Decompression, Surgical: A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Decompression Sickness: A condition occurring as a result of exposure to a rapid fall in ambient pressure. Gases, nitrogen in particular, come out of solution and form bubbles in body fluid and blood. These gas bubbles accumulate in joint spaces and the peripheral circulation impairing tissue oxygenation causing disorientation, severe pain, and potentially death.Polyradiculopathy: Disease or injury involving multiple SPINAL NERVE ROOTS. Polyradiculitis refers to inflammation of multiple spinal nerve roots.Decompression: Decompression external to the body, most often the slow lessening of external pressure on the whole body (especially in caisson workers, deep sea divers, and persons who ascend to great heights) to prevent DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS. It includes also sudden accidental decompression, but not surgical (local) decompression or decompression applied through body openings.Spinal Stenosis: Narrowing of the spinal canal.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Laminectomy: A surgical procedure that entails removing all (laminectomy) or part (laminotomy) of selected vertebral lamina to relieve pressure on the SPINAL CORD and/or SPINAL NERVE ROOTS. Vertebral lamina is the thin flattened posterior wall of vertebral arch that forms the vertebral foramen through which pass the spinal cord and nerve roots.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Spinal Cord Compression: Acute and chronic conditions characterized by external mechanical compression of the SPINAL CORD due to extramedullary neoplasm; EPIDURAL ABSCESS; SPINAL FRACTURES; bony deformities of the vertebral bodies; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations vary with the anatomic site of the lesion and may include localized pain, weakness, sensory loss, incontinence, and impotence.Diving: An activity in which the organism plunges into water. It includes scuba and bell diving. Diving as natural behavior of animals goes here, as well as diving in decompression experiments with humans or animals.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Spinal Cord Diseases: Pathologic conditions which feature SPINAL CORD damage or dysfunction, including disorders involving the meninges and perimeningeal spaces surrounding the spinal cord. Traumatic injuries, vascular diseases, infections, and inflammatory/autoimmune processes may affect the spinal cord.Spinal Canal: The cavity within the SPINAL COLUMN through which the SPINAL CORD passes.Spinal DiseasesCervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.Trigeminal Neuralgia: A syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of excruciating pain lasting several seconds or longer in the sensory distribution of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE. Pain may be initiated by stimulation of trigger points on the face, lips, or gums or by movement of facial muscles or chewing. Associated conditions include MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, vascular anomalies, ANEURYSMS, and neoplasms. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p187)Microvascular Decompression Surgery: Surgery performed to relieve pressure from MICROVESSELS that are located around nerves and are causing NERVE COMPRESSION SYNDROMES.Nerve Compression Syndromes: Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.Spinal NeoplasmsInjections, Spinal: Introduction of therapeutic agents into the spinal region using a needle and syringe.Spinal Nerve Roots: Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.Arnold-Chiari Malformation: A group of congenital malformations involving the brainstem, cerebellum, upper spinal cord, and surrounding bony structures. Type II is the most common, and features compression of the medulla and cerebellar tonsils into the upper cervical spinal canal and an associated MENINGOMYELOCELE. Type I features similar, but less severe malformations and is without an associated meningomyelocele. Type III has the features of type II with an additional herniation of the entire cerebellum through the bony defect involving the foramen magnum, forming an ENCEPHALOCELE. Type IV is a form a cerebellar hypoplasia. Clinical manifestations of types I-III include TORTICOLLIS; opisthotonus; HEADACHE; VERTIGO; VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS; APNEA; NYSTAGMUS, CONGENITAL; swallowing difficulties; and ATAXIA. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p261; Davis, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, pp236-46)Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Syringomyelia: Longitudinal cavities in the spinal cord, most often in the cervical region, which may extend for multiple spinal levels. The cavities are lined by dense, gliogenous tissue and may be associated with SPINAL CORD NEOPLASMS; spinal cord traumatic injuries; and vascular malformations. Syringomyelia is marked clinically by pain and PARESTHESIA, muscular atrophy of the hands, and analgesia with thermoanesthesia of the hands and arms, but with the tactile sense preserved (sensory dissociation). Lower extremity spasticity and incontinence may also develop. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1269)Spinal Nerves: The 31 paired peripheral nerves formed by the union of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots from each spinal cord segment. The spinal nerve plexuses and the spinal roots are also included.Spinal Cord Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms which occur within the substance of the spinal cord (intramedullary neoplasms) or in the space between the dura and spinal cord (intradural extramedullary neoplasms). The majority of intramedullary spinal tumors are primary CNS neoplasms including ASTROCYTOMA; EPENDYMOMA; and LIPOMA. Intramedullary neoplasms are often associated with SYRINGOMYELIA. The most frequent histologic types of intradural-extramedullary tumors are MENINGIOMA and NEUROFIBROMA.Diskectomy, Percutaneous: Percutaneous excision of a herniated or displaced INTERVERTEBRAL DISC by posterolateral approach, always remaining outside the spinal canal. Percutaneous nucleotomy was first described by Hijikata in Japan in 1975. In 1985 Onik introduced automated percutaneous nucleotomy which consists in percutaneous aspiration of the nucleus pulposus. It is carried out under local anesthesia, thus reducing the surgical insult and requiring brief hospitalization, often performed on an outpatient basis. It appears to be a well-tolerated alternative to surgical diskectomy and chymopapain nucleolysis.Anesthesia, Spinal: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected directly into the spinal cord.Tuberculosis, Spinal: Osteitis or caries of the vertebrae, usually occurring as a complication of tuberculosis of the lungs.Embolism, Air: Blocking of a blood vessel by air bubbles that enter the circulatory system, usually after TRAUMA; surgical procedures, or changes in atmospheric pressure.Hematoma, Epidural, Spinal: A rare epidural hematoma in the spinal epidural space, usually due to a vascular malformation (CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM VASCULAR MALFORMATIONS) or TRAUMA. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is a neurologic emergency due to a rapidly evolving compressive MYELOPATHY.Intervertebral Disc Displacement: An INTERVERTEBRAL DISC in which the nucleus pulposus has protruded through surrounding fibrocartilage. This occurs most frequently in the lower lumbar region.Spondylosis: A degenerative spinal disease that can involve any part of the VERTEBRA, the INTERVERTEBRAL DISK, and the surrounding soft tissue.Noble Gases: Elements that constitute group 18 (formerly the zero group) of the periodic table. They are gases that generally do not react chemically.Paraplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Spinal Injuries: Injuries involving the vertebral column.Spinal Osteophytosis: Outgrowth of immature bony processes or bone spurs (OSTEOPHYTE) from the VERTEBRAE, reflecting the presence of degenerative disease and calcification. It commonly occurs in cervical and lumbar SPONDYLOSIS.Diskectomy: Excision, in part or whole, of an INTERVERTEBRAL DISC. The most common indication is disk displacement or herniation. In addition to standard surgical removal, it can be performed by percutaneous diskectomy (DISKECTOMY, PERCUTANEOUS) or by laparoscopic diskectomy, the former being the more common.Foramen Magnum: The large hole at the base of the skull through which the SPINAL CORD passes.Radiculopathy: Disease involving a spinal nerve root (see SPINAL NERVE ROOTS) which may result from compression related to INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; SPINAL CORD INJURIES; SPINAL DISEASES; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations include radicular pain, weakness, and sensory loss referable to structures innervated by the involved nerve root.Sacrum: Five fused VERTEBRAE forming a triangle-shaped structure at the back of the PELVIS. It articulates superiorly with the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE, inferiorly with the COCCYX, and anteriorly with the ILIUM of the PELVIS. The sacrum strengthens and stabilizes the PELVIS.Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament: A calcification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spinal column, usually at the level of the cervical spine. It is often associated with anterior ankylosing hyperostosis.Hyperbaric Oxygenation: The therapeutic intermittent administration of oxygen in a chamber at greater than sea-level atmospheric pressures (three atmospheres). It is considered effective treatment for air and gas embolisms, smoke inhalation, acute carbon monoxide poisoning, caisson disease, clostridial gangrene, etc. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992). The list of treatment modalities includes stroke.Myelography: X-ray visualization of the spinal cord following injection of contrast medium into the spinal arachnoid space.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Exophthalmos: Abnormal protrusion of both eyes; may be caused by endocrine gland malfunction, malignancy, injury, or paralysis of the extrinsic muscles of the eye.Paraparesis: Mild to moderate loss of bilateral lower extremity motor function, which may be a manifestation of SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; MUSCULAR DISEASES; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; parasagittal brain lesions; and other conditions.Microsurgery: The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.Spinal Fractures: Broken bones in the vertebral column.Graves Ophthalmopathy: An autoimmune disorder of the EYE, occurring in patients with Graves disease. Subtypes include congestive (inflammation of the orbital connective tissue), myopathic (swelling and dysfunction of the extraocular muscles), and mixed congestive-myopathic ophthalmopathy.Ligamentum Flavum: The paired bands of yellow elastic tissue that connect adjoining laminae of the vertebrae. With the laminae, it forms the posterior wall of the spinal canal and helps hold the body erect.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Lumbosacral Region: Region of the back including the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE, SACRUM, and nearby structures.Intubation, Gastrointestinal: The insertion of a tube into the stomach, intestines, or other portion of the gastrointestinal tract to allow for the passage of food products, etc.Orbit: Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.Hemifacial Spasm: Recurrent clonic contraction of facial muscles, restricted to one side. It may occur as a manifestation of compressive lesions involving the seventh cranial nerve (FACIAL NERVE DISEASES), during recovery from BELL PALSY, or in association with other disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1378)Spondylolisthesis: Forward displacement of a superior vertebral body over the vertebral body below.Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.Muscular Atrophy, Spinal: A group of disorders marked by progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord resulting in weakness and muscular atrophy, usually without evidence of injury to the corticospinal tracts. Diseases in this category include Werdnig-Hoffmann disease and later onset SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHIES OF CHILDHOOD, most of which are hereditary. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1089)Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Femur Head Necrosis: Aseptic or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The major types are idiopathic (primary), as a complication of fractures or dislocations, and LEGG-CALVE-PERTHES DISEASE.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Internal Fixators: Internal devices used in osteosynthesis to hold the position of the fracture in proper alignment. By applying the principles of biomedical engineering, the surgeon uses metal plates, nails, rods, etc., for the correction of skeletal defects.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Epidural Abscess: Circumscribed collections of suppurative material occurring in the spinal or intracranial EPIDURAL SPACE. The majority of epidural abscesses occur in the spinal canal and are associated with OSTEOMYELITIS of a vertebral body; ANALGESIA, EPIDURAL; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations include local and radicular pain, weakness, sensory loss, URINARY INCONTINENCE, and FECAL INCONTINENCE. Cranial epidural abscesses are usually associated with OSTEOMYELITIS of a cranial bone, SINUSITIS, or OTITIS MEDIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p710 and pp1240-1; J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1998 Aug;65(2):209-12)Spinal Cord Ischemia: Reduced blood flow to the spinal cord which is supplied by the anterior spinal artery and the paired posterior spinal arteries. This condition may be associated with ARTERIOSCLEROSIS, trauma, emboli, diseases of the aorta, and other disorders. Prolonged ischemia may lead to INFARCTION of spinal cord tissue.Atmospheric Pressure: The pressure at any point in an atmosphere due solely to the weight of the atmospheric gases above the point concerned.Ganglia, Spinal: Sensory ganglia located on the dorsal spinal roots within the vertebral column. The spinal ganglion cells are pseudounipolar. The single primary branch bifurcates sending a peripheral process to carry sensory information from the periphery and a central branch which relays that information to the spinal cord or brain.Platybasia: A developmental deformity of the occipital bone and upper end of the cervical spine, in which the latter appears to have pushed the floor of the occipital bone upward. (Dorland, 27th ed)Compartment Syndromes: Conditions in which increased pressure within a limited space compromises the BLOOD CIRCULATION and function of tissue within that space. Some of the causes of increased pressure are TRAUMA, tight dressings, HEMORRHAGE, and exercise. Sequelae include nerve compression (NERVE COMPRESSION SYNDROMES); PARALYSIS; and ISCHEMIC CONTRACTURE.Kyphosis: Deformities of the SPINE characterized by an exaggerated convexity of the vertebral column. The forward bending of the thoracic region usually is more than 40 degrees. This deformity sometimes is called round back or hunchback.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Longitudinal Ligaments: Two extensive fibrous bands running the length of the vertebral column. The anterior longitudinal ligament (ligamentum longitudinale anterius; lacertus medius) interconnects the anterior surfaces of the vertebral bodies; the posterior longitudinal ligament (ligamentum longitudinale posterius) interconnects the posterior surfaces. The commonest clinical consideration is OSSIFICATION OF POSTERIOR LONGITUDINAL LIGAMENT. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Cranial Fossa, Posterior: The infratentorial compartment that contains the CEREBELLUM and BRAIN STEM. It is formed by the posterior third of the superior surface of the body of the sphenoid (SPHENOID BONE), by the occipital, the petrous, and mastoid portions of the TEMPORAL BONE, and the posterior inferior angle of the PARIETAL BONE.Epidural Space: Space between the dura mater and the walls of the vertebral canal.Cauda Equina: The lower part of the SPINAL CORD consisting of the lumbar, sacral, and coccygeal nerve roots.Helium: Helium. A noble gas with the atomic symbol He, atomic number 2, and atomic weight 4.003. It is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that is not combustible and does not support combustion. It was first detected in the sun and is now obtained from natural gas. Medically it is used as a diluent for other gases, being especially useful with oxygen in the treatment of certain cases of respiratory obstruction, and as a vehicle for general anesthetics. (Dorland, 27th ed)Thoracic Outlet Syndrome: A neurovascular syndrome associated with compression of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS; SUBCLAVIAN ARTERY; and SUBCLAVIAN VEIN at the superior thoracic outlet. This may result from a variety of anomalies such as a CERVICAL RIB, anomalous fascial bands, and abnormalities of the origin or insertion of the anterior or medial scalene muscles. Clinical features may include pain in the shoulder and neck region which radiates into the arm, PARESIS or PARALYSIS of brachial plexus innervated muscles, PARESTHESIA, loss of sensation, reduction of arterial pulses in the affected extremity, ISCHEMIA, and EDEMA. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp214-5).Motor Neurons: Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.Paramethasone: A glucocorticoid with the general properties of corticosteroids. It has been used by mouth in the treatment of all conditions in which corticosteroid therapy is indicated except adrenal-deficiency states for which its lack of sodium-retaining properties makes it less suitable than HYDROCORTISONE with supplementary FLUDROCORTISONE. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p737)Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Glossopharyngeal Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the ninth cranial (glossopharyngeal) nerve or its nuclei in the medulla. The nerve may be injured by diseases affecting the lower brain stem, floor of the posterior fossa, jugular foramen, or the nerve's extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include loss of sensation from the pharynx, decreased salivation, and syncope. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia refers to a condition that features recurrent unilateral sharp pain in the tongue, angle of the jaw, external auditory meatus and throat that may be associated with SYNCOPE. Episodes may be triggered by cough, sneeze, swallowing, or pressure on the tragus of the ear. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1390)Air Pressure: The force per unit area that the air exerts on any surface in contact with it. Primarily used for articles pertaining to air pressure within a closed environment.Submarine Medicine: The field of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of people in submarines or sealabs.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Entrapment of the MEDIAN NERVE in the carpal tunnel, which is formed by the flexor retinaculum and the CARPAL BONES. This syndrome may be associated with repetitive occupational trauma (CUMULATIVE TRAUMA DISORDERS); wrist injuries; AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES; rheumatoid arthritis (see ARTHRITIS, RHEUMATOID); ACROMEGALY; PREGNANCY; and other conditions. Symptoms include burning pain and paresthesias involving the ventral surface of the hand and fingers which may radiate proximally. Impairment of sensation in the distribution of the median nerve and thenar muscle atrophy may occur. (Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51, p45)Craniotomy: Any operation on the cranium or incision into the cranium. (Dorland, 28th ed)Cubital Tunnel Syndrome: Compression of the ULNAR NERVE in the cubital tunnel, which is formed by the two heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle, humeral-ulnar aponeurosis, and medial ligaments of the elbow. This condition may follow trauma or occur in association with processes which produce nerve enlargement or narrowing of the canal. Manifestations include elbow pain and PARESTHESIA radiating distally, weakness of ulnar innervated intrinsic hand muscles, and loss of sensation over the hypothenar region, fifth finger, and ulnar aspect of the ring finger. (Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51, p43)Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Quadriplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in all four limbs which may result from BRAIN DISEASES; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or rarely MUSCULAR DISEASES. The locked-in syndrome is characterized by quadriplegia in combination with cranial muscle paralysis. Consciousness is spared and the only retained voluntary motor activity may be limited eye movements. This condition is usually caused by a lesion in the upper BRAIN STEM which injures the descending cortico-spinal and cortico-bulbar tracts.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Decompressive Craniectomy: Excision of part of the skull. This procedure is used to treat elevated intracranial pressure that is unresponsive to conventional treatment.Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Decompression, Explosive: A sudden loss of pressure in a pressurized cabin, cockpit, or the like, so rapid as to be explosive. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Atlanto-Axial Joint: The joint involving the CERVICAL ATLAS and axis bones.Rhizotomy: Surgical interruption of a spinal or cranial nerve root. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: Compression of the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa between the humeral head and structures that make up the coracoacromial arch and the humeral tuberosities. This condition is associated with subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff (largely supraspinatus) and bicipital tendon inflammation, with or without degenerative changes in the tendon. Pain that is most severe when the arm is abducted in an arc between 40 and 120 degrees, sometimes associated with tears in the rotator cuff, is the chief symptom. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Syndromes and Eponymic Diseases, 2d ed)Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Atlanto-Occipital Joint: The point of articulation between the OCCIPITAL BONE and the CERVICAL ATLAS.Spinal Curvatures: Deformities of the SPINE characterized by abnormal bending or flexure in the vertebral column. They may be bending forward (KYPHOSIS), backward (LORDOSIS), or sideway (SCOLIOSIS).Intra-Abdominal Hypertension: Pathological elevation of intra-abdominal pressure (>12 mm Hg). It may develop as a result of SEPSIS; PANCREATITIS; capillary leaks, burns, or surgery. When the pressure is higher than 20 mm Hg, often with end-organ dysfunction, it is referred to as abdominal compartment syndrome.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Posterior Horn Cells: Neurons in the SPINAL CORD DORSAL HORN whose cell bodies and processes are confined entirely to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. They receive collateral or direct terminations of dorsal root fibers. They send their axons either directly to ANTERIOR HORN CELLS or to the WHITE MATTER ascending and descending longitudinal fibers.High Pressure Neurological Syndrome: A syndrome related to increased atmospheric pressure and characterized by tremors, nausea, dizziness, decreased motor and mental performance, and SEIZURES. This condition may occur in those who dive deeply (c. 1000 ft) usually while breathing a mixture of oxygen and helium. The condition is associated with a neuroexcitatory effect of helium.Spondylitis: Inflammation of the SPINE. This includes both arthritic and non-arthritic conditions.Facial Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Paralysis: A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)Epidural Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the space between the vertebral PERIOSTEUM and DURA MATER surrounding the SPINAL CORD. Tumors in this location are most often metastatic in origin and may cause neurologic deficits by mass effect on the spinal cord or nerve roots or by interfering with blood supply to the spinal cord.Arthroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.Ossification, Heterotopic: The development of bony substance in normally soft structures.
"Complications Associated With Minimally Invasive Decompression For Lumbar Spinal Stenosis." (August 2006) Journal of Spinal ... ISBN 978-3-540-21347-5. CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) "Symposium Keynote Speaker" (PDF). Aquatic Therapy and Rehab ... January 2000). Lumbar Spinal Stenosis. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. ISBN 978-0-7817-2380-0. Mayer, H. Michael (Editor) ( ... PMID 16770211 "Evaluation of Cold Therapy in Postoperative Spine Patients." (May 2005) Surgical Technology International. PMID ...
Much of his other diving medical research was focused on women in diving and spinal cord decompression sickness. Fife's ... Fife William P (1994). "Clinical observations on the effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on the treatment of Post-Polio ... Fife also developed the first decompression tables for the use of the mixture. The French engineering company COMEX (Compagnie ... Dole M, Wilson FR, Fife William P (October 1975). "Hyperbaric hydrogen therapy: a possible treatment for cancer". Science. 190 ...
NSAID therapy and local steroid injection. Surgical treatment by nerve decompression is used for cases of severe pain with ... They are the terminal ends of lateral rami of the posterior rami of lumbar spinal nerves (L1, 2, 3). Superior Cluneal Nerve ... Diagram of the distribution of the cutaneous branches of the posterior divisions of the spinal nerves. Areas of distribution of ... the cutaneous branches of the posterior divisions of the spinal nerves. Hammer, Warren. 1998. "Superior Cluneal Nerve ...
... which can be addressed by spinal decompression surgery. It is unclear if inversion therapy is able to decompress the sacral ... It is derived from spinal nerves L4 to S3. It contains fibers from both the anterior and posterior divisions of the lumbosacral ... Common causes of sciatica include the following lower back and hip conditions: spinal disc herniation, degenerative disc ... Sciatic nerve palsy can also result from severe spinal stenosis following the procedure, ...
Neurogenic claudication can be treated surgically with spinal decompression. Peripheral Arterial Disease at Merck Manual of ... Diagnosis and Therapy Professional Edition[not in citation given] Comer CM, Redmond AC, Bird HA, Conaghan PG (2009). " ... Standing and extension of the spine narrows the spinal canal diameter. Sitting and flexion of the spine increases spinal canal ... Spinal or neurogenic claudication is not due to lack of blood supply, but rather it is caused by nerve root compression or ...
Be Wary of Spinal Decompression Therapy with VAX-D or Similar Devices, Stephen Barrett ... "2.1 Absolute contraindications to spinal manipulative therapy", p. 21. WHO *^ Daniel, Dwain M (2007). "Non-surgical spinal ... "very limited evidence in the scientific literature to support the effectiveness of non-surgical spinal decompression therapy."[ ... "History of Lumbar Endoscopic Spinal Surgery and the Intradiskal Therapies". Advanced Concepts in Lumbar Degenerative Disk ...
One such therapy is currently in clinical trials. The drug, called Cethrin, is produced by a group called Alseres. Cethrin is a ... Cethrin is applied as a paste to the site of injury during decompression surgery. The Nogo-66 receptor (NgR) limits experience- ... It is reasonable that inhibition of the above mechanism could aid the recovery of those suffering from spinal cord injuries. ... Baptiste DC, Fehlings MG (2007). "Update on the treatment of spinal cord injury". Prog. Brain Res. 161: 217-33. doi:10.1016/ ...
... randomized controlled study has shown that surgical decompression treatment and physiotherapy are on par for lumbar spinal ... spinal manipulative therapy has been a component of the physical therapist practice. Modern physical therapy was established ... Therapy American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties American Physical Therapy Association Doctor of Physical Therapy Doctor ... Wise, Jacqui (2015-04-07). "Physical therapy is as effective as surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis, study finds". BMJ. 350: ...
It is a form of spinal decompression and is a form of spinal traction. Gravity boots are ankle supports designed for inversion ... Inversion therapy involves being upside down or at an inverted angle while hanging by the legs, ankles, or feet with the ... The first time anyone tries inversion therapy with gravity, they should be sure to have someone standing by, in case assistance ... Laskowski, Edward R., M.D. (June 9, 2014). "Does inversion therapy relieve back pain? Is it safe?". Mayo Clinic. Retrieved July ...
Kol S, Adir Y, Gordon CR, Melamed Y (June 1993). "Oxy-helium treatment of severe spinal decompression sickness after air diving ... oxygen is the standard hospital and military medical response to decompression illness. The success of recompression therapy as ... Nocturnal Oxygen Therapy Trial Group". Ann Intern Med. 93 (3): 391-8. Sep 1980. doi:10.7326/0003-4819-93-3-391. PMID 6776858. ... Air is typically 21% oxygen by volume while oxygen therapy increases this by some amount up to 100%. The use of oxygen in ...
"Surgical versus Nonsurgical Therapy for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis". New England Journal of Medicine. 358 (8): 794-810. doi:10.1056 ... Spinal decompression is a surgical procedure intended to relieve pressure on the spinal cord or on one or more compressed nerve ... Decompression of the spinal neural elements is a key component in treating spinal radiculopathy, myelopathy and claudication. ... In the lumbar spine it is commonly used to treat spinal claudication caused by spinal stenosis, and is considered the most ...
... physical therapy, imaging, and hospital charges.[10] The average total hospital costs for spinal fusions increased from $24,676 ... Anterior decompression and fusion[3]. *Posterior instrumentation and fusion - many different types of hardware can be used to ... spinal stenosis, trauma, and spinal tumors.[3] Spinal stenosis results from bony growths (osteophytes) or thickened ligaments ... Spinal fusion is most commonly performed to relieve the pain and pressure on the spinal cord that results when a disc ( ...
Postoperative radiation is delivered within 2-3 weeks of surgical decompression. Emergency radiation therapy (usually 20 Gray ... Spinal cord compression develops when the spinal cord is compressed by bone fragments from a vertebral fracture, a tumor, ... The median survival of patients with metastatic spinal cord compression is about 12 weeks, reflecting the generally advanced ... and requires swift diagnosis and treatment to prevent long-term disability due to irreversible spinal cord injury. Symptoms ...
"Oxy-helium treatment of severe spinal decompression sickness after air diving". Undersea Hyperb Med. 20 (2): 147-54. PMID ... Oxygen therapy, also known as supplemental oxygen, is the use of oxygen as a medical treatment.[1] This can include for low ... "Decompression Sickness or Illness and Arterial Gas Embolism". Archived from the original on 2008-07-05. Retrieved 2008-05-30.. ... "Oxygen Therapy". American Cancer Society. 26 December 2012. Archived from the original on 21 March 2012. Retrieved 2013-09-20. ...
Spinal manipulation for treating an ongoing migraine headache is not supported by evidence. It is recommended that opioids and ... Preventative therapy of migraines in those with migraines with auras may prevent associated strokes. People with migraines, ... Migraine surgery, which involves decompression of certain nerves around the head and neck, may be an option in certain people ... The evidence to support spinal manipulation is poor and insufficient to support its use. Tentative evidence supports the use of ...
... followed by outpatient physical therapy and occupational therapy to assist with recovery. An individual with a spinal cord ... a neurological decline in spinal cord function in stable patients as well as those who require cervical spinal decompression. ... Historically, spinal cord damage was believed to originate from concussion or contusion of the cord with stasis of axoplasmic ... Spinal cord injury Anterior cord syndrome Posterior cord syndrome Brown-Sequard syndrome Rich V, McCaslin E (2006). "Central ...
The reason is concern that it can progress to tension pneumothorax, especially during the decompression phase of therapy, ... spinal cord injury, sports injuries, or stroke. A Cochrane review published in 2016 has raised questions about the ethical ... Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Indications. The Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Committee Report (12th ed.). Durham, NC: Undersea and ... uses of hyperbaric oxygen therapy as defined by the UHMS Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Committee: Air or gas embolism; Carbon ...
CES can be caused by lumbar spinal stenosis, which is when the diameter of the spinal canal narrows. This could be the result ... Surgical intervention with decompression of the cauda equina can assist recovery. Delayed or severe nerve damage can mean up to ... Physical therapy can be somewhat useful for patient's recovery from surgery. The main focus of rehabilitation is centered on ... Cauda equina syndrome (CES) is symptoms due to damage to the bundle of nerves below the end of the spinal cord known as the ...
Spinal traction as a means of spinal decompression is often applied without directly touching bones as other methods of ... around a bleeding vessel In most cases traction is only one part of the treatment plan of a patient needing such therapy. The ... Lumbar spinal manipulation followed by Harrison "mirror image methods" (lateral translation exercise and traction) were found ... Traction is an appropriate treatment for a number of medical problems including spinal deformities such as scoliosis. ...
In the more narrow sense it refers to spinal osteoarthritis, the age-related wear and tear of the spinal column, which is the ... Physical therapy may be effective for restoring range of motion, flexibility and core strengthening. Decompressive therapies (i ... Decompression surgery: The vertebral column can be operated on from both an anterior and posterior approach. The approach ... Other alternative therapies such as massage, trigger-point therapy, yoga and acupuncture may be of limited benefit.[6] Surgery ...
Back pain Degenerative disc disease Spinal decompression Lumbar spinal stenosis Anulus fibrosus. Artificial intervertebral disc ... A herniated disc can cause mild to severe pain such as sciatica and treatment for herniated discs range from physical therapy ... A spinal disc herniation, commonly referred to as a slipped disc, can happen when unbalanced mechanical pressures substantially ... Other spinal disorders can affect the morphology of intervertebral discs. For example, patients with scoliosis commonly have ...
Patients require double antiplatelet therapy for a period of up to 3 months after the procedure and aspirin therapy for up to 1 ... Repeated lumbar punctures are regarded as unpleasant by patients, and they present a danger of introducing spinal infections if ... Two main surgical procedures exist in the treatment of IIH: optic nerve sheath decompression and fenestration and shunting. ... Surgery would normally only be offered if medical therapy is either unsuccessful or not tolerated. The choice between these two ...
Although steroids may be used to decrease cord swelling and inflammation, the usual therapy for spinal cord injury is expectant ... Kimbro, T; Tom, T; Neuman, T (May 1997). "A case of spinal cord decompression sickness presenting as partial Brown-Sequard ... These fibers decussate at the level of the spinal cord. Therefore, a hemi-section lesion to the spinal cord will demonstrate ... or spinal hemiparaplegia) is caused by damage to one half of the spinal cord, resulting in paralysis and loss of proprioception ...
Typical acute spinal decompression injury occurs in the columns of white matter. Infarcts are characterised by a region of ... All cases of decompression sickness should be treated initially with 100% oxygen until hyperbaric oxygen therapy (100% oxygen ... The decompression schedule may be derived from decompression tables, decompression software, or from dive computers, and these ... "Decompression-Decompression Sickness," which detailed his deterministic model for calculation of decompression schedules. In ...
Other spinal issues associated with Marfan syndrome include degenerative disc disease, spinal cysts and dysfunction of the ... In 1996, the first preimplantation genetic testing (PGT) therapy for Marfan was conducted; in essence PGT means conducting a ... Large pneumothoraces are likely to be medical emergencies requiring emergency decompression. As an alternative approach, custom ... Because Marfan syndrome may cause asymptomatic spinal abnormalities, any spinal surgery contemplated on a person Marfan should ...
If a lumbar puncture is performed, it will show normal cerebral spinal fluid and cell counts but an increase in pressure.[7] In ... In addition to oxygen therapy, a portable hyperbaric chamber (Gamow bag) can by used as a temporary measure in the treatment of ... It is not definitely established whether they had HACE or acute decompression sickness.[21] MRI has been used to study the ... If available, supplemental oxygen can be used as an adjunctive therapy, or when descent is not possible. FiO2 should be ...
Nerves carry messages between the brain, spinal cord, and body parts. When a nerve is compressed, it cannot function properly. ... Occupational or physical therapy is recommended to regain strength and motion in the arm. ... This method is called simple decompression. The most common surgical procedure is called an Anterior Transposition of the Ulnar ... Some physicians prescribe occupational or physical therapy. The occupational or physical therapists focus on gentle exercises ...
Advanced Spinal Decompression. *Physiotherapy & Rehabilitation. *Shockwave (ESWT) For Sports Injuries. *Telehealth (Online ... Soft tissue therapy and ESWT will often also be used to improve tendon healing. If movements are very painful, taping to rest ...
As in spinal cord injury, getting peripheral nerves to regenerate isnt enough - the newly sprouted axons must function. ... Sickle cell gene therapy to boost fetal hemoglobin: A 70-year timeline of discovery ... when decompression surgery was done within 10 months of injury, but just 0.5 when surgery happened later. As the time to ... Novel therapeutic cocktail could restore fine motor skills after spinal cord injury and stroke ...
WebMD explains both surgical and nonsurgical spinal decompression. Learn whats involved and find out if it could ease your ... How Is Nonsurgical Spinal Decompression Done?. You are fully clothed during spinal decompression therapy. The doctor fits you ... What Is Surgical Spinal Decompression?. Surgical spinal decompression is another option for treating certain types of back pain ... Nonsurgical spinal decompression is a type of motorized traction that may help relieve back pain. Spinal decompression works by ...
... spinal stenosis, herniated discs, facet syndrome and degenerative discs. It is also known as spinal decompression therapy. ... Spinal therapy helps in the Treatment for sciatica, ... Yoga Massage Therapy Spinal Therapy. Spinal Massage Therapy. * ... Decompression therapy helps in restoration of the nutrients, thereby resulting in rejuvenation. Spinal decompression therapy is ... It is also known as spinal decompression therapy. The spinal discs cause a lot of pain and discomfort in many individuals.. ...
"Spinal decompression therapy is affordable, non-invasive, gentle and, for many folks, very relaxing," said Dr. Stewart. "Most ... Spinal decompression therapy can be used to treat a wide array of conditions, including sciatica, degenerative disc disease, ... Non-surgical spinal decompression therapy involves alleviating pressure on the spine and its discs by stretching and elongating ... Rutherford Clinic of Chiropractic Raises Awareness About Spinal Decompression Therapy. Published 10:00 AM ET Sun, 14 Feb 2016 ...
The present invention relates generally to a home therapy system for aiding spinal cord decompression and for treating related ... 4. The spinal decompression and sleep therapy system of claim 1, wherein the vertical decompression leg straps of the thoracic ... 5. The spinal decompression and sleep therapy system of claim 1, wherein the system further comprises a decompression support ... 1. A spinal decompression and sleep therapy system, the system comprising: a cervical decompression device comprising: a head ...
Donald Palmer, DC is a chiropractic spinal decompression therapy provider who practices in Folsom, CA.. ... He specializes in Spinal Decompression to help patients avoid surgery. He is absolutely an expert in this treatment and has ... and spinal decompression is it. Dr. Palmer is not the least expensive and all I can say is you get what you pay for. His ... I had numerous injections, 2 radio frequency nerve ablations, physical therapy, Chiropractic care, and a mile long list of pain ...
Conways passion in life is to help people through natural less invasive avenues with chiropractic, physical therapy, and ...
The doctor prescribed physical therapy, but I decided to try my chiropractor friend who says she can help me. I had my first ... discuss spinal decompression therapy all say that people with hardware in their backs should NOT have decompression therapy. ... discuss spinal decompression therapy all say that people with hardware in their backs should NOT have decompression therapy. ... Harrington Rod + Spinal Decompression Therapy = Safe? Hello! I have a Harrington Rod that was placed in 1984 when I was 12. I ...
... and whether spinal decompression works for anyone with a herniated disc. ... Chiropractic patients who have undergone spinal decompression discuss inversion tables, ... All About Spinal Decompression Therapy Want to know more about spinal decompression from those who have been affected most? In ... Spinal Decompression Patients Advice: Avoiding Herniated Disc Surgery and Decompression Providers * Spinal Decompression ...
What Is Spinal Decompression?. Spinal decompression is a type of treatment for back pain. Decompression can be done both ... Doctors can use two procedures to perform surgical spinal decompression, also called spinal decompression. Surgeons can use ... Decompression therapy is a non-surgical treatment that helps relieve back pain caused by pressure in your spine. During non- ... There are different techniques for decompression therapy. Some health care providers place a harness around the hips. The ...
Spinal decompression therapy and its effectiveness. An article published on Spine-health.com defines spinal decompression ... Spinal decompression therapy: One more option to consider before surgery. Christina DeBusk January 27, 2015. ... Does insurance cover spinal decompression therapy?. Unfortunately, many plans (Medicare included) dont currently cover this ... One study, published in Neurological Research, found spinal decompression therapy to be extremely effective. With this ...
... spinal stenosis, disc degeneration, and sciatica. The procedure is nonsurgical spinal decompression therapy. ... Spinal decompression therapy is used to create a distractive force to relieve pressure on the nerve roots. The device we use is ... Q: I own a spinal decompression therapy table. Most of my patients have insurance and want me to submit the claim to their ... One action step to take is to call the carrier and ask what their position is on spinal decompression therapy. If you are "in- ...
... 3 Answers , Asked by Kathleen Ferguson ... What are the benefits of Spinal Decompression Therapy towards back health?. BackBack Care ... Home » IDEA Answers » What are the benefits of Spinal Decompression Therapy towards back health? ... I would like to let you know about a self-treatment for spinal decompression which I teach as a MELT (Myofascial Energetic ...
Right back decompression may also be called vertebral decompression, spinal decompression, back decompression or traction. The ... Non-Surgical Spinal Decompression Therapy. May 12, 2020. 4 min read mulmdis ... Occasionally this could include light spinal decompression exercises that really help relieve squeezed nerves by extending them ... you may benefit from the chiropractic process called spinal decompression. Your pain and numbness may be brought on by ruined ...
Wondered if anyone else has experience with Spinal Decompression Therapy ??. Thanks to any who reply.. Doug ... But my Chiropractor showed me something called Spinal Decompression therapy. It will not fix the degeneration or arthritic ... had it done, I had l3 and l4 problems, dr zemankewicz in Bartow sciatic pain yadayadayada the therapy works a treat, if it is ...
... Discuss this article in the ChiroACCESS Forums ... Non-Surgical Spinal Decompression Therapy: A Review of the Literature This information is provided to you for use in ... Decompression: a treatment for back pain. Occupational Medicine 2004; 11(10). 25. Foye P. Spinal Decompression: news story or ... Spinal decompression therapy may be an effective treatment for low back pain but significantly more research is required to ...
Spinal decompression therapy is a non-surgical treatment for chronic back and neck pain. This treatment provides you complete ... New York Spinal Decompression TherapySciaticaSpinal DecompressionSpinal Decompression Treatment Brooklyn. ... Spinal Decompression Therapy for Neck and Back Pain. Posted by admin on August 8, 2008 , Filed under: Spinal Decompression; ... Spinal compression is the common cause for neck and back pain. Spinal decompression causes the expansion of disc herniations, ...
... including heat/cold therapy, ultrasound and electrical stimulation, which will help your muscles contract. Read on to know more ... Other options may be used in conjunction with spinal decompression therapy, including heat/cold therapy, ultrasound and ... Most people have heard of nonsurgical spinal decompression therapy though they may not know what it does or why its done. If ... What is Spinal Decompression Therapy? How can it help?. Published on June 26th, 2015 ...
Get spinal decompression therapy in Orlando, FL by Orlando Spinal Aid Center. ... Looking for spinal decompression services or back & Neck Pain services in FL? ... and chiropractic spinal adjustments. Spinal adjustments are a vital and necessary part of spinal decompression therapy and are ... At orlando Spinal Aid Chiropractic Center, spinal decompression therapy increases circulation to the damaged disc, allowing it ...
Get spinal decompression therapy in Orlando, FL by Orlando Spinal Aid Center. ... Looking for spinal decompression services or back & Neck Pain services in FL? ... and chiropractic spinal adjustments. Spinal adjustments are a vital and necessary part of spinal decompression therapy and are ... Your Spinal Decompression Therapy package includes: 24 decompression treatments, necessary posture rehab sessions, an exercise ...
Spinal Decompression Therapy. A Holistic, Non-Surgical Spinal Treatment. Spinal decompression is a non-surgical therapy ... Spinal stenosis. Spinal decompression therapy reverses compression on the spinal discs in the neck or lower back caused by ... What to expect before, during and after spinal decompression. When you undergo spinal decompression therapy at Kayal Pain & ... Spinal decompression is favored by many people because it is a low-risk, pain-free, non-surgical therapy. It can be an ...
Even if shockwave therapy is not the optimal treatment in your particular case, Dr. Caruso has access to a wide range of other ... Shockwave therapy has been slow to take hold in the United States, but it is widely used in medical institutions worldwide for ... Radial Shockwave Therapy With Enpuls Version 2.0 by Zimmer MedizinSysteme. In this age of high-tech wonders, sometimes the ... Shockwave therapy, which blocks transmission of pain, has also been reported to be effective in breaking down scar tissue and ...
Nonsurgical spinal decompression is a kind of mechanical traction that may help to calm back pain. Spinal decompression works ... Some people turn to spinal decompression therapy either surgical or nonsurgical. Heres what you require to know to help ... You are completely decked out during spinal decompression therapy. The doctor fits you with equipment around your pelvis and ... To be aware how influential physical therapy Kelowna really is, investigators require to contrast spinal decompression with ...
  • During DTS Therapy, you'll experience several cycles of stretch and relaxation, which gently graduates to a peak over a period of several minutes. (kearneywellness.org)
  • Please see attached information regarding spinal decompression therapy from the equipment manufacturer and the numerous research articles that have proven the effectiveness of spinal decompression therapy. (chiroeco.com)
  • Are There Medical Studies that Document the Effectiveness of Spinal Decompression Therapy? (corewellnesscentre.ca)
  • what are the risk factors for a elderly overweight/obese client with (L4/L5 spinal injury), decompressive laminectomy? (ideafit.com)
  • It is recommended as a supplement to enhance the benefits of physical therapy, massage therapy, soft tissue mobilization, and chiropractic and orthopedic care provided by our expert staff. (blogspot.com)
  • Chiropractic Specialty Center was the first center in Malaysia to offer Spinal Decompression Therapy. (mychiro.com.my)
  • If your doctor does not yet offer spinal decompression therapy, they can help refer you to someone who does. (romochiropractic.com)
  • What is a Typical Spinal Decompression Therapy Session? (promedx.ca)
  • In a typical spinal decompression therapy session, a patient lies on a motorized table, either in a prone or supine position, with the lower half free to make any movements. (promedx.ca)