Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Aquaporins: A class of porins that allow the passage of WATER and other small molecules across CELL MEMBRANES.Aquaporin 1: Aquaporin 1 forms a water-specific channel that is constitutively expressed at the PLASMA MEMBRANE of ERYTHROCYTES and KIDNEY TUBULES, PROXIMAL. It provides these cells with a high permeability to WATER. In humans polymorphisms of this protein result in the Colton blood group antigen.Water Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Osmosis: Tendency of fluids (e.g., water) to move from the less concentrated to the more concentrated side of a semipermeable membrane.Soil Pollutants: Substances which pollute the soil. Use for soil pollutants in general or for which there is no specific heading.Body Water: Fluids composed mainly of water found within the body.Water-Electrolyte Balance: The balance of fluid in the BODY FLUID COMPARTMENTS; total BODY WATER; BLOOD VOLUME; EXTRACELLULAR SPACE; INTRACELLULAR SPACE, maintained by processes in the body that regulate the intake and excretion of WATER and ELECTROLYTES, particularly SODIUM and POTASSIUM.Pinus ponderosa: A plant species of the genus PINUS that contains isocupressic acid.Aquaporin 4: Aquaporin 4 is the major water-selective channel in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM of mammals.Demeclocycline: A TETRACYCLINE analog having a 7-chloro and a 6-methyl. Because it is excreted more slowly than TETRACYCLINE, it maintains effective blood levels for longer periods of time.Aquaporin 3: Aquaporin 3 is an aquaglyceroporin that is expressed in the KIDNEY COLLECTING DUCTS and is constitutively localized at the basolateral MEMBRANE.Aquaporin 5: Aquaporin 5 is a water-specific channel protein that is expressed primarily in alveolar, tracheal, and upper bronchial EPITHELIUM. It plays an important role in maintaining water HOMEOSTASIS in the LUNGS and may also regulate release of SALIVA and TEARS in the SALIVARY GLANDS and the LACRIMAL GLAND.Water Supply: Means or process of supplying water (as for a community) usually including reservoirs, tunnels, and pipelines and often the watershed from which the water is ultimately drawn. (Webster, 3d ed)Cell Membrane Permeability: A quality of cell membranes which permits the passage of solvents and solutes into and out of cells.Mercuric Chloride: Mercury chloride (HgCl2). A highly toxic compound that volatizes slightly at ordinary temperature and appreciably at 100 degrees C. It is corrosive to mucous membranes and used as a topical antiseptic and disinfectant.Serous Membrane: A thin lining of closed cavities of the body, consisting of a single layer of squamous epithelial cells (MESOTHELIUM) resting on a thin layer of CONNECTIVE TISSUE, and covered with secreted clear fluid from blood and lymph vessels. Major serous membranes in the body include PERICARDIUM; PERITONEUM; and PLEURA.Osmotic Pressure: The pressure required to prevent the passage of solvent through a semipermeable membrane that separates a pure solvent from a solution of the solvent and solute or that separates different concentrations of a solution. It is proportional to the osmolality of the solution.Plant Stems: Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Osmolar Concentration: The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.Permeability: Property of membranes and other structures to permit passage of light, heat, gases, liquids, metabolites, and mineral ions.Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Biological Transport, Active: The movement of materials across cell membranes and epithelial layers against an electrochemical gradient, requiring the expenditure of metabolic energy.Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Water Pollution: Contamination of bodies of water (such as LAKES; RIVERS; SEAS; and GROUNDWATER.)Water Purification: Any of several processes in which undesirable impurities in water are removed or neutralized; for example, chlorination, filtration, primary treatment, ion exchange, and distillation. It includes treatment of WASTE WATER to provide potable and hygienic water in a controlled or closed environment as well as provision of public drinking water supplies.Chlorides: Inorganic compounds derived from hydrochloric acid that contain the Cl- ion.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Potassium: An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Head Movements: Voluntary or involuntary motion of head that may be relative to or independent of body; includes animals and humans.Water Pollutants, Chemical: Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.Movement Disorders: Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.Water Pollutants: Substances or organisms which pollute the water or bodies of water. Use for water pollutants in general or those for which there is no specific heading.Soil Pollutants, Radioactive: Pollutants, present in soil, which exhibit radioactivity.Plant Viral Movement Proteins: Viral proteins that facilitate the movement of viruses between plant cells by means of PLASMODESMATA, channels that traverse the plant cell walls.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Fetal Movement: Physical activity of the FETUS in utero. Gross or fine fetal body movement can be monitored by the mother, PALPATION, or ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Biodegradation, Environmental: Elimination of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS; PESTICIDES and other waste using living organisms, usually involving intervention of environmental or sanitation engineers.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Fertilizers: Substances or mixtures that are added to the soil to supply nutrients or to make available nutrients already present in the soil, in order to increase plant growth and productivity.Water Deprivation: The withholding of water in a structured experimental situation.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Biomass: Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Saccades: An abrupt voluntary shift in ocular fixation from one point to another, as occurs in reading.Arm: The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Water SofteningDrinking: The consumption of liquids.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Carbon: A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Fixation, Ocular: The positioning and accommodation of eyes that allows the image to be brought into place on the FOVEA CENTRALIS of each eye.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Eye Movement Measurements: Methods and procedures for recording EYE MOVEMENTS.Motor Cortex: Area of the FRONTAL LOBE concerned with primary motor control located in the dorsal PRECENTRAL GYRUS immediately anterior to the central sulcus. It is comprised of three areas: the primary motor cortex located on the anterior paracentral lobule on the medial surface of the brain; the premotor cortex located anterior to the primary motor cortex; and the supplementary motor area located on the midline surface of the hemisphere anterior to the primary motor cortex.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Pursuit, Smooth: Eye movements that are slow, continuous, and conjugate and occur when a fixed object is moved slowly.Desert Climate: A type of climate characterized by insufficient moisture to support appreciable plant life. It is a climate of extreme aridity, usually of extreme heat, and of negligible rainfall. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Manure: Accumulations of solid or liquid animal excreta usually from stables and barnyards with or without litter material. Its chief application is as a fertilizer. (From Webster's 3d ed)Biota: The spectrum of different living organisms inhabiting a particular region, habitat, or biotope.Fingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.Fungi: A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.Genes, rRNA: Genes, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which are transcribed to produce the RNA which is incorporated into RIBOSOMES. Prokaryotic rRNA genes are usually found in OPERONS dispersed throughout the GENOME, whereas eukaryotic rRNA genes are clustered, multicistronic transcriptional units.Plant Transpiration: The loss of water vapor by plants to the atmosphere. It occurs mainly from the leaves through pores (stomata) whose primary function is gas exchange. The water is replaced by a continuous column of water moving upwards from the roots within the xylem vessels. (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Metals, Heavy: Metals with high specific gravity, typically larger than 5. They have complex spectra, form colored salts and double salts, have a low electrode potential, are mainly amphoteric, yield weak bases and weak acids, and are oxidizing or reducing agents (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Sewage: Refuse liquid or waste matter carried off by sewers.Rain: Water particles that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Environmental Remediation: Removal of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS or contaminants for the general protection of the environment. This is accomplished by various chemical, biological, and bulk movement methods, in conjunction with ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Nitrification: A process facilitated by specialized bacteria involving the oxidation of ammonium to nitrite and nitrate.Oligochaeta: A class of annelid worms with few setae per segment. It includes the earthworms such as Lumbricus and Eisenia.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Plants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Macaca mulatta: A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.Proprioception: Sensory functions that transduce stimuli received by proprioceptive receptors in joints, tendons, muscles, and the INNER EAR into neural impulses to be transmitted to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Proprioception provides sense of stationary positions and movements of one's body parts, and is important in maintaining KINESTHESIA and POSTURAL BALANCE.Humic Substances: Organic matter in a state of advanced decay, after passing through the stages of COMPOST and PEAT and before becoming lignite (COAL). It is composed of a heterogenous mixture of compounds including phenolic radicals and acids that polymerize and are not easily separated nor analyzed. (E.A. Ghabbour & G. Davies, eds. Humic Substances, 2001).Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Droughts: Prolonged dry periods in natural climate cycle. They are slow-onset phenomena caused by rainfall deficit combined with other predisposing factors.Filtration: A process of separating particulate matter from a fluid, such as air or a liquid, by passing the fluid carrier through a medium that will not pass the particulates. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Waste Water: Contaminated water generated as a waste product of human activity.Motion Perception: The real or apparent movement of objects through the visual field.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Wetlands: Environments or habitats at the interface between truly terrestrial ecosystems and truly aquatic systems making them different from each yet highly dependent on both. Adaptations to low soil oxygen characterize many wetland species.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Arsenic: A shiny gray element with atomic symbol As, atomic number 33, and atomic weight 75. It occurs throughout the universe, mostly in the form of metallic arsenides. Most forms are toxic. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), arsenic and certain arsenic compounds have been listed as known carcinogens. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Water Wells: Constructions built to access underground water.Carbon Cycle: The cycle by which the element carbon is exchanged between organic matter and the earth's physical environment.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Dehydration: The condition that results from excessive loss of water from a living organism.Chlorine: A greenish-yellow, diatomic gas that is a member of the halogen family of elements. It has the atomic symbol Cl, atomic number 17, and atomic weight 70.906. It is a powerful irritant that can cause fatal pulmonary edema. Chlorine is used in manufacturing, as a reagent in synthetic chemistry, for water purification, and in the production of chlorinated lime, which is used in fabric bleaching.Electrooculography: Recording of the average amplitude of the resting potential arising between the cornea and the retina in light and dark adaptation as the eyes turn a standard distance to the right and the left. The increase in potential with light adaptation is used to evaluate the condition of the retinal pigment epithelium.Nitrogen Cycle: The circulation of nitrogen in nature, consisting of a cycle of biochemical reactions in which atmospheric nitrogen is compounded, dissolved in rain, and deposited in the soil, where it is assimilated and metabolized by bacteria and plants, eventually returning to the atmosphere by bacterial decomposition of organic matter.Actinomycetales: An order of gram-positive, primarily aerobic BACTERIA that tend to form branching filaments.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Sleep, REM: A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.Environmental Pollution: Contamination of the air, bodies of water, or land with substances that are harmful to human health and the environment.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Feedback, Sensory: A mechanism of communicating one's own sensory system information about a task, movement or skill.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Models, Chemical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Organic Chemicals: A broad class of substances containing carbon and its derivatives. Many of these chemicals will frequently contain hydrogen with or without oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus, and other elements. They exist in either carbon chain or carbon ring form.Volition: Voluntary activity without external compulsion.Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis: Electrophoresis in which various denaturant gradients are used to induce nucleic acids to melt at various stages resulting in separation of molecules based on small sequence differences including SNPs. The denaturants used include heat, formamide, and urea.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Kinesthesis: Sense of movement of a part of the body, such as movement of fingers, elbows, knees, limbs, or weights.Denitrification: Nitrate reduction process generally mediated by anaerobic bacteria by which nitrogen available to plants is converted to a gaseous form and lost from the soil or water column. It is a part of the nitrogen cycle.Swimming: An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Methane: The simplest saturated hydrocarbon. It is a colorless, flammable gas, slightly soluble in water. It is one of the chief constituents of natural gas and is formed in the decomposition of organic matter. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Water Cycle: Circulation of water among various ecological systems, in various states, on, above, and below the surface of the earth.Immersion: The placing of a body or a part thereof into a liquid.Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Motion: Physical motion, i.e., a change in position of a body or subject as a result of an external force. It is distinguished from MOVEMENT, a process resulting from biological activity.Nitrates: Inorganic or organic salts and esters of nitric acid. These compounds contain the NO3- radical.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Base Composition: The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Humidity: A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Herbicides: Pesticides used to destroy unwanted vegetation, especially various types of weeds, grasses (POACEAE), and woody plants. Some plants develop HERBICIDE RESISTANCE.Wrist: The region of the upper limb between the metacarpus and the FOREARM.Plant Shoots: New immature growth of a plant including stem, leaves, tips of branches, and SEEDLINGS.Nitrogen Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain nitrogen as an integral part of the molecule.Reflex, Vestibulo-Ocular: A reflex wherein impulses are conveyed from the cupulas of the SEMICIRCULAR CANALS and from the OTOLITHIC MEMBRANE of the SACCULE AND UTRICLE via the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM and the median longitudinal fasciculus to the OCULOMOTOR NERVE nuclei. It functions to maintain a stable retinal image during head rotation by generating appropriate compensatory EYE MOVEMENTS.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Phosphorus: A non-metal element that has the atomic symbol P, atomic number 15, and atomic weight 31. It is an essential element that takes part in a broad variety of biochemical reactions.Solvents: Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Pseudomonas: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.Geologic Sediments: A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Orientation: Awareness of oneself in relation to time, place and person.Desiccation: Removal of moisture from a substance (chemical, food, tissue, etc.).Arctic Regions: The Arctic Ocean and the lands in it and adjacent to it. It includes Point Barrow, Alaska, most of the Franklin District in Canada, two thirds of Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Lapland, Novaya Zemlya, and Northern Siberia. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p66)Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Carbon Sequestration: Any of several processes for the permanent or long-term artificial or natural capture or removal and storage of carbon dioxide and other forms of carbon, through biological, chemical or physical processes, in a manner that prevents it from being released into the atmosphere.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Dyskinesias: Abnormal involuntary movements which primarily affect the extremities, trunk, or jaw that occur as a manifestation of an underlying disease process. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent episodes of dyskinesia as a primary manifestation of disease may be referred to as dyskinesia syndromes (see MOVEMENT DISORDERS). Dyskinesias are also a relatively common manifestation of BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES.2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid: An herbicide with irritant effects on the eye and the gastrointestinal system.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Oxygen Isotopes: Stable oxygen atoms that have the same atomic number as the element oxygen, but differ in atomic weight. O-17 and 18 are stable oxygen isotopes.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Air Movements: The motion of air currents.Aluminum Silicates: Any of the numerous types of clay which contain varying proportions of Al2O3 and SiO2. They are made synthetically by heating aluminum fluoride at 1000-2000 degrees C with silica and water vapor. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Pica: The persistent eating of nonnutritive substances for a period of at least one month. (DSM-IV)Archaea: One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and Eukarya), formerly called Archaebacteria under the taxon Bacteria, but now considered separate and distinct. They are characterized by: (1) the presence of characteristic tRNAs and ribosomal RNAs; (2) the absence of peptidoglycan cell walls; (3) the presence of ether-linked lipids built from branched-chain subunits; and (4) their occurrence in unusual habitats. While archaea resemble bacteria in morphology and genomic organization, they resemble eukarya in their method of genomic replication. The domain contains at least four kingdoms: CRENARCHAEOTA; EURYARCHAEOTA; NANOARCHAEOTA; and KORARCHAEOTA.Disinfection: Rendering pathogens harmless through the use of heat, antiseptics, antibacterial agents, etc.Robotics: The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Tobacco: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.Plant Development: Processes orchestrated or driven by a plethora of genes, plant hormones, and inherent biological timing mechanisms facilitated by secondary molecules, which result in the systematic transformation of plants and plant parts, from one stage of maturity to another.Proteobacteria: A phylum of bacteria consisting of the purple bacteria and their relatives which form a branch of the eubacterial tree. This group of predominantly gram-negative bacteria is classified based on homology of equivalent nucleotide sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA or by hybridization of ribosomal RNA or DNA with 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Head: The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.Industrial Waste: Worthless, damaged, defective, superfluous or effluent material from industrial operations.Atmosphere: The gaseous envelope surrounding a planet or similar body. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ksat, describes water movement through saturated media. By definition, hydraulic conductivity ... The water is then allowed to flow through the soil without adding any water, so the pressure head declines as water passes ... that describes the ease with which a fluid (usually water) can move through pore spaces or fractures. It depends on the ... Influence of the water table When a soil layer is above the water table, it is not saturated and does not contribute to the ...
Hydraulic conductivity (K) is a property of soil that describes the ease with which water can move through pore spaces. It ... They are filled with water unless the soil is very dry, but little of this water is available to plants, and water movement is ... Infiltration is the process by which water on the ground surface enters the soil. The water enters the soil through the pores ... Saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ksat, describes water movement through saturated media. Where hydraulic conductivity has the ...
This structure allows for good porosity and easy movement of air and water. This combination of ease in tillage, good moisture ... Soil peds should be described when the soil is dry or slightly moist, as they can be difficult to distinguish when wet. There ... Soil structure Soil type Soil horizon Jahn, R.; Blume, H.-P.; Asio, V.B.; Spaargaren, O.; Schad, P. (2006). Guidelines for soil ... Platy structure tends to impede the downward movement of water and plant roots through the soil. They are found most frequently ...
For 45 minutes, she consumed soil mixed with water and salt representing tears. As Edward Rubin described it, "The harrowing ... In 2012, she presented Surplus Value, a participatory work as part of the larger project of Immigrant Movement International. ... could develop an international career with ease; in a way this is no true opponent the Cuban government could ever realize. ... ISBN 978-88-8158-764-3. "Tania Bruguera: Immigrant Movement International". Tate Modern. Retrieved May 17, 2013. Bass, Nicole ...
... the root water uptake distribution, and the initial conditions for water, heat and solute movement, are specified in a ... The unsaturated soil hydraulic properties can be described using van Genuchten, Brooks and Corey, modified van Genuchten, ... SWMII significantly extended the capabilities and ease of use of UNSAT. The code simulated variably-saturated water flow in two ... The program offers graphs of the distributions of the pressure head, water content, water and solute fluxes, root water uptake ...
McKell was also responsible for pioneering achievements in regional development, urban planning, and soil, water and forest ... McKell soon became involved with the union movement, and after a brief period on the railways began working full-time as a ... Finally, McKell was also prepared to give some concessions to ease the industrial pressure. The main example was an extra week ... Historian David Clune has described the McKell style of government as cautious, pragmatic, reasoned and controlled. There was a ...
This is a movement which causes wide concern in environmental and social forums and which Clive Hamilton describes as "the ... the normal practice was simply to wash the tanks out with water and then pump the resulting mixture of oil and water into the ... The organic matter (elements carbon and nitrogen) in soil, which is supposed to be recharged by multiple plants, is the main ... the ease or difficulty of changing the system; how "resistant" it is to being changed. Precariousness: how close the current ...
In the Scouting Movement in North America, a widespread term for outhouse is "kybo". This appears to have originated from camps ... Other insects such as mosquitoes seek out standing water that may be present in the pit for the breeding of their offspring.[ ... This system was associated in particular with the English town of Rochdale, to the extent that it was described as the " ... or night soil collectors) hired by property owners or the local council. The used cans were replaced with empty, cleaned cans. ...
Wash load concentrations are approximately uniform in the water column. This is described by the endmember case in which the ... Movement of soil by burrowing animals. *Slumping and landsliding of the hillslope ... where the diffusivity is a parameter that relates to the ease of sediment transport on the particular hillslope. For this ... in water (. ρ. =. 1000. k. g. m. 3. ). {\displaystyle \left(\rho =1000{\frac {kg}{m^{3}}}\right)}. , the submerged specific ...
Both the soil of Mars and the hemoglobin of human blood are rich in iron and because of this they share its distinct deep red ... The 1st-century poet Marcus Manilius in his epic, 8000-verse poem, Astronomica, described the Sun, or Sol, as benign and ... When it comes to art, movements like Cubism and Surrealism began to de-construct the "normal" view of the world. In medicine, ... It is involved with the desire for pleasure, comfort and ease. It governs romantic relations, marriage and business ...
Soil, and especially clay, provides good thermal mass; it is very good at keeping temperatures at a constant level. Homes built ... Concrete has been the predominant building material in the modern age due to its longevity, formability, and ease of transport ... portland cement and water. After mixing, the cement hydrates and eventually hardens into a stone-like material. When used in ... All materials must be taken in required proportions as described in standards. The tent is the home of choice among nomadic ...
... sought to have FERC change their operating license to permit even lower releases of water to Eel until the drought eases. Under ... This soil is often known as "blue goo" because of its gray-blue texture and its tendency to slip when saturated. Further inland ... As Marc Reisner describes in Cadillac Desert (1986), "the feuding agencies were about to lock horns and starve over the first ... ISBN 1-58648-284-X. Palmer, Tim (2004). Endangered Rivers and the Conservation Movement. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 0-74253-141 ...
The operations have to be done in a way that will avoid soil compaction or damage to the trees that will remain standing. When ... Another term often used to describe a close to nature approach to forest management, especially in Britain and Ireland, is ... The products to obtain, other than wood, are fauna habitats, biodiversity, recreational, aesthetics, and water management. The ... movement. He thinks that the precursors of this type of forestry are to be found in Europe, mainly in Germany, and particularly ...
C.M. Hogan, "Analysis of highway noise", Journal of Water, Air, & Soil Pollution, Volume 2, Number 3, Biomedical and Life ... The ease of application of BST is one reason for its popularity, but another is its flexibility, which is important when ... This type of surface is described by a wide variety of regional terms including "chip seal", "tar and chip", "oil and stone", " ... A disadvantage of this method is that movement in the joints between the underlying concrete slabs, whether from thermal ...
On poorer soil such as in uplands, animals are often kept more extensively, and may be allowed to roam widely, foraging for ... Feed and water is supplied automatically and the lighting is controlled. The birds may be harvested on several occasions or the ... To help flush them out from their underground burrows, the polecat was domesticated as the ferret, its use described by Pliny ... Some desirable traits of animals raised for meat include fecundity, hardiness, fast growth rate, ease of management and high ...
... the height of the water table influences the water-balance components. For example, a rise of the water table towards the soil ... All water movements in this zone are vertical, either upward or downward, depending on the water balance. (In a future version ... The principles used are correspond to those described in the article soil salinity control. Salt concentrations of outgoing ... or that can be measured with relative ease. Although the calculations are done numerically and have to be repeated many times, ...
Hogan, C. Michael (1973). "Analysis of highway noise". Water, Air, & Soil Pollution. 2 (3): 387-392. doi:10.1007/BF00159677.. ... The less viscous the fluid, the greater its ease of deformation or movement. ... In everyday terms, the viscosity of a fluid is described as its "thickness". Thus, water is "thin", having a lower viscosity, ... The force of friction is always exerted in a direction that opposes movement (for kinetic friction) or potential movement (for ...
... in order to ease its transportation or protect residual trees Water Splash dam - a dam built to temporarily raise the water ... embodies the effects of changes in forest land use on the movement, distribution, and quality of water in the ecosystem Forest ... interactions and use of forests and associated resources Soil science - physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil ... describes the average annual change in tree diameter between the beginning and ending of a growth period, used more often than ...
However, in Ars Magica the "Medieval paradigm" - the way the world was described or understood in that time period - is the ... The total of Characteristic + Ability + die roll is compared to a target difficulty or Ease Factor; the action succeeds if the ... Terram involves earth and minerals: mere soil is the simplest target, while stone, metal and gems require progressively greater ... direct a target's movement, put a creature to sleep, or force a tree to bear fruit out of season. This is the main Technique ...
... even the water present in the same sample of soil. Much higher ratios of 2,000 and above are measured in loam soils and clays, ... In particular, its evaluation in oceanic sediments allowed to reconstruct the movements of North Atlantic water bodies during ... described as PaO2.25. Another phase of this oxide with orthorhombic symmetry has also been reported. The black dioxide PaO2 is ... For ease of pronunciation, the name was shortened to protactinium by the IUPAC in 1949. The discovery of protactinium completed ...
In the area of the finds, the ground was originally covered by a shallow, loose soil sitting atop a hardpan layer. During the ... These expeditions have now brought the total number of well-described meteorites found in Algeria and Libya to more than 500. ... The sudden availability of large numbers of meteorites that could be found with relative ease in places that were readily ... With this discovery, came the realization that movement of ice sheets might act to concentrate meteorites in certain areas. ...
The head was first described by Franz Blom and Oliver La Farge who investigated the La Venta remains on behalf of Tulane ... Alternatively, the backs of many of these massive monuments may have been flattened to ease their transport, providing a stable ... Dating the monuments remains difficult because of the movement of many from their original contexts prior to archaeological ... The construction of temporary causeways using the suitable and plentiful floodplain soils would have allowed a direct route ...
At the bow the cut water was especially strong, as longboats sailed in ice strewn water in spring. Hulls up to 560 cm (18.4 ... The ship was crushed by the weight of soil when buried but most details have been reconstructed. The ship was similar in hull ... At each turn the v-shape at the bottom of the angels "wings" jambed the stay preventing slippage and movement. Early long boats ... The hull's sides were fastened together to allow it to flex with the waves, combining lightness and ease of handling on land. ...
A hydrologic model is a simplification of a real-world system (e.g., surface water, soil water, wetland, groundwater, estuary) ... Advection-Dispersion equation describes solute movement in steady, one-dimensional flow using the solute dispersion coefficient ... Scale models offer a useful approximation of physical or chemical processes at a size that allows for greater ease of ... Geological Survey (U.S.) (1950-01-01). "Geological Survey water-supply paper". Geological Survey water-supply paper. ISSN 0083- ...
It was moved to the plaza of Santiago Tuxtla in 1951 and remains there to this day.[141] Monument Q was first described by ... Alternatively, the backs of many of these massive monuments may have been flattened to ease their transport,[34] providing a ... Dating the monuments remains difficult because of the movement of many from their original contexts prior to archaeological ... The construction of temporary causeways using the suitable and plentiful floodplain soils would have allowed a direct route ...
Soil and water supplyEdit. The soil profile in Bengal differs between east and west. The sandy soil of the east and the lighter ... The British acted to suppress the movement, arresting tens of thousands and killing some 2,500.[143] In Bengal, the movement ... The Government of India's Famine Commission Report (1945) described Bengal as "a land of rice growers and rice eaters".[H] Rice ... This easing of restrictions plus the ban on exports created about four months of relative price stability.[150] In mid-October ...
Hydraulic conductivity (K) is a property of soil that describes the ease with which water can move through pore spaces. It ... They are filled with water unless the soil is very dry, but little of this water is available to plants, and water movement is ... Infiltration is the process by which water on the ground surface enters the soil. The water enters the soil through the pores ... Saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ksat, describes water movement through saturated media. Where hydraulic conductivity has the ...
... grain size of soil particles and the aggregate structures they form affect the ability of a soil to transport and retain water ... Soil texture refers to the relative proportions of sand, silt, and clay particle sizes, irrespective of chemical or ... mineralogical composition (see the figure). Sandy soils are ... and permeability describes the ease of transport of fluids and ... that facilitate the movement of water. Plant roots open pores between soil aggregates, and cycles of wetting and drying create ...
Saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ksat, describes water movement through saturated media. By definition, hydraulic conductivity ... The water is then allowed to flow through the soil without adding any water, so the pressure head declines as water passes ... that describes the ease with which a fluid (usually water) can move through pore spaces or fractures. It depends on the ... Influence of the water table When a soil layer is above the water table, it is not saturated and does not contribute to the ...
Movement depends on environment. With water, food, shade and escape cover, theyll remain relatively confined. Northern ... They can run at speeds nearing 30 mph and cross rivers or lakes with ease. (Documented accounts in Europe show wild pigs ... There is also a 5% ingestion of miscellaneous soil items including dirt, sticks, and inedible garbage. "They consume up to 300 ... "They can use the snout to literally open cracks in concrete," Mayer describes. ...
These forces in turn determine the availability of soil water for plant use and processes of water movement like evaporation ... The conventional method of determining soil water content is described by Gardner (1986). With this method, a soil sample is ... The advancement of electronics has enabled capacitance probes to record continuous measurements of soil water content. The ease ... The amount of water in the soil determines how strongly water molecules are retained by the soil matrix. Soil water can range ...
Catch will leave you craving a couple dozen US-grown oysters-and a beer to help ease your pain at the folly he describes. ... "The steak was now grass-fed, the carrots were now a local, heirloom variety, grown in organic soil," he writes. "But inasmuch ... The farm-to-table restaurant movement started in the 1970s, when chefs began to realize that decades of industrial agriculture ... And we foul coastal waters with agricultural runoff and the pollution from near-shore oil drilling, sacrificing an abundant ...
Around 13,000 were eased into thimblefuls of soil and watered.. Youve likely never heard of him, but Shaw created most of the ... A fierce supporter of the industry, he thinks the local-food movement is a sham. ... the self-described strawberry cop of California. This is not a natural world. ... Then tractors mould the soil into furrows, to boost drainage and speed up picking. Plastic irrigation tubes thread each bed, ...
... which eases pile penetration; (3) the upward flow of the jetting fluid lubricates the pile and assis ts its downward movement ( ... Moisture content of the soils above water table ( 2.9 m ) varied from 1.5 to 20% with depth, whereas the soils below water ... 3.2.1 Material Models The sand was m odeled with the Hardening Soil (HS) constitutive model (described by Schanz et al. 1999, ... In order to reduce water loss (e.g., percolation) and minimize water requirement during jetting, the water used for the jetting ...
... describe units, discontinuities, and soil horizons using the same method for describing outcrops, and create an accurate ... it is likely that water can travel through the unit with relative ease. Water increases the pore pressure within the unit, ... This feature suggests that the slope can fail by translational movements. Sediment transport is minimal within Sequim Bay. ... Washington State Department of Ecology Water Resources Program. Water Well Logs. Department of Ecology Water Resources., 13 ...
Watering. Pay particular attention to watering con-tain-er plants. Be-cause the volume of soil is relatively small, containers ... For ease of care, dollies or platforms with wheels or casters can be used to move the containers from place to place. This is ... As long as the container meets the basic requirements described above it can be used. The imaginative use of discarded items or ... On a hot patio, you might consider putting containers on pallets or other structures that will allow air movement beneath the ...
Lubricants such as bentonite further reduce friction and ease the movement of the pipe through the soil. When the ram is ... National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Water Supply and Water Resources Division, Urban Watershed Management Branch. EPA ... The OSHA standard for excavation and trenching, known as 29 CFR* 1926 Subpart P, de-scribes the precautions needed for safe ... A soil-cutting shoe or bands attached to the pipe guide the soil into the pipe instead of compacting it around the pipe, and ...
"Well, when I plant my crop I know that the sun will shine every day till past harvest time! I know the soil; I own my water and ... With their moderate priced water rights, ease of acquiring title, and reasonable pro-visions as to residence, the Carey Act pro ... A large movement of people west is pre-dicted when the rates for the Shoshone opening are placed in effect. The fortunate ... It costs more to farm as above described than it does to farm in the usual way. But, friends add, and I think them perfectly ...
Describes emergency symptoms like shock, seizures, or leaks from your vagina. Offers tool to check symptoms and info on when to ... Ten movements (such as kicks, flutters, or rolls) in 1 hour or less are considered normal. But do not panic if you do not feel ... Try heat, such as a hot water bottle or a heating pad set on low, to painful areas when resting. Do not fall asleep with a ... feces or outdoor soil that cats commonly use. ... Would you describe the problem as severe, moderate, or mild ?. ...
Watering Pay particular attention to watering container plants. Because the volume of soil is relatively small, containers can ... For ease of care, dollies or platforms with wheels or casters can be used to move the containers from place to place. This is ... As long as the container meets the basic requirements described above it can be used. The imaginative use of discarded items or ... On a hot patio, you might consider putting containers on pallets or other structures that will allow air movement beneath the ...
In Illinois, we walk around on a relatively thin skin of unconsolidated sand, soils, silts, and glacial deposits that can ... Is there a water aquifer down below? ILWATER is the place to go. ... Google maps connectivity may be added to increase its ease of ... will all become important new pieces of data for ILSTRAT in describing and cataloging the hidden world beneath our feet. ... collected studies also helped work out our understanding about how the Earth formed and was changed by climate and movements of ...
The latter is comprised of the prior years soil water, which accumulates DOC in the soil matrix through the summer before ... The latter is comprised of the prior years soil water, which accumulates DOC in the soil matrix through the summer before ... deducing likely flowpaths from hydrometric and hydrochemical signals of soil water, saprolite water, and groundwater measured ... deducing likely flowpaths from hydrometric and hydrochemical signals of soil water, saprolite water, and groundwater measured ...
diuretics (water tablets) *iron supplements If your constipation is caused by medication, the condition usually eases once you ... Do not feel embarrassed about describing your bowel pattern and stools to your GP. It is important that your GP is aware of all ... As well as infrequent or irregular bowel movements, a child with constipation may also have the following signs and symptoms: * ... soiling their clothes *generally feeling unwell If your child has these symptoms or has spoken to you about having difficulty ...
Photo: rytc/flickr. Excerpted from Memes to Movements: How the Worlds Most Viral Media Is Changing Social Protest and Power, ... The embassy was technically on US soil, and therefore its staff could safely collect and disseminate the data. But the impact ... But citizens now wear masks, check the air quality, make efforts to advocate for clean air and water (within certain limits), ... In an upbeat video message posted to social media, Johnson described his symptoms as "mild," and said... ...
Diagnostics should also include an evaluation of the ease of soil gas movement underneath the concrete slab if sub-slab soil ... Water traps allow water that collects on basement floors to drain away but greatly reduce or entirely eliminate entry of soil ... This booklet describes various methods which may reduce the level of radon in your house-either by preventing its entry or by ... Radon in Water. The potential concern with radon in water is the airborne radon released when water is used. The amount of ...
GOAmazon researchers describe in Nature the role of clouds as transporters of particles between the ground and the upper ... New soil models may ease atmospheric CO2, climate change. To remove carbon dioxide from the Earths atmosphere in an effort to ... How tiny water droplets form can have a big impact on climate models. Droplets and bubbles are formed nearly everywhere, from ... above the planetary boundary layer at 2,500 m there is a temperature inversion that usually inhibits the vertical movement of ...
86,000), there is little potential for movement in soil or entry into ground water. Permethrin has a Log Pow of 6.1, but a low ... to the ease with which it is metabolized. ECOTOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION: Permethrin is highly toxic to fish (LC50 = 0.5 µg/L to ... For these modes, describe the material as:Insecticides, NOI, other than Poison. NMFC Item 102120. For shipment via ocean vessel ... pH: 4.0 @ 20°C (5% in water) SOLUBILITY IN WATER: Emulsifies SPECIFIC GRAVITY: 1.033 @ 20°C (water = 1) MOLECULAR WEIGHT: 391.3 ...
The perennial ice cover maintains a chemically stratified water column and unlike other inland bodies of water, largely ... We describe a method for Computer tomography-guided focal irradiation (CFIR) delivery to enable precise and accurate anatomical ... Behavioral analysis based on tracking the movements of worms as they crawl on agar plates have been particularly useful in the ... Soil Sampling and Isolation of Entomopathogenic Nematodes (Steinernematidae, Heterorhabditidae). Authors: Rousel A. Orozco, ...
Water movement through soil. Infiltration is the entry of water into soil. The rate of infiltration can be relatively fast, ... Available Water Holding Capacity (AWHC) describes how much available water a fixed amount of soil can hold for plant uptake. It ... Plants cannot extract all the available water between field capacity and permanent wilting point with equal ease. Soil water is ... Other factors affecting water movement through soil are the internal drainage, depth to water table, soil structure, amount of ...
... water balance - soil water retention - modeling - sphagnum moss - water - conductivity - bryophytes - desiccation - ecosystems ... Firstly a numerical model was developed to describe the water evaporation during frying (Chapter 2). Though various models ... vadose zone water movement and groundwater recharge are accounted for. The model chain WOFOST-MetaSWAP-MODFLOW generates ... but also because of the ease and speed of preparation. However, despite being a practical and easy method, the fundamental ...
4). An interesting change takes place after the level of the sub-soil water falls in October and the aeration of the lower soil ... Such soils lose their porosity with the greatest ease when flooded; the minute particles run together and form an impermeable ... the humidity rises followed by a steady upward movement in the ground water-level till October when it falls again. In 1922 the ... The results obtained in the three species were very similar, so it is only necessary to describe in detail one of them -- the ...
  • With this study, the abilities of the DFM capacitance probes and a neutron water meter (NWM) to measure evaporation from the soil surface were compared. (scielo.org.za)
  • Measuring the changes in soil water content to quantify evaporation from the soil surface has been done with various instruments. (scielo.org.za)
  • The greatest impact can be achieved by increasing the insulation of the greenhouse by using double screens, reducing the evaporation from the soil, improving the crop hygiene to avoid extra evaporation from crop debris and reduce pest pressure, and implementing controlled dehumidification of the greenhouse air. (wur.nl)
  • Through a special process, Body Biotics soil-based probiotics are kept dormant in the powder in the capsules and do not become active until placed in an aqueous solution (like water or juice). (upwardquest.com)
  • The various pore size categories have different characteristics and contribute different attributes to soils depending on the number and frequency of each type. (wikipedia.org)
  • ArcHydro and GIS tools were applied on Digital Elevation Models to delineate 16 watersheds in Southwest Florida Water Management District and to calculate characteristics of each watershed. (ufl.edu)
  • According to the characteristics of the lighting, he determined that the light correlated with the surface area of ​​the water. (us.org)
  • In Illinois, we walk around on a relatively thin 'skin' of unconsolidated sand, soils, silts, and glacial deposits that can range in thickness from a few feet to a few hundred feet. (illinois.edu)
  • Structures were studied to determine the direction of ice movement, the condition of the rocks and sediments during deformation, and the mechanics of deformation at the time of the glacial advance (Fig. 1). (ku.edu)
  • In 1894, Geikie (1894, p. 338-340) described distortion and folding in glacial drift along the coast of Norfolk, England, and it was he who first attributed the deformation to glacial ice movement. (ku.edu)
  • The pore space of soil contains the liquid and gas phases of soil, i.e., everything but the solid phase that contains mainly minerals of varying sizes as well as organic compounds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Modeling cracks therefore helps understand how these processes work and what the effects of changes in soil cracking such as compaction, can have on these processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • ρ = M s V t {\displaystyle \rho ={\frac {M_{s}}{V_{t}}}} The bulk density of soil depends greatly on the mineral make up of soil and the degree of compaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Their distribution is determined by soil texture and soil organic matter, and they are not greatly affected by compaction Size 0.1-30 μm. (wikipedia.org)
  • Explosive diarrhea is a descriptive term to describe very frequent bowel movements that is expelled in an almost violent nature and is usually excessively loud. (healthhype.com)
  • It is important to understand the mechanism behind bowel movements that appear so violent and the possible causes. (healthhype.com)
  • Diarrhea itself is usually loud and violent when compared to normal bowel movements and the term 'explosive diarrhea' is subjective. (healthhype.com)
  • There is constant urging to pass stool even after having a bowel movement. (healthhype.com)
  • In most instances of acute diarrhea, the condition resolves spontaneously within a few days although there may be some disruption of bowel movements for days or even weeks thereafter. (healthhype.com)
  • The contents of the gut move too fast due to overactivity of the bowel and proper digestion with nutrient and water absorption does not occur as efficiently. (healthhype.com)
  • Water is drawn out from the bowel wall and into the lumen of the intestines. (healthhype.com)
  • Forceful defecation that may propel stool, messing the toilet bowel and even soiling the buttocks. (healthhype.com)
  • It is usually very forceful, which is also described as violent, and loud due to the force that stool is expelled coupled with excessive flatulence that typically accompanies the diarrhea. (healthhype.com)
  • The effluent discharge produced during nitrobenzene manufacture is the principal source of nitrobenzene release to water. (cdc.gov)
  • DOC indices suggest that it is sourced from terrestrial carbon, and derives originally from soil organic carbon (SOC) before flushing to the saprolite/bedrock boundary. (frontiersin.org)
  • The contact between soil and unweathered bedrock can be detected by the differences in acoustic velocity of the materials. (astm.org)
  • Thus, accurate measurement of soil water determines how accurately these components of the water balance can be quantified. (scielo.org.za)
  • To overcome this constraint, indirect methods of soil water content measurement have been developed. (scielo.org.za)
  • Capacitance probes have smaller measurement volumes compared to those of NWM and require careful installation ensuring good contact with the soil. (scielo.org.za)
  • Alkalinity - A measurement of the quantity of chemicals present in water, which can neutralize acids. (femyers.com)
  • Because of the relative ease of measurement of many of nitrobenzene's properties and its ready detectability by both chemical analysis and human olfaction (sense of smell), its release, transport and fate, and the consequent exposure of human beings have been studied over a considerable period of time. (cdc.gov)
  • Problems with soil-borne diseases, nematodes, or poor soil can also be overcome by switching to container gardening. (issuu.com)
  • EPN) represent a group of soil-inhabiting nematodes that parasitize a wide range of insects. (jove.com)
  • The second part of this presentation focuses on the insect-baiting technique, a widely used approach for the isolation of EPN from soil samples, and the modified White trap technique which is used for the recovery of these nematodes from infected insects. (jove.com)
  • Infiltration is the process by which water on the ground surface enters the soil. (wikipedia.org)
  • The peds in the surface horizons of soils develop into clods under the effects of cultivation and the traffic of urbanization. (britannica.com)
  • The products of the latest geological technology - such as surface mapping with lasers, subsurface modeling with magnetism, and state-of-the-art 3D mapping - will all become important new pieces of data for ILSTRAT in describing and cataloging the hidden world beneath our feet. (illinois.edu)
  • the benthic zone is the ecological region at the lowest level of a body of water such as an ocean or a lake, including the sediment surface and some sub-surface layers. (ukfossils.co.uk)
  • The device illustrated and described therein comprises an annular elastic body of rubber, plastic or the like adapted to be tensioned about the workpiece and has a resiliently compressible inner surface adapted to conform to the workpiece whenthe annular body is tensioned thereabout and includes an outer surface having outwardly extending grasping protuberances. (patentgenius.com)
  • The entailed unique conditions such as underwater currents, surface waves and wind, and seabed soil can often become problematic quickly. (hindawi.com)
  • Salmon farmers house their fish in pens that float on the surface of the water. (umass.edu)
  • A waterproof coating is a substance or material made to coat an object or surface and prevent it from suffering any negative effects from exposure to water. (scribd.com)
  • Waterproofing is a treatment which is used to protect the surface or structure from the water. (scribd.com)
  • It creates a water resistant barrier which is impervious and protective to the surface below. (scribd.com)
  • Water covers a greater part of the Earth's surface. (mdpi.com)
  • For vast water bodies like oceans, rivers and large lakes, data is collected from the different heights/depths of the water level which is then delivered to the surface sinks. (mdpi.com)
  • Water-bodies cover two-thirds of the Earth's surface. (mdpi.com)
  • Heavy metals on the washwater and various soil fractions which are usually separated by gravity settling can be removed by con- ventional treatment processes such as chemical precipitation, ion exchange, and electrochemical removal. (scirp.org)
  • Peat moss in the mix will absorb water and mix much more readily if soaked with warm water before putting the mix in the container. (garden.org)
  • Soil water is more readily available to plants when soils are near field capacity and less so as soil moisture content approaches the permanent wilting point. (gov.mb.ca)
  • The shelter can therefore be readily converted into a compact condition for ease of storage and/or transport, and also presents itself as an 6 attractive or classic looking doghouse design when fully deployed. (google.com)
  • Porous floors will have an underlying foundation of sand and/or gravel to aid water movement down into the ground below the stable. (psu.edu)
  • These animals can put more little feet on the ground than any other free-ranging mammal in North America their size or larger," describes Mayer, manager of the Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology Group at the Savannah River National Laboratory in Aiken, S.C. (agweb.com)
  • Calibration of DFM capacitance probes and the NWM was done in the laboratory using the topsoil of a Bainsvlei soil form. (scielo.org.za)
  • Every winter, more than 95% of the species global population congregates at Poyang Lake, and feeds on tubers of Vallisneria spiralis in shallow water and mudflat habitat. (jove.com)
  • Results show that cranes displayed significantly different behavior patterns when using the wet meadow, compared to the cranes optimal habitat - shallow water and mudflat. (jove.com)
  • However, in its current state of onshore, shallow water fisheries, salmon aquaculture may be leading environmental degradation. (umass.edu)
  • Folds, fractures, and faults at right angles to the direction of ice movement are features common in this area and are dependent on the competency of the units involved in the deformation, which in some cases was controlled by freezing rather than lithologic composition. (ku.edu)
  • Oven Dry occurs when soil has been dried at 105°C for 24 hours so that no water remains. (gov.mb.ca)
  • Wouldn't you like to take the soil-based probiotic bacteria that were in the soil before the advent of modern farming practices with toxic sprays? (upwardquest.com)
  • Daubner's Phase One studies focused on specific identification of various strains of soil-based probiotic bacteria. (upwardquest.com)
  • Since there is a lot of dead algae, bacteria will feed rapidly while simultaneously using up dissolved oxygen in the water. (umass.edu)
  • Money would become unimportant, food (served in common mess halls) and clothing would be free, and the peasants would no longer be bent in rapt servitude to the capricious soil, bound to the wheel of the seasons, but would be liberated for other diverse activities enhancing communal well-being. (carnegiecouncil.org)
  • For example, the interface between fresh water and saltwater in an aquifer can be detected by the differences in electrical properties of the pore fluids. (astm.org)