A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.
Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.
Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.
The movement or shifting of membership between or within social classes by individuals or by groups.
Crafts, trades, professions, or other means of earning a living.
The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.
The separation of individuals or groups resulting in the lack of or minimizing of social contact and/or communication. This separation may be accomplished by physical separation, by social barriers and by psychological mechanisms. In the latter, there may be interaction but no real communication.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Wales" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, located in Europe. If you have any questions about a specific medical topic, I would be happy to help answer those!
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but 'England' is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, known for its rich history, cultural heritage, and contributions to medical science. However, in a medical context, it may refer to the location of a patient, healthcare provider, or research study, but it is not a term with a specific medical meaning.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Scotland" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. Scotland is one of the four constituent countries of the United Kingdom, located in the northern part of Great Britain. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terminology, I would be happy to help answer those!
The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.
Great Britain is not a medical term, but a geographical name for the largest island in the British Isles, which comprises England, Scotland, and Wales, forming the major part of the United Kingdom.
Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)
The state of society as it exists or in flux. While it usually refers to society as a whole in a specified geographical or political region, it is applicable also to restricted strata of a society.
Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.
Social structure of a group as it relates to the relative social rank of dominance status of its members. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
Platforms that provide the ability and tools to create and publish information accessed via the INTERNET. Generally these platforms have three characteristics with content user generated, high degree of interaction between creator and viewer, and easily integrated with other sites.
The use of community resources, individual case work, or group work to promote the adaptive capacities of individuals in relation to their social and economic environments. It includes social service agencies.
The state of birth outside of wedlock. It may refer to the offspring or the parents.
Social rank-order established by certain behavioral patterns.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
The social institution involving legal and/or religious sanction whereby individuals are joined together.
Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.
The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.
An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.
The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.
Male parents, human or animal.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
The state of not being engaged in a gainful occupation.
Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.
All deaths reported in a given population.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Social process whereby the values, attitudes, or institutions of society, such as education, family, religion, and industry become modified. It includes both the natural process and action programs initiated by members of the community.
The degree of closeness or acceptance an individual or group feels toward another individual or group.
Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Finland" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is a country located in Northern Europe, known officially as the Republic of Finland. If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to help with those!
An infant during the first month after birth.
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Living facilities for humans.
Membrane glycoproteins consisting of an alpha subunit and a BETA 2-MICROGLOBULIN beta subunit. In humans, highly polymorphic genes on CHROMOSOME 6 encode the alpha subunits of class I antigens and play an important role in determining the serological specificity of the surface antigen. Class I antigens are found on most nucleated cells and are generally detected by their reactivity with alloantisera. These antigens are recognized during GRAFT REJECTION and restrict cell-mediated lysis of virus-infected cells.
Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.
Situations affecting a significant number of people, that are believed to be sources of difficulty or threaten the stability of the community, and that require programs of amelioration.
A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.
Large, transmembrane, non-covalently linked glycoproteins (alpha and beta). Both chains can be polymorphic although there is more structural variation in the beta chains. The class II antigens in humans are called HLA-D ANTIGENS and are coded by a gene on chromosome 6. In mice, two genes named IA and IE on chromosome 17 code for the H-2 antigens. The antigens are found on B-lymphocytes, macrophages, epidermal cells, and sperm and are thought to mediate the competence of and cellular cooperation in the immune response. The term IA antigens used to refer only to the proteins encoded by the IA genes in the mouse, but is now used as a generic term for any class II histocompatibility antigen.
Behaviors which are at variance with the expected social norm and which affect other individuals.
The ability to learn and to deal with new situations and to deal effectively with tasks involving abstractions.
Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Government sponsored social insurance programs.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
The branch of psychology concerned with the effects of group membership upon the behavior, attitudes, and beliefs of an individual.
The distance from the sole to the crown of the head with body standing on a flat surface and fully extended.
A personality trait rendering the individual acceptable in social or interpersonal relations. It is related to social acceptance, social approval, popularity, social status, leadership qualities, or any quality making him a socially desirable companion.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "London" is a place name and not a medical term, so it doesn't have a medical definition. It's the capital city of England and the United Kingdom, known for its rich history, culture, and landmarks. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to help answer those!
West Germany refers to the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), which was the democratic and economically prosperous part of Germany that existed from 1949 to 1990, consisting of the states in the American, British, and French zones of occupation after World War II, and reunified with East Germany in 1990 to form a unified Federal Republic of Germany.
The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)
Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.
Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.
A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.
The units based on political theory and chosen by countries under which their governmental power is organized and administered to their citizens.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
Involvement in community activities or programs.
Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.
Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.
I must apologize, but "Ireland" is not a term that has a medical definition to the best of my knowledge and medical databases. It is a country located in Northern Europe, known for its lush green landscapes, rich history, and distinctive culture. If you have any medical terms or concepts you would like me to define, I'd be happy to help!
Behavioral or attitudinal compliance with recognized social patterns or standards.
Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.
A demographic parameter indicating a person's status with respect to marriage, divorce, widowhood, singleness, etc.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The absence of appropriate stimuli in the physical or social environment which are necessary for the emotional, social, and intellectual development of the individual.
Size and composition of the family.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
A natural, adoptive, or substitute parent of a dependent child, who lives with only one parent. The single parent may live with or visit the child. The concept includes the never-married, as well as the divorced and widowed.
Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.
Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.
Any enhancement of a motivated behavior in which individuals do the same thing with some degree of mutual stimulation and consequent coordination.
The state of estrangement individuals feel in cultural settings that they view as foreign, unpredictable, or unacceptable.
Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Denmark" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is a country located in northern Europe. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I would be happy to try to help answer them.
City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.
A branch of medicine concerned with the role of socio-environmental factors in the occurrence, prevention and treatment of disease.
Use of marketing principles also used to sell products to consumers to promote ideas, attitudes and behaviors. Design and use of programs seeking to increase the acceptance of a social idea or practice by target groups, not for the benefit of the marketer, but to benefit the target audience and the general society.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.
The state wherein the person is well adjusted.
Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.
Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.
A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.
The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.
A person's view of himself.
The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.
The number of offspring a female has borne. It is contrasted with GRAVIDITY, which refers to the number of pregnancies, regardless of outcome.
The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.
The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.
The unmarried man or woman.
Established behavior pattern characterized by excessive drive and ambition, impatience, competitiveness, sense of time urgency, and poorly contained aggression.
The sequence in which children are born into the family.
The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.
Female parents, human or animal.
A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.
A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)
Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.
#### I must clarify that 'Northern Ireland' is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is a geographical and political term referring to a part of the United Kingdom located in the northeastern portion of the island of Ireland, consisting of six of the nine counties of the historic province of Ulster.
A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Sweden" is not a medical term and does not have a medical definition. It is a country located in Northern Europe. If you have any questions related to medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to try to help answer them!
The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.
The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.
The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.
Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.
An excessive number of individuals, human or animal, in relation to available space.
A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.
A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.
Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.
Hospitals controlled by agencies and departments of the state government.
Voluntary acceptance of a child of other parents to be as one's own child, usually with legal confirmation.
Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.
The observable response an animal makes to any situation.
The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
Those forces and content of the mind which are not ordinarily available to conscious awareness or to immediate recall.
The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.
Visits to the patient's home by professional personnel for the purpose of diagnosis and/or treatment.
The status of health in urban populations.
Islands lying between southeastern North America and northern South America, enclosing the Caribbean Sea. They comprise the Greater Antilles (CUBA; DOMINICAN REPUBLIC; HAITI; JAMAICA; and PUERTO RICO), the Lesser Antilles (ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA and the other Leeward Islands, BARBADOS; MARTINIQUE and the other Windward Islands, NETHERLANDS ANTILLES; VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES, BRITISH VIRGINI ISLANDS, and the islands north of Venezuela which include TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO), and the BAHAMAS. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1330)
An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.
Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.
Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.
A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.
The legal relation between an entity (individual, group, corporation, or-profit, secular, government) and an object. The object may be corporeal, such as equipment, or completely a creature of law, such as a patent; it may be movable, such as an animal, or immovable, such as a building.
The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.
Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
Relationship between individuals when one individual threatens or becomes aggressive and the other individual remains passive or attempts to escape.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.
Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.
The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.
Exposure of the male parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring.
The status of health in rural populations.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.
Two individuals derived from two FETUSES that were fertilized at or about the same time, developed in the UTERUS simultaneously, and born to the same mother. Twins are either monozygotic (TWINS, MONOZYGOTIC) or dizygotic (TWINS, DIZYGOTIC).
Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.
The circumstances in which people are born, grow up, live, work, and age, as well as the systems put in place to deal with illness. These circumstances are in turn shaped by a wider set of forces: economics, social policies, and politics (http://www.cdc.gov/socialdeterminants/).
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Factors that can cause or prevent the outcome of interest, are not intermediate variables, and are not associated with the factor(s) under investigation. They give rise to situations in which the effects of two processes are not separated, or the contribution of causal factors cannot be separated, or the measure of the effect of exposure or risk is distorted because of its association with other factors influencing the outcome of the study.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).
A perceived attribute that is deeply discrediting and is considered to be a violation of social norms.
Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.
The nursing of an infant at the breast.
Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.
Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.
Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.
Enumerations of populations usually recording identities of all persons in every place of residence with age or date of birth, sex, occupation, national origin, language, marital status, income, relation to head of household, information on the dwelling place, education, literacy, health-related data (e.g., permanent disability), etc. The census or "numbering of the people" is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. Among the Romans, censuses were intimately connected with the enumeration of troops before and after battle and probably a military necessity. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed; Garrison, An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 4th ed, p66, p119)
Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.
Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).
The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.
Educational institutions.
A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.
Standardized tests that measure the present general ability or aptitude for intellectual performance.
Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.
Use of all social work processes in the treatment of patients in a psychiatric or mental health setting.
A social science dealing with group relationships, patterns of collective behavior, and social organization.
Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.
Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.
Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or concept, it is a country located in South America, known officially as the Federative Republic of Brazil. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or science, I'd be happy to help answer those!
The strengthening of a response with a social reward such as a nod of approval, a parent's love or attention.
Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.
A pruritic papulovesicular dermatitis occurring as a reaction to many endogenous and exogenous agents (Dorland, 27th ed).
Any deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such deviation. Bias can result from several sources: one-sided or systematic variations in measurement from the true value (systematic error); flaws in study design; deviation of inferences, interpretations, or analyses based on flawed data or data collection; etc. There is no sense of prejudice or subjectivity implied in the assessment of bias under these conditions.
The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.
Interactional process combining investigation, discussion, and agreement by a number of people in the preparation and carrying out of a program to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community. It usually involves the action of a formal political, legal, or recognized voluntary body.
The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
Any observable response or action of an adolescent.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.
Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Italy" is not a medical term or concept, it's a country located in Southern Europe. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I'd be happy to help with those!
A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.
The act of killing oneself.
The physical characteristics of the body, including the mode of performance of functions, the activity of metabolic processes, the manner and degree of reactions to stimuli, and power of resistance to the attack of pathogenic organisms.
Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.
The state of feeling sad or dejected as a result of lack of companionship or being separated from others.

Socioeconomic inequalities in health in the working population: the contribution of working conditions. (1/5512)

BACKGROUND: The aim was to study the impact of different categories of working conditions on the association between occupational class and self-reported health in the working population. METHODS: Data were collected through a postal survey conducted in 1991 among inhabitants of 18 municipalities in the southeastern Netherlands. Data concerned 4521 working men and 2411 working women and included current occupational class (seven classes), working conditions (physical working conditions, job control, job demands, social support at work), perceived general health (very good or good versus less than good) and demographic confounders. Data were analysed with logistic regression techniques. RESULTS: For both men and women we observed a higher odds ratio for a less than good perceived general health in the lower occupational classes (adjusted for confounders). The odds of a less than good perceived general health was larger among people reporting more hazardous physical working conditions, lower job control, lower social support at work and among those in the highest category of job demands. Results were similar for men and women. Men and women in the lower occupational classes reported more hazardous physical working conditions and lower job control as compared to those in higher occupational classes. High job demands were more often reported in the higher occupational classes, while social support at work was not clearly related to occupational class. When physical working conditions and job control were added simultaneously to a model with occupational class and confounders, the odds ratios for occupational classes were reduced substantially. For men, the per cent change in the odds ratios for the occupational classes ranged between 35% and 83%, and for women between 35% and 46%. CONCLUSIONS: A substantial part of the association between occupational class and a less than good perceived general health in the working population could be attributed to a differential distribution of hazardous physical working conditions and a low job control across occupational classes. This suggests that interventions aimed at improving these working conditions might result in a reduction of socioeconomic inequalities in health in the working population.  (+info)

Socioeconomic inequalities and disability pension in middle-aged men. (2/5512)

BACKGROUND: The issue of inequalities in health has generated much discussion and socioeconomic status is considered an important variable in studies of health. It is frequently used in epidemiological studies, either as a possible risk factor or a confounder and the aim of this study was to analyse the relation between socioeconomic status and risk of disability pension. METHODS: Five complete birth year cohorts of middle-aged male residents in Malmo were invited to a health survey and 5782 with complete data constituted the cohort in this prospective study. Each subject was followed for approximately 11 years and nationwide Swedish data registers were used for surveillance. RESULTS: Among the 715 men (12%), granted disability pension during follow-up, three groups were distinguished. The cumulative incidence of disability pension among blue collar workers was 17% and among lower and higher level white collar workers, 11% and 6% respectively. With simultaneous adjustment for biological risk factors and job conditions, the relative risk for being granted a disability pension (using higher level white collar workers as reference) was 2.5 among blue collar workers and 1.6 among lower level white collar workers. CONCLUSIONS: Socioeconomic status, as defined by occupation, is a risk factor for being granted disability pension even after adjusting for work conditions and other risk factors for disease.  (+info)

Permanent work incapacity, mortality and survival without work incapacity among occupations and social classes: a cohort study of ageing men in Geneva. (3/5512)

BACKGROUND: The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to investigate the burden of disability and death in men, from middle age to age of retirement, among occupational groups and classes in Geneva. METHODS: Men were included if they resided in the Canton of Geneva, were 45 years of age in 1970-1972, and were not receiving a disability pension at the start of the follow-up. The cohort of 5137 men was followed up for 20 years and linked to national registers of disability pension allowance and of causes of death. RESULTS: There was a steep upward trend in incidence of permanent work incapacity with lower social class for all causes as well as for the seven causes of disability studied. Compared with professional occupations (social class I), the relative risk (RR) of permanent work incapacity was 11.4 for partly skilled and unskilled occupations (class IV+V) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.2-28.0). The social class gradient in mortality was in the same direction as that in work incapacity although much less steep (RR class IV+V to class I = 1.6, 95% CI : 1.1-2.2). Survival without work incapacity at the time of the 65th birthday ranged from only 57% in construction workers and labourers to 89% in science and related professionals. Unemployment in Geneva was below 1.5% during almost all the study period. CONCLUSIONS: Medically-ascertained permanent work incapacity and survival without work incapacity have shown considerably greater socioeconomic differentials than the mortality differentials.  (+info)

Socioeconomic differences in childhood consultation rates in general practice in England and Wales: prospective cohort study. (4/5512)

OBJECTIVE: To establish how consultation rates in children for episodes of illness, preventive activities, and home visits vary by social class. DESIGN: Analysis of prospectively collected data from the fourth national survey of morbidity in general practice, carried out between September 1991 and August 1992. SETTING: 60 general practices in England and Wales. SUBJECTS: 106 102 children aged 0 to 15 years registered with the participating practices. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean overall consultation rates for any reason, illness by severity of underlying disease, preventive episodes, home visits, and specific diagnostic category (infections, asthma, and injuries). RESULTS: Overall consultation rates increased from registrar general's social classes I-II to classes IV-V in a linear pattern (for IV-V v I-II rate ratio 1.18; 95% confidence interval 1.14 to 1. 22). Children from social classes IV-V consulted more frequently than children from classes I-II for illnesses (rate ratio 1.23; 1.15 to 1.30), including infections, asthma, and injuries and poisonings. They also had significantly higher consultation rates for minor, moderate, and serious illnesses and higher home visiting rates (rate ratio 2.00; 1.81 to 2.18). Consultations for preventive activities were lower in children from social classes IV-V than in children from social classes I-II (rate ratio 0.95; 0.86 to 1.05). CONCLUSIONS: Childhood consultation rates for episodes of illness increase from social classes I-II through to classes IV-V. The findings on severity of underlying illness suggest the health of children from lower social classes is worse than that of children from higher social classes. These results reinforce the need to identify and target children for preventive health care in their socioeconomic context.  (+info)

The impact of genetic counselling on risk perception and mental health in women with a family history of breast cancer. (5/5512)

The present study investigated: (1) perception of genetic risk and, (2) the psychological effects of genetic counselling in women with a family history of breast cancer. Using a prospective design, with assessment pre- and post-genetic counselling at clinics and by postal follow-up at 1, 6 and 12 months, attenders at four South London genetic clinics were assessed. Participants included 282 women with a family history of breast cancer. Outcome was measured in terms of mental health, cancer-specific distress and risk perception. High levels of cancer-specific distress were found pre-genetic counselling, with 28% of participants reporting that they worried about breast cancer 'frequently or constantly' and 18% that worry about breast cancer was 'a severe or definite problem'. Following genetic counselling, levels of cancer-specific distress were unchanged. General mental health remained unchanged over time (33% psychiatric cases detected pre-genetic counselling, 27% at 12 months after genetic counselling). Prior to their genetics consultation, participants showed poor knowledge of their lifetime risk of breast cancer since there was no association between their perceived lifetime risk (when they were asked to express this as a 1 in x odds ratio) and their actual risk, when the latter was calculated by the geneticist at the clinic using the CASH model. In contrast, women were more accurate about their risk of breast cancer pre-genetic counselling when this was assessed in broad categorical terms (i.e. very much lower/very much higher than the average woman) with a significant association between this rating and the subsequently calculated CASH risk figure (P = 0.001). Genetic counselling produced a modest shift in the accuracy of perceived lifetime risk, expressed as an odds ratio, which was maintained at 12 months' follow-up. A significant minority failed to benefit from genetic counselling; 77 women continued to over-estimate their risk and maintain high levels of cancer-related worry. Most clinic attenders were inaccurate in their estimates of the population risk of breast cancer with only 24% able to give the correct figure prior to genetic counselling and 36% over-estimating this risk. There was some improvement following genetic counselling with 62% able to give the correct figure, but this information was poorly retained and this figure had dropped to 34% by the 1-year follow-up. The study showed that women attending for genetic counselling are worried about breast cancer, with 34% indicating that they had initiated the referral to the genetic clinic themselves. This anxiety is not alleviated by genetic counselling, although women reported that it was less of a problem at follow-up. Women who continue to over-estimate their risk and worry about breast cancer are likely to go on seeking unnecessary screening if they are not reassured.  (+info)

Socioeconomic status and determinants of hemostatic function in healthy women. (6/5512)

Hemostatic factors are reported to be associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). Socioeconomic status (SES) is 1 of the determinants of the hemostatic profile, but the factors underlying this association are not well known. Our aim was to examine determinants of the socioeconomic differences in hemostatic profile. Between 1991 and 1994, we studied 300 healthy women, aged 30 to 65 years, who were representative of women living in the greater Stockholm area. Fibrinogen, factor VII mass concentration (FVII:Ag), activated factor VII (FVIIa), von Willebrand factor (vWF), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) were measured. Educational attainment was used as a measure of SES. Low educational level and an unfavorable hemostatic profile were both associated with older age, unhealthful life style, psychosocial stress, atherogenic biochemical factors, and hypertension. Levels of hemostatic factors increased with lower educational attainment. Independently of age, the differences between the lowest (mandatory) and highest (college/university) education in FVII:Ag levels were 41 microg/L (95% confidence interval [CI], 15 to 66 microg/L, P=0.001), 0.26 g/L (95% CI, 0.10 to 0.42 g/L, P=0.001) in fibrinogen levels, and 0.11 U/mL (95% CI, 0.09 to 0.12 U/mL, P=0.03) in levels of vWF. The corresponding differences in FVIIa and PAI-1 were not statistically significant. With further adjustment for menopausal status, family history of CHD, marital status, psychosocial stress, lifestyle patterns, biochemical factors, and hypertension, statistically significant differences between mandatory and college/university education were observed in FVII:Ag (difference=34 microg/L; 95% CI, 2 to 65 microg/L, P=0.05) but not in fibrinogen (difference=0.03 g/L; 95% CI, -0.13 to 0.19 g/L, P=0.92) or in vWF (difference=0.06 U/mL; 95% CI, -0.10 to 0.22 U/mL, P=0.45). An educational gradient was most consistent and statistically significant for FVII:Ag, fibrinogen, and vWF. Age, psychosocial stress, unhealthful life style, atherogenic biochemical factors, and hypertension mediated the association of low educational level with elevated levels of fibrinogen and vWF. Psychosocial stress and unhealthful life style were the most important contributing factors. There was an independent association between education and FVII:Ag, which could not be explained by any of these factors.  (+info)

Alcohol consumption, alcohol-related problems, problem drinking, and socioeconomic status. (7/5512)

In general, a lower socioeconomic status (SES) is related to a lower health status, more health problems, and a shorter life expectancy. Although causal relations between SES and health are unclear, lifestyle factors play an intermediate role. The purpose of the present study was to obtain more insight into the relation between SES, alcohol consumption, alcohol-related problems, and problem drinking, through a general population survey among 8000 people in Rotterdam. Odds ratios were calculated using educational level as independent, and alcohol consumption, alcohol-related problems, and problem drinking as dependent variables. Abstinence decreased significantly by increasing educational level for both sexes. For men, excessive drinking, and notably very excessive drinking, was more prevalent in the lowest educational group. For women, no significant relation between educational level and prevalence of excessive drinking was found. After controlling for differences in drinking behaviour, among men the prevalence of 'psychological dependence' and 'social problems' was higher in intermediate educational groups, whereas prevalence of 'drunkenness' was lower in intermediate educational groups. For women, a negative relation was found between educational level and 'psychological dependence'; prevalence of 'symptomatic drinking' was higher in the lowest educational group. Prevalence of problem drinking was not related to educational level in either sex. It is concluded that differences exist between educational levels with respect to abstinence, but only limited differences were found with respect to excessive drinking. Furthermore, there is evidence for higher prevalences of alcohol-related problems in lower educational levels, after controlling for differences in drinking behaviour, in both sexes.  (+info)

Family factors affecting child development. (8/5512)

In a large, geographically defined population of children a number of family factors in addition to social class, determined by the father's occupation, were recorded by health visitors and school nurses with routine responsibility for these children. The quality of the children in normal schools was assessed in terms of nonverbal IQ and height at the ages of 5 and 10 years, and of behavior as reported by the teacher at the age of 10 years. By analysis of variance the sum of the independent effects of the other family factors greatly outweighed that of occupational social class, except in the case of the IQ at 10 years. The most important of the other family factors was the quality of the mother's care of her child during the first 3 years of life.  (+info)

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "social class" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a sociological concept that refers to the grouping of individuals in a society based on their shared economic and social positions. This can include factors such as income, education, occupation, and wealth.

However, social class can have an impact on health outcomes and access to healthcare. For example, people in lower socioeconomic groups are more likely to experience chronic diseases, mental health disorders, and have limited access to quality healthcare services compared to those in higher socioeconomic groups. This relationship is often referred to as the "social determinants of health."

Social behavior, in the context of medicine and psychology, refers to the ways in which individuals interact and engage with others within their social environment. It involves various actions, communications, and responses that are influenced by cultural norms, personal values, emotional states, and cognitive processes. These behaviors can include but are not limited to communication, cooperation, competition, empathy, altruism, aggression, and conformity.

Abnormalities in social behavior may indicate underlying mental health conditions such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, or personality disorders. Therefore, understanding and analyzing social behavior is an essential aspect of diagnosing and treating various psychological and psychiatric conditions.

Social support in a medical context refers to the resources and assistance provided by an individual's social network, including family, friends, peers, and community groups. These resources can include emotional, informational, and instrumental support, which help individuals cope with stress, manage health conditions, and maintain their overall well-being.

Emotional support involves providing empathy, care, and encouragement to help an individual feel valued, understood, and cared for. Informational support refers to the provision of advice, guidance, and knowledge that can help an individual make informed decisions about their health or other aspects of their life. Instrumental support includes practical assistance such as help with daily tasks, financial aid, or access to resources.

Social support has been shown to have a positive impact on physical and mental health outcomes, including reduced stress levels, improved immune function, better coping skills, and increased resilience. It can also play a critical role in promoting healthy behaviors, such as adherence to medical treatments and lifestyle changes.

"Social mobility" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a sociological concept that refers to the ability of individuals, families, or groups to move up or down in social status based on their access to resources, education, occupation, and other factors. However, in some contexts, social mobility may be discussed in relation to health disparities and inequities, as socioeconomic position can have a significant impact on health outcomes and access to care. For example, research has shown that individuals from lower socioeconomic backgrounds often have poorer health outcomes than those from higher socioeconomic backgrounds, due in part to factors such as limited access to quality healthcare, education, and healthy food options. Therefore, improving social mobility may be seen as a way to address these health disparities and promote greater equity in health outcomes.

In the context of medical terminology, "occupations" generally refers to the activities or tasks that a person performs as part of their daily life and routines. This can include both paid work or employment, as well as unpaid activities such as household chores, hobbies, and self-care. The term is often used in the field of occupational therapy, which focuses on helping individuals develop, recover, and maintain the skills needed for participation in their daily occupations and improving their overall quality of life. Additionally, Occupational Medicine is a medical specialty that focuses on the prevention and management of job-related injuries and illnesses, as well as promoting health and productivity in the workplace.

A "social environment" is not a term that has a specific medical definition, but it is often used in the context of public health and social sciences to refer to the physical and social conditions, relationships, and organized institutions that influence the health and well-being of individuals and communities.

The social environment includes factors such as:

* Social support networks (family, friends, community)
* Cultural norms and values
* Socioeconomic status (income, education, occupation)
* Housing and neighborhood conditions
* Access to resources (food, healthcare, transportation)
* Exposure to discrimination, violence, and other stressors

These factors can have a significant impact on health outcomes, as they can influence behaviors related to health (such as diet, exercise, and substance use), as well as exposure to disease and access to healthcare. Understanding the social environment is essential for developing effective public health interventions and policies that promote health equity and reduce health disparities.

Social isolation, in the context of health and medicine, refers to the lack of social connections, interactions, or engagement with other people or communities. It is a state of being separated from others, lacking companionship or meaningful communication, which can lead to feelings of loneliness and disconnection. Social isolation can be self-imposed or imposed by external factors such as mobility issues, loss of loved ones, or discrimination. Prolonged social isolation has been linked to various negative health outcomes, including mental health disorders, cognitive decline, and increased risk for chronic conditions like heart disease and stroke.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Wales" is not a medical term. It is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, located in Western Europe. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those!

Socioeconomic factors are a range of interconnected conditions and influences that affect the opportunities and resources a person or group has to maintain and improve their health and well-being. These factors include:

1. Economic stability: This includes employment status, job security, income level, and poverty status. Lower income and lack of employment are associated with poorer health outcomes.
2. Education: Higher levels of education are generally associated with better health outcomes. Education can affect a person's ability to access and understand health information, as well as their ability to navigate the healthcare system.
3. Social and community context: This includes factors such as social support networks, discrimination, and community safety. Strong social supports and positive community connections are associated with better health outcomes, while discrimination and lack of safety can negatively impact health.
4. Healthcare access and quality: Access to affordable, high-quality healthcare is an important socioeconomic factor that can significantly impact a person's health. Factors such as insurance status, availability of providers, and cultural competency of healthcare systems can all affect healthcare access and quality.
5. Neighborhood and built environment: The physical conditions in which people live, work, and play can also impact their health. Factors such as housing quality, transportation options, availability of healthy foods, and exposure to environmental hazards can all influence health outcomes.

Socioeconomic factors are often interrelated and can have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. For example, someone who lives in a low-income neighborhood with limited access to healthy foods and safe parks may also face challenges related to employment, education, and healthcare access that further impact their health. Addressing socioeconomic factors is an important part of promoting health equity and reducing health disparities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "England" is not a medical term or concept. It is one of the four constituent countries that make up the United Kingdom, along with Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland. England is located in the southern part of Great Britain, which is the largest island of the British Isles.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Scotland" is not a medical term or concept. It is one of the four constituent countries of the United Kingdom. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Social perception, in the context of psychology and social sciences, refers to the ability to interpret and understand other people's behavior, emotions, and intentions. It is the process by which we make sense of the social world around us, by observing and interpreting cues such as facial expressions, body language, tone of voice, and situational context.

In medical terminology, social perception is not a specific diagnosis or condition, but rather a cognitive skill that can be affected in various mental and neurological disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, and dementia. For example, individuals with autism may have difficulty interpreting social cues and understanding other people's emotions and intentions, while those with schizophrenia may have distorted perceptions of social situations and interactions.

Healthcare professionals who work with patients with cognitive or neurological disorders may assess their social perception skills as part of a comprehensive evaluation, in order to develop appropriate interventions and support strategies.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Great Britain" is not a medical concept or condition. It is a geographical and political term referring to the largest island in the British Isles, on which the majority of England, Scotland, and Wales are located. It's also used to refer to the political union of these three countries, which is called the United Kingdom. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.

Social adjustment, in the context of mental health and psychology, refers to an individual's ability to adapt and function effectively within their social environment. It involves developing and maintaining positive relationships with others, fulfilling various social roles (such as being a family member, friend, or employee), and meeting the expectations and demands of one's social group.

Social adjustment can be affected by various factors, including an individual's personality traits, coping skills, mental and physical health status, and life experiences. Poor social adjustment can lead to feelings of isolation, loneliness, and dissatisfaction with life, as well as increased risk for mental health problems such as depression and anxiety.

Assessing social adjustment is an important aspect of mental health care, as it can provide valuable insights into an individual's overall functioning and quality of life. Treatments such as psychotherapy and social skills training may be used to help improve social adjustment in individuals who are struggling in this area.

Medical professionals may use the term "social conditions" to refer to various environmental and sociological factors that can impact an individual's health and well-being. These conditions can include things like:

* Socioeconomic status (SES): This refers to a person's position in society, which is often determined by their income, education level, and occupation. People with lower SES are more likely to experience poor health outcomes due to factors such as limited access to healthcare, nutritious food, and safe housing.
* Social determinants of health (SDOH): These are the conditions in which people live, learn, work, and play that affect a wide range of health risks and outcomes. Examples include poverty, discrimination, housing instability, education level, and access to healthy foods and physical activity opportunities.
* Social support: This refers to the emotional, informational, and instrumental assistance that individuals receive from their social networks, including family, friends, neighbors, and community members. Strong social support is associated with better health outcomes, while lack of social support can contribute to poor health.
* Social isolation: This occurs when people are disconnected from others and have limited social contacts or interactions. Social isolation can lead to negative health outcomes such as depression, cognitive decline, and increased risk for chronic diseases.
* Community context: The physical and social characteristics of the communities in which people live can also impact their health. Factors such as access to green spaces, transportation options, and safe housing can all contribute to better health outcomes.

Overall, social conditions can have a significant impact on an individual's health and well-being, and addressing these factors is essential for promoting health equity and improving overall public health.

Educational status refers to the level or stage of education that a person has reached. It can be used to describe an individual's educational background, achievements, and qualifications. Educational status can be categorized in various ways, including by level (e.g., elementary school, high school, college, graduate school), years of schooling completed, or type of degree earned (e.g., bachelor's, master's, doctoral).

In medical settings, educational status may be used as a demographic variable to describe the characteristics of a patient population or to identify potential disparities in health outcomes based on education level. Research has shown that higher levels of education are often associated with better health outcomes, including lower rates of chronic diseases and improved mental health. Therefore, understanding a patient's educational status can help healthcare providers tailor their care and education strategies to meet the unique needs and challenges of each individual.

"Social dominance" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, it is a concept that is often used in the social sciences, including sociology, psychology, and anthropology. It refers to the degree of control, influence, or power that an individual or group has over others within a particular social context or hierarchy.

In some cases, social dominance may be associated with certain medical conditions or situations. For example, individuals with antisocial personality disorder or other psychiatric disorders may exhibit dominant behaviors as part of their symptoms. Similarly, social dominance can be a factor in the development and maintenance of certain types of relationships, such as those seen in abusive or coercive relationships.

However, it's important to note that social dominance is not a medical diagnosis or condition in and of itself. Rather, it is a social phenomenon that can intersect with various medical and psychological issues.

"Sex factors" is a term used in medicine and epidemiology to refer to the differences in disease incidence, prevalence, or response to treatment that are observed between males and females. These differences can be attributed to biological differences such as genetics, hormones, and anatomy, as well as social and cultural factors related to gender.

For example, some conditions such as autoimmune diseases, depression, and osteoporosis are more common in women, while others such as cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancer are more prevalent in men. Additionally, sex differences have been observed in the effectiveness and side effects of various medications and treatments.

It is important to consider sex factors in medical research and clinical practice to ensure that patients receive appropriate and effective care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Social Media" is a term related to communication technologies, particularly websites and applications that enable users to create and share content or to participate in social networking. It is not a medical concept or term, and therefore, it does not have a medical definition. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those!

Social work is a professional field of practice that promotes social change, problem-solving in human relationships, and the empowerment and liberation of people to enhance well-being. According to the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW), social work involves "the application of social sciences, theory, knowledge, and skills to effect positive changes in individuals, groups, communities, and societies."

Social workers are trained to work with individuals, families, groups, and communities to address a wide range of social, emotional, and practical needs. They help people navigate complex systems, access resources, and advocate for their rights. Social workers may be employed in various settings, including hospitals, mental health clinics, schools, community centers, and government agencies.

In medical settings, social work is often focused on helping patients and their families cope with illness, disability, or injury. Medical social workers provide counseling, support, and advocacy to help patients and families navigate the healthcare system, access needed resources, and make informed decisions about treatment options. They may also assist with discharge planning, coordinating care transitions, and connecting patients with community-based services.

Medical social work is a specialized area of practice that requires knowledge and skills in areas such as psychosocial assessment, crisis intervention, case management, and advocacy. Medical social workers must be able to communicate effectively with healthcare professionals, patients, and families, and have a deep understanding of the social determinants of health and the impact of illness on individuals and communities.

In medical or legal terms, "illegitimacy" refers to the status of a child who is born to parents who are not married to each other. This concept is more commonly used in sociology and law rather than medicine. In some societies and historical periods, illegitimate children may have faced social stigma and discrimination, but this is less common in modern times. It's important to note that the concept of illegitimacy has been largely abandoned in many legal systems, and children are now recognized as having equal rights and status regardless of their parents' marital status.

A social hierarchy in the context of medicine and public health often refers to the organization of individuals or groups based on their relative status, power, or influence within a society or community. This structure can have significant implications for health outcomes and access to care. For instance, those with higher socioeconomic status (SES) tend to have better health and longer lifespans than those with lower SES, due in part to factors such as better access to healthcare, nutritious food, safe housing, and educational opportunities.

Social hierarchies can also intersect with other forms of inequality, such as racism, sexism, and ableism, to create additional barriers to health and well-being for marginalized communities. Understanding the role of social hierarchy in health is crucial for developing effective public health interventions and policies that address these underlying determinants of health.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

I must clarify that I can't provide a "medical definition" of marriage, as the concept of marriage is a social, legal, and often religious institution, rather than a medical one. However, I can tell you that there are no medical definitions associated with the term "marriage." It is typically defined in terms of a committed relationship between two individuals, recognized by law and/or religion, which may involve shared responsibilities, rights, and obligations.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Social Sciences" is a broad term that refers to academic disciplines that study human society and social relationships. It includes fields such as anthropology, sociology, psychology, political science, and economics. These subjects are considered part of the liberal arts and humanities, not medical sciences.

However, aspects of social sciences can intersect with medical studies in areas like medical anthropology, health psychology, sociology of health and illness, and psychiatry. For instance, medical anthropologists might study how cultural factors influence healthcare practices, while health psychologists examine the role of behavior and mental processes in health and illness.

If you're looking for a definition related to medical sciences, perhaps there was some confusion with the term. Could you please clarify or provide more context?

Health status is a term used to describe the overall condition of an individual's health, including physical, mental, and social well-being. It is often assessed through various measures such as medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and self-reported health assessments. Health status can be used to identify health disparities, track changes in population health over time, and evaluate the effectiveness of healthcare interventions.

I'm happy to help! However, it's important to note that while "social justice" is a term used in many fields, including public health and medicine, it does not have a single, universally accepted medical definition. Instead, the concept of social justice in healthcare is generally understood as the pursuit of fairness, equity, and equality in the distribution of healthcare resources, opportunities, and outcomes.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines social justice as "the fair and equitable distribution of social determinants of health, which are conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age, including the health system." According to this definition, social justice in healthcare requires addressing the root causes of health disparities, such as poverty, discrimination, and lack of access to education and employment opportunities.

The American Public Health Association (APHA) defines social justice as "the distribution of resources, benefits, and burdens of society to all individuals and groups. When principles of social justice are applied, the resulting distribution is equitable and all members of society have a fair opportunity to benefit from the resources, benefits, and burdens."

In summary, while there may not be a single medical definition of social justice, it is generally understood as the pursuit of fairness, equity, and equality in healthcare and health outcomes. This involves addressing the root causes of health disparities and ensuring that all individuals have access to the resources and opportunities they need to achieve optimal health.

"Employment" is a term that is commonly used in the context of social sciences and law rather than medicine. It generally refers to the state or condition of being employed, which means an individual is engaged in a job or occupation, providing services to an employer in exchange for compensation, such as wages or salary. Employment may involve various types of work arrangements, including full-time, part-time, temporary, contract, or freelance positions.

In the context of medicine and public health, employment is often discussed in relation to its impact on health outcomes, healthcare access, and socioeconomic status. For instance, research has shown that unemployment or underemployment can negatively affect mental and physical health, while stable employment can contribute to better health outcomes and overall well-being. Additionally, employment may influence an individual's ability to afford healthcare, medications, and other essential needs, which can impact their health status.

In summary, the medical definition of 'employment' pertains to the state or condition of being engaged in a job or occupation, providing services to an employer for compensation. Employment has significant implications for health outcomes, healthcare access, and socioeconomic status.

The term "Fathers" is a general term used to describe male parents or parental figures. It does not have a specific medical definition. In the context of genetics and reproduction, the father is the biological male who contributes his sperm to fertilize an egg, resulting in conception and pregnancy. However, it's important to note that there are many different types of families and parental relationships, and not all fathers are biological parents or male.

A cross-sectional study is a type of observational research design that examines the relationship between variables at one point in time. It provides a snapshot or a "cross-section" of the population at a particular moment, allowing researchers to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition and identify potential risk factors or associations.

In a cross-sectional study, data is collected from a sample of participants at a single time point, and the variables of interest are measured simultaneously. This design can be used to investigate the association between exposure and outcome, but it cannot establish causality because it does not follow changes over time.

Cross-sectional studies can be conducted using various data collection methods, such as surveys, interviews, or medical examinations. They are often used in epidemiology to estimate the prevalence of a disease or condition in a population and to identify potential risk factors that may contribute to its development. However, because cross-sectional studies only provide a snapshot of the population at one point in time, they cannot account for changes over time or determine whether exposure preceded the outcome.

Therefore, while cross-sectional studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying potential associations between variables, further research using other study designs, such as cohort or case-control studies, is necessary to establish causality and confirm any findings.

Unemployment is an economic concept rather than a medical one. It refers to the situation where individuals who are actively seeking employment are unable to find work. The World Health Organization (WHO) and other medical bodies do not provide a specific medical definition for unemployment. However, unemployment can have significant impacts on both physical and mental health, leading to issues such as stress, anxiety, depression, and poor physical health.

Smoking is not a medical condition, but it's a significant health risk behavior. Here is the definition from a public health perspective:

Smoking is the act of inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning tobacco that is commonly consumed through cigarettes, pipes, and cigars. The smoke contains over 7,000 chemicals, including nicotine, tar, carbon monoxide, and numerous toxic and carcinogenic substances. These toxins contribute to a wide range of diseases and health conditions, such as lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and various other cancers, as well as adverse reproductive outcomes and negative impacts on the developing fetus during pregnancy. Smoking is highly addictive due to the nicotine content, which makes quitting smoking a significant challenge for many individuals.

Mortality, in medical terms, refers to the state or condition of being mortal; the quality or fact of being subject to death. It is often used in reference to the mortality rate, which is the number of deaths in a specific population, divided by the size of that population, per a given time period. This can be used as a measure of the risk of death among a population.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

"Social change" is not a medical term, but it refers to the alterations in human interactions and relationships that transform cultural patterns, social institutions, and organizational structures within societies over time. While not a medical concept itself, social change can have significant impacts on health and healthcare. For example, shifts in societal values and norms around tobacco use or access to mental health services can influence public health outcomes and healthcare delivery.

"Social distancing" is not a term with a specific medical definition. However, in the context of public health and infectious diseases, it generally refers to measures taken to reduce close physical contact between people in order to prevent or slow down the spread of an infectious agent. This can include things like keeping a certain distance from others, avoiding crowded places, and limiting gatherings. The specific recommendations for social distancing can vary depending on the situation and the nature of the infectious agent.

I'm happy to help, but I need to clarify that "residence characteristics" is not a commonly used medical term. It is more related to the field of public health or epidemiology. However, if you are asking for the characteristics of a residence that could be relevant to medical or health research, they might include:

1. Housing type (single-family home, apartment, mobile home, etc.)
2. Age and condition of the housing unit
3. Presence of environmental hazards (lead paint, asbestos, radon, etc.)
4. Quality of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems
5. Access to clean water and sanitation facilities
6. Safety features (smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors, etc.)
7. Presence of pests (rodents, cockroaches, bed bugs, etc.)
8. Neighborhood characteristics (crime rates, access to healthy food options, walkability, etc.)

These factors can all have an impact on the health outcomes of individuals and communities, and are often studied in public health research.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Finland" is not a medical term. It is a country located in Northern Europe, known officially as the Republic of Finland. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Birth weight refers to the first weight of a newborn infant, usually taken immediately after birth. It is a critical vital sign that indicates the baby's health status and is used as a predictor for various short-term and long-term health outcomes.

Typically, a full-term newborn's weight ranges from 5.5 to 8.8 pounds (2.5 to 4 kg), although normal birth weights can vary significantly based on factors such as gestational age, genetics, maternal health, and nutrition. Low birth weight is defined as less than 5.5 pounds (2.5 kg), while high birth weight is greater than 8.8 pounds (4 kg).

Low birth weight babies are at a higher risk for various medical complications, including respiratory distress syndrome, jaundice, infections, and developmental delays. High birth weight babies may face challenges with delivery, increased risk of obesity, and potential metabolic issues later in life. Regular prenatal care is essential to monitor fetal growth and ensure a healthy pregnancy and optimal birth weight for the baby.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "housing" is not a term that has a medical definition. In a general sense, housing refers to a place where someone lives, such as a house or apartment. If you have any questions related to healthcare, medicine, or health-related topics, I would be happy to try to help answer them.

Histocompatibility antigens, class I are proteins found on the surface of most cells in the body. They play a critical role in the immune system's ability to differentiate between "self" and "non-self." These antigens are composed of three polypeptides - two heavy chains and one light chain - and are encoded by genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6 in humans.

Class I MHC molecules present peptide fragments from inside the cell to CD8+ T cells, also known as cytotoxic T cells. This presentation allows the immune system to detect and destroy cells that have been infected by viruses or other intracellular pathogens, or that have become cancerous.

There are three main types of class I MHC molecules in humans: HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C. The term "HLA" stands for human leukocyte antigen, which reflects the original identification of these proteins on white blood cells (leukocytes). The genes encoding these molecules are highly polymorphic, meaning there are many different variants in the population, and matching HLA types is essential for successful organ transplantation to minimize the risk of rejection.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "social values" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, in a broader social context, "social values" refer to the beliefs, principles, and standards that a group or society holds in regard to what is considered important, desirable, or acceptable. These values can influence attitudes, behaviors, and decisions related to health and healthcare. They may also impact medical research, policy-making, and patient care.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "social problems" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a broad term used in sociology and social work to refer to issues that affect large numbers of people within a society, such as poverty, discrimination, crime, and substance abuse. These issues can certainly have impacts on individuals' mental and physical health, but they are not considered medical conditions themselves. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terminology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

Health surveys are research studies that collect data from a sample population to describe the current health status, health behaviors, and healthcare utilization of a particular group or community. These surveys may include questions about various aspects of health such as physical health, mental health, chronic conditions, lifestyle habits, access to healthcare services, and demographic information. The data collected from health surveys can be used to monitor trends in health over time, identify disparities in health outcomes, develop and evaluate public health programs and policies, and inform resource allocation decisions. Examples of national health surveys include the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

Histocompatibility antigens Class II are a group of cell surface proteins that play a crucial role in the immune system's response to foreign substances. They are expressed on the surface of various cells, including immune cells such as B lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and activated T lymphocytes.

Class II histocompatibility antigens are encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes, which are located on chromosome 6 in humans. These antigens are composed of two non-covalently associated polypeptide chains, an alpha (α) and a beta (β) chain, which form a heterodimer. There are three main types of Class II histocompatibility antigens, known as HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR.

Class II histocompatibility antigens present peptide antigens to CD4+ T helper cells, which then activate other immune cells, such as B cells and macrophages, to mount an immune response against the presented antigen. Because of their role in initiating an immune response, Class II histocompatibility antigens are important in transplantation medicine, where mismatches between donor and recipient can lead to rejection of the transplanted organ or tissue.

Social behavior disorders are a category of mental health conditions that are characterized by significant and persistent patterns of socially disruptive behavior. These behaviors may include aggression, impulsivity, defiance, and opposition to authority, which can interfere with an individual's ability to function in social, academic, or occupational settings.

Social behavior disorders can manifest in a variety of ways, depending on the age and developmental level of the individual. In children and adolescents, common examples include oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), conduct disorder (CD), and disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD). Adults with social behavior disorders may exhibit antisocial personality disorder or other related conditions.

It is important to note that social behavior disorders are not the result of poor parenting or a lack of discipline, but rather are thought to be caused by a combination of genetic, environmental, and neurobiological factors. Treatment for social behavior disorders typically involves a combination of behavioral therapy, medication, and social skills training.

I must clarify that I cannot provide a "medical definition" of intelligence, as intelligence is not a concept that is typically defined within the field of medicine. Intelligence is a term used to describe the ability to learn, understand, and make judgments or decisions based on reason, experience, and information. It is often measured through various cognitive abilities such as problem-solving, critical thinking, creativity, and knowledge acquisition.

The concept of intelligence is studied in many fields, including psychology, neuroscience, and education. In medicine, healthcare professionals may assess a person's cognitive abilities to better understand their health status or develop treatment plans. However, there is no specific "medical definition" for intelligence. Instead, it is a multifaceted concept that can be influenced by various genetic, environmental, and experiential factors.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "life style" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It generally refers to the way an individual or group lives, including their habits, behaviors, and preferences in areas such as diet, exercise, recreation, and stress management. Some lifestyle factors can have a significant impact on health outcomes and risk for certain diseases. However, it is not a medical term with a specific clinical meaning.

Longitudinal studies are a type of research design where data is collected from the same subjects repeatedly over a period of time, often years or even decades. These studies are used to establish patterns of changes and events over time, and can help researchers identify causal relationships between variables. They are particularly useful in fields such as epidemiology, psychology, and sociology, where the focus is on understanding developmental trends and the long-term effects of various factors on health and behavior.

In medical research, longitudinal studies can be used to track the progression of diseases over time, identify risk factors for certain conditions, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. For example, a longitudinal study might follow a group of individuals over several decades to assess their exposure to certain environmental factors and their subsequent development of chronic diseases such as cancer or heart disease. By comparing data collected at multiple time points, researchers can identify trends and correlations that may not be apparent in shorter-term studies.

Longitudinal studies have several advantages over other research designs, including their ability to establish temporal relationships between variables, track changes over time, and reduce the impact of confounding factors. However, they also have some limitations, such as the potential for attrition (loss of participants over time), which can introduce bias and affect the validity of the results. Additionally, longitudinal studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, requiring significant resources and a long-term commitment from both researchers and study participants.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

"Social Security" is a term that refers to a social insurance program, providing financial security to eligible individuals primarily through retirement, disability, and survivor's benefits. In the United States, it is administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA). The program is funded through payroll taxes known as Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) tax, paid by workers and their employers.

It's important to note that "Social Security" is not a medical term per se, but rather a term used in the context of social welfare programs and policies. However, it does have an impact on healthcare as many Americans rely on Social Security benefits to help cover their medical expenses, especially during retirement.

Logistic models, specifically logistic regression models, are a type of statistical analysis used in medical and epidemiological research to identify the relationship between the risk of a certain health outcome or disease (dependent variable) and one or more independent variables, such as demographic factors, exposure variables, or other clinical measurements.

In contrast to linear regression models, logistic regression models are used when the dependent variable is binary or dichotomous in nature, meaning it can only take on two values, such as "disease present" or "disease absent." The model uses a logistic function to estimate the probability of the outcome based on the independent variables.

Logistic regression models are useful for identifying risk factors and estimating the strength of associations between exposures and health outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders, and predicting the probability of an outcome given certain values of the independent variables. They can also be used to develop clinical prediction rules or scores that can aid in decision-making and patient care.

Social psychology is a branch of psychology that studies how individuals behave, think, and feel in social situations. It examines the ways in which people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the actual, imagined, or implied presence of others. Social psychologists seek to understand how we make sense of other people and how we understand ourselves in a social context. They study phenomena such as social influence, social perception, attitude change, group behavior, prejudice, aggression, and prosocial behavior.

In summary, social psychology is the scientific study of how people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are shaped by their social context and interactions with others.

"Body height" is a measure of the vertical length of a person's body from the top of their head to the bottom of their feet. It is typically measured in units such as centimeters (cm) or inches (in). In medical settings, body height is often used as a basic anthropometric measurement to assess overall health status, growth and development, nutritional status, and aging-related changes.

There are different methods for measuring body height, but the most common one involves having the person stand upright against a vertical surface (such as a wall or a stadiometer) with their heels, buttocks, shoulders, and head touching the surface. The measurement is taken at the point where the top of the person's head meets the surface.

Body height can be influenced by various factors, including genetics, nutrition, health status, and environmental conditions. Changes in body height over time can provide important insights into a person's health trajectory and potential health risks. For example, a significant decrease in body height may indicate bone loss or spinal compression, while a rapid increase in height during childhood or adolescence may suggest optimal growth and development.

"Social desirability bias" is not a medical term per se, but rather a concept that's relevant in the fields of psychology, social sciences, and research methodology. It refers to the tendency of individuals to provide responses that they believe are socially acceptable or desirable, rather than their true feelings, thoughts, or behaviors, during surveys, interviews, or other forms of assessment. This bias can lead to inaccurate or skewed data, as it may not reflect the actual experiences or attitudes of the respondents. It's important for researchers to be aware of and control for social desirability bias to ensure the validity and reliability of their findings.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "London" is a place and not a medical term or condition. It is the capital city and largest metropolitan area in both England and the United Kingdom. If you have any questions related to medical definitions or health-related topics, I would be happy to help!

"West Germany" is not a medical term. It is a geopolitical term that refers to the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) which existed from 1949 to 1990. The FRG was established in the western part of defeated Nazi Germany and was supported by the Western Allies (the United States, the United Kingdom, and France) after World War II.

In medical contexts, references to "West Germany" might appear in older studies or publications that compare health outcomes, disease prevalence, or healthcare systems between different regions or countries, including East and West Germany before reunification in 1990. However, it is essential to understand that such distinctions are historical and do not have current medical relevance.

"Social identification" is a psychological concept rather than a medical term. It refers to the process by which individuals define themselves in terms of their group membership(s) and the social categories to which they believe they belong. This process involves recognizing and internalizing the values, attitudes, and behaviors associated with those groups, and seeing oneself as a member of that social collective.

In medical and healthcare settings, social identification can play an important role in shaping patients' experiences, perceptions of their health, and interactions with healthcare providers. For example, a patient who identifies strongly with a particular cultural or ethnic group may have unique health beliefs, practices, or needs that are influenced by that group membership. Recognizing and understanding these social identifications can help healthcare professionals provide more culturally sensitive and effective care.

However, it's important to note that 'social identification' itself is not a medical term with a specific diagnosis or clinical definition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "income" is not a medical term. Income is an economic term that refers to the inflow of monetary resources or earnings that an individual or household receives from various sources, such as employment, investments, or government benefits. It is typically used in financial and economic contexts rather than medical ones. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "parents" is not a term that has a medical definition. In general usage, parents are the two people (typically) who bring up and care for a child, or who have given birth to or adopted a child. They are responsible for the child's housing, food, clothing, education, and medical care. Is there a specific medical or healthcare-related context you had in mind? I would be happy to help further if I can.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "poverty" is not a medical condition or term. It is a social condition defined by the World Bank as "pronounced deprivation in well-being," and measured through indicators such as income, consumption, and access to basic services. Poverty can have significant impacts on health outcomes and healthcare access, but it is not considered a medical diagnosis. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try my best to help answer them!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Political Systems" is not a term used in medical definitions. Political systems refer to the institutions, procedures, and mechanisms through which a society makes decisions on political matters. Examples include democracies, monarchies, and dictatorships. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health sciences, I'd be happy to help!

Regression analysis is a statistical technique used in medicine, as well as in other fields, to examine the relationship between one or more independent variables (predictors) and a dependent variable (outcome). It allows for the estimation of the average change in the outcome variable associated with a one-unit change in an independent variable, while controlling for the effects of other independent variables. This technique is often used to identify risk factors for diseases or to evaluate the effectiveness of medical interventions. In medical research, regression analysis can be used to adjust for potential confounding variables and to quantify the relationship between exposures and health outcomes. It can also be used in predictive modeling to estimate the probability of a particular outcome based on multiple predictors.

Social participation, in the context of health and medicine, refers to an individual's involvement in various life situations, activities, and interactions with others, families, communities, and society at large. It encompasses areas such as employment, education, community life, recreation, and social relationships. Social participation is considered an important aspect of overall health and well-being, as it can contribute to a person's sense of purpose, self-esteem, and quality of life. Reduced social participation may be associated with various health conditions, disabilities, or social determinants of health, making it an essential component of comprehensive healthcare and rehabilitation.

"Social welfare" is a broad concept and not a medical term per se, but it is often discussed in the context of public health and medical social work. Here's a definition related to those fields:

Social welfare refers to the programs, services, and benefits provided by governmental and non-governmental organizations to promote the well-being of individuals, families, and communities, with a particular focus on meeting basic needs, protecting vulnerable populations, and enhancing social and economic opportunities. These efforts aim to improve overall quality of life, reduce health disparities, and strengthen the social determinants of health.

Examples of social welfare programs include Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Medicaid, Section 8 housing assistance, and various community-based services such as mental health counseling, substance abuse treatment, and home healthcare.

In the medical field, social workers often play a crucial role in connecting patients to available social welfare resources to address various psychosocial needs that can impact their health outcomes.

The "cause of death" is a medical determination of the disease, injury, or event that directly results in a person's death. This information is typically documented on a death certificate and may be used for public health surveillance, research, and legal purposes. The cause of death is usually determined by a physician based on their clinical judgment and any available medical evidence, such as laboratory test results, autopsy findings, or eyewitness accounts. In some cases, the cause of death may be uncertain or unknown, and the death may be classified as "natural," "accidental," "homicide," or "suicide" based on the available information.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Ireland" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in north-western Europe, consisting of 32 provinces; 26 of which are part of the Republic of Ireland and the remaining 6 are part of the United Kingdom (Northern Ireland). If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help with those.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "social conformity" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a concept that is more commonly used in sociology and psychology.

In general, social conformity refers to the process of changing one's behavior, attitudes, or beliefs to fit in with a group, society, or culture. This can be driven by a variety of factors, including the desire for social acceptance, the need to maintain social norms, and the fear of social rejection or punishment.

While not a medical term, social conformity can have implications for health and healthcare. For example, social conformity can influence people's attitudes and behaviors related to health risks, such as smoking or excessive drinking, and can affect help-seeking behaviors, such as seeking medical care when needed. Understanding the dynamics of social conformity can be useful in developing interventions and policies aimed at promoting positive health behaviors and outcomes.

Psychological stress is the response of an individual's mind and body to challenging or demanding situations. It can be defined as a state of emotional and physical tension resulting from adversity, demand, or change. This response can involve a variety of symptoms, including emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and physiological components.

Emotional responses may include feelings of anxiety, fear, anger, sadness, or frustration. Cognitive responses might involve difficulty concentrating, racing thoughts, or negative thinking patterns. Behaviorally, psychological stress can lead to changes in appetite, sleep patterns, social interactions, and substance use. Physiologically, the body's "fight-or-flight" response is activated, leading to increased heart rate, blood pressure, muscle tension, and other symptoms.

Psychological stress can be caused by a wide range of factors, including work or school demands, financial problems, relationship issues, traumatic events, chronic illness, and major life changes. It's important to note that what causes stress in one person may not cause stress in another, as individual perceptions and coping mechanisms play a significant role.

Chronic psychological stress can have negative effects on both mental and physical health, increasing the risk of conditions such as anxiety disorders, depression, heart disease, diabetes, and autoimmune diseases. Therefore, it's essential to identify sources of stress and develop effective coping strategies to manage and reduce its impact.

"Marital status" is not a medical term, but it is often used in medical records and forms to indicate whether a person is single, married, divorced, widowed, or in a civil union. It is a social determinant of health that can have an impact on a person's access to healthcare, health behaviors, and health outcomes. For example, research has shown that people who are unmarried, divorced, or widowed may have worse health outcomes than those who are married. However, it is important to note that this relationship is complex and influenced by many other factors, including socioeconomic status, age, and overall health.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Psychosocial deprivation is not strictly defined within the field of medicine, but it is a term used in the social sciences and healthcare to refer to the lack or absence of experiences, relationships, resources, and environmental conditions that are essential for psychological and social growth, development, and well-being. It can result from various factors such as poverty, neglect, abuse, separation from caregivers, social isolation, or living in a dysfunctional environment.

Prolonged psychosocial deprivation can lead to significant impairments in cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and social functioning, which may manifest as developmental delays, learning disabilities, mental health disorders, attachment issues, and poor quality of life. Healthcare professionals, particularly those working in mental health, often consider psychosocial factors when assessing and treating individuals to ensure comprehensive care that addresses both medical and environmental needs.

"Family characteristics" is a broad term that can refer to various attributes, dynamics, and structures of a family unit. These characteristics can include:

1. Family structure: This refers to the composition of the family, such as whether it is a nuclear family (two parents and their children), single-parent family, extended family, blended family, or same-sex parent family.
2. Family roles: The responsibilities and expectations assigned to each family member, such as caregiver, provider, or decision-maker.
3. Communication patterns: How family members communicate with one another, including frequency, tone, and level of openness.
4. Problem-solving styles: How the family approaches and resolves conflicts and challenges.
5. Cultural and religious practices: The values, traditions, and beliefs that shape the family's identity and worldview.
6. Family functioning: The overall health and effectiveness of the family system, including its ability to adapt to change and support individual members' needs.
7. Attachment styles: The quality and nature of the emotional bonds between family members, which can impact attachment security and relationships throughout life.
8. Parenting style: The approach that parents take in raising their children, such as authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, or uninvolved.
9. Family history: Past experiences and events that have shaped the family's development and dynamics.
10. Genetic factors: Inherited traits and predispositions that can influence family members' health, behavior, and personality.

Understanding family characteristics is essential in fields such as medicine, psychology, social work, and counseling, as these factors can significantly impact individual and family well-being.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

There is no specific medical definition for "single parent." It is a social term used to describe a person who is raising one or more children without the other parent's involvement. This could be due to various reasons such as divorce, separation, death, or absence of the other parent. The responsibilities and challenges faced by single parents can sometimes have implications for their physical and mental health, but it is not a medical term or concept.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Spain" is not a medical term. It is a country located in southwestern Europe. If you have any questions about medical terms or topics, I would be happy to help answer them.

'Alcohol drinking' refers to the consumption of alcoholic beverages, which contain ethanol (ethyl alcohol) as the active ingredient. Ethanol is a central nervous system depressant that can cause euphoria, disinhibition, and sedation when consumed in small to moderate amounts. However, excessive drinking can lead to alcohol intoxication, with symptoms ranging from slurred speech and impaired coordination to coma and death.

Alcohol is metabolized in the liver by enzymes such as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). The breakdown of ethanol produces acetaldehyde, a toxic compound that can cause damage to various organs in the body. Chronic alcohol drinking can lead to a range of health problems, including liver disease, pancreatitis, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, and increased risk of cancer.

Moderate drinking is generally defined as up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men, where a standard drink contains about 14 grams (0.6 ounces) of pure alcohol. However, it's important to note that there are no safe levels of alcohol consumption, and any level of drinking carries some risk to health.

"Social facilitation" is not a term that is typically used in medical definitions. It is a concept from social psychology that refers to the phenomenon where the presence of others can influence an individual's performance on a task. Specifically, social facilitation occurs when the presence of others enhances the dominant response or behavior of an individual, leading to improved performance on simple or well-learned tasks and impaired performance on complex or novel tasks.

In some cases, social facilitation can have implications for health and well-being, particularly in situations where individuals are performing tasks that require concentration, coordination, or other cognitive or physical skills. For example, the presence of others during exercise may enhance an individual's motivation and performance, leading to better health outcomes. However, the presence of distractions or social pressure can also impair performance on certain tasks, such as driving or operating machinery, leading to increased risk of accidents or injuries.

Overall, while "social facilitation" is not a medical term per se, it is a concept that has relevance for understanding various social and behavioral factors that can influence health and well-being.

"Social alienation" is not a term that has a specific medical definition in the same way that a term like "hypertension" or "diabetes" does. However, it is often used in a psychological or sociological context to describe a state of feeling disconnected or isolated from society, including feelings of loneliness, estrangement, and rejection.

In some cases, social alienation may be associated with mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety, or schizophrenia. For example, a person with social anxiety disorder may experience social alienation due to their fear of social interactions and avoidance of social situations. Similarly, a person with schizophrenia may experience social alienation due to the stigma associated with their condition and difficulties with communication and social cues.

However, it's important to note that social alienation can also occur in people without any underlying mental health conditions. Factors such as discrimination, poverty, migration, and social upheaval can all contribute to feelings of social alienation.

A phobic disorder is a type of anxiety disorder characterized by an excessive and irrational fear or avoidance of specific objects, situations, or activities. This fear can cause significant distress and interfere with a person's daily life. Phobic disorders are typically classified into three main categories: specific phobias (such as fear of heights, spiders, or needles), social phobia (or social anxiety disorder), and agoraphobia (fear of open spaces or situations where escape might be difficult).

People with phobic disorders often recognize that their fear is excessive or unreasonable, but they are unable to control it. When exposed to the feared object or situation, they may experience symptoms such as rapid heartbeat, sweating, trembling, and difficulty breathing. These symptoms can be so distressing that individuals with phobic disorders go to great lengths to avoid the feared situation, which can have a significant impact on their quality of life.

Treatment for phobic disorders typically involves cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), which helps individuals identify and challenge their irrational thoughts and fears, as well as exposure therapy, which gradually exposes them to the feared object or situation in a safe and controlled environment. In some cases, medication may also be recommended to help manage symptoms of anxiety.

I'm not sure I understand your question. "Denmark" is a country located in Northern Europe, and it is not a medical term or concept. It is the southernmost of the Nordic countries, and it consists of the Jutland peninsula and several islands in the Baltic Sea. The capital city of Denmark is Copenhagen.

If you are looking for information about a medical condition that may be associated with Denmark, could you please provide more context or clarify your question? I would be happy to help you with more specific information if I can.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Poverty Areas" is not a standard medical term or classification. However, in a broader social determinants of health context, poverty is recognized as a significant factor that can impact an individual's health outcomes and access to healthcare.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines poverty as "pronounced deprivation in well-being," which includes but is not limited to lack of income and economic opportunities. The WHO also acknowledges that poverty is a major cause of ill-health and premature death around the world.

If you are referring to a specific term or concept that goes by a different name, please provide more context so I can give a more accurate response.

Social medicine is a branch of medicine that focuses on the social determinants of health and illness, and the organization and delivery of healthcare services. It emphasizes the role of socio-economic factors such as poverty, education, housing, employment, and social support networks in shaping population health outcomes. Social medicine also examines how healthcare systems can be designed and implemented to reduce health disparities and promote equity in health.

The field of social medicine draws on a range of disciplines including epidemiology, sociology, anthropology, health policy, and medical ethics. It seeks to understand the complex interplay between individual biology, behavior, and social context in shaping health and illness, and to develop evidence-based policies and interventions that can improve population health and reduce health inequities.

Social medicine is concerned not only with treating individual patients but also with promoting the health of communities and populations. It recognizes that healthcare is just one factor in determining health outcomes, and that social and economic policies have a profound impact on health and wellbeing. As such, social medicine advocates for a comprehensive approach to improving health that includes addressing the root causes of health disparities and working towards greater social justice and equity.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Social Marketing" is not a term typically used in the field of medicine. Instead, it is a marketing strategy that uses commercial marketing techniques and principles to influence the behavior of target audiences in order to improve their personal well-being and that of their communities. This approach has been applied to various public health and healthcare initiatives, such as promoting healthy lifestyles, preventing substance abuse, and increasing vaccination rates.

However, if you're looking for a medical definition related to social aspects or interactions, there might be some confusion. In that case, I would need more context to provide an accurate definition. Could you please clarify your question?

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Respiratory disorders are a group of conditions that affect the respiratory system, including the nose, throat (pharynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, lungs, and diaphragm. These disorders can make it difficult for a person to breathe normally and may cause symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and chest pain.

There are many different types of respiratory disorders, including:

1. Asthma: A chronic inflammatory disease that causes the airways to become narrow and swollen, leading to difficulty breathing.
2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): A group of lung diseases, including emphysema and chronic bronchitis, that make it hard to breathe.
3. Pneumonia: An infection of the lungs that can cause coughing, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
4. Lung cancer: A type of cancer that forms in the tissues of the lungs and can cause symptoms such as coughing, chest pain, and shortness of breath.
5. Tuberculosis (TB): A bacterial infection that mainly affects the lungs but can also affect other parts of the body.
6. Sleep apnea: A disorder that causes a person to stop breathing for short periods during sleep.
7. Interstitial lung disease: A group of disorders that cause scarring of the lung tissue, leading to difficulty breathing.
8. Pulmonary fibrosis: A type of interstitial lung disease that causes scarring of the lung tissue and makes it hard to breathe.
9. Pleural effusion: An abnormal accumulation of fluid in the space between the lungs and chest wall.
10. Lung transplantation: A surgical procedure to replace a diseased or failing lung with a healthy one from a donor.

Respiratory disorders can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, exposure to environmental pollutants, smoking, and infections. Treatment for respiratory disorders may include medications, oxygen therapy, breathing exercises, and lifestyle changes. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to treat the disorder.

Mental health is a state of well-being in which an individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community. It involves the emotional, psychological, and social aspects of an individual's health. Mental health is not just the absence of mental illness, it also includes positive characteristics such as resilience, happiness, and having a sense of purpose in life.

It is important to note that mental health can change over time, and it is possible for an individual to experience periods of good mental health as well as periods of poor mental health. Factors such as genetics, trauma, stress, and physical illness can all contribute to the development of mental health problems. Additionally, cultural and societal factors, such as discrimination and poverty, can also impact an individual's mental health.

Mental Health professionals like psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers and other mental health counselors use different tools and techniques to evaluate, diagnose and treat mental health conditions. These include therapy or counseling, medication, and self-help strategies.

Health status disparities refer to differences in the health outcomes that are observed between different populations. These populations can be defined by various sociodemographic factors such as race, ethnicity, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, disability, income, education level, and geographic location. Health status disparities can manifest as differences in rates of illness, disease prevalence or incidence, morbidity, mortality, access to healthcare services, and quality of care received. These disparities are often the result of systemic inequities and social determinants of health that negatively impact certain populations, leading to worse health outcomes compared to other groups. It is important to note that health status disparities are preventable and can be addressed through targeted public health interventions and policies aimed at reducing health inequities.

Health behavior can be defined as a series of actions and decisions that individuals take to protect, maintain or promote their health and well-being. These behaviors can include activities such as engaging in regular exercise, eating a healthy diet, getting sufficient sleep, practicing safe sex, avoiding tobacco and excessive alcohol consumption, and managing stress.

Health behaviors are influenced by various factors, including knowledge and attitudes towards health, beliefs and values, cultural norms, social support networks, environmental factors, and individual genetic predispositions. Understanding health behaviors is essential for developing effective public health interventions and promoting healthy lifestyles to prevent chronic diseases and improve overall quality of life.

An ethnic group is a category of people who identify with each other based on shared ancestry, language, culture, history, and/or physical characteristics. The concept of an ethnic group is often used in the social sciences to describe a population that shares a common identity and a sense of belonging to a larger community.

Ethnic groups can be distinguished from racial groups, which are categories of people who are defined by their physical characteristics, such as skin color, hair texture, and facial features. While race is a social construct based on physical differences, ethnicity is a cultural construct based on shared traditions, beliefs, and practices.

It's important to note that the concept of ethnic groups can be complex and fluid, as individuals may identify with multiple ethnic groups or switch their identification over time. Additionally, the boundaries between different ethnic groups can be blurred and contested, and the ways in which people define and categorize themselves and others can vary across cultures and historical periods.

Maternal age is a term used to describe the age of a woman at the time she becomes pregnant or gives birth. It is often used in medical and epidemiological contexts to discuss the potential risks, complications, and outcomes associated with pregnancy and childbirth at different stages of a woman's reproductive years.

Advanced maternal age typically refers to women who become pregnant or give birth at 35 years of age or older. This group faces an increased risk for certain chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome, and other pregnancy-related complications, including gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and cesarean delivery.

On the other end of the spectrum, adolescent pregnancies (those that occur in women under 20 years old) also come with their own set of potential risks and complications, such as preterm birth, low birth weight, and anemia.

It's important to note that while maternal age can influence pregnancy outcomes, many other factors – including genetics, lifestyle choices, and access to quality healthcare – can also play a significant role in determining the health of both mother and baby during pregnancy and childbirth.

I am not a medical doctor, but I can provide you with some information on this topic. Self-concept is more commonly discussed in psychology than in medicine, but it still has relevance to understanding individual experiences and behaviors in health and illness.

Self-concept refers to an individual's perception, beliefs, and attitudes about themselves, encompassing various dimensions such as:

1. Physical self (how one perceives their physical appearance, abilities, and health)
2. Social self (how one perceives their relationships with others, social roles, and status)
3. Psychological or personal self (how one perceives their personality traits, values, and beliefs)

Self-concept can influence how people view their own health, cope with illness, and engage in health behaviors. For example, a positive self-concept may contribute to better adherence to treatment plans and healthier lifestyle choices, while negative self-concepts might lead to poorer health outcomes due to decreased motivation or self-efficacy.

Understanding an individual's self-concept can help healthcare professionals tailor their communication style, recommendations, and interventions to better meet the patient's needs and preferences.

The odds ratio (OR) is a statistical measure used in epidemiology and research to estimate the association between an exposure and an outcome. It represents the odds that an event will occur in one group versus the odds that it will occur in another group, assuming that all other factors are held constant.

In medical research, the odds ratio is often used to quantify the strength of the relationship between a risk factor (exposure) and a disease outcome. An OR of 1 indicates no association between the exposure and the outcome, while an OR greater than 1 suggests that there is a positive association between the two. Conversely, an OR less than 1 implies a negative association.

It's important to note that the odds ratio is not the same as the relative risk (RR), which compares the incidence rates of an outcome in two groups. While the OR can approximate the RR when the outcome is rare, they are not interchangeable and can lead to different conclusions about the association between an exposure and an outcome.

In medical terms, parity refers to the number of times a woman has given birth to a viable fetus, usually defined as a pregnancy that reaches at least 20 weeks' gestation. It is often used in obstetrics and gynecology to describe a woman's childbearing history and to assess potential risks associated with childbirth.

Parity is typically categorized as follows:

* Nulliparous: A woman who has never given birth to a viable fetus.
* Primiparous: A woman who has given birth to one viable fetus.
* Multiparous: A woman who has given birth to more than one viable fetus.

In some cases, parity may also consider the number of pregnancies that resulted in stillbirths or miscarriages, although this is not always the case. It's important to note that parity does not necessarily reflect the total number of pregnancies a woman has had, only those that resulted in viable births.

Health status indicators are measures used to assess and monitor the health and well-being of a population. They provide information about various aspects of health, such as mortality rates, morbidity rates, prevalence of chronic diseases, lifestyle factors, environmental exposures, and access to healthcare services. These indicators can be used to identify trends and disparities in health outcomes, inform policy decisions, allocate resources, and evaluate the effectiveness of public health interventions. Examples of health status indicators include life expectancy, infant mortality rate, prevalence of diabetes, smoking rates, and access to primary care.

Patient acceptance of health care refers to the willingness and ability of a patient to follow and engage in a recommended treatment plan or healthcare regimen. This involves understanding the proposed medical interventions, considering their potential benefits and risks, and making an informed decision to proceed with the recommended course of action.

The factors that influence patient acceptance can include:

1. Patient's understanding of their condition and treatment options
2. Trust in their healthcare provider
3. Personal beliefs and values related to health and illness
4. Cultural, linguistic, or socioeconomic barriers
5. Emotional responses to the diagnosis or proposed treatment
6. Practical considerations, such as cost, time commitment, or potential side effects

Healthcare providers play a crucial role in facilitating patient acceptance by clearly communicating information, addressing concerns and questions, and providing support throughout the decision-making process. Encouraging shared decision-making and tailoring care plans to individual patient needs and preferences can also enhance patient acceptance of health care.

I'm not aware of a medical definition for the term "Single Person." In general, a single person is someone who is not married or in a committed relationship. However, this term is not typically used in a medical context. If you have more specific context or information that you're looking for, please let me know and I'll do my best to help!

While "Type A Personality" is commonly used in everyday language, it's important to note that it's not a term used in clinical medicine or psychology for official diagnosis. However, it does have a history in psychological research. The term was initially introduced by cardiologists Meyer Friedman and Ray Rosenman in the 1950s to describe a personality pattern associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease.

Type A Personality is often characterized by:

1. High level of competitiveness and ambition.
2. A sense of urgency and impatience, often feeling pressed for time.
3. Easily becoming frustrated or angry in traffic or in long lines.
4. Multitasking and doing many things at once.
5. Being highly organized and concerned with time management.

However, it's crucial to remember that these traits exist on a spectrum, and having some of these characteristics doesn't necessarily mean someone has a 'Type A Personality'. Also, the correlation between this personality pattern and coronary heart disease has been a subject of ongoing debate in recent years.

Birth order is a term that refers to the sequence in which a person is born in their family, specifically in relation to their siblings. It is used in psychology and sociology to describe the various personality traits, behaviors, and developmental milestones that have been associated with being the firstborn, middle child, youngest child, or an only child.

For example, some studies suggest that firstborn children tend to be more responsible, achievement-oriented, and socially dominant than their younger siblings, while later-born children may be more easygoing, adventurous, and rebellious. However, it's important to note that these patterns are not universal and can be influenced by a variety of factors, including family size, spacing between siblings, gender, parenting style, and individual temperament.

Overall, birth order is just one factor among many that contribute to a person's development and identity, and should not be used as a definitive predictor of their traits or behaviors.

Child development is a multidisciplinary field that examines the biological, psychological, emotional, and social growth and changes that occur in human beings between birth and the onset of adulthood. It involves a complex interaction of genetics, environment, culture, and experiences that shape a child's growth and development over time.

Child development is typically divided into several domains, including:

1. Physical Development: This refers to the growth and changes in a child's body, including their motor skills, sensory abilities, and overall health.
2. Cognitive Development: This involves the development of a child's thinking, learning, problem-solving, memory, language, and other mental processes.
3. Emotional Development: This refers to the development of a child's emotional awareness, expression, understanding, and regulation.
4. Social Development: This involves the development of a child's ability to interact with others, form relationships, communicate effectively, and understand social norms and expectations.

Child development is an ongoing process that occurs at different rates and in different ways for each child. Understanding typical patterns of child development can help parents, educators, and healthcare providers support children's growth and identify any potential delays or concerns.

I believe there may be a misunderstanding in your question. "Mothers" is a term that refers to individuals who have given birth to and raised children. It is not a medical term with a specific definition. If you are referring to a different word or term, please clarify so I can provide a more accurate response.

The term "family" in a medical context often refers to a group of individuals who are related by blood, marriage, or adoption and who consider themselves to be a single household. This can include spouses, parents, children, siblings, grandparents, and other extended family members. In some cases, the term may also be used more broadly to refer to any close-knit group of people who provide emotional and social support for one another, regardless of their biological or legal relationship.

In healthcare settings, understanding a patient's family dynamics can be important for providing effective care. Family members may be involved in decision-making about medical treatments, providing care and support at home, and communicating with healthcare providers. Additionally, cultural beliefs and values within families can influence health behaviors and attitudes towards medical care, making it essential for healthcare professionals to take a culturally sensitive approach when working with patients and their families.

Psychological adaptation refers to the process by which individuals adjust and cope with stressors, challenges, or changes in their environment or circumstances. It involves modifying thoughts, feelings, behaviors, and copabilities to reduce the negative impact of these stressors and promote well-being. Psychological adaptation can occur at different levels, including intrapersonal (within the individual), interpersonal (between individuals), and cultural (within a group or society).

Examples of psychological adaptation include:

* Cognitive restructuring: changing negative thoughts and beliefs to more positive or adaptive ones
* Emotion regulation: managing and reducing intense or distressing emotions
* Problem-solving: finding solutions to practical challenges or obstacles
* Seeking social support: reaching out to others for help, advice, or comfort
* Developing coping strategies: using effective ways to deal with stressors or difficulties
* Cultivating resilience: bouncing back from adversity and learning from negative experiences.

Psychological adaptation is an important aspect of mental health and well-being, as it helps individuals adapt to new situations, overcome challenges, and maintain a sense of control and optimism in the face of stressors or changes.

An "attitude to health" is a set of beliefs, values, and behaviors that an individual holds regarding their own health and well-being. It encompasses their overall approach to maintaining good health, preventing illness, seeking medical care, and managing any existing health conditions.

A positive attitude to health typically includes:

1. A belief in the importance of self-care and taking responsibility for one's own health.
2. Engaging in regular exercise, eating a balanced diet, getting enough sleep, and avoiding harmful behaviors such as smoking and excessive alcohol consumption.
3. Regular check-ups and screenings to detect potential health issues early on.
4. Seeking medical care when necessary and following recommended treatment plans.
5. A willingness to learn about and implement new healthy habits and lifestyle changes.
6. Developing a strong support network of family, friends, and healthcare professionals.

On the other hand, a negative attitude to health may involve:

1. Neglecting self-care and failing to take responsibility for one's own health.
2. Engaging in unhealthy behaviors such as sedentary lifestyle, poor diet, lack of sleep, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption.
3. Avoidance of regular check-ups and screenings, leading to delayed detection and treatment of potential health issues.
4. Resistance to seeking medical care or following recommended treatment plans.
5. Closed-mindedness towards new healthy habits and lifestyle changes.
6. Lack of a support network or reluctance to seek help from others.

Overall, an individual's attitude to health can significantly impact their physical and mental well-being, as well as their ability to manage and overcome any health challenges that may arise.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Northern Ireland" is a geographical location and political entity, and not a medical term or concept. It is one of the four constituent countries of the United Kingdom, located in the north-east of the island of Ireland. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "prejudice" is not a term that has a medical definition in the same way that a term like "myocardial infarction" (heart attack) does. Prejudice is a psychological or sociological concept that refers to preconceived opinions or attitudes about a person or group that are not based on reason or actual experience. It often involves stereotypes and can lead to discrimination or unfair treatment. While prejudice itself is not a medical condition, it can certainly have impacts on mental and physical health, both for those who experience it and for those who hold such biases.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Sweden" is not a medical term. It is a country located in northern Europe. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help answer those!

Morbidity, in medical terms, refers to the state or condition of being diseased or unhealthy. It is used to describe the incidence or prevalence of a particular disease or health condition within a population, or the presence of multiple diseases or health conditions in an individual. Morbidity can also refer to the complications or symptoms associated with a disease or injury. In clinical settings, morbidity may be used to assess a patient's overall health status and their response to treatment.

"Sex distribution" is a term used to describe the number of males and females in a study population or sample. It can be presented as a simple count, a percentage, or a ratio. This information is often used in research to identify any differences in health outcomes, disease prevalence, or response to treatment between males and females. Additionally, understanding sex distribution can help researchers ensure that their studies are representative of the general population and can inform the design of future studies.

Infant Mortality is the death of a baby before their first birthday. The infant mortality rate is typically expressed as the number of deaths per 1,000 live births. This is a key indicator of the overall health of a population and is often used to measure the well-being of children in a society.

Infant mortality can be further categorized into neonatal mortality (death within the first 28 days of life) and postneonatal mortality (death after 28 days of life but before one year). The main causes of infant mortality vary by country and region, but generally include premature birth, low birth weight, congenital anomalies, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and infectious diseases.

Reducing infant mortality is a major public health goal for many countries, and efforts to improve maternal and child health, access to quality healthcare, and socioeconomic conditions are crucial in achieving this goal.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

Low birth weight is a term used to describe babies who are born weighing less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces (2,500 grams). It's often defined as a birth weight of 2,499 grams or less. This can be further categorized into very low birth weight (less than 1,500 grams) and extremely low birth weight (less than 1,000 grams). Low birth weight is most commonly caused by premature birth, but it can also be caused by growth restriction in the womb. These babies are at risk for numerous health complications, both in the short and long term.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Urban Population" is not a medical term. It is a demographic term used to describe the portion of a country's population that lives in areas classified as urban. The United Nations defines an urban area as a city, town, or other agglomeration with a population of 20,000 or more. However, the specific definition can vary by country and organization.

In contrast, medical terms typically refer to conditions, diseases, symptoms, treatments, or healthcare-related concepts. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to help if I can!

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be some confusion in your question. "Interviews" is a broad topic that isn't typically a medical term or subject. However, interviews can certainly be a part of medical settings and procedures, such as job interviews for healthcare positions, patient interviews during medical consultations, or research interviews in clinical studies.

In the context of medical education, an interview might refer to the process by which medical schools evaluate applicants for admission, known as the medical school interview. This is a critical component of the application process and typically involves one-on-one conversations between the applicant and an admissions committee member or a series of multiple mini-interviews (MMIs) with various evaluators.

If you could provide more context or clarify what you mean by "Interviews as Topic" in a medical setting, I'd be happy to help further!

In the context of healthcare, "crowding" refers to a situation where there are more patients seeking care than the available resources (such as space, staff, and equipment) can accommodate. This can lead to prolonged wait times, decreased quality of care, and increased risks for patients and healthcare workers. Crowding is often seen in emergency departments and can be caused by factors such as an influx of patients, lack of hospital beds, or inefficient patient flow.

In the context of medical science, culture refers to the growth of microorganisms, such as bacteria or fungi, under controlled conditions in a laboratory setting. This process is used to identify and study the characteristics of these microorganisms, including their growth patterns, metabolic activities, and sensitivity to various antibiotics or other treatments.

The culture medium, which provides nutrients for the microorganisms to grow, can be modified to mimic the environment in which the organism is typically found. This helps researchers to better understand how the organism behaves in its natural habitat.

In addition to its use in diagnosis and research, culture is also an important tool in monitoring the effectiveness of treatments and tracking the spread of infectious diseases.

Family practice, also known as family medicine, is a medical specialty that provides comprehensive and continuous care to patients of all ages, genders, and stages of life. Family physicians are trained to provide a wide range of services, including preventive care, diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses, management of complex medical conditions, and providing health education and counseling.

Family practice emphasizes the importance of building long-term relationships with patients and their families, and takes into account the physical, emotional, social, and psychological factors that influence a person's health. Family physicians often serve as the primary point of contact for patients within the healthcare system, coordinating care with other specialists and healthcare providers as needed.

Family practice is a broad and diverse field, encompassing various areas such as pediatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, geriatrics, and behavioral health. The goal of family practice is to provide high-quality, patient-centered care that meets the unique needs and preferences of each individual patient and their family.

I am not a medical professional, but I can provide you with some general information about the concept of "education" in the context of health and medicine.

In this context, education generally refers to the process of acquiring knowledge, skills, values, and attitudes related to maintaining and improving one's health and well-being, as well as preventing and managing diseases and injuries. Health education can take place in various settings, such as schools, healthcare facilities, workplaces, and communities.

Health education aims to empower individuals and populations to make informed decisions about their health and promote healthy behaviors and lifestyle choices. It covers a wide range of topics, including:

1. Anatomy and physiology
2. Nutrition and diet
3. Exercise and physical activity
4. Mental health and well-being
5. Substance use and abuse
6. Sexual and reproductive health
7. Personal hygiene and infection control
8. Chronic disease management
9. Injury prevention and safety
10. Environmental health

Health education is often delivered by healthcare professionals, educators, and community leaders, using various methods such as lectures, workshops, demonstrations, simulations, and digital media. The ultimate goal of health education is to improve overall health outcomes and reduce health disparities in populations.

A "State Hospital" is a term used in the United States to refer to a type of psychiatric hospital that is owned and operated by a state government. These hospitals provide inpatient mental health services to individuals who are suffering from severe and chronic mental illnesses, and who require long-term care and treatment.

State hospitals typically serve patients who are unable to receive adequate care in other settings, such as community mental health centers or private psychiatric hospitals. They often provide a range of services, including evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and habilitation.

State hospitals may also provide forensic services for individuals who are involved in the criminal justice system and have been found to be not guilty by reason of insanity or incompetent to stand trial due to mental illness. These hospitals often have specialized units that are designed to meet the unique needs of this population, such as secure facilities for patients who pose a risk to themselves or others.

It's important to note that the quality and availability of services at state hospitals can vary widely from one state to another, and even from one hospital to another within the same state. Some state hospitals have been criticized for providing substandard care and for overusing seclusion and restraint as a means of controlling patients. However, many state hospitals are also recognized as leaders in the field of psychiatric care and provide high-quality services to their patients.

Adoption is a legal process in which the rights and responsibilities of being a parent are transferred from one person or couple to another. It permanently gives adoptive parents custody of the child and makes them legally responsible for the child's care and well-being. The birth parents' legal rights and responsibilities are typically terminated as part of the adoption process, although in some cases they may retain certain rights or have ongoing contact with the child. Adoption can involve infants, older children, or siblings, and can be arranged through private agencies, foster care systems, or international channels.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), "disabled persons" are those who have long-term physical, mental, intellectual or sensory impairments which may hinder their participation in society on an equal basis with others. The term "disability" is not meant to be understood as a 'personal tragedy' but rather as a complex interaction between the features of a person's body and mind, the activities they wish to perform and the physical and social barriers they encounter in their environment.

It's important to note that the term 'disabled persons' has been largely replaced by 'people with disabilities' or 'persons with disabilities' in many contexts, as it is considered more respectful and empowering to put the person first, rather than focusing on their disability. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) uses the term "persons with disabilities" throughout its text.

'Animal behavior' refers to the actions or responses of animals to various stimuli, including their interactions with the environment and other individuals. It is the study of the actions of animals, whether they are instinctual, learned, or a combination of both. Animal behavior includes communication, mating, foraging, predator avoidance, and social organization, among other things. The scientific study of animal behavior is called ethology. This field seeks to understand the evolutionary basis for behaviors as well as their physiological and psychological mechanisms.

"Age distribution" is a term used to describe the number of individuals within a population or sample that fall into different age categories. It is often presented in the form of a graph, table, or chart, and can provide important information about the demographic structure of a population.

The age distribution of a population can be influenced by a variety of factors, including birth rates, mortality rates, migration patterns, and aging. Public health officials and researchers use age distribution data to inform policies and programs related to healthcare, social services, and other areas that affect the well-being of populations.

For example, an age distribution graph might show a larger number of individuals in the younger age categories, indicating a population with a high birth rate. Alternatively, it might show a larger number of individuals in the older age categories, indicating a population with a high life expectancy or an aging population. Understanding the age distribution of a population can help policymakers plan for future needs and allocate resources more effectively.

In the context of medicine, risk is the probability or likelihood of an adverse health effect or the occurrence of a negative event related to treatment or exposure to certain hazards. It is usually expressed as a ratio or percentage and can be influenced by various factors such as age, gender, lifestyle, genetics, and environmental conditions. Risk assessment involves identifying, quantifying, and prioritizing risks to make informed decisions about prevention, mitigation, or treatment strategies.

'House calls' is a term used in the medical field to refer to healthcare services provided by a physician or other healthcare professional who visits a patient in their home, instead of the patient traveling to a medical office or clinic. This practice was more common in the past, but has become less so with the advent of modern medical technology and the increased emphasis on outpatient care. However, house calls are still practiced today, particularly for patients who are homebound due to illness or disability, or for those who require palliative or end-of-life care. House calls can help improve access to care for these vulnerable populations and enhance patient satisfaction by providing personalized, convenient, and compassionate care in the comfort of their own homes.

Urban health is a branch of public health that focuses on the unique health challenges and disparities faced by urban populations. It encompasses the physical, mental, and social well-being of people living in urban areas, which are characterized by high population density, diverse cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds, and unique environmental exposures.

Urban health addresses a range of issues, including infectious diseases, chronic conditions, injuries, violence, and mental health disorders, as well as the social determinants of health such as housing, education, income, and access to healthcare services. It also considers the impact of urbanization on health, including the effects of pollution, noise, crowding, and lack of green spaces.

The goal of urban health is to promote health equity and improve the overall health outcomes of urban populations by addressing these challenges through evidence-based interventions, policies, and programs that are tailored to the unique needs of urban communities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "West Indies" is not a medical term. It is a geographical term that refers to a group of islands located in the Caribbean Sea, along with the adjacent coasts of Mexico, Central America, Colombia, and Venezuela. The term "West Indies" was used by Christopher Columbus to differentiate these islands from the East Indies (Southeast Asia) and is now commonly used to refer to this region. It includes many countries such as Jamaica, Cuba, Haiti, Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico among others. If you have any medical term that you would like me to define, please let me know!

Coronary artery disease, often simply referred to as coronary disease, is a condition in which the blood vessels that supply oxygen-rich blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked due to the buildup of fatty deposits called plaques. This can lead to chest pain (angina), shortness of breath, or in severe cases, a heart attack.

The medical definition of coronary artery disease is:

A condition characterized by the accumulation of atheromatous plaques in the walls of the coronary arteries, leading to decreased blood flow and oxygen supply to the myocardium (heart muscle). This can result in symptoms such as angina pectoris, shortness of breath, or arrhythmias, and may ultimately lead to myocardial infarction (heart attack) or heart failure.

Risk factors for coronary artery disease include age, smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity, and a family history of the condition. Lifestyle changes such as quitting smoking, exercising regularly, eating a healthy diet, and managing stress can help reduce the risk of developing coronary artery disease. Medical treatments may include medications to control blood pressure, cholesterol levels, or irregular heart rhythms, as well as procedures such as angioplasty or bypass surgery to improve blood flow to the heart.

Cognition refers to the mental processes involved in acquiring, processing, and utilizing information. These processes include perception, attention, memory, language, problem-solving, and decision-making. Cognitive functions allow us to interact with our environment, understand and respond to stimuli, learn new skills, and remember experiences.

In a medical context, cognitive function is often assessed as part of a neurological or psychiatric evaluation. Impairments in cognition can be caused by various factors, such as brain injury, neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's disease), infections, toxins, and mental health conditions. Assessing cognitive function helps healthcare professionals diagnose conditions, monitor disease progression, and develop treatment plans.

A mental disorder is a syndrome characterized by clinically significant disturbance in an individual's cognition, emotion regulation, or behavior. It's associated with distress and/or impaired functioning in social, occupational, or other important areas of life, often leading to a decrease in quality of life. These disorders are typically persistent and can be severe and disabling. They may be related to factors such as genetics, early childhood experiences, or trauma. Examples include depression, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and personality disorders. It's important to note that a diagnosis should be made by a qualified mental health professional.

Quality of Life (QOL) is a broad, multidimensional concept that usually includes an individual's physical health, psychological state, level of independence, social relationships, personal beliefs, and their relationship to salient features of their environment. It reflects the impact of disease and treatment on a patient's overall well-being and ability to function in daily life.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines QOL as "an individual's perception of their position in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards and concerns." It is a subjective concept, meaning it can vary greatly from person to person.

In healthcare, QOL is often used as an outcome measure in clinical trials and other research studies to assess the impact of interventions or treatments on overall patient well-being.

In the context of medicine, the term "ownership" is not typically used as a formal medical definition. However, it may be used informally to refer to the responsibility and authority that a healthcare provider has in managing a patient's care. For example, a physician may say that they "take ownership" of a patient's care, meaning that they will oversee and coordinate all aspects of the patient's medical treatment. Additionally, in medical research or clinical trials, "data ownership" refers to who has the rights to access, use, and share the data collected during the study.

Emigration is the process of leaving one's country of origin or habitual residence to settle in another country. It involves giving up the rights and privileges associated with citizenship in the country of origin and acquiring new rights and responsibilities as a citizen or resident of the destination country. Emigrants are people who choose to leave their native land to live elsewhere, often driven by factors such as economic opportunities, political instability, or conflict.

Immigration, on the other hand, is the process of entering and settling in a new country with the intention of becoming a permanent resident or citizen. Immigrants are individuals who come from another country to live in a new place, often seeking better job opportunities, education, or quality of life. They must comply with the immigration laws and regulations of the host country and may be required to undergo medical examinations, background checks, and other screening processes before being granted permission to enter and reside in the country.

In summary, emigration refers to leaving one's home country, while immigration refers to entering and settling in a new country.

Demography is the statistical study of populations, particularly in terms of size, distribution, and characteristics such as age, race, gender, and occupation. In medical contexts, demography is often used to analyze health-related data and trends within specific populations. This can include studying the prevalence of certain diseases or conditions, identifying disparities in healthcare access and outcomes, and evaluating the effectiveness of public health interventions. Demographic data can also be used to inform policy decisions and allocate resources to address population health needs.

Neoplasms are abnormal growths of cells or tissues in the body that serve no physiological function. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign neoplasms are typically slow growing and do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant neoplasms are aggressive, invasive, and can metastasize to distant sites.

Neoplasms occur when there is a dysregulation in the normal process of cell division and differentiation, leading to uncontrolled growth and accumulation of cells. This can result from genetic mutations or other factors such as viral infections, environmental exposures, or hormonal imbalances.

Neoplasms can develop in any organ or tissue of the body and can cause various symptoms depending on their size, location, and type. Treatment options for neoplasms include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, among others.

Dominance-subordination is a social hierarchy system that exists in many animal species, including humans, where individuals within a group establish a ranking or pecking order. This hierarchy helps to maintain order and reduce conflict within the group.

In dominance-subordination, dominant individuals are those who have priority access to resources such as food, mates, and space. They also tend to be more assertive and aggressive in their behavior towards other group members. Subordinate individuals, on the other hand, defer to the dominants and may show signs of submission, such as avoiding eye contact or averting their gaze.

The establishment of dominance-subordination relationships can occur through various means, including aggression, ritualized displays, or social manipulation. Once established, these relationships can be relatively stable over time, although they may shift in response to changes in the group's composition or external factors.

In a medical context, the term "dominance-subordination" is sometimes used to describe relationships between different physiological processes or responses within an individual. For example, one process may be dominant over another in terms of its influence on behavior or physiology. However, this usage is less common than the social hierarchy sense of the term.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Body Mass Index (BMI) is a measure used to assess whether a person has a healthy weight for their height. It's calculated by dividing a person's weight in kilograms by the square of their height in meters. Here is the medical definition:

Body Mass Index (BMI) = weight(kg) / [height(m)]^2

According to the World Health Organization, BMI categories are defined as follows:

* Less than 18.5: Underweight
* 18.5-24.9: Normal or healthy weight
* 25.0-29.9: Overweight
* 30.0 and above: Obese

It is important to note that while BMI can be a useful tool for identifying weight issues in populations, it does have limitations when applied to individuals. For example, it may not accurately reflect body fat distribution or muscle mass, which can affect health risks associated with excess weight. Therefore, BMI should be used as one of several factors when evaluating an individual's health status and risk for chronic diseases.

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a class of diseases that affect the heart and blood vessels. They are the leading cause of death globally, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The term "cardiovascular disease" refers to a group of conditions that include:

1. Coronary artery disease (CAD): This is the most common type of heart disease and occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked due to the buildup of cholesterol, fat, and other substances in the walls of the arteries. This can lead to chest pain, shortness of breath, or a heart attack.
2. Heart failure: This occurs when the heart is unable to pump blood efficiently to meet the body's needs. It can be caused by various conditions, including coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, and cardiomyopathy.
3. Stroke: A stroke occurs when the blood supply to a part of the brain is interrupted or reduced, often due to a clot or a ruptured blood vessel. This can cause brain damage or death.
4. Peripheral artery disease (PAD): This occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the limbs become narrowed or blocked, leading to pain, numbness, or weakness in the legs or arms.
5. Rheumatic heart disease: This is a complication of untreated strep throat and can cause damage to the heart valves, leading to heart failure or other complications.
6. Congenital heart defects: These are structural problems with the heart that are present at birth. They can range from mild to severe and may require medical intervention.
7. Cardiomyopathy: This is a disease of the heart muscle that makes it harder for the heart to pump blood efficiently. It can be caused by various factors, including genetics, infections, and certain medications.
8. Heart arrhythmias: These are abnormal heart rhythms that can cause the heart to beat too fast, too slow, or irregularly. They can lead to symptoms such as palpitations, dizziness, or fainting.
9. Valvular heart disease: This occurs when one or more of the heart valves become damaged or diseased, leading to problems with blood flow through the heart.
10. Aortic aneurysm and dissection: These are conditions that affect the aorta, the largest artery in the body. An aneurysm is a bulge in the aorta, while a dissection is a tear in the inner layer of the aorta. Both can be life-threatening if not treated promptly.

It's important to note that many of these conditions can be managed or treated with medical interventions such as medications, surgery, or lifestyle changes. If you have any concerns about your heart health, it's important to speak with a healthcare provider.

In epidemiology, the incidence of a disease is defined as the number of new cases of that disease within a specific population over a certain period of time. It is typically expressed as a rate, with the number of new cases in the numerator and the size of the population at risk in the denominator. Incidence provides information about the risk of developing a disease during a given time period and can be used to compare disease rates between different populations or to monitor trends in disease occurrence over time.

A rural population refers to people who live in areas that are outside of urban areas, typically defined as having fewer than 2,000 residents and lacking certain infrastructure and services such as running water, sewage systems, and paved roads. Rural populations often have less access to healthcare services, education, and economic opportunities compared to their urban counterparts. This population group can face unique health challenges, including higher rates of poverty, limited access to specialized medical care, and a greater exposure to environmental hazards such as agricultural chemicals and industrial pollutants.

Epidemiologic methods are systematic approaches used to investigate and understand the distribution, determinants, and outcomes of health-related events or diseases in a population. These methods are applied to study the patterns of disease occurrence and transmission, identify risk factors and causes, and evaluate interventions for prevention and control. The core components of epidemiologic methods include:

1. Descriptive Epidemiology: This involves the systematic collection and analysis of data on the who, what, when, and where of health events to describe their distribution in a population. It includes measures such as incidence, prevalence, mortality, and morbidity rates, as well as geographic and temporal patterns.

2. Analytical Epidemiology: This involves the use of statistical methods to examine associations between potential risk factors and health outcomes. It includes observational studies (cohort, case-control, cross-sectional) and experimental studies (randomized controlled trials). The goal is to identify causal relationships and quantify the strength of associations.

3. Experimental Epidemiology: This involves the design and implementation of interventions or experiments to test hypotheses about disease prevention and control. It includes randomized controlled trials, community trials, and other experimental study designs.

4. Surveillance and Monitoring: This involves ongoing systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of health-related data for early detection, tracking, and response to health events or diseases.

5. Ethical Considerations: Epidemiologic studies must adhere to ethical principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice. This includes obtaining informed consent, ensuring confidentiality, and minimizing harm to study participants.

Overall, epidemiologic methods provide a framework for investigating and understanding the complex interplay between host, agent, and environmental factors that contribute to the occurrence of health-related events or diseases in populations.

Health services accessibility refers to the degree to which individuals and populations are able to obtain needed health services in a timely manner. It includes factors such as physical access (e.g., distance, transportation), affordability (e.g., cost of services, insurance coverage), availability (e.g., supply of providers, hours of operation), and acceptability (e.g., cultural competence, language concordance).

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), accessibility is one of the key components of health system performance, along with responsiveness and fair financing. Improving accessibility to health services is essential for achieving universal health coverage and ensuring that everyone has access to quality healthcare without facing financial hardship. Factors that affect health services accessibility can vary widely between and within countries, and addressing these disparities requires a multifaceted approach that includes policy interventions, infrastructure development, and community engagement.

"Paternal exposure" is not a standard term in medicine, but it generally refers to the potential impact on offspring due to exposures experienced by the father prior to conception. These exposures could include environmental factors such as radiation, chemicals, or infections, as well as lifestyle factors such as smoking, alcohol use, or drug use. Some studies suggest that these exposures may have an effect on the developing embryo or fetus, but more research is needed to fully understand the extent and nature of these effects.

Rural health is a branch of healthcare that focuses on the unique health challenges and needs of people living in rural areas. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines rural health as "the state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, in the rural population."

Rural populations often face disparities in healthcare access and quality compared to their urban counterparts. Factors such as geographic isolation, poverty, lack of transportation, and a shortage of healthcare providers can contribute to these disparities. Rural health encompasses a broad range of services, including primary care, prevention, chronic disease management, mental health, oral health, and emergency medical services.

The goal of rural health is to improve the health outcomes of rural populations by addressing these unique challenges and providing high-quality, accessible healthcare services that meet their needs. This may involve innovative approaches such as telemedicine, mobile health clinics, and community-based programs to reach people in remote areas.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

I'm not able to provide a medical definition of "social responsibility" as it is not a term that has a specific meaning within the field of medicine. However, I can tell you that social responsibility generally refers to the idea that individuals and organizations have a duty to act in the best interests of society and to contribute to its overall well-being. This might involve taking actions to protect the environment, promote social justice, or support the needs of vulnerable populations. In a medical context, this could mean providing care to underserved communities, engaging in public health advocacy, or conducting research that addresses important societal issues.

In the field of medicine, twins are defined as two offspring produced by the same pregnancy. They can be either monozygotic (identical) or dizygotic (fraternal). Monozygotic twins develop from a single fertilized egg that splits into two separate embryos, resulting in individuals who share identical genetic material. Dizygotic twins, on the other hand, result from the fertilization of two separate eggs by two different sperm cells, leading to siblings who share about 50% of their genetic material, similar to non-twin siblings.

In the context of public health and medical research, a peer group is a social group whose members have similar interests, concerns, or social positions. Peer groups can play an important role in shaping individual behaviors, attitudes, and beliefs, particularly during adolescence and young adulthood. In research, studying peer groups can help researchers understand how social norms and influences affect health-related behaviors, such as substance use, sexual behavior, and mental health. It's worth noting that the term "peer group" doesn't have a specific medical definition, but it is widely used in public health and medical research to refer to these types of social groups.

Social determinants of health (SDOH) refer to the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age that have an impact on their health and quality of life. These factors include but are not limited to:

* Economic stability (e.g., poverty, employment, food security)
* Education access and quality
* Health care access and quality
* Neighborhood and built environment (e.g., housing, transportation, parks and recreation)
* Social and community context (e.g., discrimination, incarceration, social support)

SDOH are responsible for a significant portion of health inequities and can have a greater impact on health than genetic factors or individual behaviors. Addressing SDOH is critical to improving overall health and reducing disparities in health outcomes.

A chronic disease is a long-term medical condition that often progresses slowly over a period of years and requires ongoing management and care. These diseases are typically not fully curable, but symptoms can be managed to improve quality of life. Common chronic diseases include heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). They are often associated with advanced age, although they can also affect children and younger adults. Chronic diseases can have significant impacts on individuals' physical, emotional, and social well-being, as well as on healthcare systems and society at large.

A case-control study is an observational research design used to identify risk factors or causes of a disease or health outcome. In this type of study, individuals with the disease or condition (cases) are compared with similar individuals who do not have the disease or condition (controls). The exposure history or other characteristics of interest are then compared between the two groups to determine if there is an association between the exposure and the disease.

Case-control studies are often used when it is not feasible or ethical to conduct a randomized controlled trial, as they can provide valuable insights into potential causes of diseases or health outcomes in a relatively short period of time and at a lower cost than other study designs. However, because case-control studies rely on retrospective data collection, they are subject to biases such as recall bias and selection bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, it is important to carefully design and conduct case-control studies to minimize these potential sources of bias.

Obesity is a complex disease characterized by an excess accumulation of body fat to the extent that it negatively impacts health. It's typically defined using Body Mass Index (BMI), a measure calculated from a person's weight and height. A BMI of 30 or higher is indicative of obesity. However, it's important to note that while BMI can be a useful tool for identifying obesity in populations, it does not directly measure body fat and may not accurately reflect health status in individuals. Other factors such as waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and blood sugar levels should also be considered when assessing health risks associated with weight.

A social stigma is a socially constructed phenomenon where certain individuals or groups are labeled, discriminated against, and excluded because of their perceived differences, which may be based on characteristics such as race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, mental or physical abilities, or health status. These negative attitudes and behaviors can lead to unequal treatment, prejudice, and discrimination, resulting in significant harm to the stigmatized individuals' social, emotional, and psychological well-being.

In medical terms, a social stigma may be associated with certain health conditions, illnesses, or disabilities that are perceived as shameful, undesirable, or deviant by society. For example, people with mental illness, HIV/AIDS, substance use disorders, or sexually transmitted infections may experience social stigma, which can negatively impact their access to healthcare services, treatment outcomes, and overall quality of life.

The negative consequences of social stigma can be reduced through education, awareness, and advocacy efforts that challenge stereotypes, promote understanding and empathy, and foster inclusive and supportive communities.

African Americans are defined as individuals who have ancestry from any of the black racial groups of Africa. This term is often used to describe people living in the United States who have total or partial descent from enslaved African peoples. The term does not refer to a single ethnicity but is a broad term that includes various ethnic groups with diverse cultures, languages, and traditions. It's important to note that some individuals may prefer to identify as Black or of African descent rather than African American, depending on their personal identity and background.

Breastfeeding is the process of providing nutrition to an infant or young child by feeding them breast milk directly from the mother's breast. It is also known as nursing. Breast milk is the natural food for newborns and infants, and it provides all the nutrients they need to grow and develop during the first six months of life.

Breastfeeding has many benefits for both the mother and the baby. For the baby, breast milk contains antibodies that help protect against infections and diseases, and it can also reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), allergies, and obesity. For the mother, breastfeeding can help her lose weight after pregnancy, reduce the risk of certain types of cancer, and promote bonding with her baby.

Breastfeeding is recommended exclusively for the first six months of an infant's life, and then continued along with appropriate complementary foods until the child is at least two years old or beyond. However, it is important to note that every mother and baby pair is unique, and what works best for one may not work as well for another. It is recommended that mothers consult with their healthcare provider to determine the best feeding plan for themselves and their baby.

Depression is a mood disorder that is characterized by persistent feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and loss of interest in activities. It can also cause significant changes in sleep, appetite, energy level, concentration, and behavior. Depression can interfere with daily life and normal functioning, and it can increase the risk of suicide and other mental health disorders. The exact cause of depression is not known, but it is believed to be related to a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. There are several types of depression, including major depressive disorder, persistent depressive disorder, postpartum depression, and seasonal affective disorder. Treatment for depression typically involves a combination of medication and psychotherapy.

"Self-assessment" in the context of medicine and healthcare generally refers to the process by which an individual evaluates their own health status, symptoms, or healthcare needs. This can involve various aspects such as:

1. Recognizing and acknowledging one's own signs and symptoms of a potential health issue.
2. Assessing the severity and impact of these symptoms on daily life.
3. Determining whether medical attention is needed and, if so, deciding the urgency of such care.
4. Monitoring the effectiveness of treatment plans and making adjustments as necessary.

Self-assessment tools in healthcare can include questionnaires, surveys, or other structured methods to guide patients in evaluating their health status. These tools can be particularly useful in managing chronic conditions, promoting preventive care, and supporting patient autonomy and engagement in their own healthcare. However, self-assessment should not replace regular check-ups and consultations with healthcare professionals, who can provide more comprehensive assessments, diagnoses, and treatment recommendations based on their clinical expertise and access to additional information and resources.

A diet, in medical terms, refers to the planned and regular consumption of food and drinks. It is a balanced selection of nutrient-rich foods that an individual eats on a daily or periodic basis to meet their energy needs and maintain good health. A well-balanced diet typically includes a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and low-fat dairy products.

A diet may also be prescribed for therapeutic purposes, such as in the management of certain medical conditions like diabetes, hypertension, or obesity. In these cases, a healthcare professional may recommend specific restrictions or modifications to an individual's regular diet to help manage their condition and improve their overall health.

It is important to note that a healthy and balanced diet should be tailored to an individual's age, gender, body size, activity level, and any underlying medical conditions. Consulting with a healthcare professional, such as a registered dietitian or nutritionist, can help ensure that an individual's dietary needs are being met in a safe and effective way.

A census is a official count or survey of a population, typically conducted by a governmental authority to gather information about the demographics, economic characteristics, and other important data about the people living within its borders. In the medical context, censuses may refer to counts or surveys of specific populations, such as patients in a hospital or residents of a particular geographic area, to gather health-related data. This information can be used to inform public health policy, allocate resources, and plan for future healthcare needs.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Friends" is not a medical term. If you are referring to the term "friends" in the context of social relationships, it generally refers to individuals who share a mutual affection and enjoy spending time together. However, if you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I'd be happy to help!

"Health Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices" (HKAP) is a term used in public health to refer to the knowledge, beliefs, assumptions, and behaviors that individuals possess or engage in that are related to health. Here's a brief definition of each component:

1. Health Knowledge: Refers to the factual information and understanding that individuals have about various health-related topics, such as anatomy, physiology, disease processes, and healthy behaviors.
2. Attitudes: Represent the positive or negative evaluations, feelings, or dispositions that people hold towards certain health issues, practices, or services. These attitudes can influence their willingness to adopt and maintain healthy behaviors.
3. Practices: Encompass the specific actions or habits that individuals engage in related to their health, such as dietary choices, exercise routines, hygiene practices, and use of healthcare services.

HKAP is a multidimensional concept that helps public health professionals understand and address various factors influencing individual and community health outcomes. By assessing and addressing knowledge gaps, negative attitudes, or unhealthy practices, interventions can be designed to promote positive behavior change and improve overall health status.

The term "environment" in a medical context generally refers to the external conditions and surroundings that can have an impact on living organisms, including humans. This includes both physical factors such as air quality, water supply, soil composition, temperature, and radiation, as well as biological factors such as the presence of microorganisms, plants, and animals.

In public health and epidemiology, the term "environmental exposure" is often used to describe the contact between an individual and a potentially harmful environmental agent, such as air pollution or contaminated water. These exposures can have significant impacts on human health, contributing to a range of diseases and disorders, including respiratory illnesses, cancer, neurological disorders, and reproductive problems.

Efforts to protect and improve the environment are therefore critical for promoting human health and preventing disease. This includes measures to reduce pollution, conserve natural resources, promote sustainable development, and mitigate the impacts of climate change.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Schools" is not a medical term. It generally refers to educational institutions where children or adults receive instruction in various subjects. If you are asking about a medical condition that might be associated with the word "school," it's possible you could mean "psychological disorders that first present or become evident during the school-aged period (approximately 5-18 years of age)." These disorders can include, but are not limited to, ADHD, learning disabilities, anxiety disorders, and mood disorders. However, without more context, it's difficult for me to provide a more specific answer.

Poisoning is defined medically as the harmful, sometimes fatal, effect produced by a substance when it is introduced into or absorbed by living tissue. This can occur through various routes such as ingestion, inhalation, injection, or absorption through the skin. The severity of poisoning depends on the type and amount of toxin involved, the route of exposure, and the individual's age, health status, and susceptibility. Symptoms can range from mild irritation to serious conditions affecting multiple organs, and may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, difficulty breathing, seizures, or unconsciousness. Immediate medical attention is required in cases of poisoning to prevent severe health consequences or death.

Intelligence tests are standardized procedures used to assess various aspects of an individual's cognitive abilities, such as their problem-solving skills, logical reasoning, verbal comprehension, and spatial relations. These tests provide a quantitative measurement of intelligence, often reported as an Intelligence Quotient (IQ) score. It is important to note that intelligence is a multifaceted concept, and intelligence tests measure only certain aspects of it. They should not be considered the sole determinant of an individual's overall intellectual capabilities or potential.

Proportional hazards models are a type of statistical analysis used in medical research to investigate the relationship between covariates (predictor variables) and survival times. The most common application of proportional hazards models is in the Cox regression model, which is named after its developer, Sir David Cox.

In a proportional hazards model, the hazard rate or risk of an event occurring at a given time is assumed to be proportional to the hazard rate of a reference group, after adjusting for the covariates. This means that the ratio of the hazard rates between any two individuals remains constant over time, regardless of their survival times.

Mathematically, the hazard function h(t) at time t for an individual with a set of covariates X can be expressed as:

h(t|X) = h0(t) \* exp(β1X1 + β2X2 + ... + βpXp)

where h0(t) is the baseline hazard function, X1, X2, ..., Xp are the covariates, and β1, β2, ..., βp are the regression coefficients that represent the effect of each covariate on the hazard rate.

The assumption of proportionality is crucial in the interpretation of the results from a Cox regression model. If the assumption is violated, then the estimated regression coefficients may be biased and misleading. Therefore, it is important to test for the proportional hazards assumption before interpreting the results of a Cox regression analysis.

Social work, psychiatric, is a specialized field of social work practice that focuses on the mental, emotional, and behavioral well-being of individuals, families, groups, and communities. It involves the application of social work principles, theories, and interventions to address the psychosocial needs and challenges of people living with mental illness or experiencing psychological distress.

Psychiatric social workers collaborate with other mental health professionals, such as psychiatrists, psychologists, and nurses, to provide comprehensive care for individuals with psychiatric disorders. They conduct biopsychosocial assessments, develop treatment plans, provide counseling and therapy, coordinate services, advocate for patients' rights, and engage in case management and discharge planning.

Psychiatric social workers also play a critical role in promoting mental health awareness, reducing stigma associated with mental illness, and advocating for policies that support the mental health needs of individuals and communities. They may work in various settings, including hospitals, clinics, community mental health centers, private practices, and residential treatment facilities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "sociology" is not a term that has a medical definition. Sociology is a social science that focuses on the study of human behavior and interactions in society, including the development, structure, and functioning of human societies. It is distinct from medical disciplines which focus on the diagnosis and treatment of health conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "History, 20th Century" is a broad and complex topic that refers to the events, developments, and transformations that occurred throughout the world during the 1900s. It is not a medical term or concept. If you're interested in learning more about this historical period, I would recommend consulting a history textbook, reputable online resources, or speaking with a historian. They can provide detailed information about the political, social, economic, and cultural changes that took place during the 20th century.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Linear Models" is actually a term from the field of statistics and machine learning, rather than medicine. A linear model is a type of statistical model that is used to analyze the relationship between two or more variables. In a linear model, the relationship between the dependent variable (the outcome or result) and the independent variable(s) (the factors being studied) is assumed to be linear, meaning that it can be described by a straight line on a graph.

The equation for a simple linear model with one independent variable (x) and one dependent variable (y) looks like this:

y = β0 + β1*x + ε

In this equation, β0 is the y-intercept or the value of y when x equals zero, β1 is the slope or the change in y for each unit increase in x, and ε is the error term or the difference between the actual values of y and the predicted values of y based on the linear model.

Linear models are widely used in medical research to study the relationship between various factors (such as exposure to a risk factor or treatment) and health outcomes (such as disease incidence or mortality). They can also be used to adjust for confounding variables, which are factors that may influence both the independent variable and the dependent variable, and thus affect the observed relationship between them.

Emotions are complex psychological states that involve three distinct components: a subjective experience, a physiological response, and a behavioral or expressive response. Emotions can be short-lived, such as a flash of anger, or more long-lasting, such as enduring sadness. They can also vary in intensity, from mild irritation to intense joy or fear.

Emotions are often distinguished from other psychological states, such as moods and temperament, which may be less specific and more enduring. Emotions are typically thought to have a clear cause or object, such as feeling happy when you receive good news or feeling anxious before a job interview.

There are many different emotions that people can experience, including happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, disgust, and shame. These emotions are often thought to serve important adaptive functions, helping individuals respond to challenges and opportunities in their environment.

In medical contexts, emotions may be relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of various mental health conditions, such as depression, anxiety disorders, and bipolar disorder. Abnormalities in emotional processing and regulation have been implicated in many psychiatric illnesses, and therapies that target these processes may be effective in treating these conditions.

I apologize, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or condition. It is the largest country in both South America and Latin America by land area and population. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, please provide more information and I will do my best to help.

Social reinforcement is a term used in psychology and psychiatry to describe the process by which certain behaviors are strengthened or increased due to positive social consequences. These consequences can include things like praise, attention, affection, or other forms of social recognition.

For example, if a child receives a lot of positive attention and praise from their parents for completing their homework, they may be more likely to continue doing their homework in the future because they have learned that this behavior is associated with positive social reinforcement. Similarly, if an employee is praised and recognized by their manager for a job well done, they may be more motivated to work hard and perform at a high level in order to receive further recognition and reinforcement.

Social reinforcement can play an important role in shaping behavior and promoting positive social interactions. However, it's important to note that the use of social reinforcement should be balanced with other forms of reinforcement, such as intrinsic motivation and self-efficacy, to ensure that individuals are motivated to engage in behaviors for their own sake and not just to receive positive social feedback.

In the context of medicine and psychology, personality is a complex concept that refers to the unique patterns of thoughts, behaviors, and emotions that define an individual and differentiate them from others. It is the set of characteristics that influence how we perceive the world, how we relate to other people, and how we cope with stress and challenges.

Personality is thought to be relatively stable over time, although it can also evolve and change in response to life experiences and maturation. It is shaped by a combination of genetic factors, environmental influences, and developmental experiences.

There are many different theories and models of personality, including the Five Factor Model (FFM), which identifies five broad domains of personality: openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism. Other approaches to understanding personality include psychoanalytic theory, humanistic psychology, and trait theory.

It's important to note that while the term "personality" is often used in everyday language to describe someone's behavior or demeanor, in medical and psychological contexts it refers to a more complex and multifaceted construct.

Eczema is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the skin, which leads to symptoms such as redness, itching, scaling, and blistering. It is often used to describe atopic dermatitis, a chronic relapsing form of eczema, although there are several other types of eczema with different causes and characteristics.

Atopic dermatitis is believed to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and it often affects people with a family history of allergic conditions such as asthma or hay fever. The condition typically begins in infancy or childhood and can persist into adulthood, although it may improve over time.

Eczema can affect any part of the body, but it is most commonly found on the hands, feet, behind the knees, inside the elbows, and on the face. The rash of eczema is often accompanied by dry, scaly skin, and people with the condition may experience periods of flare-ups and remissions.

Treatment for eczema typically involves a combination of moisturizers to keep the skin hydrated, topical corticosteroids to reduce inflammation, and antihistamines to relieve itching. In severe cases, systemic immunosuppressive drugs may be necessary. It is also important for people with eczema to avoid triggers that can worsen their symptoms, such as harsh soaps, scratchy fabrics, and stress.

"Motor activity" is a general term used in the field of medicine and neuroscience to refer to any kind of physical movement or action that is generated by the body's motor system. The motor system includes the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and muscles that work together to produce movements such as walking, talking, reaching for an object, or even subtle actions like moving your eyes.

Motor activity can be voluntary, meaning it is initiated intentionally by the individual, or involuntary, meaning it is triggered automatically by the nervous system without conscious control. Examples of voluntary motor activity include deliberately lifting your arm or kicking a ball, while examples of involuntary motor activity include heartbeat, digestion, and reflex actions like jerking your hand away from a hot stove.

Abnormalities in motor activity can be a sign of neurological or muscular disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, cerebral palsy, or multiple sclerosis. Assessment of motor activity is often used in the diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "social planning" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a term that is more commonly used in the fields of sociology and community development, where it refers to the processes and actions taken to improve the social aspects of a community or population, such as through the development and implementation of policies, programs, and services aimed at addressing social determinants of health and promoting social equity.

However, in the context of healthcare and medicine, "social planning" may refer to the process of coordinating and integrating various social services and supports for patients, particularly those with complex medical and social needs. This can include connecting patients with community resources such as housing, food assistance, transportation, and other support services that can help them manage their health and improve their overall well-being.

In summary, while "social planning" is not a term with a specific medical definition, it is a concept that is relevant to healthcare and medicine in terms of addressing the social determinants of health and coordinating care for patients with complex needs.

A registry in the context of medicine is a collection or database of standardized information about individuals who share a certain condition or attribute, such as a disease, treatment, exposure, or demographic group. These registries are used for various purposes, including:

* Monitoring and tracking the natural history of diseases and conditions
* Evaluating the safety and effectiveness of medical treatments and interventions
* Conducting research and generating hypotheses for further study
* Providing information to patients, clinicians, and researchers
* Informing public health policy and decision-making

Registries can be established for a wide range of purposes, including disease-specific registries (such as cancer or diabetes registries), procedure-specific registries (such as joint replacement or cardiac surgery registries), and population-based registries (such as birth defects or cancer registries). Data collected in registries may include demographic information, clinical data, laboratory results, treatment details, and outcomes.

Registries can be maintained by a variety of organizations, including hospitals, clinics, academic medical centers, professional societies, government agencies, and industry. Participation in registries is often voluntary, although some registries may require informed consent from participants. Data collected in registries are typically de-identified to protect the privacy of individuals.

Body weight is the measure of the force exerted on a scale or balance by an object's mass, most commonly expressed in units such as pounds (lb) or kilograms (kg). In the context of medical definitions, body weight typically refers to an individual's total weight, which includes their skeletal muscle, fat, organs, and bodily fluids.

Healthcare professionals often use body weight as a basic indicator of overall health status, as it can provide insights into various aspects of a person's health, such as nutritional status, metabolic function, and risk factors for certain diseases. For example, being significantly underweight or overweight can increase the risk of developing conditions like malnutrition, diabetes, heart disease, and certain types of cancer.

It is important to note that body weight alone may not provide a complete picture of an individual's health, as it does not account for factors such as muscle mass, bone density, or body composition. Therefore, healthcare professionals often use additional measures, such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and blood tests, to assess overall health status more comprehensively.

Adolescent behavior refers to the typical behaviors, attitudes, and emotions exhibited by individuals who are within the developmental stage of adolescence, which generally falls between the ages of 10-24 years old. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines an adolescent as "an individual who is in the process of growing from childhood to adulthood, and whose age ranges from 10 to 19 years." However, it's important to note that the specific age range can vary depending on cultural, societal, and individual factors.

During adolescence, individuals experience significant physical, cognitive, emotional, and social changes that can influence their behavior. Some common behaviors exhibited by adolescents include:

1. Increased independence and autonomy seeking: Adolescents may start to challenge authority figures, question rules, and seek more control over their lives as they develop a stronger sense of self.
2. Peer influence: Adolescents often place greater importance on their relationships with peers and may engage in behaviors that are influenced by their friends, such as experimenting with substances or adopting certain fashion styles.
3. Risk-taking behavior: Adolescents are more likely to engage in risky behaviors, such as reckless driving, substance use, and unsafe sexual practices, due to a combination of factors, including brain development, peer pressure, and the desire for novelty and excitement.
4. Emotional volatility: Hormonal changes and brain development during adolescence can lead to increased emotional intensity and instability, resulting in mood swings, irritability, and impulsivity.
5. Identity exploration: Adolescents are often preoccupied with discovering their own identity, values, beliefs, and goals, which may result in experimentation with different hairstyles, clothing, hobbies, or relationships.
6. Cognitive development: Adolescents develop the ability to think more abstractly, consider multiple perspectives, and engage in complex problem-solving, which can lead to improved decision-making and self-reflection.
7. Formation of long-term relationships: Adolescence is a critical period for establishing close friendships and romantic relationships that can have lasting impacts on an individual's social and emotional development.

It is essential to recognize that adolescent development is a complex and dynamic process, and individual experiences may vary significantly. While some risky behaviors are common during this stage, it is crucial to provide support, guidance, and resources to help adolescents navigate the challenges they face and promote healthy development.

Multivariate analysis is a statistical method used to examine the relationship between multiple independent variables and a dependent variable. It allows for the simultaneous examination of the effects of two or more independent variables on an outcome, while controlling for the effects of other variables in the model. This technique can be used to identify patterns, associations, and interactions among multiple variables, and is commonly used in medical research to understand complex health outcomes and disease processes. Examples of multivariate analysis methods include multiple regression, factor analysis, cluster analysis, and discriminant analysis.

The term "European Continental Ancestry Group" is a medical/ethnic classification that refers to individuals who trace their genetic ancestry to the continent of Europe. This group includes people from various ethnic backgrounds and nationalities, such as Northern, Southern, Eastern, and Western European descent. It is often used in research and medical settings for population studies or to identify genetic patterns and predispositions to certain diseases that may be more common in specific ancestral groups. However, it's important to note that this classification can oversimplify the complex genetic diversity within and between populations, and should be used with caution.

Occupational diseases are health conditions or illnesses that occur as a result of exposure to hazards in the workplace. These hazards can include physical, chemical, and biological agents, as well as ergonomic factors and work-related psychosocial stressors. Examples of occupational diseases include respiratory illnesses caused by inhaling dust or fumes, hearing loss due to excessive noise exposure, and musculoskeletal disorders caused by repetitive movements or poor ergonomics. The development of an occupational disease is typically related to the nature of the work being performed and the conditions in which it is carried out. It's important to note that these diseases can be prevented or minimized through proper risk assessment, implementation of control measures, and adherence to safety regulations.

Data collection in the medical context refers to the systematic gathering of information relevant to a specific research question or clinical situation. This process involves identifying and recording data elements, such as demographic characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies, from various sources including patient interviews, medical records, and diagnostic tests. The data collected is used to support clinical decision-making, inform research hypotheses, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. It is essential that data collection is performed in a standardized and unbiased manner to ensure the validity and reliability of the results.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

I'm not aware of a specific medical definition for "Continental Population Groups." However, in the context of genetics and population health, continental population groups often refer to the major population divisions based on genetic ancestry and geographical origin. These groups typically include:

1. African: Individuals with recent ancestry primarily from Africa, particularly sub-Saharan Africa.
2. European: Individuals with recent ancestry primarily from Europe.
3. Asian: Individuals with recent ancestry primarily from Asia, including East Asia, South Asia, and Central Asia.
4. Native American: Individuals with recent ancestry primarily from the indigenous populations of North, Central, and South America.
5. Oceanian: Individuals with recent ancestry primarily from Australia, New Guinea, and neighboring islands in the Pacific region.

It is important to note that these categories are not exhaustive or mutually exclusive, as human migration and admixture have led to a complex web of genetic ancestries. Furthermore, using continental population labels can oversimplify the rich diversity within each group and may perpetuate harmful stereotypes or misunderstandings about racial and ethnic identities.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

The term "Theoretical Models" is used in various scientific fields, including medicine, to describe a representation of a complex system or phenomenon. It is a simplified framework that explains how different components of the system interact with each other and how they contribute to the overall behavior of the system. Theoretical models are often used in medical research to understand and predict the outcomes of diseases, treatments, or public health interventions.

A theoretical model can take many forms, such as mathematical equations, computer simulations, or conceptual diagrams. It is based on a set of assumptions and hypotheses about the underlying mechanisms that drive the system. By manipulating these variables and observing the effects on the model's output, researchers can test their assumptions and generate new insights into the system's behavior.

Theoretical models are useful for medical research because they allow scientists to explore complex systems in a controlled and systematic way. They can help identify key drivers of disease or treatment outcomes, inform the design of clinical trials, and guide the development of new interventions. However, it is important to recognize that theoretical models are simplifications of reality and may not capture all the nuances and complexities of real-world systems. Therefore, they should be used in conjunction with other forms of evidence, such as experimental data and observational studies, to inform medical decision-making.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Italy" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in Southern Europe. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder characterized by disturbances in thought, perception, emotion, and behavior. It often includes hallucinations (usually hearing voices), delusions, paranoia, and disorganized speech and behavior. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in late adolescence or early adulthood. Schizophrenia is a complex, chronic condition that requires ongoing treatment and management. It significantly impairs social and occupational functioning, and it's often associated with reduced life expectancy due to comorbid medical conditions. The exact causes of schizophrenia are not fully understood, but research suggests that genetic, environmental, and neurodevelopmental factors play a role in its development.

Suicide is defined in the medical field as the intentional taking of one's own life. It is a complex phenomenon with various contributing factors, including psychological, biological, environmental, and sociocultural elements. Suicide is a significant global public health concern that requires comprehensive understanding, prevention, and intervention strategies. If you or someone you know is struggling with thoughts of self-harm or suicide, it's essential to seek help from a mental health professional immediately.

The term "body constitution" is often used in traditional systems of medicine, such as Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Ayurveda. It refers to the unique combination of physical and psychological characteristics that make up an individual's inherent nature and predisposition to certain health conditions. In TCM, for example, a person's body constitution may be classified as being predominantly hot, cold, damp, or dry, which can influence their susceptibility to certain diseases and their response to treatment. Similarly, in Ayurveda, an individual's constitution is determined by the balance of three fundamental energies or doshas: Vata, Pitta, and Kapha. Understanding a person's body constitution is thought to be essential for developing a personalized approach to healthcare that addresses their unique needs and tendencies. However, it should be noted that this concept is not widely recognized in modern Western medicine.

Exercise is defined in the medical context as a physical activity that is planned, structured, and repetitive, with the primary aim of improving or maintaining one or more components of physical fitness. Components of physical fitness include cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Exercise can be classified based on its intensity (light, moderate, or vigorous), duration (length of time), and frequency (number of times per week). Common types of exercise include aerobic exercises, such as walking, jogging, cycling, and swimming; resistance exercises, such as weightlifting; flexibility exercises, such as stretching; and balance exercises. Exercise has numerous health benefits, including reducing the risk of chronic diseases, improving mental health, and enhancing overall quality of life.

Loneliness is not a medical condition itself, but it's a state of distress or discomfort that can have significant physical and mental health consequences. The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines loneliness as "being without company" and "feeling sad because one has no friends or company." While there isn't a specific medical definition for loneliness, it is widely recognized by healthcare professionals as a risk factor for various negative health outcomes.

Chronic loneliness can contribute to mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances. It may also have physical health consequences, including increased risks of cardiovascular disease, weakened immune system, cognitive decline, and even premature mortality. Therefore, addressing loneliness is an essential aspect of maintaining overall well-being and preventing various health complications.

Contraception is the use of various devices, methods, or medications to prevent pregnancy. The term is derived from the Latin words "contra" meaning "against" and "conceptio" meaning "conception." Contraceptive methods can be broadly categorized into temporary and permanent methods. Temporary methods include barriers such as condoms, diaphragms, cervical caps, and sponges; hormonal methods like the pill, patch, ring, injection, and emergency contraception; and fertility awareness-based methods that involve tracking ovulation and avoiding intercourse during fertile periods. Permanent methods include surgical procedures such as tubal ligation for women and vasectomy for men.

The primary goal of contraception is to prevent the sperm from reaching and fertilizing the egg, thereby preventing pregnancy. However, some contraceptive methods also offer additional benefits such as reducing the risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and regulating menstrual cycles. It's important to note that while contraception can prevent pregnancy, it does not protect against STIs, so using condoms is still recommended for individuals who are at risk of contracting STIs.

When choosing a contraceptive method, it's essential to consider factors such as effectiveness, safety, ease of use, cost, and personal preferences. It's also important to consult with a healthcare provider to determine the most appropriate method based on individual health history and needs.

Anxiety: A feeling of worry, nervousness, or unease, typically about an imminent event or something with an uncertain outcome. In a medical context, anxiety refers to a mental health disorder characterized by feelings of excessive and persistent worry, fear, or panic that interfere with daily activities. It can also be a symptom of other medical conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes, or substance abuse disorders. Anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and phobias.

Health services needs refer to the population's requirement for healthcare services based on their health status, disease prevalence, and clinical guidelines. These needs can be categorized into normative needs (based on expert opinions or clinical guidelines) and expressed needs (based on individuals' perceptions of their own healthcare needs).

On the other hand, health services demand refers to the quantity of healthcare services that consumers are willing and able to pay for, given their preferences, values, and financial resources. Demand is influenced by various factors such as price, income, education level, and cultural beliefs.

It's important to note that while needs represent a population's requirement for healthcare services, demand reflects the actual utilization of these services. Understanding both health services needs and demand is crucial in planning and delivering effective healthcare services that meet the population's requirements while ensuring efficient resource allocation.

In the context of healthcare and medicine, "minority groups" refer to populations that are marginalized or disadvantaged due to factors such as race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability status, or socioeconomic status. These groups often experience disparities in healthcare access, quality, and outcomes compared to the dominant or majority group.

Minority groups may face barriers to care such as language barriers, cultural differences, discrimination, lack of trust in the healthcare system, and limited access to insurance or affordable care. As a result, they may have higher rates of chronic diseases, poorer health outcomes, and lower life expectancy compared to the majority population.

Healthcare providers and policymakers must recognize and address these disparities by implementing culturally sensitive and equitable practices, increasing access to care for marginalized populations, and promoting diversity and inclusion in healthcare education and leadership.

The term "African Continental Ancestry Group" is a racial category used in the field of genetics and population health to describe individuals who have ancestral origins in the African continent. This group includes people from diverse ethnic backgrounds, cultures, and languages across the African continent. It's important to note that this term is used for genetic and epidemiological research purposes and should not be used to make assumptions about an individual's personal identity, culture, or experiences.

It's also worth noting that there is significant genetic diversity within Africa, and using a single category to describe all individuals with African ancestry can oversimplify this diversity. Therefore, it's more accurate and informative to specify the particular population or region of African ancestry when discussing genetic research or health outcomes.

Population surveillance in a public health and medical context refers to the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of health-related data for a defined population over time. It aims to monitor the health status, identify emerging health threats or trends, and evaluate the impact of interventions within that population. This information is used to inform public health policy, prioritize healthcare resources, and guide disease prevention and control efforts. Population surveillance can involve various data sources, such as vital records, disease registries, surveys, and electronic health records.

Animal communication is the transmission of information from one animal to another. This can occur through a variety of means, including visual, auditory, tactile, and chemical signals. For example, animals may use body postures, facial expressions, vocalizations, touch, or the release of chemicals (such as pheromones) to convey messages to conspecifics.

Animal communication can serve a variety of functions, including coordinating group activities, warning others of danger, signaling reproductive status, and establishing social hierarchies. In some cases, animal communication may also involve the use of sophisticated cognitive abilities, such as the ability to understand and interpret complex signals or to learn and remember the meanings of different signals.

It is important to note that while animals are capable of communicating with one another, this does not necessarily mean that they have language in the same sense that humans do. Language typically involves a system of arbitrary symbols that are used to convey meaning, and it is not clear to what extent animals are able to use such symbolic systems. However, many animals are certainly able to communicate effectively using their own species-specific signals and behaviors.

Psychological models are theoretical frameworks used in psychology to explain and predict mental processes and behaviors. They are simplified representations of complex phenomena, consisting of interrelated concepts, assumptions, and hypotheses that describe how various factors interact to produce specific outcomes. These models can be quantitative (e.g., mathematical equations) or qualitative (e.g., conceptual diagrams) in nature and may draw upon empirical data, theoretical insights, or both.

Psychological models serve several purposes:

1. They provide a systematic and organized way to understand and describe psychological phenomena.
2. They generate hypotheses and predictions that can be tested through empirical research.
3. They integrate findings from different studies and help synthesize knowledge across various domains of psychology.
4. They inform the development of interventions and treatments for mental health disorders.

Examples of psychological models include:

1. The Five Factor Model (FFM) of personality, which posits that individual differences in personality can be described along five broad dimensions: Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism.
2. The Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) model, which suggests that maladaptive thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are interconnected and can be changed through targeted interventions.
3. The Dual Process Theory of Attitudes, which proposes that attitudes are formed and influenced by two distinct processes: a rapid, intuitive process (heuristic) and a slower, deliberative process (systematic).
4. The Social Cognitive Theory, which emphasizes the role of observational learning, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations in shaping behavior.
5. The Attachment Theory, which describes the dynamics of long-term relationships between humans, particularly the parent-child relationship.

It is important to note that psychological models are provisional and subject to revision or replacement as new evidence emerges. They should be considered as useful tools for understanding and explaining psychological phenomena rather than definitive truths.

Congenital abnormalities, also known as birth defects, are structural or functional anomalies that are present at birth. These abnormalities can develop at any point during fetal development, and they can affect any part of the body. They can be caused by genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both.

Congenital abnormalities can range from mild to severe and may include structural defects such as heart defects, neural tube defects, and cleft lip and palate, as well as functional defects such as intellectual disabilities and sensory impairments. Some congenital abnormalities may be visible at birth, while others may not become apparent until later in life.

In some cases, congenital abnormalities may be detected through prenatal testing, such as ultrasound or amniocentesis. In other cases, they may not be diagnosed until after the baby is born. Treatment for congenital abnormalities varies depending on the type and severity of the defect, and may include surgery, therapy, medication, or a combination of these approaches.

Autistic Disorder, also known as Autism or Classic Autism, is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects communication and behavior. It is characterized by:

1. Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across multiple contexts, including:
* Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity;
* Deficits in nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction;
* Deficits in developing, maintaining, and understanding relationships.
2. Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities, as manifested by at least two of the following:
* Stereotyped or repetitive motor movements, use of objects, or speech;
* Insistence on sameness, inflexible adherence to routines, or ritualized patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior;
* Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus;
* Hyper- or hyporeactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of the environment.
3. Symptoms must be present in the early developmental period (but may not become fully manifest until social demands exceed limited capacities) and limit or impair everyday functioning.
4. Symptoms do not occur exclusively during the course of a schizophrenia spectrum disorder or other psychotic disorders.

Autistic Disorder is part of the autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), which also include Asperger's Syndrome and Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS). The current diagnostic term for this category of conditions, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), is Autism Spectrum Disorder.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "workplace" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. The term "workplace" generally refers to a place where people work or carry out their jobs. It could be an office, a factory, a construction site, a retail store, or any other location where work-related activities take place.

If you're looking for a term related to health or medicine that describes a physical location, some examples might include "healthcare facility," "clinic," "hospital," "operating room," or "examination room." If you could provide more context or clarify what you're looking for, I'd be happy to help further!

Immunoglobulin class switching, also known as isotype switching or class switch recombination (CSR), is a biological process that occurs in B lymphocytes as part of the adaptive immune response. This mechanism allows a mature B cell to change the type of antibody it produces from one class to another (e.g., from IgM to IgG, IgA, or IgE) while keeping the same antigen-binding specificity.

During immunoglobulin class switching, the constant region genes of the heavy chain undergo a DNA recombination event, which results in the deletion of the original constant region exons and the addition of new constant region exons downstream. This switch allows the B cell to express different effector functions through the production of antibodies with distinct constant regions, tailoring the immune response to eliminate pathogens more effectively. The process is regulated by various cytokines and signals from T cells and is critical for mounting an effective humoral immune response.

Sexual behavior in animals refers to a variety of behaviors related to reproduction and mating that occur between members of the same species. These behaviors can include courtship displays, mating rituals, and various physical acts. The specific forms of sexual behavior displayed by a given species are influenced by a combination of genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors.

In some animals, sexual behavior is closely tied to reproductive cycles and may only occur during certain times of the year or under specific conditions. In other species, sexual behavior may be more frequent and less closely tied to reproduction, serving instead as a means of social bonding or communication.

It's important to note that while humans are animals, the term "sexual behavior" is often used in a more specific sense to refer to sexual activities between human beings. The study of sexual behavior in animals is an important area of research within the field of animal behavior and can provide insights into the evolutionary origins of human sexual behavior as well as the underlying mechanisms that drive it.

Women's health is a branch of healthcare that focuses on the unique health needs, conditions, and concerns of women throughout their lifespan. It covers a broad range of topics including menstruation, fertility, pregnancy, menopause, breast health, sexual health, mental health, and chronic diseases that are more common in women such as osteoporosis and autoimmune disorders. Women's health also addresses issues related to gender-based violence, socioeconomic factors, and environmental impacts on women's health. It is aimed at promoting and maintaining the physical, emotional, and reproductive well-being of women, and preventing and treating diseases and conditions that disproportionately affect them.

"Prenatal exposure delayed effects" refer to the adverse health outcomes or symptoms that become apparent in an individual during their development or later in life, which are caused by exposure to certain environmental factors or substances while they were still in the womb. These effects may not be immediately observable at birth and can take weeks, months, years, or even decades to manifest. They can result from maternal exposure to various agents such as infectious diseases, medications, illicit drugs, tobacco smoke, alcohol, or environmental pollutants during pregnancy. The delayed effects can impact multiple organ systems and may include physical, cognitive, behavioral, and developmental abnormalities. It is important to note that the risk and severity of these effects can depend on several factors, including the timing, duration, and intensity of the exposure, as well as the individual's genetic susceptibility.

A confidence interval (CI) is a range of values that is likely to contain the true value of a population parameter with a certain level of confidence. It is commonly used in statistical analysis to express the uncertainty associated with estimates derived from sample data.

For example, if we calculate a 95% confidence interval for the mean height of a population based on a sample of individuals, we can say that we are 95% confident that the true population mean height falls within the calculated range. The width of the confidence interval gives us an idea of how precise our estimate is - narrower intervals indicate more precise estimates, while wider intervals suggest greater uncertainty.

Confidence intervals are typically calculated using statistical formulas that take into account the sample size, standard deviation, and level of confidence desired. They can be used to compare different groups or to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions in medical research.

Tobacco smoke pollution is not typically defined in medical terms, but it refers to the presence of tobacco smoke in indoor or outdoor environments, which can have negative effects on air quality and human health. It is also known as secondhand smoke or environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). This type of smoke is a mixture of sidestream smoke (the smoke given off by a burning cigarette) and mainstream smoke (the smoke exhaled by a smoker).

The medical community recognizes tobacco smoke pollution as a serious health hazard. It contains more than 7,000 chemicals, hundreds of which are toxic and about 70 that can cause cancer. Exposure to tobacco smoke pollution can cause a range of adverse health effects, including respiratory symptoms, lung cancer, heart disease, and stroke. In children, it can also lead to ear infections, asthma attacks, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Therefore, many laws and regulations have been implemented worldwide to protect people from tobacco smoke pollution, such as smoking bans in public places and workplaces.

Risk assessment in the medical context refers to the process of identifying, evaluating, and prioritizing risks to patients, healthcare workers, or the community related to healthcare delivery. It involves determining the likelihood and potential impact of adverse events or hazards, such as infectious diseases, medication errors, or medical devices failures, and implementing measures to mitigate or manage those risks. The goal of risk assessment is to promote safe and high-quality care by identifying areas for improvement and taking action to minimize harm.

Decision-making is the cognitive process of selecting a course of action from among multiple alternatives. In a medical context, decision-making refers to the process by which healthcare professionals and patients make choices about medical tests, treatments, or management options based on a thorough evaluation of available information, including the patient's preferences, values, and circumstances.

The decision-making process in medicine typically involves several steps:

1. Identifying the problem or issue that requires a decision.
2. Gathering relevant information about the patient's medical history, current condition, diagnostic test results, treatment options, and potential outcomes.
3. Considering the benefits, risks, and uncertainties associated with each option.
4. Evaluating the patient's preferences, values, and goals.
5. Selecting the most appropriate course of action based on a careful weighing of the available evidence and the patient's individual needs and circumstances.
6. Communicating the decision to the patient and ensuring that they understand the rationale behind it, as well as any potential risks or benefits.
7. Monitoring the outcomes of the decision and adjusting the course of action as needed based on ongoing evaluation and feedback.

Effective decision-making in medicine requires a thorough understanding of medical evidence, clinical expertise, and patient preferences. It also involves careful consideration of ethical principles, such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. Ultimately, the goal of decision-making in healthcare is to promote the best possible outcomes for patients while minimizing harm and respecting their individual needs and values.

"Random allocation," also known as "random assignment" or "randomization," is a process used in clinical trials and other research studies to distribute participants into different intervention groups (such as experimental group vs. control group) in a way that minimizes selection bias and ensures the groups are comparable at the start of the study.

In random allocation, each participant has an equal chance of being assigned to any group, and the assignment is typically made using a computer-generated randomization schedule or other objective methods. This process helps to ensure that any differences between the groups are due to the intervention being tested rather than pre-existing differences in the participants' characteristics.

Agonistic behavior is a term used in ethology, the study of animal behavior, to describe interactions between individuals that are often competitive or hostile, but stop short of direct physical contact. These behaviors can include threats, displays, and counter-threats, as well as ritualized fighting. The term comes from the Greek word "agon," which means "competition" or "contest."

In a medical context, agonistic behavior might be used to describe competitive or hostile interactions between people, particularly in the context of mental health or psychiatric disorders. For example, a person with a personality disorder might exhibit agonistic behavior towards others as part of their pattern of manipulative or controlling behaviors. However, this is less common than the use of the term in ethology.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Pakistan" is a country in South Asia and not a medical term or condition. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I would be happy to help!

Aging is a complex, progressive and inevitable process of bodily changes over time, characterized by the accumulation of cellular damage and degenerative changes that eventually lead to increased vulnerability to disease and death. It involves various biological, genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors that contribute to the decline in physical and mental functions. The medical field studies aging through the discipline of gerontology, which aims to understand the underlying mechanisms of aging and develop interventions to promote healthy aging and extend the human healthspan.

A wound is a type of injury that occurs when the skin or other tissues are cut, pierced, torn, or otherwise broken. Wounds can be caused by a variety of factors, including accidents, violence, surgery, or certain medical conditions. There are several different types of wounds, including:

* Incisions: These are cuts that are made deliberately, often during surgery. They are usually straight and clean.
* Lacerations: These are tears in the skin or other tissues. They can be irregular and jagged.
* Abrasions: These occur when the top layer of skin is scraped off. They may look like a bruise or a scab.
* Punctures: These are wounds that are caused by sharp objects, such as needles or knives. They are usually small and deep.
* Avulsions: These occur when tissue is forcibly torn away from the body. They can be very serious and require immediate medical attention.

Injuries refer to any harm or damage to the body, including wounds. Injuries can range from minor scrapes and bruises to more severe injuries such as fractures, dislocations, and head trauma. It is important to seek medical attention for any injury that is causing significant pain, swelling, or bleeding, or if there is a suspected bone fracture or head injury.

In general, wounds and injuries should be cleaned and covered with a sterile bandage to prevent infection. Depending on the severity of the wound or injury, additional medical treatment may be necessary. This may include stitches for deep cuts, immobilization for broken bones, or surgery for more serious injuries. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully to ensure proper healing and to prevent complications.

I am not a medical professional, but I can tell you that there is no specific medical definition for "blogging." Blogging is a general term used to describe the act of creating and maintaining a blog or weblog. A blog is a website that contains regularly updated entries, typically written in an informal or conversational style.

Blogging has become a popular way for people to share their thoughts, experiences, and expertise on various topics, including health and wellness. Some healthcare professionals also use blogs as a platform to provide medical information, advice, and updates to their patients and the general public. However, it is essential to note that any medical information obtained from blogs should not replace professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

A headache is defined as pain or discomfort in the head, scalp, or neck. It can be a symptom of various underlying conditions such as stress, sinus congestion, migraine, or more serious issues like meningitis or concussion. Headaches can vary in intensity, ranging from mild to severe, and may be accompanied by other symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, or sensitivity to light and sound. There are over 150 different types of headaches, including tension headaches, cluster headaches, and sinus headaches, each with their own specific characteristics and causes.

Occupational medicine is a branch of clinical medicine that deals with the prevention and management of diseases and injuries that may arise in the workplace or as a result of work-related activities. It involves evaluating the health risks associated with various jobs, recommending measures to reduce these risks, providing medical care for workers who become ill or injured on the job, and promoting overall health and wellness in the workplace. Occupational medicine physicians may also be involved in developing policies and procedures related to workplace safety, disability management, and return-to-work programs. The ultimate goal of occupational medicine is to help ensure that workers are able to perform their jobs safely and effectively while maintaining their overall health and well-being.

Formal social control, in the context of medical sociology or health sciences, refers to the systematic mechanisms and processes through which society regulates and guides the behavior of its members in accordance with established laws, rules, and norms, particularly in relation to health and healthcare. This can include various formal institutions and agencies such as governmental bodies, regulatory authorities, professional organizations, and healthcare providers that are responsible for enforcing standards, policies, and regulations aimed at ensuring quality, safety, and effectiveness of healthcare services and products.

Examples of formal social control in healthcare may include licensing and accreditation requirements for healthcare professionals and facilities, clinical guidelines and protocols for diagnosis and treatment, quality improvement initiatives, and regulatory oversight of pharmaceuticals and medical devices. These mechanisms help to maintain order, promote compliance with ethical and professional standards, and protect the public's health and well-being.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Asia" is not a medical term. It is the largest continent in the world, comprising about 30% of the Earth's total land area and containing around 60% of the world's current human population. It is divided into several regions, including Northern Asia (Siberia), Eastern Asia (China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Taiwan), Southern Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Maldives), Southeastern Asia (Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Brunei), and Western Asia (Middle East).

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help.

Alcoholism is a chronic and often relapsing brain disorder characterized by the excessive and compulsive consumption of alcohol despite negative consequences to one's health, relationships, and daily life. It is also commonly referred to as alcohol use disorder (AUD) or alcohol dependence.

The diagnostic criteria for AUD include a pattern of alcohol use that includes problems controlling intake, continued use despite problems resulting from drinking, development of a tolerance, drinking that leads to risky behaviors or situations, and withdrawal symptoms when not drinking.

Alcoholism can cause a wide range of physical and psychological health problems, including liver disease, heart disease, neurological damage, mental health disorders, and increased risk of accidents and injuries. Treatment for alcoholism typically involves a combination of behavioral therapies, medications, and support groups to help individuals achieve and maintain sobriety.

Cooperative behavior, in a medical or healthcare context, refers to the actions and attitudes displayed by individuals or groups working together to achieve a common goal related to health and well-being. This may involve patients following their healthcare providers' advice, healthcare professionals collaborating to diagnose and treat medical conditions, or communities coming together to promote healthy behaviors and environments. Cooperative behavior is essential for positive health outcomes, as it fosters trust, communication, and shared decision-making between patients and healthcare providers, and helps to ensure that everyone involved in the care process is working towards the same goal.

Medical sociology is a subfield of sociology that focuses on the social aspects of health, illness, and healthcare. It studies how various social factors such as race, class, gender, age, and culture influence health outcomes and access to healthcare services. Medical sociologists also examine the organization and delivery of healthcare systems, the physician-patient relationship, and the impact of medical technologies on society. They use a variety of research methods including surveys, interviews, ethnographic observation, and content analysis to gather data and analyze social patterns related to health and medicine. The field of medical sociology is closely linked with other disciplines such as anthropology, psychology, and public health.

I'm happy to help, but I need to clarify that the term "social discrimination" is not typically used in medical definitions. However, discrimination can be a significant social determinant of health, which refers to the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age that shape their health.

Discrimination can be defined as the unfair or unequal treatment of people based on certain characteristics or attributes, such as race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, or socioeconomic status. Discrimination can occur in various settings, including employment, education, housing, healthcare, and criminal justice, among others.

Experiences of discrimination can have negative effects on physical and mental health outcomes, contributing to chronic stress, anxiety, depression, and other health conditions. Therefore, it is essential to address discrimination as a critical social determinant of health and work towards promoting equity, inclusion, and social justice in society.

Child health services refer to a range of medical and supportive services designed to promote the physical, mental, and social well-being of children from birth up to adolescence. These services aim to prevent or identify health problems early, provide treatment and management for existing conditions, and support healthy growth and development.

Examples of child health services include:

1. Well-child visits: Regular checkups with a pediatrician or other healthcare provider to monitor growth, development, and overall health.
2. Immunizations: Vaccinations to protect against infectious diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, polio, and hepatitis B.
3. Screening tests: Blood tests, hearing and vision screenings, and other diagnostic tests to identify potential health issues early.
4. Developmental assessments: Evaluations of a child's cognitive, emotional, social, and physical development to ensure they are meeting age-appropriate milestones.
5. Dental care: Preventive dental services such as cleanings, fluoride treatments, and sealants, as well as restorative care for cavities or other dental problems.
6. Mental health services: Counseling, therapy, and medication management for children experiencing emotional or behavioral challenges.
7. Nutrition counseling: Education and support to help families make healthy food choices and promote good nutrition.
8. Chronic disease management: Coordinated care for children with ongoing medical conditions such as asthma, diabetes, or cerebral palsy.
9. Injury prevention: Programs that teach parents and children about safety measures to reduce the risk of accidents and injuries.
10. Public health initiatives: Community-based programs that promote healthy lifestyles, provide access to healthcare services, and address social determinants of health such as poverty, housing, and education.

Bronchitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the bronchi, which are the large airways that lead to the lungs. This inflammation can cause a variety of symptoms, including coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. Bronchitis can be either acute or chronic.

Acute bronchitis is usually caused by a viral infection, such as a cold or the flu, and typically lasts for a few days to a week. Symptoms may include a productive cough (coughing up mucus or phlegm), chest discomfort, and fatigue. Acute bronchitis often resolves on its own without specific medical treatment, although rest, hydration, and over-the-counter medications to manage symptoms may be helpful.

Chronic bronchitis, on the other hand, is a long-term condition that is characterized by a persistent cough with mucus production that lasts for at least three months out of the year for two consecutive years. Chronic bronchitis is typically caused by exposure to irritants such as cigarette smoke, air pollution, or occupational dusts and chemicals. It is often associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which includes both chronic bronchitis and emphysema.

Treatment for chronic bronchitis may include medications to help open the airways, such as bronchodilators and corticosteroids, as well as lifestyle changes such as smoking cessation and avoiding irritants. In severe cases, oxygen therapy or lung transplantation may be necessary.

"Sampling studies" is not a specific medical term, but rather a general term that refers to research studies in which a sample of individuals or data is collected and analyzed to make inferences about a larger population. In medical research, sampling studies can be used to estimate the prevalence of diseases or risk factors within a certain population, to evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions, or to study the relationships between various health-related variables.

The sample for a sampling study may be selected using various methods, such as random sampling, stratified sampling, cluster sampling, or convenience sampling. The choice of sampling method depends on the research question, the characteristics of the population of interest, and practical considerations related to cost, time, and feasibility.

It is important to note that sampling studies have limitations and potential sources of bias, just like any other research design. Therefore, it is essential to carefully consider the study methods and limitations when interpreting the results of sampling studies in medical research.

Cognitive disorders are a category of mental health disorders that primarily affect cognitive abilities including learning, memory, perception, and problem-solving. These disorders can be caused by various factors such as brain injury, degenerative diseases, infection, substance abuse, or developmental disabilities. Examples of cognitive disorders include dementia, amnesia, delirium, and intellectual disability. It's important to note that the specific definition and diagnostic criteria for cognitive disorders may vary depending on the medical source or classification system being used.

"Medical Schools" is a term that refers to educational institutions specifically designed to train and educate future medical professionals. These schools offer comprehensive programs leading to a professional degree in medicine, such as the Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree. The curriculum typically includes both classroom instruction and clinical training, covering topics like anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, pathology, medical ethics, and patient care. Medical schools aim to equip students with the necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes to become competent, compassionate, and ethical healthcare providers. Admission to medical schools usually requires a bachelor's degree and completion of specific prerequisite courses, as well as a strong performance on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT).

Respiratory tract diseases refer to a broad range of medical conditions that affect the respiratory system, which includes the nose, throat (pharynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, bronchioles, and lungs. These diseases can be categorized into upper and lower respiratory tract infections based on the location of the infection.

Upper respiratory tract infections affect the nose, sinuses, pharynx, and larynx, and include conditions such as the common cold, flu, sinusitis, and laryngitis. Symptoms often include nasal congestion, sore throat, cough, and fever.

Lower respiratory tract infections affect the trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, and lungs, and can be more severe. They include conditions such as pneumonia, bronchitis, and tuberculosis. Symptoms may include cough, chest congestion, shortness of breath, and fever.

Respiratory tract diseases can also be caused by allergies, irritants, or genetic factors. Treatment varies depending on the specific condition and severity but may include medications, breathing treatments, or surgery in severe cases.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Play" and "Playthings" are not medical terms. "Play" is a fundamental aspect of child development, encompassing all types of activities that children engage in for enjoyment and recreation. These activities can include physical play (such as running, climbing, or riding a bike), social play (interacting with others), creative play (drawing, building, or pretending), and quiet play (reading, puzzles, or listening to music).

"Playthings," on the other hand, refer to objects or toys used during play. These can range from traditional toys like dolls, cars, and balls to more open-ended items like blocks, art supplies, or natural materials.

While there is no medical definition for "play" or "playthings," it's important to note that play has a significant role in children's physical, emotional, social, and cognitive development. Play allows children to explore their environment, learn new skills, develop problem-solving abilities, build relationships, and express themselves creatively. Access to diverse playthings can support and enhance these developmental processes.

I'm happy to help, but I must clarify that the term "leisure activities" is quite broad and can encompass many different types of activities. It generally refers to activities that people do in their free time for enjoyment or relaxation. Leisure activities can include hobbies, sports, games, socializing, travel, and creative pursuits, among other things.

In a medical context, leisure activities are often discussed in relation to their potential health benefits. For example, research has shown that engaging in regular leisure activities can help reduce stress, improve mood, boost cognitive function, and even increase longevity. However, it's important to note that the specific health benefits of leisure activities may vary depending on the type and frequency of activity.

Here are some medical definitions related to leisure activities:

* Physical activity: Any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that requires energy expenditure. This can include structured exercise, sports, or other forms of physical exertion during leisure time.
* Exercise: A subset of physical activity that is planned, structured, and repetitive with the goal of improving or maintaining physical fitness.
* Social support: The perception and actuality of being cared for, valued, and part of a social network. Engaging in social activities during leisure time can provide a sense of connection and belonging, which has been linked to numerous health benefits.
* Creative expression: The process of using creative skills and imagination to express oneself through various forms of art, music, writing, or other creative outlets. Creative pursuits have been shown to have numerous mental and emotional health benefits.
* Relaxation techniques: Practices that help reduce stress and promote relaxation, such as meditation, deep breathing, yoga, or progressive muscle relaxation. These techniques can be particularly beneficial during leisure time for those who struggle with anxiety or stress-related disorders.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Europe" is a geographical and political designation, rather than a medical one. It refers to the continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. Europe is made up of approximately 50 countries, depending on how one defines a "country."

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help answer them!

A facial expression is a result of the contraction or relaxation of muscles in the face that change the physical appearance of an individual's face to convey various emotions, intentions, or physical sensations. Facial expressions can be voluntary or involuntary and are a form of non-verbal communication that plays a crucial role in social interaction and conveying a person's state of mind.

The seven basic facial expressions of emotion, as proposed by Paul Ekman, include happiness, sadness, fear, disgust, surprise, anger, and contempt. These facial expressions are universally recognized across cultures and can be detected through the interpretation of specific muscle movements in the face, known as action units, which are measured and analyzed in fields such as psychology, neurology, and computer vision.

Respiratory sounds are the noises produced by the airflow through the respiratory tract during breathing. These sounds can provide valuable information about the health and function of the lungs and airways. They are typically categorized into two main types: normal breath sounds and adventitious (or abnormal) breath sounds.

Normal breath sounds include:

1. Vesicular breath sounds: These are soft, low-pitched sounds heard over most of the lung fields during quiet breathing. They are produced by the movement of air through the alveoli and smaller bronchioles.
2. Bronchovesicular breath sounds: These are medium-pitched, hollow sounds heard over the mainstem bronchi and near the upper sternal border during both inspiration and expiration. They are a combination of vesicular and bronchial breath sounds.

Abnormal or adventitious breath sounds include:

1. Crackles (or rales): These are discontinuous, non-musical sounds that resemble the crackling of paper or bubbling in a fluid-filled container. They can be heard during inspiration and are caused by the sudden opening of collapsed airways or the movement of fluid within the airways.
2. Wheezes: These are continuous, musical sounds resembling a whistle. They are produced by the narrowing or obstruction of the airways, causing turbulent airflow.
3. Rhonchi: These are low-pitched, rumbling, continuous sounds that can be heard during both inspiration and expiration. They are caused by the vibration of secretions or fluids in the larger airways.
4. Stridor: This is a high-pitched, inspiratory sound that resembles a harsh crowing or barking noise. It is usually indicative of upper airway narrowing or obstruction.

The character, location, and duration of respiratory sounds can help healthcare professionals diagnose various respiratory conditions, such as pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and bronchitis.

In the context of medicine, growth generally refers to the increase in size or mass of an organism or a specific part of the body over time. This can be quantified through various methods such as measuring height, weight, or the dimensions of particular organs or tissues. In children, normal growth is typically assessed using growth charts that plot measurements like height and weight against age to determine whether a child's growth is following a typical pattern.

Growth can be influenced by a variety of factors, including genetics, nutrition, hormonal regulation, and overall health status. Abnormalities in growth patterns may indicate underlying medical conditions or developmental disorders that require further evaluation and treatment.

In the context of human behavior, grooming typically refers to the act of cleaning or maintaining one's own or another person's appearance or hygiene. However, in the field of forensic psychology and child protection, "grooming" has a specific meaning. It refers to the process by which an abuser gradually gains the trust of a potential victim, or the victim's family or friends, with the intent to manipulate or coerce the victim into sexual activity.

This can involve various behaviors such as complimenting, giving gifts, attention, and affection, gradually increasing in intimacy and inappropriateness over time. The grooming process can take place in person, online, or a combination of both. It's important to note that grooming is a criminal behavior and is often used by abusers to exploit and victimize children and vulnerable adults.

"Family Health" is not a term that has a single, widely accepted medical definition. However, in the context of healthcare and public health, "family health" often refers to the physical, mental, and social well-being of all members of a family unit. It includes the assessment, promotion, and prevention of health conditions that affect individual family members as well as the family as a whole.

Family health may also encompass interventions and programs that aim to strengthen family relationships, communication, and functioning, as these factors can have a significant impact on overall health outcomes. Additionally, family health may involve addressing social determinants of health, such as poverty, housing, and access to healthcare, which can affect the health of families and communities.

Overall, family health is a holistic approach to healthcare that recognizes the importance of considering the needs and experiences of all family members in promoting and maintaining good health.

Biological evolution is the change in the genetic composition of populations of organisms over time, from one generation to the next. It is a process that results in descendants differing genetically from their ancestors. Biological evolution can be driven by several mechanisms, including natural selection, genetic drift, gene flow, and mutation. These processes can lead to changes in the frequency of alleles (variants of a gene) within populations, resulting in the development of new species and the extinction of others over long periods of time. Biological evolution provides a unifying explanation for the diversity of life on Earth and is supported by extensive evidence from many different fields of science, including genetics, paleontology, comparative anatomy, and biogeography.

A pair bond, in the context of human and animal behavior, refers to a long-term emotional and social attachment between two individuals, usually characterized by a strong affection, shared activities, and often sexual interaction. In humans, this concept is often discussed in the context of romantic relationships and marriage. From a medical or scientific perspective, pair bonding involves neurological and hormonal processes that help to create and maintain the attachment, such as the release of oxytocin and vasopressin during physical touch and sexual activity. The strength and duration of pair bonds can vary widely between different species and individuals.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "India" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country in South Asia, the second-most populous country in the world, known for its rich history, diverse culture, and numerous contributions to various fields including medicine. If you have any questions related to medical topics, I would be happy to help answer them!

Antigen presentation is the process by which certain cells in the immune system, known as antigen presenting cells (APCs), display foreign or abnormal proteins (antigens) on their surface to other immune cells, such as T-cells. This process allows the immune system to recognize and mount a response against harmful pathogens, infected or damaged cells.

There are two main types of antigen presentation: major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and MHC class II presentation.

1. MHC class I presentation: APCs, such as dendritic cells, macrophages, and B-cells, process and load antigens onto MHC class I molecules, which are expressed on the surface of almost all nucleated cells in the body. The MHC class I-antigen complex is then recognized by CD8+ T-cells (cytotoxic T-cells), leading to the destruction of infected or damaged cells.
2. MHC class II presentation: APCs, particularly dendritic cells and B-cells, process and load antigens onto MHC class II molecules, which are mainly expressed on the surface of professional APCs. The MHC class II-antigen complex is then recognized by CD4+ T-cells (helper T-cells), leading to the activation of other immune cells, such as B-cells and macrophages, to eliminate the pathogen or damaged cells.

In summary, antigen presentation is a crucial step in the adaptive immune response, allowing for the recognition and elimination of foreign or abnormal substances that could potentially harm the body.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

In the context of medicine and public health, "socialization" typically refers to the process by which individuals learn and internalize the norms, values, attitudes, and behaviors that are considered appropriate within their particular cultural, social, or community group. This process is critical for developing a sense of identity, fostering social connections, and promoting mental and emotional well-being.

Socialization can have important implications for health outcomes, as individuals who are able to effectively navigate social norms and relationships may be better equipped to access resources, seek support, and make healthy choices. On the other hand, inadequate socialization or social isolation can contribute to a range of negative health outcomes, including depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and poor physical health.

Healthcare providers may play an important role in promoting socialization and addressing social isolation among their patients, for example by connecting them with community resources, support groups, or other opportunities for social engagement.

Disability Evaluation is the process of determining the nature and extent of a person's functional limitations or impairments, and assessing their ability to perform various tasks and activities in order to determine eligibility for disability benefits or accommodations. This process typically involves a medical examination and assessment by a licensed healthcare professional, such as a physician or psychologist, who evaluates the individual's symptoms, medical history, laboratory test results, and functional abilities. The evaluation may also involve input from other professionals, such as vocational experts, occupational therapists, or speech-language pathologists, who can provide additional information about the person's ability to perform specific tasks and activities in a work or daily living context. Based on this information, a determination is made about whether the individual meets the criteria for disability as defined by the relevant governing authority, such as the Social Security Administration or the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Psychiatric Status Rating Scales are standardized assessment tools used by mental health professionals to evaluate and rate the severity of a person's psychiatric symptoms and functioning. These scales provide a systematic and structured approach to measuring various aspects of an individual's mental health, such as mood, anxiety, psychosis, behavior, and cognitive abilities.

The purpose of using Psychiatric Status Rating Scales is to:

1. Assess the severity and improvement of psychiatric symptoms over time.
2. Aid in diagnostic decision-making and treatment planning.
3. Monitor treatment response and adjust interventions accordingly.
4. Facilitate communication among mental health professionals about a patient's status.
5. Provide an objective basis for research and epidemiological studies.

Examples of Psychiatric Status Rating Scales include:

1. Clinical Global Impression (CGI): A brief, subjective rating scale that measures overall illness severity, treatment response, and improvement.
2. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS): A comprehensive scale used to assess the symptoms of psychosis, including positive, negative, and general psychopathology domains.
3. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) or Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS): Scales used to evaluate the severity of depressive symptoms.
4. Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS): A scale used to assess the severity of manic or hypomanic symptoms.
5. Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) or Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90-R): Scales that measure a broad range of psychiatric symptoms and psychopathology.
6. Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF): A scale used to rate an individual's overall psychological, social, and occupational functioning on a hypothetical continuum of mental health-illness.

It is important to note that Psychiatric Status Rating Scales should be administered by trained mental health professionals to ensure accurate and reliable results.

The term "developing countries" is a socio-economic classification used to describe nations that are in the process of industrialization and modernization. This term is often used interchangeably with "low and middle-income countries" or "Global South." The World Bank defines developing countries as those with a gross national income (GNI) per capita of less than US $12,695.

In the context of healthcare, developing countries face unique challenges including limited access to quality medical care, lack of resources and infrastructure, high burden of infectious diseases, and a shortage of trained healthcare professionals. These factors contribute to significant disparities in health outcomes between developing and developed nations.

The Chi-square distribution is a continuous probability distribution that is often used in statistical hypothesis testing. It is the distribution of a sum of squares of k independent standard normal random variables. The resulting quantity follows a chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom, denoted as χ²(k).

The probability density function (pdf) of the Chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom is given by:

f(x; k) = (1/ (2^(k/2) * Γ(k/2))) \* x^((k/2)-1) \* e^(-x/2), for x > 0 and 0, otherwise.

Where Γ(k/2) is the gamma function evaluated at k/2. The mean and variance of a Chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom are k and 2k, respectively.

The Chi-square distribution has various applications in statistical inference, including testing goodness-of-fit, homogeneity of variances, and independence in contingency tables.

Reproducibility of results in a medical context refers to the ability to obtain consistent and comparable findings when a particular experiment or study is repeated, either by the same researcher or by different researchers, following the same experimental protocol. It is an essential principle in scientific research that helps to ensure the validity and reliability of research findings.

In medical research, reproducibility of results is crucial for establishing the effectiveness and safety of new treatments, interventions, or diagnostic tools. It involves conducting well-designed studies with adequate sample sizes, appropriate statistical analyses, and transparent reporting of methods and findings to allow other researchers to replicate the study and confirm or refute the results.

The lack of reproducibility in medical research has become a significant concern in recent years, as several high-profile studies have failed to produce consistent findings when replicated by other researchers. This has led to increased scrutiny of research practices and a call for greater transparency, rigor, and standardization in the conduct and reporting of medical research.

Pregnancy complications refer to any health problems that arise during pregnancy which can put both the mother and the baby at risk. These complications may occur at any point during the pregnancy, from conception until childbirth. Some common pregnancy complications include:

1. Gestational diabetes: a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy in women who did not have diabetes before becoming pregnant.
2. Preeclampsia: a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver or kidneys.
3. Placenta previa: a condition where the placenta covers the cervix, which can cause bleeding and may require delivery via cesarean section.
4. Preterm labor: when labor begins before 37 weeks of gestation, which can lead to premature birth and other complications.
5. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR): a condition where the fetus does not grow at a normal rate inside the womb.
6. Multiple pregnancies: carrying more than one baby, such as twins or triplets, which can increase the risk of premature labor and other complications.
7. Rh incompatibility: a condition where the mother's blood type is different from the baby's, which can cause anemia and jaundice in the newborn.
8. Pregnancy loss: including miscarriage, stillbirth, or ectopic pregnancy, which can be emotionally devastating for the parents.

It is important to monitor pregnancy closely and seek medical attention promptly if any concerning symptoms arise. With proper care and management, many pregnancy complications can be treated effectively, reducing the risk of harm to both the mother and the baby.

I could not find a specific medical definition for "Experimental Games" as it is not a term commonly used in the medical field. However, I can provide some context that might help you understand the possible relationship between experimental games and medicine.

Experimental games generally refer to games designed specifically to explore, test, or validate certain concepts, hypotheses, or theories. These games often involve novel mechanics, rules, or systems that are intended to create unique experiences, engage players in specific ways, or teach particular skills or knowledge.

In the context of medicine and healthcare, experimental games might be used for various purposes, such as:

1. Medical education and training: Experimental games can help medical professionals learn new skills, understand complex concepts, or practice decision-making in a safe, controlled environment. These games could simulate various medical scenarios, allowing players to develop their expertise and improve patient outcomes.
2. Therapeutic interventions: Experimental games might be used as a form of therapy for patients with physical, cognitive, or emotional challenges. By engaging patients in gameplay that targets specific areas of need, these games can help improve various aspects of health and well-being. For example, therapeutic gaming applications have been developed to assist with rehabilitation, pain management, stress reduction, and mental health conditions like anxiety and depression.
3. Research: Experimental games could be used in medical research to investigate various aspects of human behavior, cognition, or physiology. By observing how players interact with the game and its mechanics, researchers can gain insights into factors that influence health, decision-making, or treatment outcomes.

In summary, while "Experimental Games" is not a standard medical term, it generally refers to games designed to explore, test, or validate specific concepts, hypotheses, or theories. In the context of medicine and healthcare, experimental games might be used for medical education, therapeutic interventions, or research purposes.

Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and to improve their health. It moves beyond a focus on individual behavior change to include social and environmental interventions that can positively influence the health of individuals, communities, and populations. Health promotion involves engaging in a wide range of activities, such as advocacy, policy development, community organization, and education that aim to create supportive environments and personal skills that foster good health. It is based on principles of empowerment, participation, and social justice.

I believe you may have accidentally omitted the word "in" from your search. Based on that, I'm assuming you are looking for a medical definition related to the term "ants." However, ants are not typically associated with medical terminology. If you meant to ask about a specific condition or concept, please provide more context so I can give a more accurate response.

If you are indeed asking about ants in the insect sense, they belong to the family Formicidae and order Hymenoptera. Some species of ants may pose public health concerns due to their ability to contaminate food sources or cause structural damage. However, ants do not have a direct medical definition associated with human health.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Norway" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country in Northern Europe, known officially as the Kingdom of Norway. If you have any questions about medical topics or definitions, I would be happy to help!

Hospitalization is the process of admitting a patient to a hospital for the purpose of receiving medical treatment, surgery, or other health care services. It involves staying in the hospital as an inpatient, typically under the care of doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals. The length of stay can vary depending on the individual's medical condition and the type of treatment required. Hospitalization may be necessary for a variety of reasons, such as to receive intensive care, to undergo diagnostic tests or procedures, to recover from surgery, or to manage chronic illnesses or injuries.

In the context of healthcare, workload refers to the amount and complexity of tasks or responsibilities that a healthcare professional is expected to perform within a given period. This can include direct patient care activities such as physical assessments, treatments, and procedures, as well as indirect care activities like documentation, communication with other healthcare team members, and quality improvement initiatives.

Workload can be measured in various ways, including the number of patients assigned to a provider, the amount of time spent on direct patient care, or the complexity of the medical conditions being managed. High workloads can impact the quality of care provided, as well as healthcare professional burnout and job satisfaction. Therefore, it is essential to monitor and manage workload effectively to ensure safe and high-quality patient care.

"State Medicine" is not a term that has a widely accepted or specific medical definition. However, in general terms, it can refer to the organization, financing, and delivery of healthcare services and resources at the national or regional level, overseen and managed by the government or state. This can include public health initiatives, regulation of healthcare professionals and institutions, and the provision of healthcare services through publicly funded programs.

In some contexts, "State Medicine" may also refer to the practice of using medical treatments or interventions as a means of achieving political or social objectives, such as reducing crime rates or improving economic productivity. However, this usage is less common and more controversial.

I must clarify that there is no such thing as "Schizophrenic Psychology." The term schizophrenia is used to describe a specific and serious mental disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels, and behaves. It's important not to use the term casually or inaccurately, as it can perpetuate stigma and misunderstanding about the condition.

Schizophrenia is characterized by symptoms such as hallucinations (hearing or seeing things that aren't there), delusions (false beliefs that are not based on reality), disorganized speech, and grossly disorganized or catatonic behavior. These symptoms can impair a person's ability to function in daily life, maintain relationships, and experience emotions appropriately.

If you have any questions related to mental health conditions or psychology, I would be happy to provide accurate information and definitions.

Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to recognize, understand, and manage our own emotions and the emotions of others. It involves the skills of perception, understanding, reasoning with emotions, and managing emotions to promote emotional and intellectual growth. EI includes four key components:

1. Perception and Expression of Emotion: The ability to accurately perceive, identify, and express emotions in oneself and others.
2. Understanding and Analyzing Emotion: The ability to understand the causes and consequences of emotions and how they may combine and change over time.
3. Emotional Reasoning: The ability to use emotions to facilitate thinking and problem solving, and to make decisions based on both emotional and rational information.
4. Emotional Management: The ability to manage emotions in oneself and others, including the regulation of one's own emotions and the ability to influence the emotions of others.

Emotional intelligence is not a fixed trait, but rather can be developed and improved through practice and learning. It has been shown to have significant implications for personal well-being, interpersonal relationships, and professional success.

Prenatal care is a type of preventive healthcare that focuses on providing regular check-ups and medical care to pregnant women, with the aim of ensuring the best possible health outcomes for both the mother and the developing fetus. It involves routine prenatal screenings and tests, such as blood pressure monitoring, urine analysis, weight checks, and ultrasounds, to assess the progress of the pregnancy and identify any potential health issues or complications early on.

Prenatal care also includes education and counseling on topics such as nutrition, exercise, and lifestyle choices that can affect pregnancy outcomes. It may involve referrals to specialists, such as obstetricians, perinatologists, or maternal-fetal medicine specialists, for high-risk pregnancies.

Overall, prenatal care is an essential component of ensuring a healthy pregnancy and reducing the risk of complications during childbirth and beyond.

Psychometrics is a branch of psychology that deals with the theory and technique of psychological measurement, such as the development and standardization of tests used to measure intelligence, aptitude, personality, attitudes, and other mental abilities or traits. It involves the construction and validation of measurement instruments, including the determination of their reliability and validity, and the application of statistical methods to analyze test data and interpret results. The ultimate goal of psychometrics is to provide accurate, objective, and meaningful measurements that can be used to understand individual differences and make informed decisions in educational, clinical, and organizational settings.

National health programs are systematic, large-scale initiatives that are put in place by national governments to address specific health issues or improve the overall health of a population. These programs often involve coordinated efforts across various sectors, including healthcare, education, and social services. They may aim to increase access to care, improve the quality of care, prevent the spread of diseases, promote healthy behaviors, or reduce health disparities. Examples of national health programs include immunization campaigns, tobacco control initiatives, and efforts to address chronic diseases such as diabetes or heart disease. These programs are typically developed based on scientific research, evidence-based practices, and public health data, and they may be funded through a variety of sources, including government budgets, grants, and private donations.

I apologize for any confusion, but "students" is not a medical term. It refers to individuals who are engaged in studying or learning at an educational institution, such as a school, college, or university. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

Myocardial ischemia is a condition in which the blood supply to the heart muscle (myocardium) is reduced or blocked, leading to insufficient oxygen delivery and potential damage to the heart tissue. This reduction in blood flow typically results from the buildup of fatty deposits, called plaques, in the coronary arteries that supply the heart with oxygen-rich blood. The plaques can rupture or become unstable, causing the formation of blood clots that obstruct the artery and limit blood flow.

Myocardial ischemia may manifest as chest pain (angina pectoris), shortness of breath, fatigue, or irregular heartbeats (arrhythmias). In severe cases, it can lead to myocardial infarction (heart attack) if the oxygen supply is significantly reduced or cut off completely, causing permanent damage or death of the heart muscle. Early diagnosis and treatment of myocardial ischemia are crucial for preventing further complications and improving patient outcomes.

Personal Construct Theory (PCT) is not a medical term per se, but rather a psychological theory developed by George Kelly in the 1950s. It is a theory of personality and psychotherapy that emphasizes an individual's unique way of construing or making sense of their experiences. According to PCT, people are active scientists who constantly test their assumptions about the world through their personal construct systems.

In medical settings, PCT may be used as a framework for understanding patients' perspectives and beliefs about their illnesses and treatments. This can help healthcare professionals tailor interventions to individual patients' needs and improve communication and collaboration between patients and healthcare providers. However, it is important to note that PCT is not a widely recognized or established medical concept, but rather a psychological theory that has been applied in various fields, including healthcare.

I must clarify that I'm a helpful assistant and not a doctor, but I can tell you that 'politics' is not a term used in medicine. Politics refers to the activities associated with the governance of a country or area, especially the debate or conflict among individuals or groups having or hoping to achieve power. If you have any medical questions, feel free to ask!

**Referral:**
A referral in the medical context is the process where a healthcare professional (such as a general practitioner or primary care physician) sends or refers a patient to another healthcare professional who has specialized knowledge and skills to address the patient's specific health condition or concern. This could be a specialist, a consultant, or a facility that provides specialized care. The referral may involve transferring the patient's care entirely to the other professional or may simply be for a consultation and advice.

**Consultation:**
A consultation in healthcare is a process where a healthcare professional seeks the opinion or advice of another professional regarding a patient's medical condition. This can be done in various ways, such as face-to-face meetings, phone calls, or written correspondence. The consulting professional provides their expert opinion to assist in the diagnosis, treatment plan, or management of the patient's condition. The ultimate decision and responsibility for the patient's care typically remain with the referring or primary healthcare provider.

Statistical models are mathematical representations that describe the relationship between variables in a given dataset. They are used to analyze and interpret data in order to make predictions or test hypotheses about a population. In the context of medicine, statistical models can be used for various purposes such as:

1. Disease risk prediction: By analyzing demographic, clinical, and genetic data using statistical models, researchers can identify factors that contribute to an individual's risk of developing certain diseases. This information can then be used to develop personalized prevention strategies or early detection methods.

2. Clinical trial design and analysis: Statistical models are essential tools for designing and analyzing clinical trials. They help determine sample size, allocate participants to treatment groups, and assess the effectiveness and safety of interventions.

3. Epidemiological studies: Researchers use statistical models to investigate the distribution and determinants of health-related events in populations. This includes studying patterns of disease transmission, evaluating public health interventions, and estimating the burden of diseases.

4. Health services research: Statistical models are employed to analyze healthcare utilization, costs, and outcomes. This helps inform decisions about resource allocation, policy development, and quality improvement initiatives.

5. Biostatistics and bioinformatics: In these fields, statistical models are used to analyze large-scale molecular data (e.g., genomics, proteomics) to understand biological processes and identify potential therapeutic targets.

In summary, statistical models in medicine provide a framework for understanding complex relationships between variables and making informed decisions based on data-driven insights.

Sociometry is a method used in social science to measure the pattern of interpersonal relationships within a group. Sociometric techniques are thus the tools or methods employed to collect and analyze sociometric data, which typically involve individuals rating or choosing others in the group with whom they would prefer to work or interact. These techniques can be used to study various aspects of group dynamics, social structure, and individual social status within a group. Examples of sociometric techniques include surveys, questionnaires, interviews, and observation.

Physician-patient relations, also known as doctor-patient relationships, refer to the interaction and communication between healthcare professionals and their patients. This relationship is founded on trust, respect, and understanding, with the physician providing medical care and treatment based on the patient's needs and best interests. Effective physician-patient relations involve clear communication, informed consent, shared decision-making, and confidentiality. A positive and collaborative relationship can lead to better health outcomes, improved patient satisfaction, and increased adherence to treatment plans.

A research design in medical or healthcare research is a systematic plan that guides the execution and reporting of research to address a specific research question or objective. It outlines the overall strategy for collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data to draw valid conclusions. The design includes details about the type of study (e.g., experimental, observational), sampling methods, data collection techniques, data analysis approaches, and any potential sources of bias or confounding that need to be controlled for. A well-defined research design helps ensure that the results are reliable, generalizable, and relevant to the research question, ultimately contributing to evidence-based practice in medicine and healthcare.

A social class or social stratum is a grouping of people into a set of hierarchical social categories, the most common being ... In a class society, at least implicitly, people are divided into distinct social strata, commonly referred to as social classes ... Wikiquote has quotations related to Social class. Media related to Social class at Wikimedia Commons Domhoff, G. William, "The ... 733+ on India Mahony, Pat & Zmroczek, Christine; Class Matters: 'Working-Class' Women's Perspectives on Social Class (Taylor & ...
The shake as an official social class was abolished from the political ideology that a shrine should not belong to one family ... The Shake (社家) was a Japanese social class and the name for families that dominated Shinto shrines through hereditary ...
... was a social and fiscal class in several late medieval states of Southeastern Europe, and also a distinctive social and fiscal ... In addition, with the beginning of Ottoman rule, within this social class also came to be included other Vlach-like (pastoral ... Social classes in the Ottoman Empire, Taxation in the Ottoman Empire, Christians from the Ottoman Empire, History of the ... By the end of the 16th century, these privileges resulted in the majority of Vlachs' social standing being equalled to that of ...
... and their immediate families that formed the social class of the medieval bourgeoisie. Entry into burgher status varied from ...
A hierarchy of social class rank in Italy today. 1. Bourgeoisie (10% of the working population) includes high-class ... Social class in Italy began early on in Ancient Rome, and this article comprises more or less how it is today.[clarification ... In his Essay on social classes the Italian economist Paolo Sylos Labini presented the following classification, based on his ... Labini, Paolo Sylos (February 1976). Saggio sulle classi sociali [Essay on social classes] (in Italian). Bari: Laterza. "Italy ...
... fusing the two social classes together during the 19th century. The social classes in France during this period were as follows ... Low cultural and education outlook. In the 21st century, social class in France is often measured by income and profession. Bon ... this social class had both economic and political sway, and could afford leisure time. This class was composed of ... Traditional social classes still have some presence, with a large bourgeoisie and especially petite bourgeoisie, and an ...
Each in turn was divided into three classes, to give nine classes in all. Social status was a formal classification, mostly ... The highest of the high class was empty, or only contained possibly the Dalai Lama The middle class of the high division - the ... a better description of the traditional Tibetan social class system would be a caste system, rather than a comparison to ... The householder class (du-jung, dud-chung-ba duiqoin, duiqion, düchung, dudchhung, duigoin or dujung) comprised peasants who ...
Some social critics have adopted the Marxist view of class in which individuals are classified by their relationship to the ... This is regarded by such people as the most important factor in a person's social rank. The middle class, or bourgeoisie, ... The social structure in Nigeria is the hierarchical characterization of social status, historically stratified under the ... In the decades since, the class system has expanded further. The middle class' links to the political elite have been ...
The psychology of social class is a branch of social psychology dedicated to understanding how social class affects ... Class consciousness Social psychology Social class Social inequality Kraus, Michael W.; Stephens, Nicole M. (September 2012). " ... Definitions of social class also vary on the extent to which they emphasize objective or subjective elements of social class. ... In the first wave of research on the psychology of social class, social classes were conceived as a form of cultural identity. ...
A 2016 report categorised Cambodians into three social classes: a small New Wealth class, a Middle Class and a Lower Income ... Social organization in Cambodia Federal Research Division. Russell R. Ross, ed. "Social Stratification and Social Mobility". ... Social strata in pre-republican Cambodia may be viewed as constituting a spectrum, with an elite group or upper class at one ... The structure of social class in Cambodia (Khmer: វណ្ណៈសង្គម [ʋannaʔ sɑŋkum]) has altered several times throughout its history ...
... uses a class structure that groups people according to wealth, income, education, type of occupation, and ... Although they attempted to emulate the lifestyle of the upper class, middle-class Haitians resented the social preeminence and ... Through education and political participation, some members of the lower class achieved mobility into the middle class. The ... To maintain their superior economic and social position, the new Haitian upper class turned away from agricultural pursuits in ...
Social classes in Iran have been divided up into upper class, propertied middle class, salaried middle class, working class, ... The working class is part of the overall urban lower class, or mostazafin, a social stratum that includes all families whose ... A more recent source divides Iranian classes into upper, middle class (about 32% of the population in 2000), working class ( ... One of the main objectives of the Iranian Revolution was to have no social classes.[citation needed] In the post-revolutionary ...
Social-class boundaries are far more flexible in the city than in the countryside, but consciousness of status and class ... Class has been a dominant factor with regard to economics, politics, and social parameters. The social structures that were put ... Such families tend to be just as concerned as those at higher social levels with giving their children an education. Many hope ... This placed more of an emphasis of social class than racial identity, although race does play somewhat of a factor in Colombian ...
... and the social mobility that goes with it, has also seen many move up from working class to middle class over the past 50 years ... Social class in Luxembourg after 1945 is generally based on occupation, personal income, and spending power as well as rights ... He aimed to re-establish and improve working conditions and social welfare benefits for the working classes in order to ... In the late 1950s, André Heiderscheid outlined the different social classes in Luxembourg as 'milieu ouvrier', 'milieu agricole ...
... is a product of both Māori and Western social structures. Researchers have traditionally discussed ... Macpherson, Cluny (1977). "Polynesians in New Zealand: An Emerging Eth-Class?". In Pitt, David (ed.). Social Class in New ... while still being categorised as working-class. Until the advent of compulsory secondary education in the 1930s, class mobility ... E-I proposed six social strata based upon education and income, and grouped by occupation. The publication of the scale was ...
This class constitutes the largest of Sri Lanka's social groups. Typically they have not had a university education, and send ... social_justice_in_Sri_Lan[dead link] Riswan, M. "A Historical Survey of Social Class and Caste System in Sri Lanka" (PDF). ... Social class in Sri Lanka is often described as casteless, though caste is still found on the island in both a symbolic and a ... Caste is also used in an analogous sense to refer to the new social class divisions that have appeared in recent decades. The ...
... was hierarchical, with multiple and overlapping social hierarchies. An individual's relative ... This was a means for the wealthier classes to maintain control over the army and social life. Roman society was patriarchal in ... 41-46, doi:10.1007/978-3-319-41978-7_4, ISBN 978-3-319-41978-7 Media related to Social class in ancient Rome at Wikimedia ... The Equestrians and Class I held 98 votes between them, thus they could outvote the combined lower classes who only had 95 ...
Aztec "Aztec Social Classes". www.aztec-history.com. Retrieved 2023-07-13. "pilli (Aztec social class)". Britannica.com. ... He had 20 wives, and his descendants became the heart of a new social class - the nobles or pipiltin (singular pilli). From ... Aztec society was traditionally divided into social classes. They became sophisticated once the Mexica people settled and began ... The class structure was so elaborate that it impressed the Spanish almost as much as Aztec architecture. The Mexica people, who ...
The most elaborate and in-depth studies of social class have focused on the working class, especially regarding occupation, ... United States portal American Dream California Dream American middle class American upper class Social history Katherine S. ... education, and public health. The emergence of systematic social science, especially sociology, shifted the center of class ... Social history of the United States, Social class in the United States). ...
... is a peer-reviewed academic journal covering social studies education in the United States. It is published by ... According to Marsela (2014), the problem of social exclusion, which is directly related to the problems of social education as ... "Social Education". MIAR: Information Matrix for the Analysis of Journals. University of Barcelona. Retrieved 2018-07-04. ... Marsela, Robo (July 2014). "Social inclusion and inclusive education". Academicus International Scientific Journal. 10: 181-191 ...
Social class in the 21st century (Penguin UK, 2015). Savage, Mike, et al. "A new model of social class? Findings from the BBC's ... "The Great British class calculator: People in the UK now fit into seven social classes, a major survey conducted by the BBC ... The social structure of the United Kingdom has historically been highly influenced by the concept of social class, which ... A Social and Economic History of Britain: 1760-1950 (1950) online Henz, Ursula, and Colin Mills. "Social Class Origin and ...
Higher social class groups report using nutrition labels at a greater rate than low social class groups, but in general, rates ... Social class can be examined according to defining factors - education, income, or occupational status - or subjective ... In contemporary Western society, social class differences in food consumption follow a general pattern. Upper class groups ... Social class differences in food consumption refers to how the quantity and quality of food varies according to a person's ...
... they gathered into a new social class, the bourgeoisie. The wish for escaping from the social class which they belonged to by ... Although the nobility had lost a lot of power and importance as a social class, they retained their rental income, social ... Social history of Spain, Social class in Spain). ... In Spain the distinction between the social classes diminished ... The nobility was not an exclusive social class: those possessing sufficient money could enter it, irrespective of lineage. For ...
... upper class, upper middle class, middle class, lower middle class, lower lower middle class and lower class, while others ... All social classes in the United States, except the upper class, consist of tens of millions of people. Thus social classes ... upper middle class, and upper class. These definitions equate class with income, permitting people to move from class to class ... W. Lloyd Warner, What is Social Class in America, 1949 Warner asserts that social class is as old as civilization itself and ...
There is considerable controversy regarding social status in the Ottoman Empire. Social scientists[which?] have developed class ... Social class in the Ottoman Empire, All stub articles, Ottoman Empire stubs). ...
... as a pedagogy is concerned with social change via the growth in confidence, agency and self-belief of ... Social Purpose Education was developed at The Northern College for Residential and Community Adult Education by Lou Mycroft and ... Social Purpose Education combines pro-social pedagogies such as The Thinking Environment, Restorative Practice, Community ... 4. Embedding Diversity An assumption of social purpose education is that it has a responsibility to challenge the social, ...
Ancient Mayan social classes included a complex relationship between elites, including kings and merchants, and commoners. The ... This faction of ancient Mayan social classes arose when some individuals gained greater access to resources than others, ... highest ancient Mayan social class included a single centralized leader known as the king or Kʼuhul ajaw, who was most often a ... Using burial location as a proxy for social status, Cucina and Tiesler (2003) found that cavities were more common in elite ...
For social workers who are newly introduced to education, the State University of New York School of Social Work provides an ... Some examples of this include the Council on Social Work Education and the State University of New York School of Social Work. ... and social and economic justice. The association provides various training for community education in a social work setting. ... In the social work setting this attempt at community education can prove to be most effective, as people's environments and ...
Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education (the equivalent in England and Scotland) "Review of Personal and Social Education ... social, health and economic education and citizenship education in England. These include: local and global communities sex ... Personal and social education (PSE) is a component of the state school curriculum in Scotland and Wales. PSE became a statutory ... Education by subject, Education in Scotland, Education in Wales). ...
Social education (shakaikyôiku 社会教育) is the Japanese word for nondegree-oriented education. Modern Japan is unquestionably a ... "Lifelong learning," another term for social education, was also a key phrase in the education reforms of the late 1980s. The ... see Education in Japan). Diverse institutions, such as the miscellaneous schools, provide social education services. Large ... basic resources in social education. The ministry of education is interested in increasing the use of public school facilities ...
A social class or social stratum is a grouping of people into a set of hierarchical social categories, the most common being ... In a class society, at least implicitly, people are divided into distinct social strata, commonly referred to as social classes ... Wikiquote has quotations related to Social class. Media related to Social class at Wikimedia Commons Domhoff, G. William, "The ... 733+ on India Mahony, Pat & Zmroczek, Christine; Class Matters: Working-Class Womens Perspectives on Social Class (Taylor & ...
Roman social class. Learn about this topic in these articles:. viewed by Sallust. * In Sallust. …a political career as a novus ... homo ("new man"); that is, he was not born into the ruling class, which was an accident that influenced both the content and ...
Social class in Mary Augusta Wards Fenwicks Career. George P. Landow, Editor-in-Chief, the Victorian Web. [Victorian Web Home ... Although we encounter the issue of social class when he first meets Cuningham and Watson, Ward makes it a major issue when ... Ward raises the issue of social and economic class in the scene when John Fenwick, who has recently arrived from Westmoreland, ... His two hosts-men of the educated middle-class-divined at once that he was self-taught, and risen from the ranks. Both ...
... and social class has several implications in the United States and how it shapes policy and perceptions of those who live in... ... Firstly, what is social class? Each persons perception of social class can be different; is social class defined by a persons ... Race And Social Class. 1. Describe the difference between race and ethnicity. What roles do race and social class continue to ... Social Class Sociology. This essay will be discussing the extent to which social class and poverty affects health and illness. ...
PASA worked with the Rescue Social Change Group, a social-marketing firm. PASA and a cadre of students coined the term ... Edutopia is a free source of information, inspiration, and practical strategies for learning and teaching in preK-12 education ... Edutopia®, the EDU Logo™ and Lucas Education Research Logo® are trademarks or registered trademarks of the George Lucas ...
Education IRB Forms : Human Research Protection Program : The University of Toledo ... Social, Behavioral & Education IRB Forms. FORM TITLE. DATE UPDATED. Informed Consent for Expedited and Convened Research. 02/13 ...
Social Studies Standards Review-Overview An Overview of the Maine Social Studies Standards Review. Steering Committee. Team ... Home → Teaching & Learning → Content Standards → Social Studies → Social Studies Standards Review-Overview → Social Studies ... The Education and Cultural Affairs Committee will hold a public hearing and work session before sending the proposed rules on ... The Legislature, once in session in January, will refer the rule as a legislative document to The Education and Cultural ...
50 Most Social CIOs in Higher Education - Download as a PDF or view online for free ... 50 Most Social CIOs in Higher Education. *1. 50 t MOST SOCIAL CIOs IN HIGHER EDUCATION @ValaAfshar ... Whats Keeping Higher Education CIOs Up at Night? by Whats Keeping Higher Education CIOs Up at Night?Vala Afshar. 14.3K. views ... Similar to 50 Most Social CIOs in Higher Education(. 13. ). Top 25 EDUs On Twitter by Dan McCabe. ...
Our education is interdisciplinary: it combines anthropology, pedagogy, psychology and sociology. ... Education. Students of Interdisciplinary Social Science learn to understand current social and societal issues and to envision ... Interdisciplinary Social Science. * Interdisciplinary Social Science * Research Close submenu + * Youth Studies Close submenu + ...
Social Innovation and Executive Education Programme for European Social Service Organizations. and for setting up a Social ... Social Innovation Education @socialinnovat10 Watch our informative Video - introducing the Social Innovation Education Project. ... Find out more about our project activites around the Social Innovation Education Programme here. ... Find out more about our project activites around the Social Innovation Education Programme here. ...
All about Social Enterprise Find out more about social enterprise, their impact and how they represent a better way to do ... The Accelerate programme supports young social entrepreneurs and social enterprises with a focus on supporting young people ... From joining us as a member to using your own spending power to support social enterprises, find out how you can join the ... Sign up to our newsletter to get the latest updates from Social Enterprise UK ...
To working-class students, especially, the promises of higher ... on the purpose and fairness of the American higher education ... "upper class," "middle class," "working class," or "lower class") and then asked them to further describe their class. The ... To working-class students, especially, the promises of higher education-meritocratic admissions and social mobility-often seem ... So do graduate degrees, particularly in social sciences, truly advance social mobility for lower- and working-class students? ...
... 2021-2022 for students at the Faculty of Social Sciences ... RU Ready Social SciencesRU Ready Social Sciences *Purchase (mobile) device for education *Faculty Welcome Day Social Sciences * ... Social media *Research mastersResearch masters *Behavioural Science *Cognitive Neuroscience *Social Cultural Science * ... Social and Cultural Science [ENG] (pdf, 306 kB) Click here for the Education and Examination Regulations from previous years. ...
Discover the impact of social class on Chinese residents household consumption. Explore empirical analysis and policy ... Even if the social class does not directly enter the utility function, the higher social class can enjoy more social resources ... social _ stra ^ i + X i η + μ i + β 2 ν i social _ stra i = π 0 + π 1 interpersonal i + ν i (2) ... it can show its social advantages and may play a role in social classes. Since the upper social class needs to maintain the ...
... you need to teach history and the social sciences and develop your research skills in the field of social studies education. ... Paying for Your Education Paying for Your Education Back * Undergraduate * Masters Masters Back * Additional Resources and ... Teacher Education Explore a career as a classroom teacher or in fields such as psychology, advocacy, or social work through the ... of diverse students in social studies and history as you gain a dual certification in Social Studies and Special Education. ...
The Council on Social Work Education considers Field Education the signature pedagogy of social work education as it allows ... To learn more about the IWU MSW Field Education program, please see the MSW Field Practicum Manual attached. This manual ... Field Education is a vital component of completing the MSW program with Indiana Wesleyan University. ... The University was founded in 1920 as Marion College and is committed to liberal arts and professional education. ...
... in Education with teacher certification in West Virginia. Social Studies Education majors are technically part of the Social ... In the Social Studies Education program, students take classes like United State History, World Civilizations, Geography, ... Social Studies Education students will develop an interdisciplinary foundation to teach an integrated social science curriculum ... Fairmont State offers a BA degree in Education which leads to teaching certification in Social Studies in the State of West ...
Social class still dictates graduate job trends. Initiatives that encourage people from disadvantaged backgrounds to study at ... The results show that graduates originally from lower social classes have more diverse and less stable career paths than the ... in lower social classes.. Employment inequalities among graduates show that not only does the final destination matter, but ... Dr Adriana DutaSchool of Education and Sport, University of Edinburgh. Key factor. The relatively late age at which less ...
Education and Social Policy University of Delaware Graduate College ... Social Policy: This area focuses on policies that address a wide range of social issues including poverty, social and economic ... in Education and Social Policy program, a collaboration between the College of Education and Human Development and the Joseph R ... This program grounds students in an understanding of how education, social and public policy systems work. It offers a rigorous ...
Explore the making of a fair and just society and how education can help shape a better future. ... MA Social Justice and Education. Explore the making of a fair and just society and how education can help shape a better future ... methodologies and approaches concerning social justice and education to support related social justice education initiatives. ... Students will analyse social justice as an essential perspective that is expressed through education; and explore education as ...
Home → Teaching & Learning → Content Standards → Social Studies → Standards & Instruction - Social Studies → Social Studies ... C3 Framework for Social Studies, 2013).. A strong Social Studies education depends upon a clear understanding of its ... Skills in Social Studies:. The application of skills in Social Studies is crucial to any curriculum. Best practices in Social ... According to the National Council for the Social Studies: advocates of citizenship education cross the political spectrum, but ...
FORENSIC SOCIAL WORK 1: Foundational Law for Social Work & Human Service Practice in Canada. Delivery Method. Online ( ... In the past several years, Shawna has expanded her training and education programs in Forensic Social Work (FSW) to the ... In the past several years, Shawna has expanded her training and education programs in Forensic Social Work (FSW) to the ... You will rely on your theoretical training in social work from previous academic studies and continuing education training in ...
TFC Education courses will prepare you academically for university study, and also allow you to experience student life. ... Begin your journey into Education and Social Work by way of the TFC: ... TFCEDUC 14F An Introduction to the New Zealand Education System. We introduce students to the education system of New Zealand. ... We also offer a degree programme in Social Work and Social Justice. ...
... global citizenship and international perspectives in the field of education! ... Education students enrolled in their first semester at Etown College will begin to explore the departments social justice ... An integral focus of our curriculum is our signature attribute of social justice. We focus our instruction on advocacy for ... Our education faculty are experts in these fields, conducting, presenting, and publishing their own research, as well as ...
The Adolescent/Young Adult Integrated Social Studies license prepares you to teach in grades 7 through 12 in junior high school ... Home / Academics / Beeghly College of Liberal Arts, Social Sciences & Education / Integrated Social Studies Education Major ... Integrated Social Studies Education Major All Integrated Social Studies Education majors take courses to receive licensure to ... The Integrated Social Studies Education major is designed to prepare you to teach social studies in secondary schools. In this ...
And at Binter we want to promote this work by helping them to improve the social and educational fabric of the archipelago. ...
Social media can enhance differentiated instruction if the tools are selected with a careful eye on individual students ... Differentiated Instruction. 100+ Tools for Differentiating Instruction Through Social Media. .css-fn6d52{margin:0 0 18px;color ... Social media can enhance differentiated instruction if the tools are selected with a careful eye on individual students ... For educators differentiating instruction, social media tools embrace collaboration and global access to people and other ...
Interests: heritage education; historical education; heritage web 2.0 educommunication; social sciences for sustainable ... committed to quality education in any field of social sciences. It is about forming a broad vision of good practices in social ... Interests: geography education; developing digital data literacy; geographical skills and ICT skills; social sciences for ... Education is key to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). Social science teachers, heritage educators, or ...
Fundada en 1531, institución de carácter docente e investigador. Con más de 54000 estudiantes, es primer destino Erasmus y está en posiciones destacadas en rankings como Shanghai
How to use higher educations new toy: Social media By Dennis Carter, Assistant Editor. November 5, 2013. October 22, 2010. ... Tags campus technology, educational technology, Educause, social media, social networking Want to share a great resource? Let ... Lawmakers to colleges: No more social media prying - April 25, 2013 * Number of college applications affected by social media ... Newsletter: Innovations in K12 Education. Yes! I want to receive the Innovations in K-12 Education Newsletter. ...
  • Find out more about our project activites around the Social Innovation Education Programme here . (uni-trier.de)
  • The Accelerate programme supports young social entrepreneurs and social enterprises with a focus on supporting young people into employment, education, or enterprise. (socialenterprise.org.uk)
  • The programme equips students to act knowledgeably, thoughtfully and decisively regarding questions of inclusion, equality and diversity, with special emphasis on current issues in higher education, intercultural communication, race, gender, sexuality, power and citizenship education. (york.ac.uk)
  • We also offer a degree programme in Social Work and Social Justice. (auckland.ac.nz)
  • Whether your intent is to complete an associate degree, finish your bachelor's degree, prepare for special education licensure, enter the world of higher learning with a master's degree, pursue a doctoral degree, or earn one of our many certificates, our education programs are designed specifically for your busy lifestyle. (indwes.edu)
  • Social Studies Education majors are technically part of the Social Studies 5 - Adult Comprehensive Specialization. (fairmontstate.edu)
  • There are numerous benefits to experiencing life in another culture, especially those directly relevant to your area of study-such as a Spanish Education majors studying in South America, or a future history teacher spending a semester in Greece. (etown.edu)
  • All Integrated Social Studies Education majors take courses to receive licensure to teach social studies to adolescents in grades 7 through 12. (ysu.edu)
  • Elementary Education majors have multiple field-based courses where you will work in classrooms in grades 1-6 and 5-9. (semo.edu)
  • For example, permitted mode of dress in some times and places was strictly regulated, with sumptuous dressing only for the high ranks of society and aristocracy, whereas sumptuary laws stipulated the dress and jewelry appropriate for a person's social rank and station. (wikipedia.org)
  • People will rank in society according to certain well-recognized standards, so as to determine each person's social class. (scirp.org)
  • The Council on Social Work Education considers Field Education the signature pedagogy of social work education as it allows students to apply knowledge, values, and skills in practice to achieve competency as a Master's level social worker. (indwes.edu)
  • Contribute to developing and or revising education practice and policy through reflection, evaluation, critical thinking and analysis of the interplay between key concepts in a range of social justice contexts, including pedagogical and decolonising practices from different perspectives. (york.ac.uk)
  • In the past, topics have included continuing competence, social work practice mobility, and working with legislators. (aswb.org)
  • This comprehensive and exhaustive reference work on the subject of education from the primary grades through higher education combines educational theory with practice, making it a unique contribution to the educational reference market. (lu.se)
  • However, academics distinguish social class from socioeconomic status, using the former to refer to one's relatively stable sociocultural background and the latter to refer to one's current social and economic situation which is consequently more changeable over time. (wikipedia.org)
  • The effects of these institutional changes on socioeconomic class have been studied by Robert Haveman and Timothy M. Smeeding, who argue that the current system "seems to intensify and reinforce differences in economic status " and does not fulfill its promise to promote socioeconomic mobility for the working class or for students of color. (aaup.org)
  • Quantitative academic scholarship typically understands class in terms of a person's socioeconomic status. (aaup.org)
  • Is early childhood education contributing to socioeconomic disparities? (phys.org)
  • The respondents used a variety of factors to define their class, including intergenerational resources, parental education and marital status, housing and food security, career histories, and cultural capital. (aaup.org)
  • Skill premia and intergenerational education mobility: The French case ," Economics of Education Review , Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 50-64. (repec.org)
  • Skill premia and intergenerational education mobility: The French case ," Working Papers 313, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality. (repec.org)
  • Passing scores in the PRAXIS II Social Studies content test and the Principles of Learning and Teaching Exam are necessary for graduation and West Virginia certification to teach Social Studies from grades 5 to 12. (fairmontstate.edu)
  • United States Mint offers free, complete lesson plans for grades K-12. (maine.gov)
  • The Adolescent/Young Adult Integrated Social Studies license prepares you to teach in grades 7 through 12 in junior high school and high school. (ysu.edu)
  • Be prepared and certified to teach 1 st - 6 th grade and to teach middle school social science grades 5-9. (semo.edu)
  • Moreover, the encyclopedia offers support at all levels of primary and secondary education, from pre-K to 12th grade. (lu.se)
  • Some people argue that due to social mobility, class boundaries do not exist. (wikipedia.org)
  • To working-class students, especially, the promises of higher education-meritocratic admissions and social mobility-often seem hollow. (aaup.org)
  • This paper relates social mobility and social stratification to the structure of higher education. (repec.org)
  • Social mobility at the top and the higher education system ," Post-Print hal-01744553, HAL. (repec.org)
  • Social mobility at the top and the higher education system ," European Journal of Political Economy , Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 36-54. (repec.org)
  • Social Mobility at the Top and the Higher Education System ," Working Papers 2017-04, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics. (repec.org)
  • Research shows that in the past 50 years, social class mobility-how a person's occupation, social class or income compares with that of their parents-has either increased or stayed static in the UK. (phys.org)
  • I study social mobility - to what extent occupational status in one generation resembles occupational status in the parental generation. (lu.se)
  • I explicitly situate social stratification and mobility in this context of changing institutions of family and work. (lu.se)
  • Doctoral students specialize in one of five interest areas, present research at conferences, collaborate with nationally-recognized faculty on peer-reviewed publications, engage in the work of interdisciplinary research centers through graduate assistantships, and learn in an environment with small class sizes and supportive faculty. (udel.edu)
  • Our education faculty are experts in these fields, conducting, presenting, and publishing their own research, as well as facilitating opportunities for student scholarship. (etown.edu)
  • As an elementary education/middle school social science major, you'll learn to meet the rigor of teacher education in a supportive environment with faculty who have extensive classroom experience themselves. (semo.edu)
  • Previously, Dr. Tharp served DePaul as Associate Director within the former Center for Intercultural Programs where he oversaw the Center's curricular social justice education program and workshop initiatives, created and facilitated diversity and social justice education workshops for students, faculty, staff, and community partners, and coordinated a new online education initiative. (routledge.com)
  • that is, he was not born into the ruling class, which was an accident that influenced both the content and tone of his historical judgments. (britannica.com)
  • Differentiating with social media is most effective when we plan learning experiences based on content, process, and product (our lesson structure) and incorporate readiness , interests , and learning profiles (student voice). (edutopia.org)
  • Once in place, data portability likely will eventually lead to better products for users, Metcalf said, noting that if users can more easily export their content and photos, social sites will have to provide better features to attract users. (computerworld.com)
  • Education International - Unless otherwise noted, all content on this website is free to use under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 license. (ei-ie.org)
  • As an instructor, he has taught undergraduate and graduate courses focusing on social justice educational content and process. (sjsu.edu)
  • The simplest definition of bilingual education is the use of two languages in the teaching of curriculum content in K-12 schools. (lu.se)
  • With the template developed and then validated by the committee of experts, it will be possible to develop in the classroom content related to the right to health and social participation in the scope of elementary education , as well as encourage engagement in important bodies for the maintenance of democracy , justice and social equity . (bvsalud.org)
  • Welcome to the TB Behavioral and Social Science Resources webpage, a part of the TB Education & Training Resources website. (cdc.gov)
  • TB behavioral and social science resources can be found on this webpage (below). (cdc.gov)
  • This TB Behavioral and Social Science Resources webpage provides a range of behavioral and social science resources focused on the prevention, control, and elimination of TB. (cdc.gov)
  • Planting the Seeds for Future Research in December 2003 in Atlanta, GA. The goals of this forum were to identify and prioritize TB behavioral and social science research needs and gaps. (cdc.gov)
  • This section provides descriptions of current TB behavioral and social science activities sponsored by CDC and other organizations. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition, research projects that utilized behavioral and social science methods or applied social science theory or concepts were selected. (cdc.gov)
  • This section contains tools and instruments, including focus group guides, interview guides, and surveys, that have been used in TB behavioral and social science research activities. (cdc.gov)
  • Children who are born with FASD can have a mix of problems, such as medical, behavioral, educational, and social problems. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Throughout the semester, we have discussed many different social justice issues. (bartleby.com)
  • Educational policymakers, researchers and teachers recognise that social justice is fundamental to their work. (york.ac.uk)
  • This course will equip you to investigate the pedagogical and professional issues that relate to social justice. (york.ac.uk)
  • On the MASJE degree students work with colleagues in the Education Department's Centre for Research on Education and Social Justice (CRESJ) where they will have the opportunity to explore the nature of social justice and the role of education in its achievement. (york.ac.uk)
  • You will gain fundamental philosophical perspectives on education and social justice, and be able to critically reflect on dominant conceptions of education and human capital. (york.ac.uk)
  • and explore education as a mechanism to enhance social justice (for example through policy). (york.ac.uk)
  • Apply in-depth knowledge of the theories, principles, methodologies and approaches concerning social justice and education to support related social justice education initiatives. (york.ac.uk)
  • Contribute to debates about the nature of pedagogical initiatives in the field of social justice in education and society. (york.ac.uk)
  • An integral focus of our curriculum is our signature attribute of social justice. (etown.edu)
  • We know that an understanding of, and scholarship in, social justice curriculum enriches classrooms and makes for better educators. (etown.edu)
  • Education students enrolled in their first semester at Etown College will begin to explore the department's social justice initiative through a common book selection. (etown.edu)
  • This book is principally written for entry-level student affairs and non-profit staff who develop and facilitate social justice education workshops and structured conversations, as well as for student peer educators who are often employed to assist in the facilitation of such workshops for their peers. (routledge.com)
  • They provide readers with an easy to follow five-part framework to systematically design social justice education workshops and structured conversations and to assess the resulting learning. (routledge.com)
  • A Process to Design, Facilitate, and Assess Social Justice Education Workshops and Structured Conversations 1. (routledge.com)
  • Examples of Applying this Process to Social Justice Education Workshops and Structured Conversations 8. (routledge.com)
  • Ensuring Social Justice and Advancing Education Appendix. (routledge.com)
  • D. Scott Tharp, Ph.D., M.S.W., has worked in higher education for over ten years with a focus on social justice education, learning assessment, and program evaluation. (routledge.com)
  • As a scholar-practitioner, his research focuses on all aspects of social justice education, including curriculum design, facilitation, and assessment. (routledge.com)
  • Our dedication to Racial Equality and Social Justice (RESJ) spans decades. (cambridgecollege.edu)
  • craig (he/him/his) joined the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in the spring of 2019 and serves as the Director for Social Justice Education. (sjsu.edu)
  • For over 25 years, craig has served a variety of colleges and universities across the country as a social justice educator. (sjsu.edu)
  • He has designed, administered, facilitated and researched social justice educational and leadership programs across the country. (sjsu.edu)
  • In addition to identifying the standards and performance indicators that have connections to personal finance and economics at all grade bands, this comprehensive guide offers links to lesson plans, games, activities, and local Maine resources that educators can use to help their students meet the standards related to personal finance. (maine.gov)
  • Council for Economic Education carries out its mission by educating the educators: providing the curriculum tools, the pedagogical support, and the community of peers that instruct, inspire, and guide. (maine.gov)
  • Foundation for Teaching Economics works to introduce young individuals to an economic way of thinking about national and international issues, and to promote excellence in economic education by helping teachers of economics become more effective educators. (maine.gov)
  • For educators differentiating instruction, social media tools embrace collaboration and global access to people and other resources. (edutopia.org)
  • Social science teachers, heritage educators, or committed geographers, among other specialists, have developed innovative educational proposals or have implemented digital tools for new sustainable approaches to heritage, public space, and communities. (mdpi.com)
  • This course provides resources with practical applications and easily implemented planning and assessment strategies for physical educators, adapted physical educators, special education teachers, therapeutic recreation specialists and parents. (cambridgecollege.edu)
  • As leaders, it's imperative we remain focused on providing educators what they need to succeed as the education landscape continues to evolve. (eschoolnews.com)
  • There are clear social inequalities in labour market outcomes among graduates and this already uneven playing field is likely to get worse because of growing job uncertainty. (ed.ac.uk)
  • This area focuses on policies related to early care and education (encompassing both education and human services), such as family engagement, teacher preparation and professional development, and the quality and outcomes of early learning experiences. (udel.edu)
  • It aims to provide a systematic synthesis and evaluation of research knowledge about IPE and its outcomes at qualifying social work level. (scie.org.uk)
  • The Physical Education/Social Emotional Learning (SEL) certificate coursework is based on SHAPE America's Grade Level Outcomes for K-12 Physical Education and the CASEL Social Emotional Competencies. (cambridgecollege.edu)
  • In combination, these factors exacerbate poor health outcomes in populations disproportionately affected by social conditions beyond their control, including infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes COVID-19. (cdc.gov)
  • EDUCAUSE panelists encouraged attendees to search for social media staff on their own campus. (eschoolnews.com)
  • More recently, state spending on higher education has leveled off at public four-year universities and in-state graduate tuition and doctoral student debt has increased (see figure). (aaup.org)
  • In an effort to weigh Haveman and Smeeding's conclusion against the claims of universities, we asked more than one hundred social science graduate students at the University of Washington, in an informal pilot survey, how they define their class background and how it shapes their graduate school experience. (aaup.org)
  • But what does this really mean to social science graduate students, many of whom study social and economic stratification? (aaup.org)
  • What effect does this range of class backgrounds have on the graduate school experience? (aaup.org)
  • Of course students who graduate with a Social Studies Education degree are prepared to teach. (fairmontstate.edu)
  • That is, graduate students, at least in terms of Social Studies preparation, have to complete the exact same program. (fairmontstate.edu)
  • The Anna Reese Tempest Distinguished Educator Lecture Series began in memory of Anna Reese Tempest, a graduate of Elizabethtown College Class of 1934, who was dedicated to teaching foreign languages to high school students in the public education system. (etown.edu)
  • Kindergarten students with stronger social and emotional skills are more likely to graduate from high school and college and have stable, full-time employment while being less likely to commit crimes or have drug, alcohol, and mental health problems. (cambridgecollege.edu)
  • Explore a career as a classroom teacher or in fields such as psychology, advocacy, or social work through the study of education and human development in this undergraduate minor. (nyu.edu)
  • It includes the history, sociology, philosophy, politics and psychology of education and teacher preparation. (auckland.ac.nz)
  • Issues related to human development and learning are examined by individuals whose specializations are in diverse areas including education, psychology, sociology, philosophy, law, and medicine. (lu.se)
  • Through a history-based curriculum and hands-on student teaching, prepare for a career as a social studies teacher who inspires students to be active citizens. (nyu.edu)
  • Social Studies Education students will develop an interdisciplinary foundation to teach an integrated social science curriculum. (fairmontstate.edu)
  • We illustrate the historical development of the New Zealand education system, and address issues such as changes to governance and curriculum and ethnic diversity in New Zealand schools. (auckland.ac.nz)
  • Implementing best practices such as standards-based assessments, curriculum including social emotional learning, and instruction. (cambridgecollege.edu)
  • A social class or social stratum is a grouping of people into a set of hierarchical social categories, the most common being the upper, middle and lower classes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each member of the group may have different ranks in the simple order, but they also enjoy the social stratum obtained as part of the group. (scirp.org)
  • This study examines the career trajectories of degree holders across their life and analyses how these vary according to students' social origins. (ed.ac.uk)
  • The study from the Understanding Inequalities project, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, is published online in the journal Advances of Life Course Research. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Most recently, students in ED 372 - Peace Education and Integrated Schools in Northern Ireland and the United States - went to Belfast during the May term 2018 to study, research, and meet with stakeholders involved in the integrated and shared education movements. (etown.edu)
  • The Elementary Education/ Middle School Social Science program of study prepares future teachers to work with students in elementary and middle school settings. (semo.edu)
  • He is a member of the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) and an invited speaker at NCORE - the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity in American Higher Education. (routledge.com)
  • People educated at private schools are twice as likely to be consistent Conservative voters as those who had a state education, a new study has found. (phys.org)
  • This study aimed to evaluate the presence of social anxiety disorder and comorbidities in higher education teachers. (bvsalud.org)
  • In the article, Jon Magne Vestøl reports a review study of articles from the Journal of Moral Education. (lu.se)
  • There is an important difference to keep in mind between bilingual education and the study of foreign languages as school subjects: In bilingual education, two languages are used for instruction, and the goal is academic success in and through the two languages. (lu.se)
  • This encyclopaedia is a dynamic reference and study place for students, teachers, researchers and professionals in the field of education, philosophy and social sciences, offering both short and long entries on topics of theoretical and practical interest in educational theory and philosophy by authoritative world scholars representing the full ambit of education as a rapidly expanding global field of knowledge and expertise. (lu.se)
  • A functional connectivity study of 174 subjects, 78 of whom had social anxiety disorder, examined whether emotion regulation can be a transdiagnostic measure. (medscape.com)
  • In two of the papers in this dissertation, I use Swedish pre-industrial social status as reflected by different surname types in conjunction with occupational status to study patterns of persistence in the social structure. (lu.se)
  • His understanding of classes in modern capitalist society is that the proletariat work but do not own the means of production, and the bourgeoisie, those who invest and live off the surplus generated by the proletariat's operation of the means of production, do not work at all. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Education and Cultural Affairs Committee will hold a public hearing and work session before sending the proposed rules on to the full legislature. (maine.gov)
  • This program grounds students in an understanding of how education, social and public policy systems work . (udel.edu)
  • And at Binter we want to promote this work by helping them to improve the social and educational fabric of the archipelago. (bintercanarias.com)
  • ASWB hosts an annual two-day training for social work regulators. (aswb.org)
  • Interprofessional learning has become embedded within the requirements for qualifying level education for social work and health professionals. (scie.org.uk)
  • This review of IPE for qualifying social work complements SCIE's Knowledge review 10: The learning, teaching and assessment of partnership work in social work education. (scie.org.uk)
  • Particularly valuable for those starting out in this work is guidance on facilitation and on the use and selection of exercises to align with goals and participants' characteristics and social identities. (routledge.com)
  • The Physical Education/Social Emotional Learning certificate program at Cambridge College is offered entirely online, giving you maximum flexibility to work at a time and place that's convenient for you. (cambridgecollege.edu)
  • In 2019, the country was ranked number 27 among other countries in Public Administration, Defence, Education, Health, Social Work Value Added with 16.61 Percent of Value Added in Industry and Services. (nationmaster.com)
  • The social and environmental conditions of work are important understudied risk factors that can be feasibly integrated into large population-based health studies. (cdc.gov)
  • I start by studying the changing social structure of men's and women's work, different empirical representations thereof, and their relationship to this changing context. (lu.se)
  • Develop the skills to teach a range of diverse students in social studies and history as you gain a dual certification in Social Studies and Special Education. (nyu.edu)
  • Use coins as a jumping-off point to teach science, social studies, math, and more. (maine.gov)
  • The Integrated Social Studies Education major is designed to prepare you to teach social studies in secondary schools. (ysu.edu)
  • In this program, you'll get an overview of the disciplines that make up the social sciences in order to teach them in your very own classroom. (ysu.edu)
  • From the possible influence mechanism of social class on household consumption, the level of social class is reflected in the amount of economic resources and political resources occupied by individuals. (scirp.org)
  • For instance, when the GI Bill enabled students from working-class backgrounds to enroll in large numbers, some administrators were outright hostile. (aaup.org)
  • The course will emphasize the importance of case formulation and core treatment principles that cut across anxiety-based problems, including panic disorder, agoraphobia, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, health anxiety, and related problems. (dal.ca)
  • Social phobia, also called social anxiety disorder, is the third most common mental health disorder after depression and substance abuse, affecting as many as 10 million Americans. (medscape.com)
  • Social phobia is an anxiety disorder involving intense distress in response to public situations. (medscape.com)
  • Very low weight (600-1250 g) premature babies may also be at higher risk for later development of social anxiety disorder, possibly owing to abnormalities in the uncinate fasciculus, the major white matter tract connecting the frontal cortex to the amygdala, and other limbic temporal regions. (medscape.com)
  • Using social media to communicate with students in the online arenas they most prefer-Facebook and, to a lesser extent, Twitter-was a focal point at the annual EDUCAUSE conference in Anaheim, Calif. , where 6,700 campus technology staff came together this week to discuss the latest in educational technology. (eschoolnews.com)
  • The first key idea from the materials is that social inequities and capitalism are intertwined. (bartleby.com)
  • The population health impact of COVID-19 has exposed decades, if not centuries, of inequities that have systematically undermined the physical, social, material, and emotional health of racial and ethnic minority groups (1,2). (cdc.gov)
  • We discuss education as a major social determinant of health and the impact of restricted access to in-person school, and we describe disparities in underlying chronic medical conditions and social inequities associated with poverty and systemic disadvantage. (cdc.gov)
  • Additionally, Fairmont offers a Master of Arts in Teaching degree in Education that provides certification in the exact manner that the undergraduate program does. (fairmontstate.edu)
  • The third article by Sebastian Tjelle Jarmer focuses on the themes of democracy and citizenship education. (lu.se)
  • Through the Fairmont State University Social Studies Education program, students earn a B.A. in Education with teacher certification in West Virginia. (fairmontstate.edu)
  • Studying Education as a teaching qualification equips you with the knowledge and skills to be an excellent teacher. (auckland.ac.nz)
  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the mean annual salary for a special education teacher is $65,920. (semo.edu)
  • 10. Social Inequality Workshop for Regional Teacher Nonprofit (RTN. (routledge.com)
  • The regional elements consist in 1-2 regional annual conferences for all the teacher unions, and they deal with themes such as education policy, strategy development, teachers' working conditions, service to the members, quality in education etc. (ei-ie.org)
  • Apart from economic theoretical research, some references inside and outside China have also examined the impacts of different social-demographic and economic characteristics on household consumption from the perspective of micro empirical research. (scirp.org)
  • BA courses cover theory and research across a wide variety of areas, ranging from child and adolescent development to treaty politics in education. (auckland.ac.nz)
  • Marketers and consumers differ in what they believe makes a brand best-in-class on social media , according to recent research from Sprout Social . (marketingprofs.com)
  • The Evolution Of Education: A Macroeconomic Analysis ," International Economic Review , Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 54, pages 915-936, August. (repec.org)
  • Online classes at Cambridge College are highly collaborative, interactive learning experiences led by scholar practitioners who bring extensive research and professional experience to the program. (cambridgecollege.edu)
  • Nordidactica erhåller publiceringsstöd från The joint committee for Nordic research councils in the humanities and social sciences, NOS-HS ( https://www.aka.fi/en/nos-hs ). (lu.se)
  • The Encyclopedia also includes selections from key legal documents such as the Constitution and federal statutes that serve as the primary sources for research on education law. (lu.se)
  • The pathophysiology of social phobia is evolving as a result of research into brain connectivity and function and recent hypotheses regarding cognition. (medscape.com)
  • In just one year, build your knowledge of history and social sciences, learn pedagogical strategies, and apply them in supervised student teaching placements. (nyu.edu)
  • Acquire hands-on experience in New York schools, learn pedagogical methods, develop your foundation in social studies and drama, and prepare for teaching certification. (nyu.edu)
  • Fairmont State offers a BA degree in Education which leads to teaching certification in Social Studies in the State of West Virginia. (fairmontstate.edu)
  • In order to support teachers and districts in teaching about Personal Finance, the Maine Department of Education in partnership with the Maine Jump$tart Coalition for Personal Financial Literacy , has created a financial education resource, titled the Maine Financial Literacy Framework & Resource Guide . (maine.gov)
  • The Maine Department of Education also maintains a web page devoted to resources and organizations that support the teaching of financial literacy . (maine.gov)
  • Teaching the News puts economic lessons into real life perspective and also helps educate your students on how to critically engage with current events. (maine.gov)
  • Education explores learning and teaching at all stages of people's lives. (auckland.ac.nz)
  • This builds a basis for in-depth learning about frameworks for literacy teaching in childhood, the impact of multiculturalism on classrooms and the future of education in schools. (auckland.ac.nz)
  • Other studies will allow you to spend time in the schools observing, co-teaching, and teaching lessons on your own. (ysu.edu)
  • 8217;re prepared for a teaching career in social studies, history, geography, and more. (semo.edu)
  • Advance your skills in teaching physical education. (cambridgecollege.edu)
  • Teaching physical education is about helping students to enjoy a lifetime of healthy physical activity. (cambridgecollege.edu)
  • Graduates of this program will have greater competency teaching physical education and social and emotional learning. (cambridgecollege.edu)
  • The results show that graduates originally from lower social classes have more diverse and less stable career paths than the more structured routes of their advantaged counterparts. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Graduates from less privileged backgrounds are less likely to enter top-level jobs in their 20s and more likely to enter, and remain, in lower social classes. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Only 10% of all college graduates have studied abroad, which makes education abroad an advantage when applying to jobs after graduation. (etown.edu)
  • Early Childhood graduates with add-on certification in Elementary Education find jobs as preschool, kindergarten, and elementary grade teachers in public or private schools. (semo.edu)
  • This contrasts with the view of the sociologist Max Weber, who argued that "class" is determined by economic position, in contrast to "social status" or "Stand" which is determined by social prestige rather than simply just relations of production. (wikipedia.org)
  • How do changes in safety net policies affect low-income families' social and economic trajectories? (udel.edu)
  • This area focuses on policies that address a wide range of social issues including poverty, social and economic inequality, and well-being. (udel.edu)
  • The Evolution of Education: A Macroeconomic Analysis ," 2008 Meeting Papers 377, Society for Economic Dynamics. (repec.org)
  • Reducing these disparities along with the inequitable economic and social impact of the pandemic on families from racial and ethnic minority groups requires broad community-based and underused collaborations, as well as innovative approaches. (cdc.gov)
  • EQAVET aims to enhance the quality of vocational education and training programmes. (europa.eu)
  • Social and emotional learning (SEL) focuses on helping students to integrate skills, attitudes, and behaviors that contribute to overall personal wellbeing. (cambridgecollege.edu)
  • Given this, we will discuss social inequalities and capitalism, the welfare system, and propose two policies that solves welfare, and social and income inequalities. (bartleby.com)
  • Education and training were required to get a mandatory job which then allowed for one to receive welfare. (bartleby.com)
  • This area includes policies related to housing, homelessness, welfare, adoption and other social and human services. (udel.edu)
  • This paper examines the impact of social security on welfare. (imf.org)
  • The paper finds that the current U.S. Social Security system can improve welfare even though the levels of aggregate output, employment, capital, and consumption fall relative to their levels without such a system. (imf.org)
  • What Is Social and Emotional Learning? (cambridgecollege.edu)
  • Skills taught in social and emotional learning programs have been shown to have far-reaching benefits for children's success in school, career, and life. (cambridgecollege.edu)
  • Download the Skills-Based Physical Education/Social Emotional Learning program sheet. (cambridgecollege.edu)
  • This issue presents seven fresh studies on the didactics of social science subjects. (lu.se)
  • In the first article Jonas Henau Teglbjærg focuses on classroom discussions in Danish social science lessons. (lu.se)
  • The book focuses on important themes in education and human development. (lu.se)
  • Race, gender, and social class has several implications in the United States and how it shapes policy and perceptions of those who live in poverty. (bartleby.com)
  • Recent admissions scandals have cast serious doubt on the purpose and fairness of the American higher education system. (aaup.org)
  • How does financial aid influence equity and access in higher education? (udel.edu)
  • This area includes policies related to equity, access, retention, learning and instruction in higher education. (udel.edu)
  • Dennis has covered higher education technology since April 2008, having interviewed some of the most recognized IT pros in U.S. colleges and universities. (eschoolnews.com)
  • Before that, Dr. Tharp served as the Program Coordinator in the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs at Columbia College Chicago.Dr. Tharp is an active scholar-practitioner who has published articles in the Journal of Transformative Education, Multicultural Education, Multicultural Perspectives, Change Magazine, About Campus Magazine, and Diverse: Issues in Higher Education Magazine. (routledge.com)
  • historically as well as today, a mother's occupational status matters more at lower social origins, while a father's occupational status matters more at higher social origins. (lu.se)
  • The existence of a class system dates back to times of Ancient Egypt, where the position of elite was also characterized by literacy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Become a first-rate scholar and practitioner in a focus area of your choosing, including literacy education, mathematics education, special education, and more. (nyu.edu)
  • The University of Delaware's interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Education and Social Policy program, a collaboration between the College of Education and Human Development and the Joseph R. Biden, Jr. School of Public Policy and Administration , prepares students to address these complex education and social policy questions. (udel.edu)
  • The Elementary Education/Middle School Social Science program prepares students for the classroom through coursework on campus and fieldwork within schools. (semo.edu)
  • The University was founded in 1920 as Marion College and is committed to liberal arts and professional education. (indwes.edu)
  • 39 Historically, social class and behavior were laid down in law. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chasing deliberation in the Social Science classroom. (lu.se)
  • We focus our instruction on advocacy for equity, civic engagement, global citizenship, and international/comparative perspectives. (etown.edu)
  • The Encyclopedia of Education Law is a compendium of information drawn from the various dimensions of education law that tells its story from a variety of perspectives. (lu.se)
  • Social phobia is considered a disorder if it is severe enough to adversely affect social or occupational functioning. (medscape.com)
  • Parental social origins do not act independently but accumulate to shape children's occupational status attainment. (lu.se)
  • Your coursework will begin with a First Year Experience course that will provide you with everything you need to know about YSU and the Integrated Social Studies Education program. (ysu.edu)
  • Scribes and officials formed the upper class in ancient Egypt, known as the "white kilt class" in reference to the bleached linen garments that served as a mark of their rank. (wikipedia.org)
  • 109 The upper class prominently displayed their social status in art and literature. (wikipedia.org)
  • We expect, as we do several times in the novel, that Fenwick will fall in love with Eugénie, but then Ward concludes this paragraph with the observation that, he "began to envisage what these highly trained women of the upper class, these raffinées of the world, may be for those who understand them-a stimulus, an enigma, an education" (80-81). (victorianweb.org)
  • In the TEDTalks, while the upper class, or plutocrats, are typically living large, the lower classes are struggling to live. (bartleby.com)
  • Our survey asked students how they would define their class background ("upper class," "middle class," "working class," or "lower class") and then asked them to further describe their class. (aaup.org)
  • Finally, 14 percent of the students reported belonging to the upper class. (aaup.org)
  • As one student from an upper-class background says, "Concerns about money were nominal, no debt, lots of privileged access to school, lots of cultural capital to help me. (aaup.org)
  • Elementary Education students must be admitted to the Educator Preparation Program prior to enrolling in upper division (300 level or above) education courses. (semo.edu)
  • What Can You Do with an Elementary Education: Social Science Degree? (semo.edu)
  • Right to health and encouragement of social participation in elementary education. (bvsalud.org)
  • The Legislature, once in session in January, will refer the rule as a legislative document to The Education and Cultural Affairs Committee where they will be given an LD Resolve to revise during session. (maine.gov)
  • These students said that their class background was defined by "lack of access to cultural and social enrichment as a child, reliance upon school lunch programs, and a general lack of availability of healthy food, reliable transportation, and peer mentorship" or "high debt, no savings, constant precarity, lack of access to quality medical care. (aaup.org)
  • This corresponded to a general decrease in significance ascribed to hereditary characteristics and increase in the significance of wealth and income as indicators of position in the social hierarchy. (wikipedia.org)
  • If we draw a conclusion of the above literature on the influential factors of household consumption, we can find that although some previous studies have taken a micro perspective to analyze the influential factors of family consumption from the characteristics of individual heterogeneity, an essential factor is often ignored among many micro factors: the social class of residents. (scirp.org)
  • In all times, societies have known social hierarchies and boundaries between individuals and groups with distinct social characteristics. (lu.se)
  • Field Education is a vital component of completing the MSW program with Indiana Wesleyan University. (indwes.edu)
  • To learn more about the IWU MSW Field Education program, please see the MSW Field Practicum Manual attached. (indwes.edu)
  • and a professional program of studies in Education totaling 39 hours which includes Education courses and clinical/field experiences. (fairmontstate.edu)
  • If you have a Massachusetts initial license in physical education, you may also submit the credits earned in this program when applying for or renewing your Massachusetts professional license. (cambridgecollege.edu)
  • Following stints at St. Andrew's School as the Associate Director of Advancement and the Meyer Foundation as a Program Officer, Nakamoto joined Discovery Education in 2017. (eschoolnews.com)
  • To evaluate the knowledge of mothers from different social classes regarding oral health. (bvsalud.org)
  • Each participant was asked to answer an interview with questions related to age, number of children, level of education, family income and knowledge regarding oral health. (bvsalud.org)
  • The majority of the interviewees (49.8%) were classified in social class B. With regards to receiving information about oral health, 83.3% of the mothers of class A and 31.8% of class D reported that they had received it. (bvsalud.org)
  • The interviewees of classes A, B and C presented a medium level of knowledge, while the interviewees of class D showed a low level of knowledge regarding oral health. (bvsalud.org)
  • Given the social contract that underpins universal health coverage (UHC), accelerating and sustaining progress towards UHC requires both technical and political commitment. (who.int)
  • These include medicines to help with some symptoms, medical care for health problems, behavior and education therapy, and parent training. (medlineplus.gov)
  • You'll complete a minimum of 120 credit hours to complete this degree, including the general education requirements and at least 39 senior division hours. (semo.edu)
  • His two hosts-men of the educated middle-class-divined at once that he was self-taught, and risen from the ranks. (victorianweb.org)
  • The field subsequently expanded to draw upon disciplines from the arts, humanities, and social sciences and to examine larger educational forces and their effects upon the individual, society, and conceptions of knowledge. (lu.se)
  • Each topic in this 2-volume encyclopedia is discussed as it relates to the education of African Americans. (lu.se)