to control muscles (often seen as an odd limp), depending on which area is compressed. (encyclopedia.com)