South AmericaGuinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.North AmericaCentral AmericaSouth Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Americas: The general name for NORTH AMERICA; CENTRAL AMERICA; and SOUTH AMERICA unspecified or combined.Latin America: The geographic area of Latin America in general and when the specific country or countries are not indicated. It usually includes Central America, South America, Mexico, and the islands of the Caribbean.ArgentinaIndians, South American: Individual members of South American ethnic groups with historic ancestral origins in Asia.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Guyana: A republic in the north of South America, east of VENEZUELA and west of SURINAME. Its capital is Georgetown.ColombiaGuinea: A republic in western Africa, south of SENEGAL and MALI, east of GUINEA-BISSAU. Its capital is Conakry.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)ChilePhylogeography: A field of study concerned with the principles and processes governing the geographic distributions of genealogical lineages, especially those within and among closely related species. (Avise, J.C., Phylogeography: The History and Formation of Species. Harvard University Press, 2000)Papua New Guinea: A country consisting of the eastern half of the island of New Guinea and adjacent islands, including New Britain, New Ireland, the Admiralty Islands, and New Hanover in the Bismarck Archipelago; Bougainville and Buka in the northern Solomon Islands; the D'Entrecasteaux and Trobriand Islands; Woodlark (Murua) Island; and the Louisiade Archipelago. It became independent on September 16, 1975. Formerly, the southern part was the Australian Territory of Papua, and the northern part was the UN Trust Territory of New Guinea, administered by Australia. They were administratively merged in 1949 and named Papua and New Guinea, and renamed Papua New Guinea in 1971.ParaguayIndians, Central American: Individual members of Central American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia. Mexican Indians are not included.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.PeruAfricaAsia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.BrazilSpecies Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.New Guinea: Originally an island of the Malay Archipelago, the second largest island in the world. It divided, West New Guinea becoming part of Indonesia and East New Guinea becoming Papua New Guinea.VenezuelaSequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Caribbean Region: The area that lies between continental North and South America and comprises the Caribbean Sea, the West Indies, and the adjacent mainland regions of southern Mexico, Central America, Colombia, and Venezuela.UruguayEcuadorSouth CarolinaBoliviaMolecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Oceania: The islands of the central and South Pacific, including Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia, and traditionally Australasia. (Random House Dictionary, 2d ed)French Guiana: A French overseas department on the northeast coast of South America. Its capital is Cayenne. It was first settled by the French in 1604. Early development was hindered because of the presence of a penal colony. The name of the country and the capital are variants of Guyana, possibly from the native Indian Guarani guai (born) + ana (kin), implying a united and interrelated race of people. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p418 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p195)Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).DNA, Mitochondrial: Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.Radiometric Dating: Techniques used to determine the age of materials, based on the content and half-lives of the RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES they contain.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Paleontology: The study of early forms of life through fossil remains.Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Sloths: Slow-moving exclusively arboreal mammals that inhabit the tropical forests of South and Central America.PanamaEmigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Insect Vectors: Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Paleodontology: The study of the teeth of early forms of life through fossil remains.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.Siberia: A region, north-central Asia, largely in Russia. It extends from the Ural Mountains to the Pacific Ocean and from the Arctic Ocean to central Kazakhstan and the borders of China and Mongolia.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.BelizeChagas Disease: Infection with the protozoan parasite TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI, a form of TRYPANOSOMIASIS endemic in Central and South America. It is named after the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, who discovered the parasite. Infection by the parasite (positive serologic result only) is distinguished from the clinical manifestations that develop years later, such as destruction of PARASYMPATHETIC GANGLIA; CHAGAS CARDIOMYOPATHY; and dysfunction of the ESOPHAGUS or COLON.Triatoma: A genus of the subfamily TRIATOMINAE. Several species are vectors of TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI.Yellow Fever: An acute infectious disease primarily of the tropics, caused by a virus and transmitted to man by mosquitoes of the genera Aedes and Haemagogus. The severe form is characterized by fever, HEMOLYTIC JAUNDICE, and renal damage.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)South Australia: A state in south central Australia. Its capital is Adelaide. It was probably first visited by F. Thyssen in 1627. Later discoveries in 1802 and 1830 opened up the southern part. It became a British province in 1836 with this self-descriptive name and became a state in 1901. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1135)Animal Distribution: A process by which animals in various forms and stages of development are physically distributed through time and space.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Animal Migration: Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Ileum: The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Drosera: A plant genus of the family Droseraceae, order Nepenthales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida, that contains naphthoquinone glucosides. The name sundew is rarely used for PYROLA.EuropeSwine Diseases: Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.New South Wales: A state in southeastern Australia. Its capital is Sydney. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1770 and first settled at Botany Bay by marines and convicts in 1788. It was named by Captain Cook who thought its coastline resembled that of South Wales. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p840 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p377)Ascorbic Acid Deficiency: A condition due to a dietary deficiency of ascorbic acid (vitamin C), characterized by malaise, lethargy, and weakness. As the disease progresses, joints, muscles, and subcutaneous tissues may become the sites of hemorrhage. Ascorbic acid deficiency frequently develops into SCURVY in young children fed unsupplemented cow's milk exclusively during their first year. It develops also commonly in chronic alcoholism. (Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1177)Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Archaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.Disease Vectors: Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.DNA, Ribosomal Spacer: The intergenic DNA segments that are between the ribosomal RNA genes (internal transcribed spacers) and between the tandemly repeated units of rDNA (external transcribed spacers and nontranscribed spacers).Dinosaurs: General name for two extinct orders of reptiles from the Mesozoic era: Saurischia and Ornithischia.Asia, Southeastern: The geographical area of Asia comprising BORNEO; BRUNEI; CAMBODIA; INDONESIA; LAOS; MALAYSIA; the MEKONG VALLEY; MYANMAR (formerly Burma), the PHILIPPINES; SINGAPORE; THAILAND; and VIETNAM.Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Trachea: The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.Rodentia: A mammalian order which consists of 29 families and many genera.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Cestoda: A subclass of segmented worms comprising the tapeworms.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.MexicoGeological Processes: Events and activities of the Earth and its structures.Bayes Theorem: A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihood of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.Equatorial Guinea: A republic in central Africa, bordering the Bay of Biafra, CAMEROON is to the north and GABON to the south. Its capital is Malabo.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Beetles: INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.Xenarthra: An order of New World mammals characterized by the absence of incisors and canines from among their teeth, and comprising the ARMADILLOS, the SLOTHS, and the anteaters. The order is distinguished from all others by what are known as xenarthrous vertebrae (xenos, strange; arthron, joint): there are secondary, and sometimes even more, articulations between the vertebrae of the lumbar series. The order was formerly called Edentata. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed; Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, vol. I, p515)Coccidioidomycosis: Infection with a fungus of the genus COCCIDIOIDES, endemic to the SOUTHWESTERN UNITED STATES. It is sometimes called valley fever but should not be confused with RIFT VALLEY FEVER. Infection is caused by inhalation of airborne, fungal particles known as arthroconidia, a form of FUNGAL SPORES. A primary form is an acute, benign, self-limited respiratory infection. A secondary form is a virulent, severe, chronic, progressive granulomatous disease with systemic involvement. It can be detected by use of COCCIDIOIDIN.Tracheobionta: A subset of various vascular plants (also known as the Tracheophyta) which include seed-bearing and non seed-bearing species.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Yellow fever virus: The type species of the FLAVIVIRUS genus. Principal vector transmission to humans is by AEDES spp. mosquitoes.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Trypanosoma cruzi: The agent of South American trypanosomiasis or CHAGAS DISEASE. Its vertebrate hosts are man and various domestic and wild animals. Insects of several species are vectors.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Myiasis: The invasion of living tissues of man and other mammals by dipterous larvae.South DakotaGene Pool: The total genetic information possessed by the reproductive members of a POPULATION of sexually reproducing organisms.Genetic Speciation: The splitting of an ancestral species into daughter species that coexist in time (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 6th ed). Causal factors may include geographic isolation, HABITAT geometry, migration, REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION, random GENETIC DRIFT and MUTATION.Sigmodontinae: A subfamily of the family MURIDAE comprised of 69 genera. New World mice and rats are included in this subfamily.Introduced Species: Non-native organisms brought into a region, habitat, or ECOSYSTEM by human activity.Falkland Islands: A British colony in the Atlantic Islands, comprising two principal islands, East Falkland and West Falkland. Its capital is Stanley. Discovered in 1592, it was not occupied until the French settled there briefly in 1764. Later the English settled there but were expelled by the Spanish in 1770. The Falklands were claimed by Argentina but were occupied in 1833 by the British who, after an April 1982 invasion by Argentina, regained them in June. The islands were named by British Captain John Strong in 1690 for the fifth Viscount Falkland who financed Strong's expedition. The Spanish name for the islands, Malvinas, is from the French Malouins, inhabitants of St. Malo who attempted to colonize the islands in 1764. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p389 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p182)Geological Phenomena: The inanimate matter of Earth, the structures and properties of this matter, and the processes that affect it.Cytochromes b: Cytochromes of the b group that have alpha-band absorption of 563-564 nm. They occur as subunits in MITOCHONDRIAL ELECTRON TRANSPORT COMPLEX III.Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)DNA, Protozoan: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of protozoa.Mimosa: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that contains kukulkanin, a CHALCONE.Paleopathology: The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.Pacific Islands: The islands of the Pacific Ocean divided into MICRONESIA; MELANESIA; and POLYNESIA (including NEW ZEALAND). The collective name Oceania includes the aforenamed islands, adding AUSTRALIA; NEW ZEALAND; and the Malay Archipelago (INDONESIA). (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p910, 880)Encephalitis Virus, Eastern Equine: A species of ALPHAVIRUS causing encephalomyelitis in Equidae and humans. The virus ranges along the Atlantic seaboard of the United States and Canada and as far south as the Caribbean, Mexico, and parts of Central and South America. Infections in horses show a mortality of up to 90 percent and in humans as high as 80 percent in epidemics.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Suriname: A republic in the north of South America, bordered on the west by GUYANA (British Guiana) and on the east by FRENCH GUIANA. Its capital is Paramaribo. It was formerly called Netherlands Guiana or Dutch Guiana or Surinam. Suriname was first settled by the English in 1651 but was ceded to the Dutch by treaty in 1667. It became an autonomous territory under the Dutch crown in 1954 and gained independence in 1975. The country was named for the Surinam River but the meaning of that name is uncertain. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1167 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p526)Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome: Acute respiratory illness in humans caused by the Muerto Canyon virus whose primary rodent reservoir is the deer mouse Peromyscus maniculatus. First identified in the southwestern United States, this syndrome is characterized most commonly by fever, myalgias, headache, cough, and rapid respiratory failure.Insect Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous insects through chemical, biological, or other means.GuatemalaAngiosperms: Members of the group of vascular plants which bear flowers. They are differentiated from GYMNOSPERMS by their production of seeds within a closed chamber (OVARY, PLANT). The Angiosperms division is composed of two classes, the monocotyledons (Liliopsida) and dicotyledons (Magnoliopsida). Angiosperms represent approximately 80% of all known living plants.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Sus scrofa: A species of SWINE, in the family Suidae, comprising a number of subspecies including the domestic pig Sus scrofa domestica.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Herpesvirus 5, Bovine: A species of VARICELLOVIRUS that causes a fatal MENINGOENCEPHALITIS in calves.Hantavirus: A genus of the family BUNYAVIRIDAE causing HANTAVIRUS INFECTIONS, first identified during the Korean war. Infection is found primarily in rodents and humans. Transmission does not appear to involve arthropods. HANTAAN VIRUS is the type species.Communicable Diseases, Emerging: Infectious diseases that are novel in their outbreak ranges (geographic and host) or transmission mode.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Europe, EasternMarsupialia: An infraclass of MAMMALS, also called Metatheria, where the young are born at an early stage of development and continue to develop in a pouch (marsupium). In contrast to Eutheria (placentals), marsupials have an incomplete PLACENTA.Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine: A species of ALPHAVIRUS that is the etiologic agent of encephalomyelitis in humans and equines. It is seen most commonly in parts of Central and South America.Histamine: An amine derived by enzymatic decarboxylation of HISTIDINE. It is a powerful stimulant of gastric secretion, a constrictor of bronchial smooth muscle, a vasodilator, and also a centrally acting neurotransmitter.Trichechus inunguis: Member of the genus Trichechus found in the Amazon and Orinoco drainages of northeastern South America. (From Scott, Concise Encyclopedia Biology, 1996)Hypersensitivity, Delayed: An increased reactivity to specific antigens mediated not by antibodies but by cells.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Simuliidae: Several species of the genus Simulium (family Simuliidae) that act as intermediate hosts (vectors) for the parasitic disease ONCHOCERCIASIS.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Molecular Epidemiology: The application of molecular biology to the answering of epidemiological questions. The examination of patterns of changes in DNA to implicate particular carcinogens and the use of molecular markers to predict which individuals are at highest risk for a disease are common examples.Ilex paraguariensis: A plant species of the family AQUIFOLIACEAE. An infusion of the leaves is commonly drunk in South America for stimulating effect in much the same manner as coffee is in other cultures.Anopheles: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) that are known vectors of MALARIA.Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Geology: The science of the earth and other celestial bodies and their history as recorded in the rocks. It includes the study of geologic processes of an area such as rock formations, weathering and erosion, and sedimentation. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Trichechus manatus: Member of the genus Trichechus inhabiting the coast and coastal rivers of the southeastern United States as well as the West Indies and the adjacent mainland from Vera Cruz, Mexico to northern South America. (From Scott, Concise Encyclopedia Biology, 1996)Alphavirus: A genus of TOGAVIRIDAE, also known as Group A arboviruses, serologically related to each other but not to other Togaviridae. The viruses are transmitted by mosquitoes. The type species is the SINDBIS VIRUS.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.United StatesAmino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Myenteric Plexus: One of two ganglionated neural networks which together form the ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM. The myenteric (Auerbach's) plexus is located between the longitudinal and circular muscle layers of the gut. Its neurons project to the circular muscle, to other myenteric ganglia, to submucosal ganglia, or directly to the epithelium, and play an important role in regulating and patterning gut motility. (From FASEB J 1989;3:127-38)Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Bronchoconstriction: Narrowing of the caliber of the BRONCHI, physiologically or as a result of pharmacological intervention.Endemic Diseases: The constant presence of diseases or infectious agents within a given geographic area or population group. It may also refer to the usual prevalence of a given disease with such area or group. It includes holoendemic and hyperendemic diseases. A holoendemic disease is one for which a high prevalent level of infection begins early in life and affects most of the child population, leading to a state of equilibrium such that the adult population shows evidence of the disease much less commonly than do children (malaria in many communities is a holoendemic disease). A hyperendemic disease is one that is constantly present at a high incidence and/or prevalence rate and affects all groups equally. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed, p53, 78, 80)Catfishes: Common name of the order Siluriformes. This order contains many families and over 2,000 species, including venomous species. Heteropneustes and Plotosus genera have dangerous stings and are aggressive. Most species are passive stingers.Africa South of the Sahara: All of Africa except Northern Africa (AFRICA, NORTHERN).Yellow Fever Vaccine: Vaccine used to prevent YELLOW FEVER. It consists of a live attenuated 17D strain of the YELLOW FEVER VIRUS.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Polynesia: The collective name for the islands of the central Pacific Ocean, including the Austral Islands, Cook Islands, Easter Island, HAWAII; NEW ZEALAND; Phoenix Islands, PITCAIRN ISLAND; SAMOA; TONGA; Tuamotu Archipelago, Wake Island, and Wallis and Futuna Islands. Polynesians are of the Caucasoid race, but many are of mixed origin. Polynesia is from the Greek poly, many + nesos, island, with reference to the many islands in the group. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p966 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p426)Chloroquine: The prototypical antimalarial agent with a mechanism that is not well understood. It has also been used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and in the systemic therapy of amebic liver abscesses.Perilymph: The fluid separating the membranous labyrinth from the osseous labyrinth of the ear. It is entirely separate from the ENDOLYMPH which is contained in the membranous labyrinth. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1396, 642)Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Cochlea: The part of the inner ear (LABYRINTH) that is concerned with hearing. It forms the anterior part of the labyrinth, as a snail-like structure that is situated almost horizontally anterior to the VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Roseolovirus: A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily BETAHERPESVIRINAE, whose viruses have been isolated from lymphocytes. HERPESVIRUS 6, HUMAN is the type species.
... "guinea pigs". Cavies are widespread throughout South America. The high diversity of habitats of different species is paralleled ... both less than those of the guinea pig. Placental development in Galea is very similar to that of the guinea pig. Galea species ... Galea is a genus of South American rodents of the family Caviidae. Four extant species are known, found in Argentina, Bolivia, ... "Maturation of Epididymal Spermatozoa in the Nondomesticated Guinea Pigs Cavia aperea and Galea musteloides". Journal of ...
... is a guinea pig species from South America. It is found in southern Venezuela, Guyana, and portions of northern ... Some biologists believe it to be a feral offshoot of the domestic guinea pig, Cavia porcellus; others subsume it under the wild ...
Cahokia was the most populous city in North America. (Larger cities did exist in Mesoamerica and South America.) Monk's Mound, ... Guinea pigs were raised for meat in the Andes. Iguanas and a range of wild animals, such as deer and pecari, were another ... Artifacts have been found in both North and South America which have been dated to 14,000 years ago, and accordingly humans ... Over the course of millennia, Paleo-Indians spread throughout North and South America. Exactly when the first group of people ...
James L. Patton; Ulyses F. J. Pardiñas; Guillermo D'Elía (2015). Mammals of South America, Volume 2: Rodents. University of ... The greater guinea pig, Cavia magna, is a species of rodent found in the coastal strip of Brazil and Uruguay, where it lives in ... The greater guinea pig is a herbivore. It is a solitary animal and has a complex network of tunnels and runways through the ... A large rodent, the greater guinea pig grows to a total length of 310 mm (12.2 in) and weight of 636 g (22.4 oz) for males and ...
Indigenous settlers first introduced dogs and guinea pigs from South or Central America. Afterwards, Taínos introduced hutias ... The avifauna of the West Indies is predominantly of tropical North American (southern North America and Central America) origin ... with aggressive South American species having colonized the area only recently. The South American families occurring in the ... 1994). "The South American Sailfin Armored Catfish, Liposarcus multiradiatus (Hancock), a New Exotic Established in Puerto ...
... is a guinea pig species from South America. It is found in Colombia near Bogotá. It is believed to be a feral ... offshoot of the domestic guinea pig, Cavia porcellus, and is often treated as a synonym of C. porcellus, but Zúñiga et al. ( ...
South America. The 30 centimetres (12 in) long creature was related to guinea pigs and the capybara. Palmer, D., ed. (1999). ...
The cavy family (Caviidae) is a family of rodents native to South America, including the domestic guinea pig, wild cavies, and ... Fossils caviids first appeared during the middle of the Miocene epoch in South America. Family Caviidae Subfamily Caviinae: ... guinea pigs (cavies) Genus Cavia, this genus is especially called 'cavy'. Genus Galea Genus Microcavia: mountain cavies ...
The guinea pig's close rodent cousins, capybara and paca, are consumed as food in South America. The Catholic Church's ... "India Pushes Guinea Pigs as Food". CBS News. Retrieved 2007-03-12. Mitchell, Chip (2006-11-01). "Guinea Pig: It's What's for ... though actually it is not a rat at all and is a close relative of porcupines and guinea pigs that inhabit Africa, south of the ... Guinea pig meat is exported to the United States and European nations. In 2004, the New York City Department of Parks and ...
... guinea pig. They were domesticated by 2000 BC and were easy to keep and multiplied rapidly. Guinea pigs were often cooked by ... As in the rest of Central and South America, chili peppers were an important and highly praised part of their diet. The Inca ... The most common sources of meat were guinea pigs and llamas, and dried fish was common. There were also several types of edible ... realm stretched north-south, encompassing a great variety of climate zones. In Peru in particular, the mountain ranges provide ...
The genus Kerodon contains two species of South American rock cavies related to capybaras and guinea pigs. They are found in ... Traditionally, the genus Kerodon has been considered a member of the subfamily Caviinae along with the guinea pigs and other ...
They are native to Middle America, northern and central South America, and the southern Lesser Antilles. Some species have also ... They are related to guinea pigs and look quite similar, but are larger and have longer legs. The species vary considerably in ... Agoutis are found in forested and wooded areas in Central and South America. Their habitats include rainforests, savannas and, ... Dasyprocta prymnolopha Central American agouti, Dasyprocta punctata Coiban agouti, Dasyprocta coibae Crested agouti, Dasyprocta ...
The Tropics - A recently finished group of enclosures exhibiting South American animal species. Here you will find American ... guinea pigs, frogs and locusts. The zoo's kunekune pigs, Alma and Neena, also live here. Pridelands - Large African animals ... The six international regions are: Africa, Nepal, Pacific Islands, South America, Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka. Auckland Zoo ... "American alligator". www.aucklandzoo.co.nz. "Auckland Zoo - Auckland Zoo News 2014". "New zebra heard in the works » Auckland ...
The best-known species in this genus is the domestic guinea pig, Cavia porcellus, an important meat animal in South America and ... domestic guinea pig, wild ancestor unknown Cavia tschudii - montane guinea pig, Peru south to northern Chile and northwest ... At least five wild species of guinea pig are recognised, in addition to the domestic form: Cavia aperea - Brazilian guinea pig ... shiny guinea pig, eastern Brazil Cavia intermedia - intermediate guinea pig, Moleques do Sul islands, Santa Catarina, Brazil, ...
They presently exist mainly in South America; three members of the family also range into Central America. Species of the ... In general form, most spiny rats resemble rats, although they are more closely related to guinea pigs and chinchillas. Most ... Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Patton, James L.; Leite, Yuri L. R. (2016). "Family Echimyidae (hutias, South American spiny-rats and ... Leite, Yuri L. R.; Patton, James L. (2002). "Evolution of South American spiny rats (Rodentia, Echimyidae): the star-phylogeny ...
Main meat was the guinea pig, endemic to South America, which they farmed in their homes. In special cases they ate llamas, ... a very important tuber in the diet of the South American indigenous people, cultivated as of 1120 BCE and still one of the most ... or guinea pig, widely domesticated in Muisca territories Odocoileus virginianus, Mazama rufina, M. americana and M. goazoubira ... Central America, Peru and Colombia Arachis hypogaea, peanuts, grown in the Andes and in Alto Magdalena Erythrina edulis, called ...
In the Highlands is the cuy, a South American name for guinea pig, a common meat. Given the coastal location, both countries ... American countries, plus Equatorial Guinea. "Latin America" The Free Online Dictionary (American Heritage Dictionary of the ... "Spanish American". Some list "Hispanic," "Hispanic American" and "Hispano-American" as synonyms for "Spanish American." (All ... Hispanic America also contrasts with Latin America, which includes not only Hispanic America, but also Brazil, as well as the ...
... potato in South America, and sunflower in the Eastern Woodlands of North America. Sumerian farmers grew the cereals barley and ... and guinea pigs. Bananas were cultivated and hybridized in the same period in Papua New Guinea. In Mesoamerica, wild teosinte ... It gradually spread across North America and was the major crop of Native Americans at the time of European exploration. Other ... After its introduction from South America to Spain in the late 1500s, the potato became a staple crop throughout Europe by the ...
Native to South America, the capybara inhabits savannas and dense forests and lives near bodies of water. It is a highly social ... Like its relative the guinea pig, the capybara does not have the capacity to synthesize vitamin C, and capybaras not ... In parts of South America, especially in Venezuela, capybara meat is popular during Lent and Holy Week as the Catholic Church ... Capybaras have adapted well to urbanization in South America. They can be found in many areas in zoos and parks, and may live ...
These large relatives of guinea pigs are common in the Patagonian steppes of Argentina, but also live in Paraguay and elsewhere ... in South America. Maras are the fourth-largest rodent in the world, after capybaras, beavers, and porcupines, reaching about 45 ...
In 1980, after retiring from Bank of America, Morrow published last autobiography, Forty Years a Guinea Pig: A Black Man's View ... In 1973, Morrow published his autobiography, Way Down South Up North. ... "E. Frederick Morrow served many aspects of America , African American Registry". www.aaregistry.org. Retrieved 2016-01-25. ... He later became the first African American vice-president of Bank of America. ...
... may refer to: a large breed of guinea pig raised for its meat in the Andean regions of South America. CUY: the IATA airport ...
After the Inter-American Conference in Baltimore, Silverman continued her travels in South America, and then obtained special ... guinea pigs' to 'terrifying tropical diseases'". Eventually the alternative emigration plans were scrapped in the wake of the ... in South America, New Zealand, Australia, and South Africa on fund-raising missions. Then in 1946, she was in Europe visiting ... diplomats including Sumner Welles proposed American alternatives, Silverman embarked on several tours of South America and the ...
... which also appeared in South America in the Eocene when it was an isolated continent, long before the Great American ... ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. D'Erchia, A.; Gissi, C.; Pesole, G.; Saccone, C.; Arnason, U. (1996). "The guinea-pig is not a rodent ... Bond, M.; Tejedor, M. F.; Campbell, K. E.; Chornogubsky, L.; Novo, N.; Goin, F. (2015-02-04). "Eocene primates of South America ... Graur, D.; Hide, W.; Li, W. (1991). "Is the guinea-pig a rodent?". Nature. 351 (6328): 649-652. doi:10.1038/351649a0. PMID ...
Guinea pigs were also domesticated as a food source at this time. By 2000 BCE, many agrarian village communities had developed ... In the last million years since the Late Miocene, South America became connected with the continent of North America via the ... The result of the intrusion of North American fauna was that hundreds of South American species became extinct in a relatively ... The terror bird Titanis was the only discovered South American carnivore species who made the journey into North America. The ...
... pigs with EVD get very high ebolavirus concentrations in their lungs, and not their bloodstream.[76] Therefore, pigs with EVD ... American Society for Microbiology. 29 (4): 773-793. doi:10.1128/cmr.00003-16. ISSN 0893-8512. LCCN 88647279. OCLC 38839512. PMC ... It occurred between June and November 1976, in Nzara, South Sudan[42][150] (then part of Sudan), and was caused by Sudan virus ... "Ebola gone from Guinea". CBC News. Thomson Reuters. 29 December 2015. Archived from the original on 30 December 2015. Retrieved ...
While for many people the guinea pig is considered a cute and fluffy pet, In Peru they are a delicacy that has been enjoyed for ... Globe Trekker - Ultimate South America. Explore the heart of the Amazonian.... SHOP ... Guinea Pig: A Peruvian Delicacy. While for many people the world over the guinea pig is considered a cute and fluffy pet, In ... Care and preparation of the guinea pig used to be a womans chore but raising guinea pigs is increasingly becoming a commercial ...
James L. Patton; Ulyses F. J. Pardiñas; Guillermo DElía (2015). Mammals of South America, Volume 2: Rodents. University of ... The greater guinea pig, Cavia magna, is a species of rodent found in the coastal strip of Brazil and Uruguay, where it lives in ... The greater guinea pig is a herbivore. It is a solitary animal and has a complex network of tunnels and runways through the ... A large rodent, the greater guinea pig grows to a total length of 310 mm (12.2 in) and weight of 636 g (22.4 oz) for males and ...
Lyn Zantow Domesticated more than 500 years ago in South America, guinea pigs were first brought to Europe in the 1500s by the ... Background Guinea pigs originally came from South America. Theyre larger than hamsters, but smaller than rabbits. They ... Adopt-A-Rescued-Guinea-Pig Month: Why adopt and not buy a guinea pig? by Guest Blogger • Mar 23 , 2011 ... If you have adopted a guinea pig, check out this information on guinea pig housing, litter training, roommates, exercise, ...
... or from confusion of Guinea with the South American region of Guyana (but OED is against this). Pig… See more definitions. ... guinea pig (n.). rodent native to South America, 1660s. It does not come from Guinea and has nothing to do with the pig. ... river pig [OED], or from confusion of Guinea with the South American region of Guyana (but OED is against this). Pig probably ... Guinea, and South America [Barnhart, Klein], or from its resemblance to the young of the Guinea-hog ...
Arthropod and helminth parasites of the wild guinea pig, Cavia aperea, from the Andes and the cordillera in Peru, South America ... As part of an ongoing research project concerning the diversity and distribution of parasites of Caviidae in South America, 143 ... wild guinea pigs (Cavia aperea) were collected from 3 localities in the Andean Highlands of Peru. Samples were collected ...
Guinea Pig - South America. A strange one, because again I see this as kind of wrong. Yet I know over here we use guinea pigs ... Typically served whole and roasted or in a casserole, guinea pig is said to have a similar flavour to rabbit. ... Sannakji - South Korea. Another one that ranks high on the cruelty scale, this dish involves hacking the tentacles off a baby ... Im from the south in the US and there are a few things Ive eaten most find disgusting. Some of my favorites are fried deer ...
The montane guinea pig, Cavia tschudii, a type of rodent, is a guinea pig species from the Andes in South America. The montane ... guinea pig is the likely ancestor of Cavia porcellus, the cavy or domestic guinea pig. Peruvian wild guinea pigs were first ... The montane guinea pig is native to the high Andes in South America. Its range extends from Peru southward to the Tarapacá ... In 1867, Leopold Fitzinger renamed the latter guinea pig Cavia tschudii. The montane guinea pig is a medium-sized species, ...
... but the guinea pigs that are fixtures in elementary school classrooms today were once ambassadors from a new land. ... While the guinea pigs, also known as cavies, served as food in South America, they seem to have been treated as pets in Europe ... Guinea pigs: Easy-to-pack pets for early European explorers A source of food in South America, they lived the good life ... They found that the guinea pig was likely born and raised in Europe - no big surprise, given that guinea pigs as young as 3 ...
... guinea pigs; fish ... Western South America, bordering the South Pacific Ocean, ... the South America-1 (SAM-1) and Pan American (PAN-AM) submarine cable systems provide links to parts of Central and South ... Mount Huaynaputina in the southern Peruvian Andes erupted in the largest volcanic explosion in South America in historical ... Alliance for Progress (Alianza para el Progreso) or APP [Cesar ACUNA Peralta]American Popular Revolutionary Alliance or APRA. ...
Detection of antibodies against influenza A and B raises the question about the role of guinea pigs in the ecology and ... we conducted a serologic study in domestic guinea pigs in Ecuador. ... To determine whether guinea pigs are infected with influenza virus in nature, ... In some regions of South America, guinea pigs are part of the traditional cuisine and are produced as livestock and sold ...
Guinea pigs often make for a wonderful family pet. These small animals are expressive, affectionate and gentle. But there are ... Guinea pigs, also known as cavies, originally come from South America. Wild guinea pigs can still be found across many ... Guinea Pigs and Their Teeth. Guinea pigs enjoy timothy hay, it is a natural way to help them with their teeth. Guinea pigs ... Guinea pigs are indoor pets. When you bring your new guinea pig home, put their cage in an area that has the least amount of ...
... just a few reasons guinea pigs are ideal livestock ... Guinea pigs are native to South America. In Peru they call them ... For thousands of years South Americans have farmed guinea pigs - but this has not taken root in most other parts of the world, ... What should be done to support guinea pig farming?. For decades researchers and producers in South America have improved cavy ... "pig from India". But they are not pigs, or from India or Guinea. We therefore prefer to call them "domestic cavies". ...
The guinea pig, native to South America, has long been used in labs and as a popular household pet. Brought to Europe in the ... Guinea Pig Skull - The guinea pig, native to South America, has long been used in labs and as a popular household pet. Brought ... Guinea Pig Skull - The guinea pig, native to South America, has long been used in labs and as a popular household pet. Brought ... A rodent, the guinea pig primarily feeds on vegetation, seeds and berries. There are 8 species of guinea pigs found in the wild ...
The History of Guinea Pigs. Guinea pigs are a species of rodent that originated in South America. Theyre thought to have been ... Some guinea pig species still live in the wild. In some South American regions they are still kept as household animals, and ... South America was home to the Incas. After being domesticated by Andean people, guinea pigs remained popular in the area for ... Domesticated guinea pigs as a species no longer exist in the wild, but very closely related species such as the montane guinea ...
Yet, todays guinea pigs weigh about 2.2 pounds (1 kilogram). Both creatures belong to a diverse radiation of South American ... South America had been an island for tens of millions of years, Sugden explained. South American animals thus managed to evolve ... Guinea-zilla? Worlds largest rodent identified as ancient sibling to guinea pigs. 19.09.2003 ... "Imagine a weird guinea pig, but huge, with a long tail for balancing on its hind legs and continuously growing teeth," said ...
In the summer an outside hutch is great, guinea pigs love to eat fresh grass. Come winter, this particular guinea pig is moved ... Introduction and Description Introduction This is an outside hutch where the guinea pig can spend the warmer months. ... Guinea pigs are "grazers" that are indigenous to South America. In their natural habitat, they form large, extended family ... Your guinea pig may not like being picked up at first, so please be patient. When you pick up your guinea pig, place a hand on ...
These are commonly found in various regions of South America. They move together in groups for eating grass or other vegetation ... The guinea pig also called the cavy. Despite their common name, these animals are not in the pig family nor are they from ... Guinea pigs are between 700 and 1200 g in weight and between 20 and 25 cm in length. They typically live an average of four to ... Guinea pigs can learn complex paths to food and can accurately remember a learned path for months. Also, they are a good ...
Find out how to care for your guinea pig. ... All the information you need to know about guinea pigs - ... They originate from the grasslands and lower slopes of the Andes Mountains in South America. Why not view our full Guinea pig ... Understanding Guinea pigs¿ needs. There is no one ¿perfect¿ way to care for all guinea pigs because every guinea pig and every ... Guinea pigs are small, sociable, `chatty¿ rodents. There are different breeds and varieties of guinea pigs, with a wide variety ...
Free flashcards to help memorize facts about I love guinea pigs. Other activities to help include hangman, crossword, word ... any of the family of south american rodents. guinea pig. a small, fat animal with short ears and a short tail or no tail. ...
Discussion forum for Guinea Pig Cages (Cavy Cages), Care, Housing, Diet, Health and Adoptables ... Canada, Mexico, Argentina & other South America. Forum Actions:. *View this forums RSS feed ... Guinea Pigs. Owned by. Ginger pig love. Latest Discussion. DIY guinea pig supplies in group Economical Pigs. ... Guinea pigs, rescues and shelter listings from the GUINEA PIG ZONE! All guinea pig listings (free and easy) from the ZONE are ...
Guinea pigs were first domesticated about 4500 years ago in South America, providing the native South Americans with meat as ... Behold the domesticated guinea pig (Cavia aperea f. porcellus):. Figure 1: Guinea Pig. I dont think they look much like pigs ... Keywords: domestication, guinea pig, guinea pigs, morris water maze, navigation, pet, pets, spatial learning ... though they differ in many ways from domestic guinea pigs. Guinea pigs are less aggressive, more "friendly," display more male ...
... guinea pig is uncertain. It perhaps comes from English speakers using the location Guinea to mean a vague, foreign land and ... Where do guinea pigs live?. A: Guinea pigs are native to South America and were first put into use by human society in what is ... What can a guinea pig eat?. A: Guinea pigs may eat a mix of grass hay, vegetables and fruits as part of their daily nutritional ... Can guinea pigs swim?. A: Guinea pigs are natural swimmers but may not appreciate being put into the water. They will swim if ...
Watch , Brazil, Colombia, Now Venezuela: US Pursues Right-Wing Hegemony in South America Watch: From Colombia and Brazil, Kei ... How Greece Became A Guinea Pig For A Cashless And Controlled Society As Greece moves closer to becoming a cashless society, it ... Indeed, it could be said that Greece is being used as a guinea pig not just for a grand neoliberal experiment in both austerity ... Outside of Europe, cash is being eliminated even in countries such as Somalia and Kenya, while South Korea-itself no stranger ...
Guinea Pigs. The guinea pig (or cavy) is a rodent native to South America. Guinea pigs are a popular household pet as they are ... Miniature Pigs. Pigs often thought to be being lazy and dirty animals, but they are in fact very intelligent. Pigs have the ... Guinea Pigs are herbivores and eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, and grasses. ... Pigs do not have sweat glands and are therefore unable to sweat and control their body temperature during warm weather. To cool ...
Caviidae, the cavy family, is composed of rodents native to South America and includes the domestic guinea pig, wild cavies, ... They are found across South America in open areas from moist savanna to thorn forests or scrub desert. This family of rodents ... Subfamily Caviinae: guinea pigs (cavies) *Genus Cavia (at least 6 species), this genus is especially called cavy. ... family of rodents that includes the domestic guinea pig. "Cavy" redirects here. For the animal commonly referred to as "cavy", ...
  • The occurrence of (a) guinea pig in a late 16th century context of a manor at Hill Hall, Essex, owned by a member of the royal court, suggests that it was a prestigious animal," Fabienne Pigiere of the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences and colleagues wrote in the upcoming April issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science. (nbcnews.com)
  • In the 16th century, domesticated guinea pigs were brought to Europe where they were subjected to further selective breeding, resulting in the common form we know and love today as pets and laboratory animals. (scienceblogs.com)
  • In Western societies, the domestic guinea pig has enjoyed widespread popularity as a household pet since its introduction by European traders in the 16th century. (appadvice.com)
  • After being domesticated by Andean people, guinea pigs remained popular in the area for many thousands of years, and were extremely popular amongst the Incas. (omlet.co.uk)
  • The Incan people were a South American civilisation that lived in and around the Andean mountains from the thirteenth to the sixteenth century, and were famous for their stunning works of art and breathtaking architecture. (omlet.co.uk)
  • In Andean medicine the guinea pig was rubbed over the body of a sick patient, and when it started squeaking they believed it had identified the affected area! (omlet.us)
  • They are originally for the Andean region of South America and have served as a food source since as early as 5000 B.C. The name of the guinea pig can be quite deceiving. (kiva.org)
  • Choose your guinea pigs from a litter that is at least six weeks old.The puppies (baby guinea pigs) that you choose should be plump and well fed, should have bright eyes and clear ears and nose, and should have shiny, silky fur all over including under the bottom. (mypets.net.au)
  • Cleaning Baby Guinea Pigs By: Dane Stanton If you have recently acquired a baby guinea pig and are wondering how to clean baby guinea pigs, you definitely aren't alone. (petlvr.com)
  • Serum samples were collected from adult guinea pigs that we purchased from local farms (Cuenca), where they had been raised as livestock, or from live animal markets (Guayaquil and Manabí). (cdc.gov)
  • However, adult guinea pigs of the same sex do tend to fight, so you may want to select either two female littermates, or two young male littermates. (buildeazy.com)
  • In her town, Isabel can sell one adult guinea pig for $6USD. (kiva.org)
  • The Brazilian guinea pig lives in small groups, usually consisting of a single male and one or two females. (eol.org)
  • Although the Brazilian guinea pig breeds throughout the year, most births usually occur between September and April. (eol.org)
  • They're thought to have been domesticated as early as 5000 BC, and they form a persistent part of the culture of many people within this area - statues dating back to 500 BC as well as later art all depict guinea pigs in a variety of different forms. (omlet.co.uk)
  • A large rodent, the greater guinea pig grows to a total length of 310 mm (12.2 in) and weight of 636 g (22.4 oz) for males and a total length of 303 mm (11.9 in) and weight of 537 g (18.9 oz) for females. (wikipedia.org)
  • She took out a small loan to purchase 30 females and 3 males guinea pigs. (kiva.org)