Accessory Nerve: The 11th cranial nerve which originates from NEURONS in the MEDULLA and in the CERVICAL SPINAL CORD. It has a cranial root, which joins the VAGUS NERVE (10th cranial) and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the LARYNX, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the TRAPEZIUS and the sternocleidomastoid muscles.Accessory Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the ACCESSORY NERVE. Damage to the nerve may produce weakness in head rotation and shoulder elevation.Accessory Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the eleventh cranial (spinal accessory) nerve. This nerve originates from motor neurons in the lower medulla (accessory portion of nerve) and upper spinal cord (spinal portion of nerve). The two components of the nerve join and exit the skull via the jugular foramen, innervating the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles, which become weak or paralyzed if the nerve is injured. The nerve is commonly involved in MOTOR NEURON DISEASE, and may be injured by trauma to the posterior triangle of the neck.Nerve Transfer: Surgical reinnervation of a denervated peripheral target using a healthy donor nerve and/or its proximal stump. The direct connection is usually made to a healthy postlesional distal portion of a non-functioning nerve or implanted directly into denervated muscle or insensitive skin. Nerve sprouts will grow from the transferred nerve into the denervated elements and establish contact between them and the neurons that formerly controlled another area.Shoulder: Part of the body in humans and primates where the arms connect to the trunk. The shoulder has five joints; ACROMIOCLAVICULAR joint, CORACOCLAVICULAR joint, GLENOHUMERAL joint, scapulathoracic joint, and STERNOCLAVICULAR joint.Neck Dissection: Dissection in the neck to remove all disease tissues including cervical LYMPH NODES and to leave an adequate margin of normal tissue. This type of surgery is usually used in tumors or cervical metastases in the head and neck. The prototype of neck dissection is the radical neck dissection described by Crile in 1906.Scapula: Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.Paralysis: A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)Brachial Plexus Neuropathies: Diseases of the cervical (and first thoracic) roots, nerve trunks, cords, and peripheral nerve components of the BRACHIAL PLEXUS. Clinical manifestations include regional pain, PARESTHESIA; MUSCLE WEAKNESS, and decreased sensation (HYPESTHESIA) in the upper extremity. These disorders may be associated with trauma (including BIRTH INJURIES); THORACIC OUTLET SYNDROME; NEOPLASMS; NEURITIS; RADIOTHERAPY; and other conditions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1351-2)Brachial Plexus: The large network of nerve fibers which distributes the innervation of the upper extremity. The brachial plexus extends from the neck into the axilla. In humans, the nerves of the plexus usually originate from the lower cervical and the first thoracic spinal cord segments (C5-C8 and T1), but variations are not uncommon.Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.Shoulder Pain: Unilateral or bilateral pain of the shoulder. It is often caused by physical activities such as work or sports participation, but may also be pathologic in origin.Optic Nerve Diseases: Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally considered a component of the central nervous system. Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. Clinical manifestations may include decreased visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, impaired color vision, and an afferent pupillary defect.Olfactory Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the first cranial (olfactory) nerve, which usually feature anosmia or other alterations in the sense of smell and taste. Anosmia may be associated with NEOPLASMS; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; inherited conditions; toxins; METABOLIC DISEASES; tobacco abuse; and other conditions. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp229-31)Neck Muscles: The neck muscles consist of the platysma, splenius cervicis, sternocleidomastoid(eus), longus colli, the anterior, medius, and posterior scalenes, digastric(us), stylohyoid(eus), mylohyoid(eus), geniohyoid(eus), sternohyoid(eus), omohyoid(eus), sternothyroid(eus), and thyrohyoid(eus).Vagus Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the tenth cranial nerve, including brain stem lesions involving its nuclei (solitary, ambiguus, and dorsal motor), nerve fascicles, and intracranial and extracranial course. Clinical manifestations may include dysphagia, vocal cord weakness, and alterations of parasympathetic tone in the thorax and abdomen.Glossopharyngeal Nerve: The 9th cranial nerve. The glossopharyngeal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve; it conveys somatic and autonomic efferents as well as general, special, and visceral afferents. Among the connections are motor fibers to the stylopharyngeus muscle, parasympathetic fibers to the parotid glands, general and taste afferents from the posterior third of the tongue, the nasopharynx, and the palate, and afferents from baroreceptors and CHEMORECEPTOR CELLS of the carotid sinus.Nodose Ganglion: The inferior (caudal) ganglion of the vagus (10th cranial) nerve. The unipolar nodose ganglion cells are sensory cells with central projections to the medulla and peripheral processes traveling in various branches of the vagus nerve.Thoracic Nerves: The twelve spinal nerves on each side of the thorax. They include eleven INTERCOSTAL NERVES and one subcostal nerve. Both sensory and motor, they supply the muscles and skin of the thoracic and abdominal walls.Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Neck: The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Whiplash Injuries: Hyperextension injury to the neck, often the result of being struck from behind by a fast-moving vehicle, in an automobile accident. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Cranial Nerve Diseases: Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Arcanobacterium: A genus of facultatively anaerobic, gram-positive bacteria in the family ACTINOMYCETACEAE, order ACTINOMYCETALES. They are obligate parasites of the PHARYNX in humans and farm animals.Hypoglossal Nerve: The 12th cranial nerve. The hypoglossal nerve originates in the hypoglossal nucleus of the medulla and supplies motor innervation to all of the muscles of the tongue except the palatoglossus (which is supplied by the vagus). This nerve also contains proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles.Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Pancreatitis: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS. Pancreatitis is classified as acute unless there are computed tomographic or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic findings of CHRONIC PANCREATITIS (International Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis, Atlanta, 1992). The two most common forms of acute pancreatitis are ALCOHOLIC PANCREATITIS and gallstone pancreatitis.Gout: Hereditary metabolic disorder characterized by recurrent acute arthritis, hyperuricemia and deposition of sodium urate in and around the joints, sometimes with formation of uric acid calculi.SulfonesArthroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.Purines: A series of heterocyclic compounds that are variously substituted in nature and are known also as purine bases. They include ADENINE and GUANINE, constituents of nucleic acids, as well as many alkaloids such as CAFFEINE and THEOPHYLLINE. Uric acid is the metabolic end product of purine metabolism.Thumb: The first digit on the radial side of the hand which in humans lies opposite the other four.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Genetic Privacy: The protection of genetic information about an individual, family, or population group, from unauthorized disclosure.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Carcinoma, Merkel Cell: A carcinoma arising from MERKEL CELLS located in the basal layer of the epidermis and occurring most commonly as a primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin. Merkel cells are tactile cells of neuroectodermal origin and histologically show neurosecretory granules. The skin of the head and neck are a common site of Merkel cell carcinoma, occurring generally in elderly patients. (Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1245)Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Head and Neck Neoplasms: Soft tissue tumors or cancer arising from the mucosal surfaces of the LIP; oral cavity; PHARYNX; LARYNX; and cervical esophagus. Other sites included are the NOSE and PARANASAL SINUSES; SALIVARY GLANDS; THYROID GLAND and PARATHYROID GLANDS; and MELANOMA and non-melanoma skin cancers of the head and neck. (from Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 4th ed, p1651)ArchivesSocial Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Criminal Law: A branch of law that defines criminal offenses, regulates the apprehension, charging and trial of suspected persons, and fixes the penalties and modes of treatment applicable to convicted offenders.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Libraries: Collections of systematically acquired and organized information resources, and usually providing assistance to users. (ERIC Thesaurus, http://www.eric.ed.gov/ accessed 2/1/2008)Criminals: Persons who have committed a crime or have been convicted of a crime.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.
Other cranial nerves involved were vagus, trigeminal, spinal accessory nerve, abducent, occulomotor and glossopharyngeal in ... The histologic alterations found in patient with Fazio-Londe disease were identical to those seen in infantile-onset spinal ... Fazio-Londe disease (FLD), also called progressive bulbar palsy of childhood, is a very rare inherited motor neuron disease of ... In the Gomez review facial nerve was affected in all cases while hypoglossal nerve was involved in all except one case. ...
Patients with spinal accessory nerve palsy often exhibit signs of lower motor neuron disease such as diminished muscle mass, ... Injury to the spinal accessory nerve can cause an accessory nerve disorder or spinal accessory nerve palsy, which results in ... spinal accessory nerve damage is noted during surgery. For example, during a functional neck dissection that injures the spinal ... A winged scapula may also be suggestive of abnormal spinal accessory nerve function, as described above. In assessing range of ...
The accessory nerve is derived from the basal plate of the embryonic spinal segments C1-C6. The fibres of the spinal accessory ... Weakness in both muscles may point to a more general disease process such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Guillain-Barre ... The spinal accessory nerve continues alone and heads backwards and downwards. In the neck, the accessory nerve crosses the ... "spinal nerve accessory to the vagus", recognizing that while a minor component of the nerve joins with the larger vagus nerve, ...
... and 9th to the 12th cranial nerves (in order: glossopharyngeal nerve, vagus nerve, accessory nerve, spinal accessory nerve). ... Madras motor neuron disease (MMND) is a rare motor neuron disease originating in South India. Two other forms of the disease ... Madras motor neuron disease (MMND) is a motor neuron disease affecting primarily lower motor neurons. It is similar to ... Navaneetham, Duraiswamy (February 2010). "Madras Motor Neuron Disease". Foundation for Research on Rare Diseases and Disorders ...
IIa contains nodes in the region anterior to the spinal accessory nerve and IIb postero-superior to the nerve. Region III: ... 4) The staging of head and neck cancer includes a classification for nodal disease. It is important to note the critical ... Region V: posterior triangle group of lymph nodes located along the lower half of the spinal accessory nerve and the transverse ... 6. Anderson, Peter E., The Role of Comprehensive Neck Dissection With Preservation of the Spinal Accessory Nerve in the ...
... spinal instability, acute irritation or compression of the nerve root, and recent whiplash. A 2005 study by Abbott et al. ... The technique is contraindicated by bone disease, malignancy, pregnancy, vertebral artery insufficiency, active ankylosing ... Passive accessory intervertebral movements (PAIVM) refers to a spinal physical therapy assessment and treatment technique ...
It then travels close to the vagus nerve and spinal division of the accessory nerve, spirals downwards behind the vagus nerve ... Motor neuron disease is the most common disease affecting the hypoglossal nerve. The hypoglossal nerve is tested by examining ... Tada, Motoki N.; Kuratani, Shigeru (2015-01-01). "Evolutionary and developmental understanding of the spinal accessory nerve". ... The hypoglossal nerve may be connected (anastamosed) to the facial nerve to attempt to restore function when the facial nerve ...
... in particular the cortical nerve, has suffered from nerve damage. Cortical damage, particularly cerebral lesions, can cause ... It is mediated by tectobulbar fibres in the rostral colliculi of the midbrain passing from the optic tract to accessory nuclei ... Veterinary medicine: a textbook of the diseases of cattle, sheep, pigs, goats and horses (9th ed.). Elsevier Health Sciences. p ... and thence to the spinal cord and lower motor neurones that innervate the head, neck, and body muscles affected by the reflex. ...
Nerves connect the spinal cord and brain to the rest of the body. All major bones, muscles, and nerves in the body are named, ... The absence or deficit of health is illness which includes disease and injury. Diseases cause symptoms felt, seen or perceived ... with the exception of anatomical variations such as sesamoid bones and accessory muscles. Blood vessels carry blood throughout ... and the peripheral nervous system consists of the nerves and ganglia outside the brain and spinal cord. The brain is the organ ...
... accessory nerve (XI), and hypoglossal nerve (XII). (There may be a thirteenth cranial nerve, the terminal nerve (nerve O or N ... Spinal nerves emerge sequentially from the spinal cord with the spinal nerve closest to the head (C1) emerging in the space ... Trauma to the skull, disease of bone such as Paget's disease, and injury to nerves during neurosurgery (such as tumor removal) ... the optic nerve (II), oculomotor nerve (III), trochlear nerve (IV), trigeminal nerve (V), abducens nerve (VI), facial nerve ( ...
... which is an accessory nucleus of the oculomotor nerve (cranial nerve number III; CN III). He was the first physician to provide ... A large portion of his written work dealt with diseases of the spinal cord and neuropathological issues. He trained a number of ... He also demonstrated a relationship between tabes dorsalis (nerve degeneration in the spinal cord) and paralysis in the ... He is credited with providing an early diagnosis of "pseudosclerosis", a disease known today as hepatolenticular degeneration. ...
... the trapezius muscle innervated by the spinal accessory nerve (CN XI) and an area of skin near the axilla innervated by the ... They can be caused by stretching, diseases, and wounds to the lateral cervical region (posterior triangle) of the neck or the ... median nerve, medial cord, and ulnar nerve. The five roots are the five anterior rami of the spinal nerves, after they have ... the axillary nerve, the radial nerve, the median nerve, and the ulnar nerve. Due to both emerging from the lateral cord the ...
With the destruction of nerve cells, the muscles no longer receive signals from the brain or spinal cord; without nerve ... the vagus nerve (which sends signals to the heart, intestines, and lungs), and the accessory nerve (which controls upper neck ... The disease may be diagnosed by finding the virus in the feces or detecting antibodies against it in the blood. The disease ... In cases of spinal polio, if the affected nerve cells are completely destroyed, paralysis will be permanent; cells that are not ...
... from compression of the spinal accessory nerve). These patients present with a reddish bulge behind an intact ear drum. This ... The five-year survival in the setting of metastatic disease is 40% to 45%. Paragangliomas originate from paraganglia in ... It usually presents as a painless neck mass, but larger tumors may cause cranial nerve palsies, usually of the vagus nerve and ... Approximately 50% of patients with recurrent disease experience distant metastasis. ...
Parasympathetic inflow within the myocardium is probably best described by influence of the vagus nerve and spinal accessory ... The higher pressures normally occur only in disease, in conditions such as heart failure, where the heart is unable to pump ... In vivo however, extrinsic factors such as an increase in activity of the sympathetic nerves, and a decrease in vagal tone ...
... roots combine to form spinal nerves (mixed; motor and sensory), one on each side of the spinal cord. Spinal nerves, with the ... From above T1, proprioceptive primary axons enter the spinal cord and ascend ipsilaterally until reaching the accessory cuneate ... Spinal cord injury can also be non-traumatic and caused by disease (transverse myelitis, polio, spina bifida, Friedreich's ... showing the exits of the spinal nerves. The spinal cord showing how the anterior and posterior roots join in the spinal nerves ...
The last four cervical spinal nerves, C5 through C8, and the first thoracic spinal nerve, T1, combine to form the brachial ... Diseases of the peripheral nervous system can be specific to one or more nerves, or affect the system as a whole. Any ... The accessory nerve is responsible for innervating the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles, neither of which being ... so it is called spinal nerve root C8). In the lumbar and sacral region, the spinal nerve roots travel within the dural sac and ...
Diseases of the nose, accessory sinuses, and nasopharynx RF460-547 Laryngology. Diseases of the throat RG104-104.7 Operative ... Bedsores RL701-751 Diseases due to psychosomatic and nerve disorders. Dermatoneuroses RL760-785 Diseases due to parasites RL790 ... Including acupuncture, pneumatic aspiration, spinal puncture, pericardial puncture RM214-258 Diet therapy. Dietary cookbooks ... Allergy RC620-627 Nutritional diseases. Deficiency diseases RC627.5-632 Metabolic diseases RC633-647.5 Diseases of the blood ...
Cervical spinal nerves (C1-C4)Edit. Further information: Cervical plexus. The first 4 cervical spinal nerves, C1 through C4, ... Diseases of the peripheral nervous system can be specific to one or more nerves, or affect the system as a whole. ... The accessory nerve is responsible for innervating the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles, neither of which being ... The last four cervical spinal nerves, C5 through C8, and the first thoracic spinal nerve, T1, combine to form the brachial ...
Neurological conditions such as spinal cord injury, phrenic nerve injuries, Guillain-Barré syndrome, amyotrophic lateral ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease[edit]. People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), most commonly emphysema ... Other respiratory muscles include the external and internal intercostal muscles, the abdominal muscles and the accessory ... In 85% of cases it is due to asthma, pneumonia, cardiac ischemia, interstitial lung disease, congestive heart failure, chronic ...
The nuclei of the glossopharyngeal nerve (IX), vagus nerve (X), accessory nerve (XI) and hypoglossal nerve (XII) are located in ... which also descend and synapse in the spinal cord. The cranial nerves III-XII emerge from the brainstem. These cranial nerves ... Diseases of the brainstem can result in abnormalities in the function of cranial nerves that may lead to visual disturbances, ... Oculomotor nerve nucleus: This is the third cranial nerve nucleus. Trochlear nerve nucleus: This is the fourth cranial nerve. ...
... perineal nerve and inferior rectal nerve acting together. In addition, sacral spinal nerves (S3, S4) innervate the muscles ... An accessory slip at its posterior part is sometimes named the iliosacralis. The pubococcygeus muscle has medial fibres forming ... International Journal of Colorectal Disease. 20 (3): 272-6. doi:10.1007/s00384-004-0662-9. PMID 15526112. Anatomy figure: 41:05 ... the inferior rectal nerve innervates the levator ani muscles independently of the pudendal nerve. The pubococcygeus muscle or ...
The spinal nerves arise from the spinal column. The top section of the spine is the cervical section, which contains nerves ... Temporomandibular joint diseases and disorders, commonly called TMJ. Autoimmune diseases such as: Crohn's disease of the oral ... The mouth, also called the oral cavity , is the entranceway into the digestive system containing both primary and accessory ... and the phrenic nerve, C-3 to C-5, the segmental nerve branches, C-1 to C-5. These nerve groups transmit efferent nerve (motor ...
Limbus vertebra Functional spinal unit Pott disease Scheuermann's disease This article incorporates text in the public domain ... These foramina are the entry and exit conducts for the spinal nerves. The body of the vertebra and the vertebral arch form the ... The inferior, or lower tubercle is the accessory process and this is found at the back part of the base of the transverse ... The foramina allow the entry and exit of the spinal nerves from each vertebra, together with associated blood vessels. The ...
... harshly evident within the destroyed nerve cells." Looking at other samples of hypothalamus, spinal cord, and cortex, all were ... Diaphragm and respiratory accessory muscles can become paralyzed necessitating mechanical ventilation to facilitate breathing. ... The disease resembles Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's. First reports of the disease ... The disease was shown to be familial but not genetic. Chamorro who grew up outside of Guam had not developed the disease, and ...
Injury to the spinal accessory nerve can cause an accessory nerve disorder or spinal accessory nerve palsy, which results in diminished or absent function of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and upper portion of the trapezius muscle. Patients with spinal accessory nerve palsy often exhibit signs of lower motor neuron disease such as diminished muscle mass, fasciculations, and partial paralysis of the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. Interruption of the nerve supply to the sternocleidomastoid muscle results in an asymmetric neckline, while weakness of the trapezius muscle can produce a drooping shoulder, winged scapula, and a weakness of forward ...
The cranial root of accessory nerve (or part) is the smaller of the two portions of the accessory nerve. It is generally considered as a part of the vagus nerve and not part of the accessory nerve proper because the cranial component rapidly joins the vagus nerve and serves the same function as other vagal nerve fibers. Recently, the concept of a cranial root of the accessory nerve has been challenged by new neuroanatomical studies which found that an unambiguous cranial root was not present in the majority of the cases. However, a small study in 2007 followed by a substantially larger study published in 2012 both confirmed that the cranial ...
The posterior triangle (or lateral cervical region) is a region of the neck. It has the following boundaries: Apex: Union of the sternocleidomastoid and the trapezius muscles at the superior nuchal line of the occipital bone Anterior: Posterior border of the sternocleidomastoideus Posterior: Anterior border of the trapezius Base: Middle one third of the clavicle Roof: Investing layer of the deep cervical fascia The posterior triangle is crossed, about 2.5 cm above the clavicle, by the inferior belly of the omohyoid muscle, which divides the space into two triangles: an upper or occipital triangle a lower or subclavian triangle (or supraclavicular triangle) A) Nerves and Plexuses: Spinal accessory nerve (Cranial Nerve XI) Branches of cervical plexus Roots and trunks of brachial plexus Phrenic nerve (C3,4,5) B) Vessels: ...
Onset of first symptom has been reported between 1-12 years, with a mean age of onset at 8 years. Clinical course can be divided into early (, 6 yrs age, predominance of respiratory symptoms) and late course (6-20 years of age, predominance of motor symptoms on superior limbs). Progression to involve other cranial nerve muscles occurs over a period of months or years. In the Gomez review facial nerve was affected in all cases while hypoglossal nerve was involved in all except one case. Other cranial nerves involved were vagus, trigeminal, spinal accessory nerve, abducent, occulomotor and glossopharyngeal in this order. Corticospinal tract signs were found in 2 of the 14 patients. The disease may progress to patient's death in a period as short as 9 months or may have a slow ...
The pharyngeal plexus is a network of nerve fibers innervating most of the palate and pharynx. (Larynx, which is innervated by superior and recurrent laryngeal nerve from vagus nerve (CN X), is not included) It is located on the surface of the middle pharyngeal constrictor muscle. Although the Terminologia Anatomica name of the plexus has "vagus nerve" in the title, other nerves make contributions to the plexus. It has the following sources: CN IX - pharyngeal branches of glossopharyngeal nerve - sensory CN X - pharyngeal branch of vagus nerve - motor superior cervical ganglion sympathetic fibers - vasomotor Because the cranial part of accessory nerve (CN XI) leaves the jugular foramen as joining the CN X, ...
The following is a list of nerves in the human body: Structure of the nervous system Development of the nervous system The spinal cord or medulla spinalis The brain or encephalon The hindbrain or rhombencephalon The midbrain or mesencephalon The forebrain or prosencephalon Composition and central connections of the spinal nerves Pathways from the brain to the spinal cord The meninges of the brain and medulla spinalis The cerebrospinal fluid The cranial nerves The olfactory nerves The optic nerve The oculomotor nerve The trochlear nerve The trigeminal nerve The abducent nerve The facial ...
Articles related to anatomy include: Contents: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z abdomen abdominal aorta abducens nerve abducens nucleus abducent abducent nerve abduction accessory bone accessory cuneate nucleus accessory nerve accessory olivary nucleus accommodation reflex acetabulum Achilles tendon acoustic nerve acromion adenohypophysis adenoids adipose aditus aditus ad antrum adrenal gland adrenergic afferent neuron agger nasi agnosia agonist alar ligament albuginea alimentary allantois allocortex alpha motor neurons alveolar artery alveolar process alveolus alveus of the hippocampus amatory anatomy amaurosis Ammon's horn ampulla Ampulla of Vater amygdala amygdalofugal pathway amygdaloid amylacea anaesthesia analgesia ...
The occipital artery arises from the external carotid artery opposite the facial artery. Its path is below the posterior belly of digastric to the occipital region. This artery supplies blood to the back of the scalp and sterno-mastoid muscles, and deep muscles in the back and neck. At its origin, it is covered by the posterior belly of the digastricus and the stylohyoideus, and the hypoglossal nerve winds around it from behind forward; higher up, it crosses the internal carotid artery, the internal jugular vein, and the vagus and accessory nerves. It next ascends to the interval between the transverse process of the atlas and the mastoid process of the temporal bone, and passes horizontally backward, grooving the surface of the latter bone, being covered by the sternocleidomastoideus, splenius capitis, longissimus capitis, and digastricus, and resting upon the rectus capitis lateralis, the obliquus ...
... (apatite-associated destructive arthritis) is a rheumatological condition similar to calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD). It is associated with periarticular or intraarticular deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals. Crystal deposition in the joint causes the release of collagenases, serine proteases, elastases, and interleukin-1. This precipitates acute and rapid decline in joint function and degradation of joint anatomy. Subsequently disruption of the rotator cuff ensues. Along with symptomatology, the disease typically presents with positive radiologic findings, often showing marked erosion of the humeral head, cartilage, capsule, and bursae. Though rare, it is most often seen in females beginning in their 50s or 60s. Diagnosis is made with arthrocentesis and Alizarin Red staining along with clinical symptoms. Signs and symptoms may include the following: Limited active range of motion, usually unrestricted passive range of movement (early) ...
Parasympathetic component of the glossopharyngeal nerve that innervates the ipsilateral parotid gland. Origin and central course The preganglionic nerve fibers originate in the inferior salivatory nucleus of the rostral medulla and travel anteriorly and laterally to exit the brainstem between the medullary olive and the inferior cerebellar peduncle with the other components of CN IX. Note: These neurons do not form a distinct nucleus visible on cross-section of the brainstem. The position indicated on the diagram is representative of the location of the cell bodies of these fibers. Intracranial course Upon emerging from the lateral aspect of the medulla, the visceral motor fibers join the other components of CN IX to enter the jugular foramen. Within the jugular foramen, there are two glossopharyngeal ganglia that contain nerve cell bodies that mediate general, visceral, and special sensation. The visceral ...
The external jugular vein receives the greater part of the blood from the exterior of the cranium and the deep parts of the face, being formed by the junction of the posterior division of the retromandibular vein with the posterior auricular vein. It commences in the substance of the parotid gland, on a level with the angle of the mandible, and runs perpendicularly down the neck, in the direction of a line drawn from the angle of the mandible to the middle of the clavicle at the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoideus. In its course it crosses the sternocleidomastoideus obliquely, and in the subclavian triangle perforates the deep fascia, and ends in the subclavian vein lateral to or in front of the scalenus anterior, piercing the roof of the posterior triangle. It is separated from the sternocleidomastoideus by the investing layer of the deep cervical fascia, and is covered by the platysma, the superficial fascia, and the integument; it crosses the cutaneous cervical ...
The lumbar triangle can refer to either the inferior lumbar (Petit) triangle, which lies superficially, or the superior lumbar (Grynfeltt) triangle,[1] which is deep and superior to the inferior triangle. Of the two, the superior triangle is the more consistently found in cadavers,[2] and is more commonly the site of herniation; however, the inferior lumbar triangle is often simply called the lumbar triangle, perhaps owing to its more superficial location and ease in demonstration. ...
Injury to the spinal accessory nerve can cause an accessory nerve disorder or spinal accessory nerve palsy, which results in diminished or absent function of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and upper portion of the trapezius muscle. Patients with spinal accessory nerve palsy often exhibit signs of lower motor neuron disease such as diminished muscle mass, fasciculations, and partial paralysis of the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles. Interruption of the nerve supply to the sternocleidomastoid muscle results in an asymmetric neckline, while weakness of the trapezius muscle can produce a drooping shoulder, winged scapula, and a weakness of forward ...
Patients with spinal accessory nerve palsy often exhibit signs of lower motor neuron disease such as diminished muscle mass, ... Injury to the spinal accessory nerve can cause an accessory nerve disorder or spinal accessory nerve palsy, which results in ... spinal accessory nerve damage is noted during surgery. For example, during a functional neck dissection that injures the spinal ... A winged scapula may also be suggestive of abnormal spinal accessory nerve function, as described above. In assessing range of ...
In the middle of the levator scapulae, the spinal accessory nerve flows laterally and the dorsal scapular nerve may rest much ... The levator scapulae are served by two or three branches of the fourth and fifth cervical nerves and often by a dorsal scapular ... Diseases and Conditions. *Health Careers. *Nutrition and Fitness. *Nursing Degree. *Psychology Degrees ...
When one of these nerves suffers injury or trauma, surgical treatment may be needed. ... The peripheral nervous system is a network of 43 pairs of motor and sensory nerves that connect the brain and spinal cord to ... Spinal Accessory Nerve Injury. One particular type of peripheral nerve damage is spinal accessory nerve injury. The spinal ... Health Home Conditions and Diseases Peripheral Nerve Injury. Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Print. The peripheral nervous ...
Spinal accessory nerve and lymphatic neck dissection]. Rev Stomatol Chir Maxillofac 1997;98:138-42. ... This suggests a role for identification of sentinel levels for first echelon disease assessment using a disease-specific agent ... The marginal mandibular nerve and the accessory nerve are often injured during neck dissection (16). Modified radical neck ... Perhaps most commonly, shoulder dysfunction and pain occur after neck dissection due to accessory nerve injury (11-14). More ...
Other cranial nerves involved were vagus, trigeminal, spinal accessory nerve, abducent, occulomotor and glossopharyngeal in ... The histologic alterations found in patient with Fazio-Londe disease were identical to those seen in infantile-onset spinal ... In the Gomez review facial nerve was affected in all cases while hypoglossal nerve was involved in all except one case. ... Post mortem examination of cases have found depletion of nerve cells in the nuclei of cranial nerves. ...
Spinal accessory nerve biopsy as an antemortem diagnostic test for equine motor neuron disease. Equine Vet J 1996;28:215-219.. ... Equine Motor Neuron Disease Equine Motor Neuron Disease (EMND) is an acquired neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor nerves ... evidence of the degeneration of myelinated axons upon biopsy of the ventral branch of the spinal accessory nerve or the finding ... Equine motor neuron disease: findings in 28 horses and proposal of a pathophysiological mechanism for the disease. Equine Vet J ...
VII Facial Nerve. IX Glossopharygeal Nerve. X Vagus Nerve. XI Spinal Accessory Nerve. XII Hypoglossal Nerve. Swallowing in the ... Difficulty in swallowing that occurs as consequence of disease to either the organs and muscles involved in swallowing, or more ... nerves and muscles in the throat, which make the muscles weak. This makes it difficult for a person. to swallow without choking ... Disruption in cranial nerve development. The result of a brain that is not developing & working properly. brainstem and the ...
Level V contains the lymph nodes located along the lower half of the spinal accessory nerve and the transverse cervical artery ... Level I nodes often indicate disease in the anterior oral cavity. Level II, III, and IV nodes often indicate disease in the ... Level V nodes often indicate disease in the nasopharynx. Supraclavicular nodes usually indicate dis ease below the level of the ... It is convenient to use the level system to describe the location of lymph node disease in the neck. Level I contains the ...
Iatrogenic injuries to the spinal accessory nerve (SAN) are not uncommon during lymph node biopsy of the posterior cervical ... In Neurosurgical Focus Volume 41 (2016): Issue 1 (Jul 2016): (In)famous Neurological Injuries and Disease: Cases and Events of ... Surgical outcomes of 156 spinal accessory nerve injuries caused by lymph node biopsy procedures ... Neurolysis, suture, and nerve grafts were used for the surgical repair of the injured nerves. In 9 patients with partial loss ...
Often in degenerative joint disease, secondary degenerative joint. J bone joint surg am. The spinal accessory nerve and ... The nerve after before viagra and pics descends through the base of the seven pitchers returned to their purpose; the ... another disease associated with larger numbers of sebaceous or tarsal ankle plantar flexed ankle can, over the tendon to ... the work and using the saphenous cutaneous nerve. %, vascular injuries. ...
Spinal accessory nerve cranial nerve xi; secondary innervation directly from the lateral pterygoid superior head of the joints ... However, skeletal muscle cells extent of the anatomy and degenerative joint disease in postmenopausal to anterior stabilization ... The suprascapular nerve, the spinal column. Variability in the text. Operative treatment consists of stratified epithelium. ... A severe axillary nerve with a suspected osd involves a positive test, consisting of pale nephron is essentially a severe ...
Drugs & Diseases , Otolaryngology and Facial Plastic Surgery , Accessory Nerve Injury Q&A ... Lateral pectoral nerve transfer for spinal accessory nerve injury. J Neurosurg Spine. 2017 Jan. 26 (1):112-5. [Medline]. ... Reconstruction of the spinal accessory nerve with selective fascicular nerve transfer of the upper trunk. J Neurosurg Spine. ... Spinal Accessory Nerve Monitoring and Clinical Outcome Results of Nerve-Sparing Neck Dissections. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. ...
CASE REPORT: Schwannoma of the extracranial portion of the accessory nerve presenting as spinal adenopathy (13 May, 2019) ... CASE REPORT: Hydroxychloroquine-induced podocytopathy mimicking Fabry disease (13 May, 2019) Justine Serre, David Buob, Jean- ... Unilateral facial nerve hypoplasia without evident facial palsy (13 May, 2019) Free Sofia Costa, Mafalda Cascais, Rui Pedro ... Varicose veins causing tibial nerve compression in the tarsal tunnel (10 May, 2019) Free Rudi Falovic, Mithun Nambiar, Pamela ...
Ultrasound Visualization of the Spinal Accessory Nerve In Vivo. Endo, Yoshimi Endo, Yoshimi Less ... Efficacy of Ultrasound-Guided Steroid Injections for Pain Management of Midfoot Joint Degenerative Disease. Endo, Yoshimi ... Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Used as Ultrasonographic Assessment of the Incidence of Raised Intracranial Pressure in ... Ultrasonographic Assessment of Longitudinal Median Nerve and Hand Flexor Tendon Dynamics in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Endo, ...
Journal of the aortic root, this leads to preservation of sternocleidomastoid muscle, spinal accessory nerve, and internal ... How common are staphylococcus aureus, brucella, and mycobacterium tuberculosis osteomyelitis lyme disease rheumatic diseases ... Consider lyme disease exposure in utero aspiration. Such changes would be either spontaneous out of the outcome to your own ... Psychoanalysis is not affected by disease process. Hammar, m. frisk, j. And figg, w. D. Herbal medicine: A year review. Mutat. ...
Jaren on vagus nerve multiple sclerosis: 46 F Dx of demyelinating Neuropathy. Can it cause bladder dysfunction/autonomic % ... Are spinal accessory nerve injuries sometimes confused for impingement syndrome ? Dr. Walter Husar Dr. Husar ... Not similar diseases: Als is very different, and is a disease of "mis-folded proteins" like alzheimers and parkinsons, and all ... Vagus nerve / spine: Spinal stenosis should not affect the vagus nerve. The vagus nerve is safely outside of the spinal canal. ...
Tumor above the spinal accessory nerve in papillary thyroid cancer that involves lateral neck nodes. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck ... Sentinel lymph node biopsy in the management of thyroid disease. Br J Surg. 2001;88:321-2.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Occult well differentiated thyroid carcinoma presenting as cervical node disease. World J Surg. 1995;19:642-7.PubMedCrossRef ... The challenge in the management of this malignancy is to tailor the treatment to be aggressive enough to eradicate the disease ...
Electrodiagnostic studies were consistent with a diagnosis of radiation-induced spinal accessory nerve hyperactivity. The ... This edition of What is in the Literature? will focus on motor neuron disease (MND), including adult forms [amyotrophic ... Cold-induced sweating syndrome (CISS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease due to mutation in the Cytokine receptor-like ... OBJECTIVES: We report the clinical phenotype in 3 consecutive generations with demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease that ...
To the best of our knowledge, the natural course and the most effective way of handling spontaneous spinal accessory nerve ... the clinical consequences of any injury to the spinal accessory nerve may vary. ... Isolated spinal accessory nerve dysfunction has a major detrimental impact on the functional performance of the shoulder girdle ... This palsy is commonly seen after surgical procedures in the posterior cervical triangle for malignant diseases and after ...
... cell carcinoma into the lymph nodes of the neck reduce survival and is the most important factor in the spread of the disease. ... spinal accessory nerve, squamous cell carcinoma, sternocleidomastoid on November 28, 2011. by chzechze. ... Tag Archives: spinal accessory nerve. Neck dissections Leave a reply The neck dissection is a surgical procedure for control of ...
Spinal Accessory - controls the muscles responsible for head movement. xii. Hypoglossal - controls the muscles of the tongue ... Of course, any type of disease, injury or accident to a cranial nerve may affect the functioning of what that specific nerve ... Cranial Nerves and Their Functions. Did you know that there are 12 pairs of cranial nerves that perform some highly ... Injuries to the neck and head can affect these nerves, leading to many ailments besides just headaches and neck pain! ...
Right Shoulder Spinal Accessory Nerve Palsy and Eden Lange Procedure. $150.00 +. * Stroke / Intracerebral Bleed Secondary to ...
... which is heavily pally supplied by the spinal accessory nerve. Tophi are characteristically deposited in different soft tissue ... Type 3 dis- ease is nearly identical to type 1 disease except that the course is more rapidly progressive. The example provided ... These diseases, such as Huntingtons disease and fragile X syndrome, are characterized by expansion of these repeats in ... McArdles disease is a defect in glycogenolysis that results from myophosphorylase deficiency. Lysosomal storage diseases result ...
The nerve is vulnerable in the posterior triangle. ... Spinal accessory nerve palsy often occurs most often due to ... Renal rickets is the term used for rickets where the primary cause is not vitamin D deficiency but a renal disease leading to ... Few cases of spontaneous spinal accessory nerve palsy have been reported. Pathophysiology of Nerve Injury. The nerve injured or ... Spinal accessory nerve is XI cranial nerve that consists of two components - spinal and cranial. ...
CN11 (Spinal Accessory): CN 11 innervates the muscles which permit shrugging of the shoulders (Trapezius) and turning the head ... Even though Cranial Nerve VII is the one most often mentioned in connection with Lyme disease, it seems that any cranial nerve( ... Lyme disease.. Bourke SJ1.. "Abstract. Neurological problems form an important part of the clinical spectrum of Lyme disease. A ... Lyme disease is an infrequent, often difficult, diagnosis in children who present to an ED. Early disseminated and late disease ...
  • The posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle is one of the intrinsic muscles of the larynx innervated by the recurrent laryngeal nerve. (ajnr.org)
  • The triangle formed by the intermediate tendon of the digastric muscle, the posterior border of the mylohyoid muscle, and the hypoglossal nerve is sometimes called Pirogov- Belclard 's triangle. (medscape.com)
  • The glossopharyngeal nerve (CN IX) provides general sensation for the posterior one-third tongue. (medscape.com)
  • These attachments may blend with the femoral head presses firmly against the radial nerve, posterior to the coronoid process of decomposing a single redislocation years after recovery leads to some degree, from the glenoid during powerful elbow exion strength. (naturalpath.net)
  • The posterior cricoarytenoid and lateral crico-arytenoid are innervated by the recurrent laryngeal nerves and are involved in abdcution (posterior) and adduction (lateral) of the vocal chords. (myneurosurg.com)
  • The Strange Case of George Dedlow" portrays a union officer who was not a physician but who had some medical background and who sustained a series of war wounds leading to severe nerve pain, the author's first description of causalgia, multiple amputations, and the psychological as well as physical symptoms of phantom limb syndrome. (thejns.org)
  • optic neuritis (abbreviated on) is one of many symptoms of ms and results from inflammation in one or both optic nerves. (healthtap.com)
  • 5. Assess for signs and symptoms should be reported, and genetic diseases of the middle meningeal artery, lacrimal nerve, superior ophthalmic vein, trochlear nerve, and the amount of drainage from each of two or three tracheal rings (fig. Followed by physical examination of the sternum, 6 mg rapid iv administration initially. (suagm.edu)
  • Unexplained lymphadenopathy without signs or symptoms of serious disease or malignancy can be observed for one month, after which specific testing or biopsy should be performed. (aafp.org)
  • Gordon sign obtained by application of end organ involvement liver disease is treated by decompression, and reduction of neurologic signs are closdy monitored especially changes in symptoms related to tissue however, unbound toxin has been in use of low grade tumor, whether there is no history of heavy drinking but stopped once she started developing le t occipital lobe lower bank right homonymous upper quadrant defect pie in the mother. (rtilab.com)
  • You must always seek the advice of a professional for questions related to a disease, disease symptoms, and appropriate therapeutic treatments. (drugs.com)
  • Your symptoms suggest impingement, either through direct nerve compression or swelling around the nerve. (healthtap.com)
  • Coughing, straining, jugular compression, and other causes of increased cerebral spinal fluid pressure increase symptoms. (chiro.org)
  • The ability of CT and MR imaging to depict denervation atrophy in the PCA muscle in patients with recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy was evaluated. (ajnr.org)
  • In a hemithyroidectomy operation, where ~ half of the thyroid gland is removed, the blood supply to the thyroid is divided adjacent to the gland, the recurrent laryngeal nerve is identified and followed up to the voice box and the parathyroid glands on that side are left undisturbed if possible. (mythyroid.com)
  • Levitra for pulmonary hypertension - Anal disorders, such as inking of the disease and insulin (requires careful glucose monitoring), both of the. (phcoct.org)
  • Phrenic nerve block guided by ultrasound is known to be safer than the one solely depending on surface anatomy. (painspa.co.uk)
  • Curr opin neurobiol davis kd, pope g, chen j, watkins sc, et al early analgesia for procedures that will not remove somatic dysfunction with rotation of the spinal cord activity are much less likely if the infant and young adult, th ed. (dvas.org)
  • Just as chiropractors can test the functioning of nerves that exit along your spine, there are tests which can reveal whether each cranial nerve is functioning properly. (choosenatural.com)
  • Damage to the spine or spinal cord can be life-limiting, debilitating to a day-to-day routine and can impact almost every aspect of life, from a career to personal relationships. (jmw.co.uk)
  • The afferent limb of the hiccup reflex consists of the vagus and phrenic nerve with contributions of the sympathetic chain arising from the 6th to the 12th thoracic segments, whereas the efferent limb consists mainly from the phrenic nerve. (painspa.co.uk)
  • Therefore, diagnosis of the neuromuscular disorders described below requires not only determination of alpha-tocopherol status but also the appropriate clinical signs, supporting clinical pathology and/or muscle biopsy results and elimination of other possible diseases. (msu.edu)
  • It results from a vast array of disease processes ( Table 1 ) , 1 whose broad categories are easily recalled using the mnemonic acronym "MIAMI," representing M alignancies, I nfections, A utoimmune disorders, M iscellaneous and unusual conditions, and I atrogenic causes. (aafp.org)
  • These findings indicate that deletions at the SMN locus are not present in BMA of upper and lower limb and suggest that these disorders are not only clinically but also genetically separate entities from proximal spinal muscular atrophies. (pianolarge.ml)
  • Pulsed radiofrequency ablation of the phrenic nerves can be used for long term management of intractable hiccups. (painspa.co.uk)
  • also more common than secondary bph nodules and fibrosis regenerative nodes necrosis hepatic branch of lateral sural cutaneous nerve branch of. (bvbdallas.org)
  • In depth consideration of the lymphatic system in a group, but not with the lump and the most common complications include end-stage renal disease. (thefoodmission.com)
  • Presently, END is considered to be a superior to observation, with better overall survival and disease-free survival rates, and a lower nodal recurrence rate with minimal complications [ 6 - 8 ]. (kjorl.org)
  • If the animal can move the eyes normally and no abnormal movements are detected, the function of these nerves is usually within normal limits. (equimagenes.com)