GizzardSpices: The dried seeds, bark, root, stems, buds, leaves, or fruit of aromatic plants used to season food.Turkeys: Large woodland game BIRDS in the subfamily Meleagridinae, family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. Formerly they were considered a distinct family, Melegrididae.TurkeyMyosin-Light-Chain Kinase: An enzyme that phosphorylates myosin light chains in the presence of ATP to yield myosin-light chain phosphate and ADP, and requires calcium and CALMODULIN. The 20-kDa light chain is phosphorylated more rapidly than any other acceptor, but light chains from other myosins and myosin itself can act as acceptors. The enzyme plays a central role in the regulation of smooth muscle contraction.Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Myosins: A diverse superfamily of proteins that function as translocating proteins. They share the common characteristics of being able to bind ACTINS and hydrolyze MgATP. Myosins generally consist of heavy chains which are involved in locomotion, and light chains which are involved in regulation. Within the structure of myosin heavy chain are three domains: the head, the neck and the tail. The head region of the heavy chain contains the actin binding domain and MgATPase domain which provides energy for locomotion. The neck region is involved in binding the light-chains. The tail region provides the anchoring point that maintains the position of the heavy chain. The superfamily of myosins is organized into structural classes based upon the type and arrangement of the subunits they contain.Myosin-Light-Chain Phosphatase: A phosphoprotein phosphatase that is specific for MYOSIN LIGHT CHAINS. It is composed of three subunits, which include a catalytic subunit, a myosin binding subunit, and a third subunit of unknown function.Chickens: Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.Fowl adenovirus A: The type species of the genus AVIADENOVIRUS, family ADENOVIRIDAE, an oncogenic virus of birds. This is also called CELO virus for chick embryo lethal orphan virus.Curcuma: A plant genus of the family ZINGIBERACEAE that contains CURCUMIN and curcuminoids.Curcumin: A yellow-orange dye obtained from tumeric, the powdered root of CURCUMA longa. It is used in the preparation of curcuma paper and the detection of boron. Curcumin appears to possess a spectrum of pharmacological properties, due primarily to its inhibitory effects on metabolic enzymes.Tropomyosin: A protein found in the thin filaments of muscle fibers. It inhibits contraction of the muscle unless its position is modified by TROPONIN.Variola virus: A species of ORTHOPOXVIRUS causing infections in humans. No infections have been reported since 1977 and the virus is now believed to be virtually extinct.Calmodulin-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind calmodulin. They are found in many tissues and have a variety of functions including F-actin cross-linking properties, inhibition of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and calcium and magnesium ATPases.Piper nigrum: A plant species in the PIPERACEAE plant family. It is a common spice on foods and is used medicinally to increase gastrointestinal assimilation of other supplements and drugs. Piperine is a key component. Black pepper is picked unripe and heaped for a few days to ferment. White Pepper is the ripe fruit dehulled by maceration in water.Crocus: A plant genus, in the IRIDACEAE family, known as a source of Saffron.Poultry Diseases: Diseases of birds which are raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption and are usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc. The concept is differentiated from BIRD DISEASES which is for diseases of birds not considered poultry and usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild.Condiments: Aromatic substances added to food before or after cooking to enhance its flavor. These are usually of vegetable origin.Myosin Subfragments: Parts of the myosin molecule resulting from cleavage by proteolytic enzymes (PAPAIN; TRYPSIN; or CHYMOTRYPSIN) at well-localized regions. Study of these isolated fragments helps to delineate the functional roles of different parts of myosin. Two of the most common subfragments are myosin S-1 and myosin S-2. S-1 contains the heads of the heavy chains plus the light chains and S-2 contains part of the double-stranded, alpha-helical, heavy chain tail (myosin rod).Actomyosin: A protein complex of actin and MYOSINS occurring in muscle. It is the essential contractile substance of muscle.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Designer Drugs: Drugs designed and synthesized, often for illegal street use, by modification of existing drug structures (e.g., amphetamines). Of special interest are MPTP (a reverse ester of meperidine), MDA (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine), and MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine). Many drugs act on the aminergic system, the physiologically active biogenic amines.Eugenia: A genus in the family Myrtaceae sometimes known as "stoppers" in FOLK MEDICINE. Many species of the genus SYZYGIUM have synonymous names that begin with the Eugenia genus name.Origanum: A plant genus of the family LAMIACEAE that is the source of a familiar food seasoning.Adenosine Triphosphatases: A group of enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. The hydrolysis reaction is usually coupled with another function such as transporting Ca(2+) across a membrane. These enzymes may be dependent on Ca(2+), Mg(2+), anions, H+, or DNA.Actinin: A protein factor that regulates the length of R-actin. It is chemically similar, but immunochemically distinguishable from actin.Ca(2+) Mg(2+)-ATPaseAdenoviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the ADENOVIRIDAE.Elettaria: A plant genus of the family ZINGIBERACEAE, order Zingiberales, subclass Zingiberidae. Elettaria cardamomum (L.) Maton is the source of Cardamom used in SPICES.Trigonella: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE.Eugenol: A cinnamate derivative of the shikamate pathway found in CLOVE OIL and other PLANTS.Black Pepper: A common spice from fruit of PIPER NIGRUM. Black pepper is picked unripe and heaped for a few days to ferment. White Pepper is the ripe fruit dehulled by maceration in water. Piperine is a key component used medicinally to increase gastrointestinal assimilation of other supplements and drugs.Cuminum: A plant genus of the family APIACEAE. The seed is used in SPICES.
  • olittlewood: I would say using gizzards as a flavoring agent for broth is a good idea in general, since they're usually included with the whole turkey anyway and do contain a significant amount of flavor. (wisegeek.com)
  • If using the gizzards for broth flavoring is completely off the menu, then you might be able to use chicken bouillon cubes or chicken seasoning packs from ramen noodle boxes to boost the flavor of the broth. (wisegeek.com)
  • I won a bet once by ripping a handful of white meat off the breast, and squeezing it with my bare hand until a measured two ounces of turkey broth dripped into a cup below it. (popularmechanics.com)
  • Roast turkey until thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh registers 175°F, adding 1 cup broth every 30 minutes, lifting foil to baste with pan juices and removing foil during last 15 minutes to brown turkey, about 3 hours 30 minutes longer if unstuffed or 4 hours 15 minutes if stuffed. (epicurious.com)
  • Bone-in poultry products that are injected or marinated with a solution containing butter or other edible fat, broth, stock or water plus spices, flavor enhancers and other approved substances must be labeled as "basted" or "self-basted. (usda.gov)
  • That roasted turkey carcass, will make an extraordinary rich delicious poultry broth. (ruhlman.com)
  • The gizzards alone can also be added to soup stocks for additional flavor. (wisegeek.com)
  • Industrial turkey is bland and flaccid, pumped with watery solutions in an attempt to improve texture and add "flavor. (motherearthnews.com)
  • Pastured turkeys "showcase real flavor," says Hank Will, American Livestock Breed Conservancy (ALBC) board member and Editor-in-Chief of Grit magazine. (motherearthnews.com)
  • The brine adds so much flavor that the turkey is delicious without being smoked. (foodandwine.com)
  • When Mark Sylvester makes a Thanksgiving meal for the 25 to 30 guests who gather at his Oconto cottage, he buys a fresh turkey that weighs about 30 pounds, then injects flavorings and cooks it over flavored woods for even more flavor. (jsonline.com)
  • If you love the brawny flavor of poultry juices mixed with your side dish, or if you're simply a traditionalist, stuffing the turkey is the way to go. (benningtonbanner.com)
  • Soul food takes on a spicy accent in gumbo packed with flavor, spice and plenty of shrimp and oysters. (bettycrocker.com)
  • You'll want to play with the spices a bit to get the flavor you want, thats kinda just a base and it doesnt make a whole lot of dip. (sinfest.net)
  • Lamb leg soup is a very authentic soup recipe from South India, some prepare it spicy whereas my version adopted from my Mom is mildly spiced but well flavored. (pachakam.com)
  • In France, especially the Dordogne region, duck gizzards are eaten in the traditional Périgordian salad, along with walnuts, croutons and lettuce. (wikipedia.org)
  • But some years one of their "birds" has been a turducken, a turkey with a duck inside it and a chicken inside of that. (jsonline.com)
  • The first dressing I make would be cornbread in the turkey, the next is an Andouille sausage dressing inside the duck. (jsonline.com)
  • It's very heavy because we use a 16-pound turkey, and the duck is about eight pounds. (jsonline.com)
  • Beyond noodles, owner Tommy Lee isn't afraid to feature alternative proteins, especially at sibling restaurant Hop Alley, where beef tongue, duck gizzards, octopus and pig ears have all made appearances. (westword.com)
  • What they modify or add is that they flavored the inside of the duck with ingredients like star ansie, five spice, salt, hoisin sauce, ginger, green onions and so forth. (theartofcooking.org)
  • All fowl ( turkey, chicken, duck, capon, quail, etc.) that are processed and made available for consumption could be considered part of the poultry industry. (ncdcr.gov)
  • Those that do employ the following method of chewing: "A bird swallows small bits of gravel that act as 'teeth' in the gizzard, breaking down hard food such as seeds and thus helping digestion. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1) Crush 1 teaspoon black peppercorns with 1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds in a mortar and pestle or spice grinder. (blogspot.com)
  • It was one of the basic ingredients in blancmange, a stew usually consisting of chicken and fried onions cooked in milk and seasoned with spices and sugar. (wikipedia.org)
  • Now that I've got that off my chest, I have to say, by the end of Thursday, tens of millions of households will have the most miraculous ingredients for stock right at hand-turkey bones that have been lovingly roasted. (ruhlman.com)
  • In the Southern United States, the gizzard is typically served fried, sometimes eaten with hot sauce or honey mustard, or added to crawfish boil along with crawfish sauce, and it is also used in traditional New Orleans gumbo. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chicken gizzards are often served with a honey mustard or barbecue sauce. (wisegeek.com)
  • Gizzards and spices bathed in olive oil for several hours, cooled and tucked into a crock in the back of the refrigerator for fanciful salads or in our case, a fanciful sauce. (blogspot.co.uk)
  • The turnips were tender and tasty, the sauce (after I thinned it out with a bit of water) aromatic but the gizzards, while about as tender as they were likely to get, were dull dull dull. (blogspot.com)
  • So it was no surprise that when we asked readers to nominate friends and family members who excel at making this meal, we heard about cooks who make their turkeys in different ways - all of which sounded tasty. (jsonline.com)
  • Some cooks add chickpeas, chicken gizzards, or broken-up bits of angel hair pasta. (epicurious.com)
  • Are Additives Allowed in Fresh Turkeys? (usda.gov)
  • Additives are NOT allowed on fresh turkeys or those "minimally processed" (cut into parts). (usda.gov)
  • However, if turkeys are "processed" (injected with a basting solution, ground, canned, cured, smoked, dried or made into luncheon meats), additives such as MSG, salt, or sodium erythorbate may be added but must be listed on the label in descending order from largest to smallest amount of the ingredient. (usda.gov)
  • Remove any feathers and quills with pliers (kosher turkeys tend to require this more than others). (sinfest.net)