Confusion: A mental state characterized by bewilderment, emotional disturbance, lack of clear thinking, and perceptual disorientation.Dizziness: An imprecise term which may refer to a sense of spatial disorientation, motion of the environment, or lightheadedness.Agnosia: Loss of the ability to comprehend the meaning or recognize the importance of various forms of stimulation that cannot be attributed to impairment of a primary sensory modality. Tactile agnosia is characterized by an inability to perceive the shape and nature of an object by touch alone, despite unimpaired sensation to light touch, position, and other primary sensory modalities.Architecture as Topic: The art and science of designing buildings and structures. More generally, it is the design of the total built environment, including town planning, urban design, and landscape architecture.Orientation: Awareness of oneself in relation to time, place and person.Amnesia: Pathologic partial or complete loss of the ability to recall past experiences (AMNESIA, RETROGRADE) or to form new memories (AMNESIA, ANTEROGRADE). This condition may be of organic or psychologic origin. Organic forms of amnesia are usually associated with dysfunction of the DIENCEPHALON or HIPPOCAMPUS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp426-7)Limbic Encephalitis: A paraneoplastic syndrome marked by degeneration of neurons in the LIMBIC SYSTEM. Clinical features include HALLUCINATIONS, loss of EPISODIC MEMORY; ANOSMIA; AGEUSIA; TEMPORAL LOBE EPILEPSY; DEMENTIA; and affective disturbance (depression). Circulating anti-neuronal antibodies (e.g., anti-Hu; anti-Yo; anti-Ri; and anti-Ma2) and small cell lung carcinomas or testicular carcinoma are frequently associated with this syndrome.Space Perception: The awareness of the spatial properties of objects; includes physical space.Vertigo: An illusion of movement, either of the external world revolving around the individual or of the individual revolving in space. Vertigo may be associated with disorders of the inner ear (EAR, INNER); VESTIBULAR NERVE; BRAINSTEM; or CEREBRAL CORTEX. Lesions in the TEMPORAL LOBE and PARIETAL LOBE may be associated with FOCAL SEIZURES that may feature vertigo as an ictal manifestation. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp300-1)Vestibular Diseases: Pathological processes of the VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH which contains part of the balancing apparatus. Patients with vestibular diseases show instability and are at risk of frequent falls.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Vestibular Function Tests: A number of tests used to determine if the brain or balance portion of the inner ear are causing dizziness.Vestibular Neuronitis: Idiopathic inflammation of the VESTIBULAR NERVE, characterized clinically by the acute or subacute onset of VERTIGO; NAUSEA; and imbalance. The COCHLEAR NERVE is typically spared and HEARING LOSS and TINNITUS do not usually occur. Symptoms usually resolve over a period of days to weeks. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p304)Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Meniere Disease: A disease of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) that is characterized by fluctuating SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS; TINNITUS; episodic VERTIGO; and aural fullness. It is the most common form of endolymphatic hydrops.Nystagmus, Pathologic: Involuntary movements of the eye that are divided into two types, jerk and pendular. Jerk nystagmus has a slow phase in one direction followed by a corrective fast phase in the opposite direction, and is usually caused by central or peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Pendular nystagmus features oscillations that are of equal velocity in both directions and this condition is often associated with visual loss early in life. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p272)Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Whiplash Injuries: Hyperextension injury to the neck, often the result of being struck from behind by a fast-moving vehicle, in an automobile accident. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Postural Balance: A POSTURE in which an ideal body mass distribution is achieved. Postural balance provides the body carriage stability and conditions for normal functions in stationary position or in movement, such as sitting, standing, or walking.Nystagmus, Physiologic: Involuntary rhythmical movements of the eyes in the normal person. These can be naturally occurring as in end-position (end-point, end-stage, or deviational) nystagmus or induced by the optokinetic drum (NYSTAGMUS, OPTOKINETIC), caloric test, or a rotating chair.Sensation Disorders: Disorders of the special senses (i.e., VISION; HEARING; TASTE; and SMELL) or somatosensory system (i.e., afferent components of the PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM).Syncope: A transient loss of consciousness and postural tone caused by diminished blood flow to the brain (i.e., BRAIN ISCHEMIA). Presyncope refers to the sensation of lightheadedness and loss of strength that precedes a syncopal event or accompanies an incomplete syncope. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp367-9)Labyrinth Diseases: Pathological processes of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) which contains the essential apparatus of hearing (COCHLEA) and balance (SEMICIRCULAR CANALS).Diagnostic Techniques, Otological: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the ear or of hearing disorders or demonstration of hearing acuity or loss.Micro-Electrical-Mechanical Systems: A class of devices combining electrical and mechanical components that have at least one of the dimensions in the micrometer range (between 1 micron and 1 millimeter). They include sensors, actuators, microducts, and micropumps.Semicircular Canals: Three long canals (anterior, posterior, and lateral) of the bony labyrinth. They are set at right angles to each other and are situated posterosuperior to the vestibule of the bony labyrinth (VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH). The semicircular canals have five openings into the vestibule with one shared by the anterior and the posterior canals. Within the canals are the SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS.Coriolis Force: The apparent deflection (Coriolis acceleration) of a body in motion with respect to the earth, as seen by an observer on the earth, attributed to a fictitious force (Coriolis force) but actually caused by the rotation of the earth. In a medical context it refers to the physiological effects (nausea, vertigo, dizziness, etc.) felt by a person moving radially in a rotating system, as a rotating space station. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed & McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Vestibular Nerve: The vestibular part of the 8th cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE). The vestibular nerve fibers arise from neurons of Scarpa's ganglion and project peripherally to vestibular hair cells and centrally to the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM. These fibers mediate the sense of balance and head position.Vestibule, Labyrinth: An oval, bony chamber of the inner ear, part of the bony labyrinth. It is continuous with bony COCHLEA anteriorly, and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS posteriorly. The vestibule contains two communicating sacs (utricle and saccule) of the balancing apparatus. The oval window on its lateral wall is occupied by the base of the STAPES of the MIDDLE EAR.Neural Prostheses: Medical devices which substitute for a nervous system function by electrically stimulating the nerves directly and monitoring the response to the electrical stimulation.Gold Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of gold that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Au 185-196, 198-201, and 203 are radioactive gold isotopes.Labyrinthitis: Inflammation of the inner ear (LABYRINTH).Moon: The natural satellite of the planet Earth. It includes the lunar cycles or phases, the lunar month, lunar landscapes, geography, and soil.Medicine, Chinese Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.Drugs, Chinese Herbal: Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.Tripterygium: A plant genus of the family CELASTRACEAE that is a source of triterpenoids and diterpene epoxides such as triptolide.IllinoisMedicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.ChicagoFibromyalgia: A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)Lyme Disease: An infectious disease caused by a spirochete, BORRELIA BURGDORFERI, which is transmitted chiefly by Ixodes dammini (see IXODES) and pacificus ticks in the United States and Ixodes ricinis (see IXODES) in Europe. It is a disease with early and late cutaneous manifestations plus involvement of the nervous system, heart, eye, and joints in variable combinations. The disease was formerly known as Lyme arthritis and first discovered at Old Lyme, Connecticut.Borrelia burgdorferi: A specific species of bacteria, part of the BORRELIA BURGDORFERI GROUP, whose common name is Lyme disease spirochete.Borrelia burgdorferi Group: Gram-negative helical bacteria, in the genus BORRELIA, that are the etiologic agents of LYME DISEASE. The group comprises many specific species including Borrelia afzelii, Borellia garinii, and BORRELIA BURGDORFERI proper. These spirochetes are generally transmitted by several species of ixodid ticks.Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Lyme Disease Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent LYME DISEASE.Borrelia: A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, helical bacteria, various species of which produce RELAPSING FEVER in humans and other animals.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Bacopa: A plant genus of the family Plantaginaceae. Members contain bacopaside, bacopasaponins and other dammarane type jujubogenins.Central Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of any component of the brain (including the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, brain stem, and cerebellum) or the spinal cord.Brain Concussion: A nonspecific term used to describe transient alterations or loss of consciousness following closed head injuries. The duration of UNCONSCIOUSNESS generally lasts a few seconds, but may persist for several hours. Concussions may be classified as mild, intermediate, and severe. Prolonged periods of unconsciousness (often defined as greater than 6 hours in duration) may be referred to as post-traumatic coma (COMA, POST-HEAD INJURY). (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p418)Triethyltin Compounds: Organic compounds composed of tin and three ethyl groups. Affect mitochondrial metabolism and inhibit oxidative phosphorylation by acting directly on the energy conserving processes.
Chronic subjective dizziness Dizziness Equilibrioception Ideomotor phenomenon Proprioception Seasickness Spatial disorientation ... Disorders of the visual system can lead to dizziness, vertigo, and feelings of instability. Vertigo is not associated with ...
Illusions of self-motion Proprioception Seasickness Spatial disorientation Post, RE; Dickerson, LM (2010). "Dizziness: a ... Other causes of dizziness include presyncope, disequilibrium, and non-specific dizziness. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo ... type of dizziness Vertigo is a medical condition where a person feels as if they or the objects around them are moving when ... Dizziness affects approximately 20-40% of people at some point in time, while about 7.5-10% have vertigo. About 5% have vertigo ...
Kinaesthetics Kinesthetic learning Motion sickness Motor control Multisensory integration Seasickness Spatial disorientation ... Balance disorder Body image Body schema Broken escalator phenomenon Dizziness Equilibrioception Ideomotor phenomenon Illusions ... Juggling trains reaction time, spatial location, and efficient movement[citation needed]. Standing on a wobble board or balance ...
... of self-motion Motion sickness Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome Proprioception Seasickness Spatial disorientation The ... a state of dizziness and disorientation due to intoxication Vertigo "dizziness" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary Dizziness at ... Dizziness is an impairment in spatial perception and stability. Because the term dizziness is imprecise, it can refer to ... causing dizziness/fainting Many conditions are associated with dizziness. Dizziness can accompany certain serious events, such ...
1978 Dizziness Equilibrioception Flash Airlines Flight 604 Gulf Air Flight 072 Ideomotor phenomenon Illusions of self-motion ... Spatial orientation (the inverse being spatial disorientation, aka spatial-D) is the ability to maintain body orientation and ... "spatial disorientation - physiology". Retrieved 30 July 2016. Previc, F. H., & Ercoline, W. R. (2004). Spatial disorientation ... Spatial disorientation, spatial unawareness is the inability of a person to correctly determine his/her body position in space ...
... anxiety and spatial disorientation when shopping in town squares. This phenomenon was called "agoraphobia", meaning a fear of ... The term chronic subjective dizziness (CSD) is used to describe a commonly encountered type of dizziness that is not easily ... dizziness or lightheadedness Disequilibrium on most days for at least 3 months Spatial orientation problems Off-kilter ... "Chronic Subjective Dizziness". About.com Neurology. About.com. Retrieved 14 June 2014. Staab, JP; Eckhardt-Henn, A; Horii, A; ...
Cognitive dysfunction (disorientation) may occur with vestibular disorders. Cognitive deficits are not just spatial in nature, ... www.earandbalance.net/ National Institutes of Health - dizziness and vertigo Dizziness, Hearing and Balance Timothy C. Hain, M. ... Dizziness and instability usually persist for several months and sometimes for a year or more. Ménière's disease - an inner ear ... Causes of dizziness related to the ear are often characterized by vertigo (spinning) and nausea. Nystagmus (flickering of the ...
Spatial disorientation - Inability of a person to correctly determine their body position in space ... Dizziness and Vertigo Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine (17th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. ISBN 978-0-07-147691-1. .. ... Other causes of dizziness include presyncope, disequilibrium, and non-specific dizziness.[2] ... Dizziness affects approximately 20-40% of people at some point in time, while about 7.5-10% have vertigo.[3] About 5% have ...
The Coriolis effect is a concern for pilots, where it can cause extreme disorientation. Dizziness Equilibrioception Sensory ... ISBN 0-387-40500-3. Fred H. Previc, William R. Ercoline (2004). Spatial Disorientation in Aviation. Reston, VA: American ...
Ideomotor phenomenon Illusions of self-motion Motion sickness Proprioception Seasickness Spatial disorientation Vertigo The ... The broken escalator phenomenon, also known as the Walker effect, is the sensation of losing balance or dizziness reported by ...
Spatial disorientation. *The spins, a state of dizziness and disorientation due to intoxication ... Dizziness is an impairment in spatial perception and stability.[1] The term dizziness is imprecise:[2] it can refer to vertigo ... Many conditions are associated with dizziness. Dizziness can accompany certain serious events, such as a concussion or brain ... "Dizziness and Vertigo". Merck Manual. 2009.. *^ Research, Center for Drug Evaluation and. "Drug Safety and Availability - FDA ...
A balance disorder is a condition that makes a person feel nausea, disorientation or dizziness, as if moving, spinning or ... The vestibular apparatus also detects spatial orientation with respect to visual input. A similar sensation of falling can be ...
Juggling trains reaction time, spatial location, and efficient movement[citation needed]. Standing on a wobble board or balance ... Spatial disorientation. *Theory of multiple intelligences. *Vertigo. ReferencesEdit. *^ "Proprioception". Merriam-Webster ...
The state of confusion associated with Wernicke's may consist of apathy, inattention, spatial disorientation, inability to ... dizziness, and fatigue. Among those at highest risk for B12 deficiency are the elderly population, as 10-15% of people aged 60+ ... Vitamin A affects spatial memory most of the time because the size of the nuclei in hippocampal neurons are reduced by ... Cognitive changes may range from loss of concentration to memory loss, disorientation, and dementia. All of these symptoms may ...
Additional analyses in this study revealed that spatial pattern of bird population decline appeared only after the introduction ... Persons who might orally ingest acute amounts would experience emesis, diaphoresis, drowsiness and disorientation. This would ... dizziness, apathy, locomotor effects, labored breathing) and transient growth retardation. Exposure to high doses may be ...
The otoconia floats freely in the inner ear fluid, causing disorientation and vertigo. The disorder can be tested for using a ... Nystagmus in patients indicates dysfunction of the vestibular system, which can lead to dizziness and inability to complete a ... Borel, L.; Lopez, C.; Péruch, P.; Lacour, M. (Dec 2008). "Vestibular syndrome: a change in internal spatial representation". ... This disorder can disrupt the function of the righting reflex as the symptoms of vertigo and disorientation prevent proper ...
When disorientation is severe the patient may describe symptoms which sound bizarre, raising doubts over the organic basis of ... The model shows that a response is dependent on two factors which are the spatial dependence of gel displacement and the ... In addition to vertigo, symptoms of BPPV include dizziness, imbalance, difficulty concentrating, and nausea. The otolithic ... spatial distribution of stereocilia height in the hair cell bundle. Purves, Dale (2012). Neuroscience. Sinauer Associates, Inc ...
Libido disorders, disorientation, and hallucinations are very rarely reported. Priapism is a very rare adverse event that can ... This suggests that cortical networks that normally process spatial working memory become more efficient in response to the drug ... and dizziness. Cardiac adverse effects may include palpitations, changes in blood pressure and heart rate (typically mild), ... blood flow in the doroslateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex while improving performance of a spatial working ...
Difficulty in remembering recent events, problems with language, disorientation, mood swings[1][2]. ... Lalonde R, Dumont M, Staufenbiel M, Sturchler-Pierrat C, Strazielle C (November 2002). "Spatial learning, exploration, anxiety ... dizziness, headache and fatigue.[180] The combination of memantine and donepezil has been shown to be "of statistically ... disorientation (including easily getting lost), mood swings, loss of motivation, not managing self care, and behavioural issues ...
Spatial disorientation - Inability of a person to correctly determine their body position in space ... Dizziness and Vertigo Harrisons Principles of Internal Medicine (17th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. ISBN 978-0-07-147691-1. .. ... Other causes of dizziness include presyncope, disequilibrium, and non-specific dizziness.[2] ... Dizziness affects approximately 20-40% of people at some point in time, while about 7.5-10% have vertigo.[3] About 5% have ...
dizziness. *spatial disorientation. *fainting. *feeling unwell, dizzy, or lightheaded when sitting up or standing still for ...
Vertigo and dizziness. *Imbalance and spatial disorientation. *Vision disturbance. *Hearing changes. *Cognitive and/or ... Download a dizziness and balance medical history questionnaire; fill it out and bring it with you to your PCP appointment. ... Dizziness, impaired balance and altered coordination have been reported in as many as 30% of people after suffering a mild ... Assessment & Management of Dizziness Associated with Mild TBI. A comprehensive physical exam should be performed on military ...
Some patterns (stripes, checks) cause dizziness. Spatial disorientation. Staggering gait (clumsy walking). Words on printed ... Dizziness when you turn your head or move. Dry chronic cough. Dry eyes, nose and mouth (sicca syndrome). Pain in ears, palate, ... Disorientation: getting lost, going to wrong places. Difficulty with speech or writing. Mood swings, irritability, depression. ... Dizziness or vertigo. Dropping things frequently. Dysequilibrium (balance problems). Impaired coordination. Loss of balance ...
headaches, dizziness and nausea. . failing memory, confusion and spatial disorientation. . pain and burning feeling in the eyes ... Spatial disorientation. . Headaches, facial and tooth pain. . Blood brain barrier changes (pathological leakage in BBB). . Loss ...
Chronic subjective dizziness Dizziness Equilibrioception Ideomotor phenomenon Proprioception Seasickness Spatial disorientation ... Disorders of the visual system can lead to dizziness, vertigo, and feelings of instability. Vertigo is not associated with ...
After convulsion, the person also experiences confusion, poor body equilibrium, and a few minutes of spatial disorientation. ... All have the possibility of causing such undesirable side effects as drowsiness, nausea, or dizziness. Several new drugs are ... and spatial disorientation. However, in contrast to reflex epilepsies, it cannot be induced by sensory stimulation. Convulsive ... dizziness , or hyperactivity; inability to see clearly or speak distinctly; nausea or vomiting ; or sleep problems. ...
A: Individuals with a vestibular disorder frequently experience dizziness, vision disturbances, spatial disorientation, hearing ...
Overt symptoms may also include balance and spatial disorientation problems, vision disturbances, inner-ear e ... Warfighters who have been exposed to blasts have reported high rates of vestibular symptoms such as dizziness, clumsiness, ...
"Were excited that this could someday be a key to helping people who have dizziness and spatial disorientation to feel better." ... they have located a specific site in the human brain that could be one of the sources of dizziness and spatial disorientation. ... might also be possible to use TMS to fix dysfunction in the same location in people with dizziness and spatial disorientation ... While dizziness can also be linked to damage to the inner ear, or to other senses such as vision, neurology instructor Dr. Amir ...
Illusions of self-motion Proprioception Seasickness Spatial disorientation Post, RE; Dickerson, LM (2010). "Dizziness: a ... Other causes of dizziness include presyncope, disequilibrium, and non-specific dizziness. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo ... type of dizziness Vertigo is a medical condition where a person feels as if they or the objects around them are moving when ... Dizziness affects approximately 20-40% of people at some point in time, while about 7.5-10% have vertigo. About 5% have vertigo ...
Vertigo and Dizziness. *Imbalance & Spatial Disorientation. *Vision Disturbance. *Problems Concentrating. *Hearing Changes ... Dizziness is the 2nd most common complaint heard in doctors offices and is the #1 complaint for individuals over age 70. ... Dizziness: A lightheaded, unsteadiness, floating, faintness or rocking sensation. The sensation of being heavily weighted to ... Statistics reported by The National Institute of Health indicate that dizziness will occur in 69 million of the nations ...
Dizziness is a sense of spatial disorientation without a false sense of motion, often described as light-headedness, ... Dizziness. Mayo Clinic; 2010. Available from: www.mayoclinic.com/health/dizziness/ (Accessed Aug, 2012). ... Presyncopal dizziness usually has a cardiovascular cause and may be accompanied by other symptoms indicative of hypotension or ... Patients with dizziness or disequilibrium may require further testing, and a serious underlying cardiovascular cause or ...
... dizziness/vertigo) and spatial disorientation, which are commonly associated with balance impairment and falls in older adults ... and spatial disorientation. Thus, the role of vestibular function in neurodegenerative disease is yet another area that ... Other demographic factors such as sex and race have not been well studied, but there is some evidence that dizziness and ... and this risk further increases among those who report symptoms of dizziness. ...
Dizziness is a common complaint. Studies in the United States1-2 and United Kingdom3-5 found that the 1-month point prevalence ... of dizziness is about 20% in primary care settings. Most patients with ... Inaccuracies in these internal spatial maps may cause disorientation and uneasiness in complex motion environments, such as ... Psychopathology and Dizziness. Psychiatric Causes of Dizziness. Psychiatric disorders are the sole cause of dizziness (a true ...
The absence of this information causes blurred vision and spatial disorientation, vertigo, dizziness, imbalance, nausea, ...
A special focus has been on understanding the mechanisms of spatial disorientation, and how their deleterious effects can be ... dizziness, imbalance, and disorders of eye movements. ...
Symptoms such as vertigo, disequilibrium, lightheadedness, and spatial disorientation can all be described as dizziness. ... Before treating your dizziness, it is important to determine the cause of your dizziness. It is often best to contact your ... Dizziness. Dizziness is a term people use to describe a variety of sensations. ... Some causes of dizziness resolve on their own, and others can be easily treated. For example, the most common cause of ...
... spatial disorientation, postural dizziness, vertigo and nerve impingement (Simons, Travell, Simons 1999). Many of these ... dizziness, imbalance, neck soreness, a swollen-glands feeling, runny nose, maxillary sinus congestion, tension headaches, eye ...
... spacial disorientation; panic attacks; dizziness; personality changes; and mixing up words when speaking, reading, or writing ... spatial disorientation; hypersensitivity of skin and rashes; light sensitivity; dry and burning eyes; blurred vision; swollen ... for headache and dizziness; GV-20 with Sishencong for dizziness and headache; SI-19 for ringing in the ears. ... Treatment: Add ST-40 to resolve Dampness; GV-20 to disperse dizziness and calm the Spirit; Sishencong [Ex-HN-1] to disperse ...
... spatial disorientation; panic attacks; dizziness; personality changes; and mixing up words when speaking, reading, or writing ... spatial disorientation; hypersensitivity of skin and rashes; light sensitivity; dry and burning eyes; blurred vision; swollen ... for headache and dizziness; GV 20 with Sishencong for dizziness and headache; SI-19 for ringing in the ears. ... C. Stirring of liver wind- may include dizziness and headache, tension and stiffness in the neck, tingling and numbness in the ...
Spatial disorientation. *Body disassociation. *Blurry vision. *Photophobia (sensitivity to light). *Phonophobia (sensitivity to ... Dizziness vs. Unsteadiness. Vertigo is a feeling of spinning when you are not actually moving. Dizziness occurs when you feel ... hyperventilation are some of the apparent reasons for dizziness and should be ruled out. However, many forms of dizziness are ... Have dizziness or vertigo? Schedule a complimentary phone consultation to discuss what could be causing your symptoms. (Click ...
... spatial disorientation; and anxiety/panic? On the other hand, confido price in hindi most Candida isolates appear to remain ... The clinical presentation of vestibular symptoms that often correlate with migraine includes-but is not limited to-dizziness; ...
Some patterns (stripes, checks) cause dizziness. Spatial disorientation. Staggering gait (clumsy walking). Words on printed ... Dizziness when you turn your head or move. Dry chronic cough. Dry eyes, nose and mouth (sicca syndrome). Pain in ears, palate, ... Dizziness or vertigo. Dropping things frequently. Dysequilibrium (balance problems). Impaired coordination. Loss of balance ...
  • 7,11,14 The core feature of this chronic subjective dizziness (CSD) is an acquired hypersensitivity to motion stimuli, including increased awareness of one's own movements and reduced tolerance for motion in the environment. (healio.com)
  • Typical symptoms of vascular disorders causing dizziness include feeling faint or lightheaded and transient loss of balance, often made better by lying down and sometimes made worse by standing quickly. (howsyourhearing.org)
  • Dizziness is a catch-all term that can describe an assortment of symptoms from feeling woozy after a ride at the amusement park or feeling light-headed as you stand up from sitting, to a sensation of being unstable or feeling like you are going to faint. (atlasptco.com)
  • While dizziness can also be linked to damage to the inner ear, or to other senses such as vision, neurology instructor Dr. Amir Kheradmand and his colleagues report that they have discovered a region of the brain that plays a vital role in our subconscious awareness of which way is up and which way is down. (redorbit.com)
  • Many conditions cause dizziness because multiple parts of the body are required for maintaining balance including the inner ear, eyes, muscles, skeleton, and the nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Physical therapy can be used to treat a range of diseases, including dysfunctions of the vestibular system (the inner ear, eyes, and brain), which present with symptoms like dizziness. (twinboro.com)
  • They are all symptoms that can result from a peripheral vestibular disorder (a dysfunction of the balance organs of the inner ear) or central vestibular disorder (a dysfunction of one or more parts of the central nervous system that help process balance and spatial information). (herbalpalace.com)
  • Statistics reported by The National Institute of Health indicate that dizziness will occur in 69 million of the nation's population at some point in their lives and may limit a person's everyday living. (seniorsguide.net)
  • Dizziness, impaired balance and altered coordination have been reported in as many as 30% of people after suffering a mild traumatic brain injury, or mTBI (Cicerone, 1995). (vestibular.org)
  • Researchers from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine believe that they have located a specific site in the human brain that could be one of the sources of dizziness and spatial disorientation. (redorbit.com)
  • Central balance pathways also create maps in the brain that represent spatial relationships between a person and objects in the environment. (healio.com)
  • However, many forms of dizziness are caused by poor integration of neurological pathways of the brain. (sfbrainandspine.com)
  • Dizziness can accompany certain serious events, such as a concussion or brain bleed, epilepsy and seizures (convulsions), strokes, and cases of meningitis and encephalitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also, maintaining normal blood pressure (low blood pressure in particular can cause dizziness upon standing up), preventing ear infections (yes, adults can get them, too) and correcting vision can help, especially in reducing the risk of falls. (chicagotribune.com)
  • 9 In more modern times, patients with medically unexplained dizziness frequently are diagnosed with "psychogenic dizziness," a catch-all term that belies our understanding of the relationships between physical and psychological factors that initiate and sustain dizziness. (healio.com)
  • Nystagmus (flickering of the eye, related to the Vestibulo-ocular reflex [VOR]) is often seen in patients with an acute peripheral cause of dizziness. (findmeacure.com)