USSRCommonwealth of Independent StatesAcademic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.RussiaArmenia: An ancient country in western Asia, by the twentieth century divided among the former USSR, Turkey, and Iran. It was attacked at various times from before the 7th century B.C. to 69 B.C. by Assyrians, Medes, Persians, the Greeks under Alexander, and the Romans. It changed hands frequently in wars between Neo-Persian and Roman Empires from the 3d to 7th centuries and later under Arabs, Seljuks, Byzantines, and Mongols. In the 19th century Armenian nationalism arose but suffered during Russo-Turkish hostilities. It became part of the Soviet Republic in 1921, with part remaining under Turkey. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988)Europe, EasternCommunism: A totalitarian system of government in which a single authoritarian party controls state-owned means of production with the professed aim of establishing a classless society.KyrgyzstanRepublic of BelarusUkraineAsia, Central: The geographical area of Asia comprising KAZAKHSTAN; KYRGYZSTAN; TAJIKISTAN; TURKMENISTAN; and UZBEKISTAN. The desert region of Kara Kum (Qara Qum) is largely in Turkmenistan and the desert region of Kyzyl Kum (Kizil Kum or Qizil Qum), is in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p233, 590, 636)Georgia (Republic)TajikistanMoldovaAzerbaijanDiphtheria: A localized infection of mucous membranes or skin caused by toxigenic strains of CORYNEBACTERIUM DIPHTHERIAE. It is characterized by the presence of a pseudomembrane at the site of infection. DIPHTHERIA TOXIN, produced by C. diphtheriae, can cause myocarditis, polyneuritis, and other systemic toxic effects.EstoniaUzbekistanKazakhstanAchievement: Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.Sheltered Workshops: Protective places of employment for disabled persons which provide training and employment on a temporary or permanent basis.Diphtheria-Tetanus Vaccine: A combined vaccine used to prevent infection with diphtheria and tetanus toxoid. This is used in place of DTP vaccine (DIPHTHERIA-TETANUS-PERTUSSIS VACCINE) when PERTUSSIS VACCINE is contraindicated.IsraelProfessional Misconduct: Violation of laws, regulations, or professional standards.Baltic States: The collective name for the republics of ESTONIA; LATVIA; and LITHUANIA on the eastern shore of the Baltic Sea. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p111)Transcaucasia: Area of Europe that includes ARMENIA,; AZERBAIJAN; and the Republic of GEORGIA.Community Psychiatry: Branch of psychiatry concerned with the provision and delivery of a coordinated program of mental health care to a specified population. The foci included in this concept are: all social, psychological and physical factors related to etiology, prevention, and maintaining positive mental health in the community.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.LatviaForensic Psychiatry: Psychiatry in its legal aspects. This includes criminology, penology, commitment of mentally ill, the psychiatrist's role in compensation cases, the problems of releasing information to the court, and of expert testimony.Medical Missions, Official: Travel by a group of physicians for the purpose of making a special study or undertaking a special project of short-term duration.Diphtheria Toxoid: The formaldehyde-inactivated toxin of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. It is generally used in mixtures with TETANUS TOXOID and PERTUSSIS VACCINE; (DTP); or with tetanus toxoid alone (DT for pediatric use and Td, which contains 5- to 10-fold less diphtheria toxoid, for other use). Diphtheria toxoid is used for the prevention of diphtheria; DIPHTHERIA ANTITOXIN is for treatment.Gift Giving: The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Czechoslovakia: Created as a republic in 1918 by Czechs and Slovaks from territories formerly part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. The country split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia 1 January 1993.Radioactive Hazard Release: Uncontrolled release of radioactive material from its containment. This either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a radioactive hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.Emigrants and Immigrants: People who leave their place of residence in one country and settle in a different country.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Yugoslavia: Created as the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes in 1918. Yugoslavia became the official name in 1929. BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA; CROATIA; and SLOVENIA formed independent countries 7 April 1992. Macedonia became independent 8 February 1994 as the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (MACEDONIA REPUBLIC).Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Economic Competition: The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Corynebacterium diphtheriae: A species of gram-positive, asporogenous bacteria in which three cultural types are recognized. These types (gravis, intermedius, and mitis) were originally given in accordance with the clinical severity of the cases from which the different strains were most frequently isolated. This species is the causative agent of DIPHTHERIA.LithuaniaArabs: Members of a Semitic people inhabiting the Arabian peninsula or other countries of the Middle East and North Africa. The term may be used with reference to ancient, medieval, or modern ethnic or cultural groups. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)United StatesMentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Jews: An ethnic group with historical ties to the land of ISRAEL and the religion of JUDAISM.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Power Plants: Units that convert some other form of energy into electrical energy.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Underachievement: Performance, usually in school work, poorer than that predicted from aptitude and/or intelligence testing.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.GermanyFellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.School Admission Criteria: Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.EuropeTuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant: Tuberculosis resistant to chemotherapy with two or more ANTITUBERCULAR AGENTS, including at least ISONIAZID and RIFAMPICIN. The problem of resistance is particularly troublesome in tuberculous OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS associated with HIV INFECTIONS. It requires the use of second line drugs which are more toxic than the first line regimens. TB with isolates that have developed further resistance to at least three of the six classes of second line drugs is defined as EXTENSIVELY DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Acculturation: Process of cultural change in which one group or members of a group assimilate various cultural patterns from another.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Academies and Institutes: Organizations representing specialized fields which are accepted as authoritative; may be non-governmental, university or an independent research organization, e.g., National Academy of Sciences, Brookings Institution, etc.Libraries, MedicalNational Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Learning Disorders: Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, DYSCALCULIA, and DYSGRAPHIA.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Training Support: Financial support for training including both student stipends and loans and training grants to institutions.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Staff Development: The process by which the employer promotes staff performance and efficiency consistent with management goals and objectives.Hospitalists: Physicians who are employed to work exclusively in hospital settings, primarily for managed care organizations. They are the attending or primary responsible physician for the patient during hospitalization.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Personnel Selection: The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Schools: Educational institutions.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Deception: The act of deceiving or the fact of being deceived.Aptitude Tests: Primarily non-verbal tests designed to predict an individual's future learning ability or performance.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Library Collection Development: Development of a library collection, including the determination and coordination of selection policy, assessment of needs of users and potential users, collection use studies, collection evaluation, identification of collection needs, selection of materials, planning for resource sharing, collection maintenance and weeding, and budgeting.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.College Admission Test: Test designed to identify students suitable for admission into a graduate or undergraduate curriculum.Students, Pharmacy: Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Job Satisfaction: Personal satisfaction relative to the work situation.Dental Research: The study of laws, theories, and hypotheses through a systematic examination of pertinent facts and their interpretation in the field of dentistry. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982, p674)Student Dropouts: Individuals who leave school, secondary or college, prior to completion of specified curriculum requirements.Library Services: Services offered to the library user. They include reference and circulation.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Hematology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with morphology, physiology, and pathology of the blood and blood-forming tissues.Ethics, Institutional: The moral and ethical obligations or responsibilities of institutions.Antitubercular Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of tuberculosis. They are divided into two main classes: "first-line" agents, those with the greatest efficacy and acceptable degrees of toxicity used successfully in the great majority of cases; and "second-line" drugs used in drug-resistant cases or those in which some other patient-related condition has compromised the effectiveness of primary therapy.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Salaries and Fringe Benefits: The remuneration paid or benefits granted to an employee.Financial Support: The provision of monetary resources including money or capital and credit; obtaining or furnishing money or capital for a purchase or enterprise and the funds so obtained. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed.)Efficiency: Ratio of output to effort, or the ratio of effort produced to energy expended.Portraits as Topic: Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)Education, Premedical: Preparatory education meeting the requirements for admission to medical school.Awards and PrizesEducation, Medical, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform physicians of recent advances in their field.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Aspirations (Psychology): Strong desires to accomplish something. This usually pertains to greater values or high ideals.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Community-Based Participatory Research: Collaborative process of research involving researchers and community representatives.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Remedial Teaching: Specialized instruction for students deviating from the expected norm.Intelligence: The ability to learn and to deal with new situations and to deal effectively with tasks involving abstractions.Minority Groups: A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Education, Pharmacy, Graduate: Educational programs for pharmacists who have a bachelor's degree or a Doctor of Pharmacy degree entering a specific field of pharmacy. They may lead to an advanced degree.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Organizational Affiliation: Formal relationships established between otherwise independent organizations. These include affiliation agreements, interlocking boards, common controls, hospital medical school affiliations, etc.Translational Medical Research: The application of discoveries generated by laboratory research and preclinical studies to the development of clinical trials and studies in humans. A second area of translational research concerns enhancing the adoption of best practices.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Education, Special: Education of the individual who markedly deviates intellectually, physically, socially, or emotionally from those considered to be normal, thus requiring special instruction.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.
  • 10. A. V. Skorohod , Random processes with independent increments , Mathematics and its Applications (Soviet Series), vol. 47, Kluwer Academic Publishers Group, Dordrecht, 1991. (ams.org)
  • The journal focuses on political, economic and social affairs of the countries of the former Soviet bloc and their successors, as well as their history in the 20th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recently, published evidence and particularly effective arguments show that Stalin began a massive deployment of Soviet forces to the western frontier early in June 1941. (codoh.com)
  • The evidence supports a view that Stalin intended to use the forces concentrated in the west as quickly as possible - probably about mid-July 1941 - for a Soviet Barbarossa. (codoh.com)
  • Although it is at present relatively modest, with a budget of only 20 million roubles (Pounds sterling 20 million) for 1990, the 'anti-monopoly' fund represents an important breakthrough in Soviet science planning at a time when the country's scientists are finding it difficult to respond to the challenges of perestroika. (newscientist.com)
  • ACMS Speaker Series with Dr. Tsendpurev Tsegmid Abstract: Dr Tsegmid presents the collective work of the Green Horse Society (1990-2002), pioneers of contemporary art in post-Soviet Mongolia. (mongoliacenter.org)
  • The amendments, which will make Mr. Gorbachev head of government with direct legislative powers much greater than he enjoys now, contain ``an immensely dangerous time bomb,'' academician Andrei Sakharov told Soviet and American scholars. (csmonitor.com)
  • The congress will also elect the president of the Supreme Soviet - a role assumed by Gorbachev a month ago. (csmonitor.com)
  • And he noted that Gorbachev or his successor will have the power to legislate between Supreme Soviet sessions - that is for four to six months a year. (csmonitor.com)
  • The electoral law and constitutional amendment, published on Oct. 22, are due to be discussed by an extraordinary meeting of the country's parliament, the Supreme Soviet, at the end of November. (csmonitor.com)
  • In May 2015, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko signed a law that mandated the transfer of the country's complete set of archives, from the "Soviet organs of repression," such as the KGB and its decedent, the Security Service of Ukraine (SBU), to a government organization called the Ukrainian Institute of National Memory . (foreignpolicy.com)
  • Europe-Asia Studies is an academic peer-reviewed journal published 10 times a year by Routledge on behalf of the Institute of Central and East European Studies, University of Glasgow , and continuing (since vol. 45, 1993) the journal Soviet Studies (vols. (wikipedia.org)
  • This timely book will be of great interest not only to scholars of post-soviet countries, but also to those interested in humanitarian and development aid worldwide. (routledge.com)
  • They were essential to keeping the Soviet regime in power, to persecuting its victims at home and to implementing its policies both at home and abroad. (aber.ac.uk)
  • During the reorganization of the Soviet government in the 1980s, Klejn's papers began to be printed again, and he was allowed to go abroad. (oup.com)
  • Even during the 1980s, the monkey colony was part of the Soviet space program. (redorbit.com)
  • The letter's signatories -- including professor Abbas Milani, head of Iranian studies at Stanford University, and other prominent academics and researchers such as Iranian-Canadian professor and author Ramin Jahanbegloo -- point to comments by Iranian cleric Hojatoleslam Kazem Sedighi, who said last month that adultery increases the risk of earthquakes . (rferl.org)
  • Prominent Soviet-era dissident Zhores Medvedev has died in London at the age of 93. (rferl.org)
  • In 1970, he was forcibly committed to a Soviet psychiatric hospital, but he was released after three weeks following intense protests by prominent figures including physicist Andrei Sakharov and writer Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. (rferl.org)
  • She is also a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and co-chairs its Hewett Forum on post-Soviet affairs. (eventbrite.com)
  • Kolmogorov was a leading and admired Soviet scientist all through the era of Stalin's purges, the Gulag, the KGB, the murders and disappearances and forced confessions, the show trials, the rewritings of history, the allies suddenly denounced as traitors, the tragicomedy of Lysenkoism . (scottaaronson.com)
  • At one time, the monument stood in testimony of Soviet scientific accomplishments, but it is now merely a shadow of the revolutionary center that helped conquer diseases such as polio and save thousands of lives during World War Two with penicillin treatments. (redorbit.com)
  • The prisoners at this time were to a large extent members of targeted national groups whom the Soviet government repressed for reasons arising from the war. (arlindo-correia.com)
  • As an academic, you basically do retrospective analysis with more or less full information and lots of time,' he said at the event. (stanford.edu)
  • By the Soviet Pharmacopoeia the extraction time of infusions is 15 min and for decoctions 30 min. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • More academic publications recommend a longer extraction time. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Central planning and unintended consequences: creating the Soviet financial system, 1930-1939. (springer.com)
  • During the 25 years or so from its full realization until its dismantling after Stalin's death in 1953, the Gulag made substantial contributions to the Soviet economy at the cost of the grotesque suffering of millions. (arlindo-correia.com)
  • All material is authored by accomplished academics and vetted by database-specific advisory boards, while daily updates across the suite ensure that database content evolves to reflect changing understandings and developments in the field. (abc-clio.com)
  • A number of major survey-based academic studies, conducted primarily before the "Orange Revolution," concluded that mass political values in Ukraine were generally supportive of democracy, and that they did not preclude emergence of a consolidated democracy. (ssrn.com)
  • Survey of Soviet Research in Information Theory. (iitp.ru)
  • The ABC-CLIO Solutions Academic Edition suite supplies the digital reference collections and full-text scholarship integral to undergraduate research in the humanities. (abc-clio.com)
  • Yet he cautioned academics to avoid policy-directed research and instead concentrate on doing 'serious' work that might one day make a contribution -- although perhaps not in a predictable manner. (stanford.edu)
  • This is because the KGB and GRU personnel serve and travel abroad, where they have the opportunity to establish and maintain contact with Western intelligence, and they have a better opportunity than most Soviet officials to learn about and become disillusioned with the inner workings of the Soviet system. (globalsecurity.org)
  • While brutalizing Soviet lands, it also began committing crimes against humanity all over Europe, doing precisely what it used to do in its African colonies, decades earlier, which was, basically, exterminating entire nations and races. (globalresearch.ca)
  • The extraordinary deployment of the Soviet forces on the western frontier is best explained as an offensive deployment for an attack without full mobilization by extremely powerful forces massed there for that purpose. (codoh.com)
  • Roughly 35 thesis-driven, peer-reviewed essays from leading academics such as Joseph Byrne, Harold J. Goldberg, and Ezekiel Walker that tackle complex questions such as "Is 'the family' an essential requirement for a stable society? (abc-clio.com)
  • Both Europe-Asia Studies and Soviet Studies are available online with subscription via JSTOR from 1949 onwards. (wikipedia.org)