Cauda Equina: The lower part of the SPINAL CORD consisting of the lumbar, sacral, and coccygeal nerve roots.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Polyradiculopathy: Disease or injury involving multiple SPINAL NERVE ROOTS. Polyradiculitis refers to inflammation of multiple spinal nerve roots.Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Sperm Maturation: The maturing process of SPERMATOZOA after leaving the testicular SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES. Maturation in SPERM MOTILITY and FERTILITY takes place in the EPIDIDYMIS as the sperm migrate from caput epididymis to cauda epididymis.Spinal Nerve Roots: Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.Spinal Cord Compression: Acute and chronic conditions characterized by external mechanical compression of the SPINAL CORD due to extramedullary neoplasm; EPIDURAL ABSCESS; SPINAL FRACTURES; bony deformities of the vertebral bodies; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations vary with the anatomic site of the lesion and may include localized pain, weakness, sensory loss, incontinence, and impotence.Injections, Spinal: Introduction of therapeutic agents into the spinal region using a needle and syringe.Spinal Cord Diseases: Pathologic conditions which feature SPINAL CORD damage or dysfunction, including disorders involving the meninges and perimeningeal spaces surrounding the spinal cord. Traumatic injuries, vascular diseases, infections, and inflammatory/autoimmune processes may affect the spinal cord.Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from peripheral nerve tissue. This includes NEUROFIBROMAS; SCHWANNOMAS; GRANULAR CELL TUMORS; and malignant peripheral NERVE SHEATH NEOPLASMS. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp1750-1)Spinal Nerves: The 31 paired peripheral nerves formed by the union of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots from each spinal cord segment. The spinal nerve plexuses and the spinal roots are also included.Spinal DiseasesSpermatozoa: Mature male germ cells derived from SPERMATIDS. As spermatids move toward the lumen of the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES, they undergo extensive structural changes including the loss of cytoplasm, condensation of CHROMATIN into the SPERM HEAD, formation of the ACROSOME cap, the SPERM MIDPIECE and the SPERM TAIL that provides motility.Spinal Canal: The cavity within the SPINAL COLUMN through which the SPINAL CORD passes.Anesthesia, Spinal: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected directly into the spinal cord.Spinal Stenosis: Narrowing of the spinal canal.Spinal NeoplasmsSpinal Cord Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms which occur within the substance of the spinal cord (intramedullary neoplasms) or in the space between the dura and spinal cord (intradural extramedullary neoplasms). The majority of intramedullary spinal tumors are primary CNS neoplasms including ASTROCYTOMA; EPENDYMOMA; and LIPOMA. Intramedullary neoplasms are often associated with SYRINGOMYELIA. The most frequent histologic types of intradural-extramedullary tumors are MENINGIOMA and NEUROFIBROMA.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Sperm Transport: Passive or active movement of SPERMATOZOA from the testicular SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES through the male reproductive tract as well as within the female reproductive tract.Nerve Compression Syndromes: Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.Laminectomy: A surgical procedure that entails removing all (laminectomy) or part (laminotomy) of selected vertebral lamina to relieve pressure on the SPINAL CORD and/or SPINAL NERVE ROOTS. Vertebral lamina is the thin flattened posterior wall of vertebral arch that forms the vertebral foramen through which pass the spinal cord and nerve roots.Sperm Motility: Movement characteristics of SPERMATOZOA in a fresh specimen. It is measured as the percentage of sperms that are moving, and as the percentage of sperms with productive flagellar motion such as rapid, linear, and forward progression.Spinal Injuries: Injuries involving the vertebral column.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Muscular Atrophy, Spinal: A group of disorders marked by progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord resulting in weakness and muscular atrophy, usually without evidence of injury to the corticospinal tracts. Diseases in this category include Werdnig-Hoffmann disease and later onset SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHIES OF CHILDHOOD, most of which are hereditary. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1089)Rete Testis: The network of channels formed at the termination of the straight SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES in the mediastinum testis. Rete testis channels drain into the efferent ductules that pass into the caput EPIDIDYMIS.Lumbosacral Region: Region of the back including the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE, SACRUM, and nearby structures.Spinal Cord Ischemia: Reduced blood flow to the spinal cord which is supplied by the anterior spinal artery and the paired posterior spinal arteries. This condition may be associated with ARTERIOSCLEROSIS, trauma, emboli, diseases of the aorta, and other disorders. Prolonged ischemia may lead to INFARCTION of spinal cord tissue.Ganglia, Spinal: Sensory ganglia located on the dorsal spinal roots within the vertebral column. The spinal ganglion cells are pseudounipolar. The single primary branch bifurcates sending a peripheral process to carry sensory information from the periphery and a central branch which relays that information to the spinal cord or brain.Tuberculosis, Spinal: Osteitis or caries of the vertebrae, usually occurring as a complication of tuberculosis of the lungs.Myelography: X-ray visualization of the spinal cord following injection of contrast medium into the spinal arachnoid space.Motor Neurons: Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Sacrum: Five fused VERTEBRAE forming a triangle-shaped structure at the back of the PELVIS. It articulates superiorly with the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE, inferiorly with the COCCYX, and anteriorly with the ILIUM of the PELVIS. The sacrum strengthens and stabilizes the PELVIS.Decompression, Surgical: A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Paraplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness.Arachnoiditis: Acute or chronic inflammation of the arachnoid membrane of the meninges most often involving the spinal cord or base of the brain. This term generally refers to a persistent inflammatory process characterized by thickening of the ARACHNOID membrane and dural adhesions. Associated conditions include prior surgery, infections, trauma, SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, and chemical irritation. Clinical features vary with the site of inflammation, but include cranial neuropathies, radiculopathies, and myelopathies. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1997, Ch48, p25)Testis: The male gonad containing two functional parts: the SEMINIFEROUS TUBULES for the production and transport of male germ cells (SPERMATOGENESIS) and the interstitial compartment containing LEYDIG CELLS that produce ANDROGENS.Spinal Curvatures: Deformities of the SPINE characterized by abnormal bending or flexure in the vertebral column. They may be bending forward (KYPHOSIS), backward (LORDOSIS), or sideway (SCOLIOSIS).Hematoma, Epidural, Spinal: A rare epidural hematoma in the spinal epidural space, usually due to a vascular malformation (CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM VASCULAR MALFORMATIONS) or TRAUMA. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is a neurologic emergency due to a rapidly evolving compressive MYELOPATHY.Sperm Count: A count of SPERM in the ejaculum, expressed as number per milliliter.Posterior Horn Cells: Neurons in the SPINAL CORD DORSAL HORN whose cell bodies and processes are confined entirely to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. They receive collateral or direct terminations of dorsal root fibers. They send their axons either directly to ANTERIOR HORN CELLS or to the WHITE MATTER ascending and descending longitudinal fibers.Ejaculation: The emission of SEMEN to the exterior, resulting from the contraction of muscles surrounding the male internal urogenital ducts.Cervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.Genitalia, Male: The male reproductive organs. They are divided into the external organs (PENIS; SCROTUM;and URETHRA) and the internal organs (TESTIS; EPIDIDYMIS; VAS DEFERENS; SEMINAL VESICLES; EJACULATORY DUCTS; PROSTATE; and BULBOURETHRAL GLANDS).Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Paraparesis: Mild to moderate loss of bilateral lower extremity motor function, which may be a manifestation of SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; MUSCULAR DISEASES; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; parasagittal brain lesions; and other conditions.Spinal Muscular Atrophies of Childhood: A group of recessively inherited diseases that feature progressive muscular atrophy and hypotonia. They are classified as type I (Werdnig-Hoffman disease), type II (intermediate form), and type III (Kugelberg-Welander disease). Type I is fatal in infancy, type II has a late infantile onset and is associated with survival into the second or third decade. Type III has its onset in childhood, and is slowly progressive. (J Med Genet 1996 Apr:33(4):281-3)Sperm Tail: The posterior filiform portion of the spermatozoon (SPERMATOZOA) that provides sperm motility.Sperm Head: The anterior portion of the spermatozoon (SPERMATOZOA) that contains mainly the nucleus with highly compact CHROMATIN material.Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Intervertebral Disc Displacement: An INTERVERTEBRAL DISC in which the nucleus pulposus has protruded through surrounding fibrocartilage. This occurs most frequently in the lower lumbar region.Radiculopathy: Disease involving a spinal nerve root (see SPINAL NERVE ROOTS) which may result from compression related to INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; SPINAL CORD INJURIES; SPINAL DISEASES; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations include radicular pain, weakness, and sensory loss referable to structures innervated by the involved nerve root.Spinal Fractures: Broken bones in the vertebral column.Chlorohydrins: Any of the compounds derived from a group of glycols or polyhydroxy alcohols by chlorine substitution for part of the hydroxyl groups. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Spinal Cord Regeneration: Repair of the damaged neuron function after SPINAL CORD INJURY or SPINAL CORD DISEASES.alpha-Chlorohydrin: A chlorinated PROPANEDIOL with antifertility activity in males used as a chemosterilant in rodents.Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic: Dysfunction of the URINARY BLADDER due to disease of the central or peripheral nervous system pathways involved in the control of URINATION. This is often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, but may also be caused by BRAIN DISEASES or PERIPHERAL NERVE DISEASES.Ejaculatory Ducts: Paired ducts in the human male through which semen is ejaculated into the urethra.Acrosome: The cap-like structure covering the anterior portion of SPERM HEAD. Acrosome, derived from LYSOSOMES, is a membrane-bound organelle that contains the required hydrolytic and proteolytic enzymes necessary for sperm penetration of the egg in FERTILIZATION.Quadriplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in all four limbs which may result from BRAIN DISEASES; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or rarely MUSCULAR DISEASES. The locked-in syndrome is characterized by quadriplegia in combination with cranial muscle paralysis. Consciousness is spared and the only retained voluntary motor activity may be limited eye movements. This condition is usually caused by a lesion in the upper BRAIN STEM which injures the descending cortico-spinal and cortico-bulbar tracts.Trigeminal Nucleus, Spinal: Nucleus of the spinal tract of the trigeminal nerve. It is divided cytoarchitectonically into three parts: oralis, caudalis (TRIGEMINAL CAUDAL NUCLEUS), and interpolaris.Hyperalgesia: An increased sensation of pain or discomfort produced by mimimally noxious stimuli due to damage to soft tissue containing NOCICEPTORS or injury to a peripheral nerve.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Manipulation, Spinal: Adjustment and manipulation of the vertebral column.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Sperm Capacitation: The structural and functional changes by which SPERMATOZOA become capable of oocyte FERTILIZATION. It normally requires exposing the sperm to the female genital tract for a period of time to bring about increased SPERM MOTILITY and the ACROSOME REACTION before fertilization in the FALLOPIAN TUBES can take place.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Meningocele: A congenital or acquired protrusion of the meninges, unaccompanied by neural tissue, through a bony defect in the skull or vertebral column.Anterior Horn Cells: MOTOR NEURONS in the anterior (ventral) horn of the SPINAL CORD which project to SKELETAL MUSCLES.Spermatogenesis: The process of germ cell development in the male from the primordial germ cells, through SPERMATOGONIA; SPERMATOCYTES; SPERMATIDS; to the mature haploid SPERMATOZOA.Neuralgia: Intense or aching pain that occurs along the course or distribution of a peripheral or cranial nerve.Axons: Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.Epidural Space: Space between the dura mater and the walls of the vertebral canal.Ornidazole: A nitroimidazole antiprotozoal agent used in ameba and trichomonas infections. It is partially plasma-bound and also has radiation-sensitizing action.Cordotomy: Any operation on the spinal cord. (Stedman, 26th ed)Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Spinal Puncture: Tapping fluid from the subarachnoid space in the lumbar region, usually between the third and fourth lumbar vertebrae.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Neurilemmoma: A neoplasm that arises from SCHWANN CELLS of the cranial, peripheral, and autonomic nerves. Clinically, these tumors may present as a cranial neuropathy, abdominal or soft tissue mass, intracranial lesion, or with spinal cord compression. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, highly vascular, and composed of a homogenous pattern of biphasic fusiform-shaped cells that may have a palisaded appearance. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp964-5)Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Ligamentum Flavum: The paired bands of yellow elastic tissue that connect adjoining laminae of the vertebrae. With the laminae, it forms the posterior wall of the spinal canal and helps hold the body erect.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Seminiferous Tubules: The convoluted tubules in the TESTIS where sperm are produced (SPERMATOGENESIS) and conveyed to the RETE TESTIS. Spermatogenic tubules are composed of developing germ cells and the supporting SERTOLI CELLS.Electrodiagnosis: Diagnosis of disease states by recording the spontaneous electrical activity of tissues or organs or by the response to stimulation of electrically excitable tissue.Vas Deferens: The excretory duct of the testes that carries SPERMATOZOA. It rises from the SCROTUM and joins the SEMINAL VESICLES to form the ejaculatory duct.Forensic Ballistics: The science of studying projectiles in motion, ballistics, being applied to law. Ballistics on firearm projectiles, such as bullets, include the study of what happens inside the weapon, during the flight of the projectile, and when the projectile strikes the target, such as body tissue.Nerve Regeneration: Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.Fertility: The capacity to conceive or to induce conception. It may refer to either the male or female.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Nociceptors: Peripheral AFFERENT NEURONS which are sensitive to injuries or pain, usually caused by extreme thermal exposures, mechanical forces, or other noxious stimuli. Their cell bodies reside in the DORSAL ROOT GANGLIA. Their peripheral terminals (NERVE ENDINGS) innervate target tissues and transduce noxious stimuli via axons to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain located in the posterior regions of the THORAX; LUMBOSACRAL REGION; or the adjacent regions.Myelitis: Inflammation of the spinal cord. Relatively common etiologies include infections; AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES; SPINAL CORD; and ischemia (see also SPINAL CORD VASCULAR DISEASES). Clinical features generally include weakness, sensory loss, localized pain, incontinence, and other signs of autonomic dysfunction.Epididymal Secretory Proteins: Proteins secreted by the epididymal epithelium. These proteins are both tissue- and species-specific. They are important molecular agents in the process of sperm maturation.Contraceptive Agents, Male: Chemical substances or agents with contraceptive activity in males. Use for male contraceptive agents in general or for which there is no specific heading.Hypesthesia: Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.Scoliosis: An appreciable lateral deviation in the normally straight vertical line of the spine. (Dorland, 27th ed)Spinal Cord Stimulation: Application of electric current to the spine for treatment of a variety of conditions involving innervation from the spinal cord.Peripheral Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the peripheral nerves external to the brain and spinal cord, which includes diseases of the nerve roots, ganglia, plexi, autonomic nerves, sensory nerves, and motor nerves.Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory: The electric response evoked in the CEREBRAL CORTEX by stimulation along AFFERENT PATHWAYS from PERIPHERAL NERVES to CEREBRUM.Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Testosterone: A potent androgenic steroid and major product secreted by the LEYDIG CELLS of the TESTIS. Its production is stimulated by LUTEINIZING HORMONE from the PITUITARY GLAND. In turn, testosterone exerts feedback control of the pituitary LH and FSH secretion. Depending on the tissues, testosterone can be further converted to DIHYDROTESTOSTERONE or ESTRADIOL.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Afferent Pathways: Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a peripheral part toward a nerve center.Vasectomy: Surgical removal of the ductus deferens, or a portion of it. It is done in association with prostatectomy, or to induce infertility. (Dorland, 28th ed)Paralysis: A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)Sperm-Ovum Interactions: Interactive processes between the oocyte (OVUM) and the sperm (SPERMATOZOA) including sperm adhesion, ACROSOME REACTION, sperm penetration of the ZONA PELLUCIDA, and events leading to FERTILIZATION.Spinal Dysraphism: Congenital defects of closure of one or more vertebral arches, which may be associated with malformations of the spinal cord, nerve roots, congenital fibrous bands, lipomas, and congenital cysts. These malformations range from mild (e.g., SPINA BIFIDA OCCULTA) to severe, including rachischisis where there is complete failure of neural tube and spinal cord fusion, resulting in exposure of the spinal cord at the surface. Spinal dysraphism includes all forms of spina bifida. The open form is called SPINA BIFIDA CYSTICA and the closed form is SPINA BIFIDA OCCULTA. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p34)Paresthesia: Subjective cutaneous sensations (e.g., cold, warmth, tingling, pressure, etc.) that are experienced spontaneously in the absence of stimulation.Hematoma, Subdural, Spinal: Subdural hematoma of the SPINAL CANAL.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Neurologic Examination: Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.Hemangioblastoma: A benign tumor of the nervous system that may occur sporadically or in association with VON HIPPEL-LINDAU DISEASE. It accounts for approximately 2% of intracranial tumors, arising most frequently in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. Histologically, the tumors are composed of multiple capillary and sinusoidal channels lined with endothelial cells and clusters of lipid-laden pseudoxanthoma cells. Usually solitary, these tumors can be multiple and may also occur in the brain stem, spinal cord, retina, and supratentorial compartment. Cerebellar hemangioblastomas usually present in the third decade with INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION, and ataxia. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2071-2)Wounds, Gunshot: Disruption of structural continuity of the body as a result of the discharge of firearms.Neurons, Afferent: Neurons which conduct NERVE IMPULSES to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Physical Stimulation: Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.Spinal Osteophytosis: Outgrowth of immature bony processes or bone spurs (OSTEOPHYTE) from the VERTEBRAE, reflecting the presence of degenerative disease and calcification. It commonly occurs in cervical and lumbar SPONDYLOSIS.Vasovasostomy: Surgical anastomosis or fistulization of the spermatic ducts to restore fertility in a previously vasectomized male.Hindlimb: Either of two extremities of four-footed non-primate land animals. It usually consists of a FEMUR; TIBIA; and FIBULA; tarsals; METATARSALS; and TOES. (From Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p73)Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Replantation: Restoration of an organ or other structure to its original site.Synovial Cyst: Non-neoplastic tumor-like lesions at joints, developed from the SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE of a joint through the JOINT CAPSULE into the periarticular tissues. They are filled with SYNOVIAL FLUID with a smooth and translucent appearance. A synovial cyst can develop from any joint, but most commonly at the back of the knee, where it is known as POPLITEAL CYST.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Urination: Discharge of URINE, liquid waste processed by the KIDNEY, from the body.Survival of Motor Neuron 1 Protein: A SMN complex protein that is essential for the function of the SMN protein complex. In humans the protein is encoded by a single gene found near the inversion telomere of a large inverted region of CHROMOSOME 5. Mutations in the gene coding for survival of motor neuron 1 protein may result in SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHIES OF CHILDHOOD.Paraganglioma: A neural crest tumor usually derived from the chromoreceptor tissue of a paraganglion, such as the carotid body, or medulla of the adrenal gland (usually called a chromaffinoma or pheochromocytoma). It is more common in women than in men. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Electric Stimulation Therapy: Application of electric current in treatment without the generation of perceptible heat. It includes electric stimulation of nerves or muscles, passage of current into the body, or use of interrupted current of low intensity to raise the threshold of the skin to pain.Interneurons: Most generally any NEURONS which are not motor or sensory. Interneurons may also refer to neurons whose AXONS remain within a particular brain region in contrast to projection neurons, which have axons projecting to other brain regions.Ligation: Application of a ligature to tie a vessel or strangulate a part.Neural Conduction: The propagation of the NERVE IMPULSE along the nerve away from the site of an excitation stimulus.Analgesics: Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.Zona Pellucida: A tough transparent membrane surrounding the OVUM. It is penetrated by the sperm during FERTILIZATION.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Lampreys: Common name for the only family (Petromyzontidae) of eellike fish in the order Petromyzontiformes. They are jawless but have a sucking mouth with horny teeth.Spinal Cord Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any of the BLOOD VESSELS feeding the SPINAL CORD, such as the anterior and paired posterior spinal arteries or their many branches. Disease processes may include ATHEROSCLEROSIS; EMBOLISM; and ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS leading to ISCHEMIA or HEMORRHAGE into the spinal cord (hematomyelia).Urination Disorders: Abnormalities in the process of URINE voiding, including bladder control, frequency of URINATION, as well as the volume and composition of URINE.Seminal Vesicles: A saclike, glandular diverticulum on each ductus deferens in male vertebrates. It is united with the excretory duct and serves for temporary storage of semen. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)SMN Complex Proteins: A complex of proteins that assemble the SNRNP CORE PROTEINS into a core structure that surrounds a highly conserved RNA sequence found in SMALL NUCLEAR RNA. They are found localized in the GEMINI OF COILED BODIES and in the CYTOPLASM. The SMN complex is named after the Survival of Motor Neuron Complex Protein 1, which is a critical component of the complex.Sciatica: A condition characterized by pain radiating from the back into the buttock and posterior/lateral aspects of the leg. Sciatica may be a manifestation of SCIATIC NEUROPATHY; RADICULOPATHY (involving the SPINAL NERVE ROOTS; L4, L5, S1, or S2, often associated with INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT); or lesions of the CAUDA EQUINA.Decerebrate State: A condition characterized by abnormal posturing of the limbs that is associated with injury to the brainstem. This may occur as a clinical manifestation or induced experimentally in animals. The extensor reflexes are exaggerated leading to rigid extension of the limbs accompanied by hyperreflexia and opisthotonus. This condition is usually caused by lesions which occur in the region of the brainstem that lies between the red nuclei and the vestibular nuclei. In contrast, decorticate rigidity is characterized by flexion of the elbows and wrists with extension of the legs and feet. The causative lesion for this condition is located above the red nuclei and usually consists of diffuse cerebral damage. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p358)Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Urinary Bladder: A musculomembranous sac along the URINARY TRACT. URINE flows from the KIDNEYS into the bladder via the ureters (URETER), and is held there until URINATION.Mesocricetus: A genus of the family Muridae having three species. The present domesticated strains were developed from individuals brought from Syria. They are widely used in biomedical research.Kyphosis: Deformities of the SPINE characterized by an exaggerated convexity of the vertebral column. The forward bending of the thoracic region usually is more than 40 degrees. This deformity sometimes is called round back or hunchback.Castration: Surgical removal or artificial destruction of gonads.Pyramidal Tracts: Fibers that arise from cells within the cerebral cortex, pass through the medullary pyramid, and descend in the spinal cord. Many authorities say the pyramidal tracts include both the corticospinal and corticobulbar tracts.Spondylitis, Ankylosing: A chronic inflammatory condition affecting the axial joints, such as the SACROILIAC JOINT and other intervertebral or costovertebral joints. It occurs predominantly in young males and is characterized by pain and stiffness of joints (ANKYLOSIS) with inflammation at tendon insertions.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Scrotum: A cutaneous pouch of skin containing the testicles and spermatic cords.Pain Threshold: Amount of stimulation required before the sensation of pain is experienced.Tabes Dorsalis: Parenchymatous NEUROSYPHILIS marked by slowly progressive degeneration of the posterior columns, posterior roots, and ganglia of the spinal cord. The condition tends to present 15 to 20 years after the initial infection and is characterized by lightening-like pains in the lower extremities, URINARY INCONTINENCE; ATAXIA; severely impaired position and vibratory sense, abnormal gait (see GAIT DISORDERS, NEUROLOGIC), OPTIC ATROPHY; Argyll-Robertson pupils, hypotonia, hyperreflexia, and trophic joint degeneration (Charcot's Joint; see ARTHROPATHY, NEUROGENIC). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p726)Epidural Abscess: Circumscribed collections of suppurative material occurring in the spinal or intracranial EPIDURAL SPACE. The majority of epidural abscesses occur in the spinal canal and are associated with OSTEOMYELITIS of a vertebral body; ANALGESIA, EPIDURAL; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations include local and radicular pain, weakness, sensory loss, URINARY INCONTINENCE, and FECAL INCONTINENCE. Cranial epidural abscesses are usually associated with OSTEOMYELITIS of a cranial bone, SINUSITIS, or OTITIS MEDIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p710 and pp1240-1; J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1998 Aug;65(2):209-12)Morphine: The principal alkaloid in opium and the prototype opiate analgesic and narcotic. Morphine has widespread effects in the central nervous system and on smooth muscle.Sexual Maturation: Achievement of full sexual capacity in animals and in humans.Autonomic Dysreflexia: A syndrome associated with damage to the spinal cord above the mid thoracic level (see SPINAL CORD INJURIES) characterized by a marked increase in the sympathetic response to minor stimuli such as bladder or rectal distention. Manifestations include HYPERTENSION; TACHYCARDIA (or reflex bradycardia); FEVER; FLUSHING; and HYPERHIDROSIS. Extreme hypertension may be associated with a STROKE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp538 and 1232; J Spinal Cord Med 1997;20(3):355-60)Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Anesthesia, Obstetrical: A variety of anesthetic methods such as EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA used to control the pain of childbirth.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Muscle Spasticity: A form of muscle hypertonia associated with upper MOTOR NEURON DISEASE. Resistance to passive stretch of a spastic muscle results in minimal initial resistance (a "free interval") followed by an incremental increase in muscle tone. Tone increases in proportion to the velocity of stretch. Spasticity is usually accompanied by HYPERREFLEXIA and variable degrees of MUSCLE WEAKNESS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p54)Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Strychnine: An alkaloid found in the seeds of STRYCHNOS NUX-VOMICA. It is a competitive antagonist at glycine receptors and thus a convulsant. It has been used as an analeptic, in the treatment of nonketotic hyperglycinemia and sleep apnea, and as a rat poison.Paraganglioma, Extra-Adrenal: A relatively rare, usually benign neoplasm originating in the chemoreceptor tissue of the CAROTID BODY; GLOMUS JUGULARE; GLOMUS TYMPANICUM; AORTIC BODIES; and the female genital tract. It consists histologically of rounded or ovoid hyperchromatic cells that tend to be grouped in an alveolus-like pattern within a scant to moderate amount of fibrous stroma and a few large thin-walled vascular channels. (From Stedman, 27th ed)Urodynamics: The mechanical laws of fluid dynamics as they apply to urine transport.Subarachnoid Space: The space between the arachnoid membrane and PIA MATER, filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID. It contains large blood vessels that supply the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Low Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain in the lumbar or sacral regions, which may be associated with musculo-ligamentous SPRAINS AND STRAINS; INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; and other conditions.Efferent Pathways: Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a nerve center toward a peripheral site. Such impulses are conducted via efferent neurons (NEURONS, EFFERENT), such as MOTOR NEURONS, autonomic neurons, and hypophyseal neurons.Brain Stem: The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.
He was the first doctor to provide a methodical description of perineurial cysts of the spinal region, which are now known as ... Tarlov, I.M. (1953). Sacral nerve-root cysts; another cause of the sciatic or cauda equina syndrome. Springfield, Ill.: C.C. ... The following year he received a grant from the United States Public Health Service to study spinal cord compression. He ... Tarlov, I.M. (1957). Spinal Cord Compression; Mechanism of Paralysis and Treatment. Springfield, Ill.: C.C. Thomas. ...
After the spinal cord tapers out, the spinal nerves continue to branch out diagonally, forming the cauda equina. The pia mater ... The conus medullaris (Latin for "medullary cone") or conus terminalis is the tapered, lower end of the spinal cord. It occurs ... The latter contribute more to the vascular supply of the cauda equina. Conus medullaris syndrome is a collection of signs and ... Comparatively, cauda equina syndrome may cause radicular pain, bowel/bladder dysfunction, saddle anesthesia and lower extremity ...
The actual spinal cord (Angelamedulla spinalis) terminates between vertebrae one and two of this series, called L1 and L2. The ... nervous tissue that extends below this point are individual strands that collectively form the cauda equina. In between each ... This is why a disorder of the low back that affects a nerve root, such as a spinal disc herniation, can cause pain that ... anatomy the five vertebrae in the lumbar region of the back are the largest and strongest in the movable part of the spinal ...
"Descriptive epidemiology of malignant and nonmalignant primary spinal cord, spinal meninges, and cauda equina tumors, United ... They develop from cells that line both the hollow cavities of the brain and the canal containing the spinal cord, but they ... They may also arise in the spinal cord, conus medullaris and supratentorial locations. Other symptoms can include (but are not ... Usually, in pediatric cases the location is intracranial, while in adults it is spinal. The common location of intracranial ...
Adding spinal implant devices during fusion increases the risks but provides no added improvement in pain or function. It is ... In particular, early use of imaging (either MRI or CT) is recommended for suspected cancer, infection, or cauda equina syndrome ... As a result, there is less space through which the spinal cord and nerve roots may pass. When a disc degenerates as a result of ... It may also be useful in those with spinal stenosis. In the absence of these issues, there is no clear evidence of a benefit ...
The kinematics of a complete spinal motion segment when one of its constituent spinal joints are manipulated are much more ... and cauda equina syndrome. In a 1993 study, J.D. Cassidy, DC, and co-workers concluded that the treatment of lumbar ... In particular, the rapid rate of change of force that occurs during the thrust phase when spinal joints are manipulated is not ... When applied to joints in the spine, it is referred to as spinal manipulation. Manipulation is known by several other names. ...
Besides os cuculi, os caudae, with caudae, of the tail is attested. This Latin expression might be the source of the English, ... Panourias, I.G., Stranjalis, G., Stavrinou, L.C. & Sakas, D.E. (2011). The Hellenic and Hippocratic origins of the spinal ... os, cuculus, cauda. Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short. A Latin Dictionary on Perseus Project. Schreger, C.H.Th.(1805). ...
... a condition in which the spinal canal (the spaces the spinal cord runs through) narrows and compresses the spinal cord, cauda ... may extrude through the tear and press against spinal nerves within the spinal cord, cauda equina, or exiting nerve roots, ... Other compressive spinal causes include lumbar spinal stenosis, ... or muscle weakness may result from spinal tumors or cauda ... This can occur as a result of a spinal disk bulge or spinal disc herniation (a herniated intervertebral disc), or from ...
The thecal sac or dural sac is the membranous sheath or tube of dura mater that surrounds the spinal cord and the cauda equina ... tethered spinal cord syndrome may occur. In a split cord malformation, some portion of the spinal cord is divided into parallel ... If the spinal cord is not free to move within the thecal sac due to abnormal tissue attachments, especially during growth, ... The lumbar cistern within the thecal sac is the subarachnoid space below the end of the spinal cord and above the tapering of ...
Other characteristics of BNS identified via MRI are abnormal enhancement of cranial and spinal nerves, as well as thickening ... and enhancement of the cauda equina. The MYD88 L2659 is a gene mutation found in the majority of WM cases. During CSF analysis ... and/or the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Symptoms are diverse and nonspecific, and they can vary depending on which aspect of ...
The level of spinal cord injury for this class involves people who have incomplete lesions at a slightly higher level. This ... This is often caused by polio or cauda-equina syndrome. Swimmers in this class lack full propulsion in their kicks because of a ... People with spinal cord injuries compete in this class, including F7 and F8 sportspeople. F7 is wheelchair sport classification ...
Decompression of the spinal cord or cauda equina[edit]. Laminectomy is an open or minimally invasive surgical procedure in ... Spinal decompression is a surgical procedure intended to relieve pressure on the spinal cord or on one or more compressed nerve ... In the lumbar spine it is commonly used to treat spinal claudication caused by spinal stenosis, and is considered the most ... Spinal Stenosis~treatment at eMedicine *^ "Back and Leg Pain - Definition List , Resources , HJD Spine Center". Med.nyu.edu. ...
While only around 10 percent of adults have a spinal abnormality due to genetics, a sixth lumbar vertebra is one of the more ... One study found that male German Shepherd Dogs with a lumbosacral transitional vertebra are at greater risk for cauda equina ... dead link] "Spinal Cord, Inc". Retrieved November 27, 2016. "Laser Spine Institute". Retrieved November 27, 2016. Braund, K.G ... Most around 85% are not clinically significant, but they can cause compression of the spinal cord by deforming the vertebral ...
If the prolapse is very large and presses on the nerves within the spinal column or the cauda equina, both sides of the body ... Spinal manipulation is contraindicated for disc herniations when there are progressive neurological deficits such as with cauda ... "2.1 Absolute contraindications to spinal manipulative therapy", p. 21. WHO *^ Daniel, Dwain M (2007). "Non-surgical spinal ... In the majority of cases, spinal disc herniation doesn't require surgery. A study on sciatica, which can be caused by spinal ...
CSF within the spinal cord can flow all the way down to the lumbar cistern at the end of the cord around the cauda equina where ... The brain and spinal cord are covered by the meninges, the three protective membranes of the tough dura mater, the arachnoid ... The fourth ventricle narrows at the obex (in the caudal medulla), to become the central canal of the spinal cord. In more ... From the fourth ventricle it can pass into the central canal of the spinal cord or into the subarachnoid cisterns via three ...
... may refer to: pelvic splanchnic nerve sacral nerves, the spinal nerves that arise from vertebral column through ... of the vertebral column in the level of the L1 vertebra and they extend until the sacrum forming a structure called the cauda ...
... injection into the cauda equina or tail end of the spinal cord). Spinal and epidural are the most commonly used forms of ... Spinal anesthesia is a "one-shot" injection that provides rapid onset and profound sensory anesthesia with lower doses of ... Nerve blocks are also associated with a lower risk of neurologic complications compared to the more central epidural or spinal ... Central neuraxial anesthesia is the injection of local anesthetic around the spinal cord to provide analgesia in the abdomen, ...
The spinal dose is then given, the spinal needle withdrawn, and the epidural catheter inserted as normal. This method, known as ... below which lies a bundle of nerves known as the cauda equina ("horse's tail"). Hence, lumbar epidural injections carry a low ... This is called combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia (CSE). The practitioner may insert the spinal anaesthetic at one level ... The cerebrospinal fluid that surrounds the spinal cord is contained by the arachnoid mater. In adults, the spinal cord ...
Emboli to the spinal cord may cause paraparesis (decreased power in the legs) or cauda equina syndrome, a group of symptoms due ... brain and spinal cord) and the peripheral nervous system may be involved. Emboli to the brain may cause stroke-like episodes, ... to loss of function of the distal part of the spinal cord - loss of control over the bladder, rectum and skin sensation around ...
... and cortical input to the corresponding spinal segment. This reflex is mediated by the S1 spinal segment of the spinal cord. ... stenosis Endocrine disorders Hypothyroidism Sciatic neuropathy Lumbosacral plexus disorder Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Cauda ... Any spinal cord lesions, be it traumatic, neoplastic, pyogenic, vascular above the level of S1 can cause clonus. This is ... These are monosynaptic spinal segmental reflexes. When they are intact, integrity of the following is confirmed: cutaneous ...
... spina bifida spinal accessory nucleus spinal cord spinal lemniscus spinal nerve spine spine of the scapula spinocerebellar ... canal carotid groove carotid plexus carotid sheath carotid sinus carotid siphon carpus cartilage caruncle catheter cauda cauda ... subdurale cecum celiac celiac artery celiac ganglion celiac trunk celom central canal Central gelatinous substance of spinal ... of cerebellum anterior nucleus of the thalamus anterior perforated substance anterior pituitary anterior root anterior spinal ...
... which tend to grow slowly and are restricted to the conus medullaris-cauda equina-filum terminale region of the spinal cord, ... Though mutations in NF2 are rarely found in sporadic ependymomas other than the spinal form, SCHIP1, a NF2 interacting gene, is ... Notch signaling pathway and HOX family of transcription factors are up regulated in supratentorial and spinal ependymomas ... NF2 mutations and chromosome 22q loss occur preferentially in intramedullary spinal ependymomas". The American Journal of ...
... and sends a small spinal branch through the intervertebral foramen between the last lumbar vertebra and the sacrum, into the ... vertebral canal to supply the cauda equina.. ...
It is unknown which characteristics predispose sarcoidosis patients to brain or spinal cord involvement. The diagnosis of ... or cauda equina symptoms (incontinence to urine or stool, decreased sensation in the buttocks). Granulomas in the pituitary ... brain and spinal cord). It can have many manifestations, but abnormalities of the cranial nerves (a group of twelve nerves ... and other features of raised intracranial pressure and hydrocephalus Involvement of the spinal cord is rare, but can lead to ...
Other congenital cauda equina malformations (Q06.4) Hydromyelia (Q06.8) Other specified congenital malformations of spinal cord ... spinal) meningocele(spinal) meningomyelocele myelocele myelomeningocele rachischisis syringomyelocele (Q06) Other congenital ... malformations of spinal cord (Q06.0) Amyelia (Q06.1) Hypoplasia and dysplasia of spinal cord (Q06.2) Diastematomyelia (Q06.3) ... Q06.9) Congenital malformation of spinal cord, unspecified (Q07) Other congenital malformations of nervous system (Q07.0) ...
Spinal cord injury. During spinal shock, the bladder is flaccid and unresponsive. It becomes overfilled, and urine dribbles ... When the afferent and efferent nerves are both destroyed, as they may be by tumors of the cauda equina or filum terminale, the ... The bladder can be made to contract by voluntary facilitation of the spinal voiding reflex when it contains only a few ... Bladder afferent signals ascend the spinal cord to the periaqueductal gray, where they project both to the pontine micturition ...
3. Pain in one or both of the lower extremities? Consider herniated disc or cauda equina tumor. 4. Incontinence? Consider a ... Consider peripheral arteriosclerosis, Leriche syndrome, or spinal stenosis. ... 5. Urinary retention? Consider tabes dorsalis, diabetic neuropathy, or cauda equina tumor. On physical examination, is (are) ... space-occupying lesion of the spinal cord, multiple sclerosis, or trauma. ...
Cauda Equina Syndrome is a rare but severe narrowing of the spinal canal, and sudden compression of the nerves at the end of ... Claiming Compensation For Cauda Equina Syndrome. You are here: Home / 2019 / January / 08 / Claiming Compensation For Cauda ... Claiming Compensation For Cauda Equina Syndrome. 8th January 2019 by Healys. For sufferers of Cauda Equina Syndrome, failure or ... Cauda Equina Syndrome can progress quickly and suddenly, and may require hospital admission and surgery. The symptoms of Cauda ...
MRI revealed a subdural space occupying lesion compressing the cauda equina at L5-S1 level producing a Y shaped dural sac (Y ... Spinal Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of radiculopathy and spinal cord compression syndromes. Its early diagnosis is ... Conclusion: Spinal subdural hematoma may present with rapidly progressive neurological symptoms. MRI is the investigation of ... Keywords: Spinal subdural haematoma, extramedullary spinal cord compression, MRI scan.. Introduction. Spinal subdural ...
... The nerves of the spinal cord branch out in the lumbar ...
Chiropractic High-Velocity Low-Amplitude Spinal Manipulation in the Treatment of a Case of Postsurgical Chronic Cauda Equina ... Syndrome http://www.chiro.org/cases/ABSTRACTS/Chronic_Cauda_Equina_Syndrome.shtml ... Spinal Manipulationin the Treatment of a Case of Postsurgical. Chronic Cauda Equina Syndrome This section is compiled by Frank ... 2] Subsequently, administering spinal manipulation to a patient after spinal surgery requires a substantial knowledge of ...
Two syndromes are Conus Medullaris and Cauda Equina. ... you can sue for a spinal cord injury syndrome if there is ... Cauda Equina. Cauda Equina syndrome happens when nerve roots at the end of the spinal cord (L2-S5) are injured. This can cause ... Our spinal cord injury lawyers have a national practice representing people with spinal cord injuries caused by accidents ... Spinal Cord Injury Lawsuit Compensation. Compensation for anterior cord syndrome spinal injuries should include amounts for ...
However to properly evaluate the injury to the spinal cord a... ... Spinal fracture with cauda equina syndrome (teaching). Case ... This is impinging the spinal cord at the level of conus/start of the cauda equina. No change in cord signal. ... A: With impact to the back and neurological compromise, the spinal cord or spinal nerves may be damaged. This is a surgical ... Severe fracture of L2 vertebral body with narrowing of spinal canal.. Also bilateral transverse process fractures of L2 and ...
Les radios dites « communautaires » constituent un champ social de communication qui nous ouvre une perspective interne sur l… Expand ...
"Obesity and spinal epidural lipomatosis in cauda equina syndrome, The Spine Journal" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental ... Obesity and spinal epidural lipomatosis in cauda equina syndrome. Obesity and spinal epidural lipomatosis in cauda equina ... Obesity and spinal epidural lipomatosis in cauda equina syndrome. Cushnie, Duncan; Urquhart, Jennifer C.; Gurr, Kevin R.; ... Cauda equina syndrome secondary to idiopathic spinal epidural lipomatosis. Lisai, P.; Doria, C.; Crissantu, L.; Meloni, G.B.; ...
... bowel and sexual dysfunction and mobility issues after spinal surgery. ... Claim against surgeon for leaving haemostatic material in the spinal canal and failing to respond to clear signs of Cauda ... Claim against surgeon for leaving haemostatic material in the spinal canal and failing to respond to clear signs of Cauda ... Despite reporting what are known as red flags of Cauda Equina Syndrome and her surgeon being aware of these symptoms, there ...
... Author. * Vianna, PTG ... CAUDA equina syndrome (CES) has long been recognized as a rare complication of spinal anesthesia.(1) CES has been described ... Cauda equina syndrome after spinal tetracaine: Electromyographic evaluation-20 years follow-up. Anesthesiology. Philadelphia: ... In all cases, lumbar puncture was performed at the L3-L4 interspace with a disposable spinal needle while the patients were in ...
Cauda Equina Syndrome. (CES; Compression of Spinal Nerve Roots; Syndrome, Cauda Equina; Spinal Nerve Roots, Compression). ... Spinal surgery or spinal anesthesia. *Lesion or tumor affecting the spinal bones, spinal nerve roots, or cerebrospinal fluid ( ... Cauda equina syndrome (CES) is compression of the nerve roots at the base of the spinal cord. The nerve roots (known as the ... A common cause of CES is injury of a spinal disc on the nerve roots. A spinal disc is a semi-soft mass of tissue between the ...
Information on spinal stenosis, a back condition caused by a narrowing of the spine. To learn what steps may be taken to help, ... What is Spinal Stenosis. Spinal stenosis is caused by a narrowing of the spine, which then places pressure on the spinal cord ... Symptoms of Spinal Stenosis. Back pain is one symptom of spinal stenosis, but because the narrow spinal column places pressure ... Spinal stenosis most frequently affects men and women over the age of 60, but it can occur earlier as a result of other causes: ...
The objectives of rehabilitation after an individual has sustained an acute spinal cord injury (SCI) include maximizing the ... Cauda equina syndrome. Because cauda equina syndrome is characterized by injury to the lumbosacral nerve root, it is not truly ... Incidence and outcomes of spinal cord injury clinical syndromes. J Spinal Cord Med. 2007. 30(3):215-24. [Medline]. [Full Text]. ... American Spinal Injury Association:. International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury. Atlanta, Ga ...
Cauda equina syndrome can result from extreme lumbar stenosis that impinges one multiple nerve roots within the central canal, ... Cauda equina syndrome spinal stenosis is one of the worst possible expressions, since it is a true medical emergency and may ... Cauda Equina Syndrome Spinal Stenosis. Cauda equina syndrome spinal stenosis is a literal medical emergency which affects some ... Cauda Equina Syndrome Spinal Stenosis or Cervical Spinal Stenosis?. The spinal cord exists in the cervical region, unlike in ...
Table 4. Cauda Equina Versus Conus Medullaris SyndromeFeatures Cauda Equina... more ... The salient features and findings of cauda equina syndrome and conus medullaris syndrome are listed in Table 4, below. ... Cauda equina syndrome after spinal anaesthesia with hyperbaric 5% lignocaine: a review of six cases of cauda equina syndrome ... Cauda equina syndrome resulting from treatment of dural ectasia with fibrin glue injection. J Spinal Disord Tech. 2006 Apr. 19( ...
cauda equina and spinal cord. You are here: Home / Shop / Tag: cauda equina and spinal cord ... A viscoelastic core enables 6 degrees of freedom providing a real-time look at a spinal motion segment….helping communicate the ...
Decompression of the spinal cord or cauda equina[edit]. Laminectomy is an open or minimally invasive surgical procedure in ... Spinal decompression is a surgical procedure intended to relieve pressure on the spinal cord or on one or more compressed nerve ... In the lumbar spine it is commonly used to treat spinal claudication caused by spinal stenosis, and is considered the most ... Spinal Stenosis~treatment at eMedicine *^ "Back and Leg Pain - Definition List , Resources , HJD Spine Center". Med.nyu.edu. ...
And this is spinal cord. Thats the end of the spinal cord. But below the end of the spinal cord are all of these roots. And ... Sheep Spinal Cord & Cauda Equina. Para ver esse vídeo, ative o JavaScript e considere fazer upgrade para um navegador web que ... So, we have some spinal cords. I just wanted to show you a few more things. Once again, you see that the entire spinal cord is ... So this structure here, where you, all you have is roots, the spinal cord is, is, has ended, thats the end of the spinal cord ...
Cauda Equina Syndrome Started by AliKat2 on 07/20/2017 3:20pm ... Spinal Fusion t12 to l5. Started by Azelk on 05/24/2017 5:43pm ... spinal fusion c5 and 6. Started by gsts529 on 08/28/2017 8:25am ... Spinal cord injury. Started by Painpatsy on 07/03/2017 2:43pm ... Nerve pain after c5-7 fusion and spinal cord decompression. Started by RobinSteury on 06/22/2017 8:22pm ... Spinal Fusion Denied. Started by Suzyhomebaker on 07/18/2017 11:08pm ...
spinal surgery Sept. 19th. Scared to death. Started by San DIego Linda on 08/09/2013 12:01pm ... cauda equina syndrone Started by winston on 08/02/2013 10:42am ... Spinal Cord Stimulator. Started by Randy W on 07/28/2013 5:34am ...
Electric stimulation after spinal cord injury improves blood pressure, bowel function and gives better control of the muscles ... Cauda Equina Syndrome. Cauda equina syndrome is a serious condition that occurs due to the compression of the nerves and nerve ... Spinal Cord Injury. Spinal cord injury is an injury to the spinal cord that results in temporary or permanent changes in its ... Spinal Injury - Symptom Evaluation. Spinal Injury refers to damage to spinal cord that runs below the brain through the back. ...
... living in a care home has a devastating impact on the lives of people paralysed by spinal cord injury. ... Cauda Equina Syndrome. Cauda equina syndrome is a serious condition that occurs due to the compression of the nerves and nerve ... Spinal Cord Injury. Spinal cord injury is an injury to the spinal cord that results in temporary or permanent changes in its ... Spinal Injury - Symptom Evaluation. Spinal Injury refers to damage to spinal cord that runs below the brain through the back. ...
... equina syndrome is caused by any narrowing of the spinal canal that compresses the nerve roots below the level of the spinal ... cord.{ref14} Numerous causes of cauda equina syndrome have been repor... more ... Cauda equina syndrome after spinal anaesthesia with hyperbaric 5% lignocaine: a review of six cases of cauda equina syndrome ... Cauda equina syndrome is caused by any narrowing of the spinal canal that compresses the nerve roots below the level of the ...
Antulio Aroche treats spinal injuries and spinal fractures in Camarillo, also serving the communities of Ventura, Oxnard and ... Cauda equina syndrome is characterized by the persistent severe low back pain caused by the compression of the spinal nerves. ... Home / Patient Info / Conditions / Cauda Equina Syndrome Cauda Equina Syndrome Cauda equina syndrome is an emergency condition ... cauda equina) at the end of the spinal cord (lower back and hip region). If not treated promptly, it can lead to permanent ...
  • For sufferers of Cauda Equina Syndrome, failure or delay in diagnosis can have permanent and life-changing consequences. (healys.com)
  • This year, the MPS and NICE have revised the "red flags" which should be heeded during diagnosis: symptoms which when presented could indicate Cauda Equina. (healys.com)
  • The personal accounts of patients and recent research by the MPS has shown that failure or delay in the diagnosis and treatment of Cauda Equina can lead to serious disability in those affected. (healys.com)
  • Due to the severe and permanent disabilities that can occur as a result, the non-diagnosis or misdiagnosis of Cauda Equina Syndrome is among the top errors made by GPs that led to the most expensive compensation claims. (healys.com)
  • If you feel that you have suffered from missed or delayed diagnosis or treatment of Cauda Equina Syndrome, or have developed the condition as a result of another medical procedure, you may be able to seek compensation to help with rehabilitation and treatment, and to fund any adjustments necessary to your home or lifestyle. (healys.com)
  • Jonathan Austen-Jones, Medical Negligence partner, says: "Cauda Equina Syndrome is a medical emergency, which if not properly diagnosed and treated can lead to life-changing injuries and consequences. (healys.com)
  • If your syrinx is creating a compressive effect within spinal cord, risk of future deterioration is very real indeed, and would try to get this under control before more neurological disability ensues. (healthtap.com)