Acacia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. The gums and tanning agents obtained from Acacia are called GUM ARABIC. The common name of catechu is more often used for Areca catechu (ARECA).Gum Arabic: Powdered exudate from various Acacia species, especially A. senegal (Leguminosae). It forms mucilage or syrup in water. Gum arabic is used as a suspending agent, excipient, and emulsifier in foods and pharmaceuticals.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Tannins: Polyphenolic compounds with molecular weights of around 500-3000 daltons and containing enough hydroxyl groups (1-2 per 100 MW) for effective cross linking of other compounds (ASTRINGENTS). The two main types are HYDROLYZABLE TANNINS and CONDENSED TANNINS. Historically, the term has applied to many compounds and plant extracts able to render skin COLLAGEN impervious to degradation. The word tannin derives from the Celtic word for OAK TREE which was used for leather processing.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Sudan: A country in northeastern Africa. The capital is Khartoum.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Pacific Islands: The islands of the Pacific Ocean divided into MICRONESIA; MELANESIA; and POLYNESIA (including NEW ZEALAND). The collective name Oceania includes the aforenamed islands, adding AUSTRALIA; NEW ZEALAND; and the Malay Archipelago (INDONESIA). (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p910, 880)Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Micronesia: The collective name for islands of the Pacific Ocean east of the Philippines, including the Mariana, PALAU, Caroline, Marshall, and Kiribati Islands. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p761 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p350)Polynesia: The collective name for the islands of the central Pacific Ocean, including the Austral Islands, Cook Islands, Easter Island, HAWAII; NEW ZEALAND; Phoenix Islands, PITCAIRN ISLAND; SAMOA; TONGA; Tuamotu Archipelago, Wake Island, and Wallis and Futuna Islands. Polynesians are of the Caucasoid race, but many are of mixed origin. Polynesia is from the Greek poly, many + nesos, island, with reference to the many islands in the group. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p966 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p426)Astringents: Agents, usually topical, that cause the contraction of tissues for the control of bleeding or secretions.Hydrolyzable Tannins: Polymeric derivatives of GALLIC ACID that are esters of a sugar.Protein Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of proteins in the diet, characterized by adaptive enzyme changes in the liver, increase in amino acid synthetases, and diminution of urea formation, thus conserving nitrogen and reducing its loss in the urine. Growth, immune response, repair, and production of enzymes and hormones are all impaired in severe protein deficiency. Protein deficiency may also arise in the face of adequate protein intake if the protein is of poor quality (i.e., the content of one or more amino acids is inadequate and thus becomes the limiting factor in protein utilization). (From Merck Manual, 16th ed; Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 12th ed, p406)Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Alnus: A plant genus of the family BETULACEAE that is distinguished from birch (BETULA) by its usually stalked winter buds and by cones that remain on the branches after the small, winged nutlets are released.Tasmania: An island south of Australia and the smallest state of the Commonwealth. Its capital is Hobart. It was discovered and named Van Diemen's Island in 1642 by Abel Tasman, a Dutch navigator, in honor of the Dutch governor-general of the Dutch East Indian colonies. It was renamed for the discoverer in 1853. In 1803 it was taken over by Great Britain and was used as a penal colony. It was granted government in 1856 and federated as a state in 1901. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1190 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, p535)New South Wales: A state in southeastern Australia. Its capital is Sydney. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1770 and first settled at Botany Bay by marines and convicts in 1788. It was named by Captain Cook who thought its coastline resembled that of South Wales. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p840 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p377)South Australia: A state in south central Australia. Its capital is Adelaide. It was probably first visited by F. Thyssen in 1627. Later discoveries in 1802 and 1830 opened up the southern part. It became a British province in 1836 with this self-descriptive name and became a state in 1901. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1135)Comb and Wattles: Fleshy and reddish outgrowth of skin tissue found on top of the head, attached to the sides of the head, and hanging from the mandible of birds such as turkeys and chickens.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Agave: A genus known for fibers obtained from their leaves: sisal from A. sisalana, henequen from A. fourcroyoides and A. cantala, or Manila-Maguey fiber from A. cantala. Some species provide a sap that is fermented to an intoxicating drink, called pulque in Mexico. Some contain agavesides.Dahlia: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE that contains antifungal plant defensin.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Copyright: It is a form of protection provided by law. In the United States this protection is granted to authors of original works of authorship, including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. (from Circular of the United States Copyright Office, 6/30/2008)Cuminum: A plant genus of the family APIACEAE. The seed is used in SPICES.Foeniculum: A plant genus of the family APIACEAE used in SPICES.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Floors and Floorcoverings: The surface of a structure upon which one stands or walks.Housing, AnimalFagaceae: A plant family of the order Fagales subclass Hamamelidae, class Magnoliopsida.Wood: A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.Air Pollution, Indoor: The contamination of indoor air.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.
  • The other species, distributed in the Indian Ocean, tropical Asia and tropical America are now classified under Vachellia (former subgenus Acacia): 163 species (pantropical) Senegalia (former subgenus Aculeiferum): 203 species (pantropical) Acaciella (former subgenus Aculeiferum section Filicinae): 15 species (Americas) Mariosousa: 13 species related to (and including) Acacia coulteri (Americas) Two Australian acacias were re-classified under Vachellia, and another two under Senegalia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ants in return protect their host plant from herbivores and competing plants, by patrolling aggressively, removing or repelling intruders and clipping competing vegetation…other species of Vachellia do not display the constellation of mutualism-associated traits-inhabitable swollen thorns, food bodies and enlarged extrafloral nectaries-shown by the Mesoamerican ant-acacias. (asknature.org)
  • Notable acacia species include sweet acacia (Acacia farnesiana) a semi-evergreen shrub or small tree that has strongly fragrant yellow blooms and feathery green leaves, and weeping acacia (Acacia pendula), an upright evergreen tree that boasts sweeping, pendulous branches and pale yellow blooms that appear in late summer and fall. (sfgate.com)
  • At the same time some of the subspecies of A. nilotica were until fairly recently thought to be distinct species: for example, eastern African plants were usually called A. subalata and southern African ones A. benthamii . (fao.org)
  • A species of plants native to the state that are in imminent danger of extinction within the state, the survival of which is unlikely if the causes of a decline in the number of plants continue, and includes all species determined to be endangered or threatened pursuant to the Federal Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended. (usf.edu)
  • Defined as species of plants native to the state that are in rapid decline in the number of plants within the state, but which have not so decreased in such number as to cause them to be endangered. (usf.edu)
  • U.S.) Source - List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants under the provisions of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended. (usf.edu)
  • 2020. Acacia complanata in Kew Science Plants of the World online . (wikimedia.org)
  • The original mandate that started the TAXA Wood Knowledge Base was actually to locate and document as many species of woods and woody plants. (woodsoftheworld.org)
  • Acacia is classified in the division Magnoliophyta Magnoliophyta , division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The ant aggressively defends the acacia from plant-eating insects, neighboring plants, and disease-causing microorganisms. (asknature.org)
  • The ants act as caretakers for the tree, and clear the ground and keep it free of any other plants and even prune surrounding branches of other trees that threaten to outshade the acacia. (toptropicals.com)
  • Of the whole class of New Holland plants, few are more interesting than Acacias. (chestofbooks.com)
  • It may seem surprising that Acacia howittii is such a hardy and quick grower in cultivation and yet is on the list of rare species of Australian plants. (anbg.gov.au)
  • In the Gardens the species has been used as a screen plant and one stand of seven plants (since removed) used for screening an amenities block on the Eucalyptus lawn gained the admiration of visitors. (anbg.gov.au)
  • Acacia trees are not the only plants that have evolved to work closely with ants. (listverse.com)
  • Methods: For each species, we compared growth of plants in soils from their native and non-native ranges using a glasshouse study, a soil dilution method (most probable number) and T-RFLP to assess rhizobial abundance and community composition, respectively. (edu.au)
  • Rhizobial abundance was equally high across species and ranges, indicating plants are unlikely to be limited by soil rhizobial abundance in non-native ranges. (edu.au)
  • http://homeguides.sfgate.com/acacia-plants-65237.html. (sfgate.com)
  • Acacia Plants" accessed September 24, 2019. (sfgate.com)
  • All Acacia species contain mainly the xanthophylls zeaxanthin and lutein compounds: from ca. 38 mg.kg -1 of total lipids ( A. cyclops) to ca. 113 mg.kg -1 of total lipids (A. cyanophylla) . (biomedcentral.com)
  • Acacia cyclops, A. saligna and Paraserianthes lophantha formed associations with different rhizobial communities in non-native vs. native range soils. (edu.au)
  • As a tree with bright or golden yellow flowers in round heads, straight stipular spines in pairs but never inflated into "ant-galls" and indehiscent but compressed pods, there are few species with which it is likely to be confused. (fao.org)
  • whilst repeated tests conducted with the fresh leaves, flowers, and immature pods of Acacia karroo Hayne failed to reveal the presence of such a glucoside. (up.ac.za)
  • 2) Methods are described of feeding the pods of species of Acacia, which contain cyanogenetic glucosides, to stock with safety. (up.ac.za)
  • Flowering in this species occurs mainly during winter, depending on seasonal conditions and pods mature during September to May . (florabank.org.au)
  • Predation by sap sucking insects on maturing pods of this species often reduces seed viability. (florabank.org.au)
  • We assessed the role of the soil microbial community (with an emphasis on symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria, collectively termed rhizobia) in determining cross-continental invasion success of five woody legume species. (edu.au)
  • Main conclusions: Invasive success of these five legume species is not constrained by the abundance of rhizobia in novel ranges for established legume populations, at least within Australia. (edu.au)
  • The decision that Australia could annex the title Acacia goes against the normal rules of taxonomy, the science that gives names to all living organisms, both alive and extinct. (sanparks.org)
  • In taxonomy, "the accepted rule is that the earliest published name has precedence", but the Australians have waived this rule claiming special circumstances, despite the fact that the first named acacia was an African tree. (sanparks.org)
  • Three new Qld species related to A. leiocalyx were recently described by L.Pedley in Austrobaileya 5(2): 307-321 (1999), namely, A. burdekensis , A. faucium and A. fodinalis . (worldwidewattle.com)
  • In the case of Acacia rigidula , this report also fueled a minor explosion of commercial weight-loss products that included this plant, at least in the list of ingredients on their label. (sacredcacti.com)
  • Increased above-ground biomass of A. longifolia when grown in soil from its non-native range suggests that invasive success of this species may be associated with differences in the non-rhizobial components of soil microbial communities in the novel range. (edu.au)
  • Category I - Species that are invading and disrupting native plant communities in Florida. (usf.edu)
  • Category II - Species that have shown a potential to disrupt native plant communities. (usf.edu)
  • Forms tall, dense, impenetrable stands in disturbed and bare sites, preventing native species establishing. (weedbusters.org.nz)
  • Can be succeeded in tall canopy habitats by taller native species (not in kauri or tanekaha forest). (weedbusters.org.nz)
  • That's why we have to keep removing weeds that prevent regeneration, protect native seedlings that appear naturally, collect material for direct seeding, and grow key species up for planting. (google.com)
  • applies to subsequent 'species' questions) become naturalized where it is not native? (cal-ipc.org)
  • Although differences in rhizobial community composition were evident between the native and non-native ranges for three of the five species, these were not associated with differences in plant growth. (edu.au)
  • Bullhorn acacias provide nutrients and housing for ants in return for protection from herbivores thanks to a mutualistic relationship. (asknature.org)
  • Even more valuable to the ants are tiny sacs full of proteins, fatty nutrients, and vitamins called Beltian bodies that grow on the end of acacia leaves. (asknature.org)
  • Recently, scientists have also discovered that the ants also spread bacteria from their feet onto the acacia leaves. (asknature.org)
  • The acacia ants revisited: Convergent evolution and biogeographic context in an iconic ant/plant mutualism. (asknature.org)
  • They have also enslaved whole species of ants to actively fight off their foes. (listverse.com)
  • This is very similar to the acacia ant, but the ant plant benefits from its ants in another way. (listverse.com)
  • Evans 1989 A comprehensive analysis, including nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for 35 samples of gum arabic, has been published to serve as the basis for international standardization of acacia gum. (drugs.com)
  • Renal and extrarenal effects of Gum Arabic ( Acacia Senegal )--what can be learned from animal experiments? (thegoodscentscompany.com)
  • This was a major takeaway I got from an interview with Rajiv, a furniture maker for the past 35 years, who praised the fact that Acacia products are quite resistant to scratches, unlike some other wood species that show scratches more obviously. (articlecube.com)
  • Whether you simply like the darker finish of Acacia wood, the renewable forestry aspects due to its faster organic growth rate, or that it has a strong visual appearance that compliments any room, the popularity of this wood species continues to grow as more homeowners learn about it and express a preference for it. (articlecube.com)
  • When you look around at your friend's homes that have been furnished recently, you're likely to see more use of acacia wood, rather than only seeing pine or mahogany pieces. (articlecube.com)
  • In a conversation occurring a year or so after the second publication had occurred, Sasha Shulgin questioned the soundness of my inclusion of the information in the 1999 printing of Cactus Chemistry By Species . (sacredcacti.com)