Behaviors which are at variance with the expected social norm and which affect other individuals.
A disorder characterized by episodes of vigorous and often violent motor activity during REM sleep (SLEEP, REM). The affected individual may inflict self injury or harm others, and is difficult to awaken from this condition. Episodes are usually followed by a vivid recollection of a dream that is consistent with the aggressive behavior. This condition primarily affects adult males. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p393)
Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.
Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.
The observable response an animal makes to any situation.
A series of thoughts, images, or emotions occurring during sleep which are dissociated from the usual stream of consciousness of the waking state.
Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.
Movements or behaviors associated with sleep, sleep stages, or partial arousals from sleep that may impair sleep maintenance. Parasomnias are generally divided into four groups: arousal disorders, sleep-wake transition disorders, parasomnias of REM sleep, and nonspecific parasomnias. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p191)
An anticonvulsant used for several types of seizures, including myotonic or atonic seizures, photosensitive epilepsy, and absence seizures, although tolerance may develop. It is seldom effective in generalized tonic-clonic or partial seizures. The mechanism of action appears to involve the enhancement of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptor responses.
Parasomnias characterized by behavioral abnormalities that occur during the transition between wakefulness and sleep (or between sleep and wakefulness).
A condition characterized by recurrent episodes of daytime somnolence and lapses in consciousness (microsomnias) that may be associated with automatic behaviors and AMNESIA. CATAPLEXY; SLEEP PARALYSIS, and hypnagogic HALLUCINATIONS frequently accompany narcolepsy. The pathophysiology of this disorder includes sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which normally follows stage III or IV sleep. (From Neurology 1998 Feb;50(2 Suppl 1):S2-S7)
Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.
A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.
Simultaneous and continuous monitoring of several parameters during sleep to study normal and abnormal sleep. The study includes monitoring of brain waves, to assess sleep stages, and other physiological variables such as breathing, eye movements, and blood oxygen levels which exhibit a disrupted pattern with sleep disturbances.
A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.
Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.
Sexual activities of animals.
The separation of individuals or groups resulting in the lack of or minimizing of social contact and/or communication. This separation may be accomplished by physical separation, by social barriers and by psychological mechanisms. In the latter, there may be interaction but no real communication.
A syndrome complex composed of three conditions which represent clinical variants of the same disease process: STRIATONIGRAL DEGENERATION; SHY-DRAGER SYNDROME; and the sporadic form of OLIVOPONTOCEREBELLAR ATROPHIES. Clinical features include autonomic, cerebellar, and basal ganglia dysfunction. Pathologic examination reveals atrophy of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, pons, and medulla, with prominent loss of autonomic neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1076; Baillieres Clin Neurol 1997 Apr;6(1):187-204; Med Clin North Am 1999 Mar;83(2):381-92)
A neurodegenerative disease characterized by dementia, mild parkinsonism, and fluctuations in attention and alertness. The neuropsychiatric manifestations tend to precede the onset of bradykinesia, MUSCLE RIGIDITY, and other extrapyramidal signs. DELUSIONS and visual HALLUCINATIONS are relatively frequent in this condition. Histologic examination reveals LEWY BODIES in the CEREBRAL CORTEX and BRAIN STEM. SENILE PLAQUES and other pathologic features characteristic of ALZHEIMER DISEASE may also be present. (From Neurology 1997;48:376-380; Neurology 1996;47:1113-1124)
Loss of or impaired ability to smell. This may be caused by OLFACTORY NERVE DISEASES; PARANASAL SINUS DISEASES; viral RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; SMOKING; and other conditions.
Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.
A progressive, degenerative neurologic disease characterized by a TREMOR that is maximal at rest, retropulsion (i.e. a tendency to fall backwards), rigidity, stooped posture, slowness of voluntary movements, and a masklike facial expression. Pathologic features include loss of melanin containing neurons in the substantia nigra and other pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. LEWY BODIES are present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but may also be found in a related condition (LEWY BODY DISEASE, DIFFUSE) characterized by dementia in combination with varying degrees of parkinsonism. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1059, pp1067-75)
Social structure of a group as it relates to the relative social rank of dominance status of its members. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)
The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).
In animals, the social relationship established between a male and female for reproduction. It may include raising of young.
A treatment that suppresses undesirable behavior by simultaneously exposing the subject to unpleasant consequences.
A condition characterized by transient weakness or paralysis of somatic musculature triggered by an emotional stimulus or physical exertion. Cataplexy is frequently associated with NARCOLEPSY. During a cataplectic attack, there is a marked reduction in muscle tone similar to the normal physiologic hypotonia that accompanies rapid eye movement sleep (SLEEP, REM). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p396)
A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)
Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.
Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.
A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.
The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.
Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.
The tendency to explore or investigate a novel environment. It is considered a motivation not clearly distinguishable from curiosity.
The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.
Polyketides of up to a few dozen carbons in length, formed by chain extension of multiple PROPIONATES and oxygenated to form tetrahydrofuran and lactone rings along the length of the chain. They are found in ANNONACEAE and other PLANTS. Related compounds cyclize to MACROLIDES.
An animal's cleaning and caring for the body surface. This includes preening, the cleaning and oiling of feathers with the bill or of hair with the tongue.
Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)
A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)
Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.
Any behavior associated with conflict between two individuals.
The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.
Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)
Diseases of the parasympathetic or sympathetic divisions of the AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; which has components located in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Autonomic dysfunction may be associated with HYPOTHALAMIC DISEASES; BRAIN STEM disorders; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES. Manifestations include impairments of vegetative functions including the maintenance of BLOOD PRESSURE; HEART RATE; pupil function; SWEATING; REPRODUCTIVE AND URINARY PHYSIOLOGY; and DIGESTION.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
Social rank-order established by certain behavioral patterns.
A nonapeptide hormone released from the neurohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, POSTERIOR). It differs from VASOPRESSIN by two amino acids at residues 3 and 8. Oxytocin acts on SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS, such as causing UTERINE CONTRACTIONS and MILK EJECTION.
A subfamily of MURIDAE found nearly world-wide and consisting of about 20 genera. Voles, lemmings, and muskrats are members.
The family Sturnidae, in the order PASSERIFORMES. The starling family also includes mynahs and oxpeckers.
The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in children.
Those characteristics that distinguish one SEX from the other. The primary sex characteristics are the OVARIES and TESTES and their related hormones. Secondary sex characteristics are those which are masculine or feminine but not directly related to reproduction.
The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.
The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.
The name of two islands of the West Indies, separated by a narrow channel. Their capital is Basse-Terre. They were discovered by Columbus in 1493, occupied by the French in 1635, held by the British at various times between 1759 and 1813, transferred to Sweden in 1813, and restored to France in 1816. Its status was changed from colony to a French overseas department in 1946. Columbus named it in honor of the monastery of Santa Maria de Guadalupe in Spain. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p470 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p221)
A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Spontaneous or voluntary recreational activities pursued for enjoyment and accessories or equipment used in the activities; includes games, toys, etc.
A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.
Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.
Behavior in which persons hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation.
Dyssomnias (i.e., insomnias or hypersomnias) associated with dysfunction of internal sleep mechanisms or secondary to a sleep-related medical disorder (e.g., sleep apnea, post-traumatic sleep disorders, etc.). (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)
Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.
Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)
Abnormal behavioral or physiologic events that are associated with REM sleep, including REM SLEEP BEHAVIOR DISORDER.
Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.
Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.
Relationship between individuals when one individual threatens or becomes aggressive and the other individual remains passive or attempts to escape.
Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.
Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.
Disorders related to substance abuse.
The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.
Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.
Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.
Sounds used in animal communication.
Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.
Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.
The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.
Communication between animals involving the giving off by one individual of some chemical or physical signal, that, on being received by another, influences its behavior.
Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.
Platforms that provide the ability and tools to create and publish information accessed via the INTERNET. Generally these platforms have three characteristics with content user generated, high degree of interaction between creator and viewer, and easily integrated with other sites.
Relatively invariant mode of behavior elicited or determined by a particular situation; may be verbal, postural, or expressive.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
The use of community resources, individual case work, or group work to promote the adaptive capacities of individuals in relation to their social and economic environments. It includes social service agencies.
Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.
Cell surface proteins that bind oxytocin with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. Oxytocin receptors in the uterus and the mammary glands mediate the hormone's stimulation of contraction and milk ejection. The presence of oxytocin and oxytocin receptors in neurons of the brain probably reflects an additional role as a neurotransmitter.
Methods and procedures for recording EYE MOVEMENTS.
Excessive periodic leg movements during sleep that cause micro-arousals and interfere with the maintenance of sleep. This condition induces a state of relative sleep deprivation which manifests as excessive daytime hypersomnolence. The movements are characterized by repetitive contractions of the tibialis anterior muscle, extension of the toe, and intermittent flexion of the hip, knee and ankle. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p387)
The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.
Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.
Consideration and concern for others, as opposed to self-love or egoism, which can be a motivating influence.
Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.
Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.
The mimicking of the behavior of one individual by another.
Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.
A nonapeptide that contains the ring of OXYTOCIN and the side chain of ARG-VASOPRESSIN with the latter determining the specific recognition of hormone receptors. Vasotocin is the non-mammalian vasopressin-like hormone or antidiuretic hormone regulating water and salt metabolism.
Sexual activities of humans.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
Hereditary and sporadic conditions which are characterized by progressive nervous system dysfunction. These disorders are often associated with atrophy of the affected central or peripheral nervous system structures.
The adopting or performing the role of another significant individual in order to gain insight into the behavior of that person.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.
Any observable response or action of an adolescent.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.
A disorder characterized by aching or burning sensations in the lower and rarely the upper extremities that occur prior to sleep or may awaken the patient from sleep.
A group of disorders which feature impaired motor control characterized by bradykinesia, MUSCLE RIGIDITY; TREMOR; and postural instability. Parkinsonian diseases are generally divided into primary parkinsonism (see PARKINSON DISEASE), secondary parkinsonism (see PARKINSON DISEASE, SECONDARY) and inherited forms. These conditions are associated with dysfunction of dopaminergic or closely related motor integration neuronal pathways in the BASAL GANGLIA.
The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.
The strengthening of a response with a social reward such as a nod of approval, a parent's love or attention.
The degree of closeness or acceptance an individual or group feels toward another individual or group.
Social process whereby the values, attitudes, or institutions of society, such as education, family, religion, and industry become modified. It includes both the natural process and action programs initiated by members of the community.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)
An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.
Substances that do not act as agonists or antagonists but do affect the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptor-ionophore complex. GABA-A receptors (RECEPTORS, GABA-A) appear to have at least three allosteric sites at which modulators act: a site at which BENZODIAZEPINES act by increasing the opening frequency of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-activated chloride channels; a site at which BARBITURATES act to prolong the duration of channel opening; and a site at which some steroids may act. GENERAL ANESTHETICS probably act at least partly by potentiating GABAergic responses, but they are not included here.
Behavior in defense of an area against another individual or individuals primarily of the same species.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
Observable changes of expression in the face in response to emotional stimuli.
Specific molecular sites or proteins on or in cells to which VASOPRESSINS bind or interact in order to modify the function of the cells. Two types of vasopressin receptor exist, the V1 receptor in the vascular smooth muscle and the V2 receptor in the kidneys. The V1 receptor can be subdivided into V1a and V1b (formerly V3) receptors.
Games designed to provide information on hypotheses, policies, procedures, or strategies.
Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)
Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.
Group behavior toward others by virtue of their group membership.
Periods of sleep manifested by changes in EEG activity and certain behavioral correlates; includes Stage 1: sleep onset, drowsy sleep; Stage 2: light sleep; Stages 3 and 4: delta sleep, light sleep, deep sleep, telencephalic sleep.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Transmission of emotions, ideas, and attitudes between individuals in ways other than the spoken language.
Chemical substances, excreted by an organism into the environment, that elicit behavioral or physiological responses from other organisms of the same species. Perception of these chemical signals may be olfactory or by contact.
A prodromal phase of cognitive decline that may precede the emergence of ALZHEIMER DISEASE and other dementias. It may include impairment of cognition, such as impairments in language, visuospatial awareness, ATTENTION and MEMORY.
Emotional attachment to someone or something in the environment.
The science and technology dealing with the procurement, breeding, care, health, and selection of animals used in biomedical research and testing.
Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.
The knowledge or perception that someone or something present has been previously encountered.
Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.
Loss of functional activity and trophic degeneration of nerve axons and their terminal arborizations following the destruction of their cells of origin or interruption of their continuity with these cells. The pathology is characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases. Often the process of nerve degeneration is studied in research on neuroanatomical localization and correlation of the neurophysiology of neural pathways.
Peptides released by NEURONS as intercellular messengers. Many neuropeptides are also hormones released by non-neuronal cells.
Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.
The state of society as it exists or in flux. While it usually refers to society as a whole in a specified geographical or political region, it is applicable also to restricted strata of a society.
The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.
A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.
A disorder caused by hemizygous microdeletion of about 28 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, including the ELASTIN gene. Clinical manifestations include SUPRAVALVULAR AORTIC STENOSIS; MENTAL RETARDATION; elfin facies; impaired visuospatial constructive abilities; and transient HYPERCALCEMIA in infancy. The condition affects both sexes, with onset at birth or in early infancy.
The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Situations affecting a significant number of people, that are believed to be sources of difficulty or threaten the stability of the community, and that require programs of amelioration.
Therapy whose primary emphasis is on the physical and social structuring of the environment to promote interpersonal relationships which will be influential in reducing behavioral disturbances of patients.
Includes both producing and responding to words, either written or spoken.
An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.
A personality trait rendering the individual acceptable in social or interpersonal relations. It is related to social acceptance, social approval, popularity, social status, leadership qualities, or any quality making him a socially desirable companion.
Visual impairments limiting one or more of the basic functions of the eye: visual acuity, dark adaptation, color vision, or peripheral vision. These may result from EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; VISUAL PATHWAY diseases; OCCIPITAL LOBE diseases; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS; and other conditions (From Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p132).
Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.
The branch of psychology concerned with the effects of group membership upon the behavior, attitudes, and beliefs of an individual.
Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.
The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)
A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)
Coordinate set of non-specific behavioral responses to non-psychiatric illness. These may include loss of APPETITE or LIBIDO; disinterest in ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING; or withdrawal from social interaction.
The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a father.
Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, DYSCALCULIA, and DYSGRAPHIA.
An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.
Government sponsored social insurance programs.
The direct struggle between individuals for environmental necessities or for a common goal.
The processes, properties and biological objects that are involved in maintaining, expressing, and transmitting from one organism to another, genetically encoded traits.
The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.
A biogenic amine that is found in animals and plants. In mammals, melatonin is produced by the PINEAL GLAND. Its secretion increases in darkness and decreases during exposure to light. Melatonin is implicated in the regulation of SLEEP, mood, and REPRODUCTION. Melatonin is also an effective antioxidant.
Behavioral or attitudinal compliance with recognized social patterns or standards.
The experimental study of the relationship between the genotype of an organism and its behavior. The scope includes the effects of genes on simple sensory processes to complex organization of the nervous system.
The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.
A defense mechanism through which unacceptable impulses and instinctive urges are diverted into personally and socially acceptable channels; e.g., aggression may be diverted through sports activities.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Prolonged separation of the offspring from the mother.
Learning the correct route through a maze to obtain reinforcement. It is used for human or animal populations. (Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 6th ed)
The disappearance of responsiveness to a repeated stimulation. It does not include drug habituation.
A person's view of himself.
Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.
A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.
Theoretical construct used in applied mathematics to analyze certain situations in which there is an interplay between parties that may have similar, opposed, or mixed interests. In a typical game, decision-making "players," who each have their own goals, try to gain advantage over the other parties by anticipating each other's decisions; the game is finally resolved as a consequence of the players' decisions.
Any observable response or action of a neonate or infant up through the age of 23 months.
Any enhancement of a motivated behavior in which individuals do the same thing with some degree of mutual stimulation and consequent coordination.
Markedly disturbed and developmentally inappropriate social relatedness that begins before age 5 and is associated with grossly pathological child care. The child may persistently fail to initiate and respond to social interactions in a developmentally appropriate way (inhibited type) or there may be a pattern of diffuse attachments with nondiscriminate sociability (disinhibited type). (From DSM-V)
The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.
A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Involvement in community activities or programs.
Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.
The application of an unpleasant stimulus or penalty for the purpose of eliminating or correcting undesirable behavior.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
The phenomenon of an organism's responding to all situations similar to one in which it has been conditioned.
Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.

Nutrition and health outcomes associated with food insecurity and hunger. (1/292)

This paper explores how food insecurity and hunger relate to health and nutrition outcomes in food-rich countries such as the United States. It focuses on two subgroups of the population for whom data are available: women of childbearing age and school-age children. Special consideration is given to examining how food insecurity relates to these outcomes independently of socioeconomic status and poverty. In a population-based sample of women of childbearing age, the least severe level of food insecurity (household food insecurity) was correlated with higher body mass index (BMI), controlling for other available and known influences on obesity including income level. In low income school-age children from two large urban areas of the U.S., risk of hunger and hunger were associated with compromised psychosocial functioning, controlling for maternal education and estimated household income. The nutrition and health consequences of food insecurity comprise a potentially rich area for future, socially relevant research in the field of nutritional sciences.  (+info)

Use of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist to screen for psychosocial problems in pediatric primary care: a national feasibility study. (2/292)

BACKGROUND: Routine use of a brief psychosocial screening instrument has been proposed as a means of improving recognition, management, and referral of children's psychosocial morbidity in primary care. OBJECTIVE: To assess the feasibility of routine psychosocial screening using the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC) in pediatrics by using a brief version of the checklist in a large sample representative of the full range of pediatric practice settings in the United States and Canada. We evaluated large-scale screening and the performance of the PSC in detecting psychosocial problems by (1) determining whether the prevalence of psychosocial dysfunction identified by the PSC was consistent with findings in previous, smaller samples; (2) assessing whether the prevalence of positive PSC screening scores varied by population subgroups; and (3) determining whether the PSC was completed by a significant proportion of parents from all subgroups and settings. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-one thousand sixty-five children between the ages of 4 and 15 years were seen in 2 large primary care networks: the Ambulatory Sentinel Practice Network and the Pediatric Research in Office Settings network, involving 395 pediatric and family practice clinicians in 44 states, Puerto Rico, and 4 Canadian provinces. Parents were asked to complete a brief questionnaire that included demographic information, history of mental health services, the 35-item PSC, and the number of pediatric visits within the past 6 months. RESULTS: The overall prevalence rates of psychosocial dysfunction as measured by the PSC in school-aged and preschool-aged pediatric outpatients (13% and 10%, respectively) were nearly identical to the rates that had been reported in several smaller samples (12%-14% among school-aged children and 7%-14% among preschoolers). Consistent with previous findings, children from low-income families were twice as likely to be scored as dysfunctional on the PSC than were children from higher-income families. Similarly, children from single-parent as opposed to those from 2-parent families and children with a past history of mental health services showed an elevated risk of psychosocial impairment. The current study was the first to demonstrate a 50% increase in risk of impairment for male children. The overall rate of completed forms was 97%, well within an acceptable range, and at least 94% of the parents in each sociodemographic subgroup completed the PSC form. CONCLUSIONS: Use of the PSC offers an approach to the recognition of psychosocial dysfunction that is sufficiently consistent across groups and locales to become part of comprehensive pediatric care in virtually all outpatient settings. In addition to its clinical utility, the consistency and widespread acceptability of the PSC make it well suited for the next generation of pediatric mental health services research, which can address whether earlier recognition of and intervention for psychosocial problems in pediatrics will lead to cost-effective outcomes.  (+info)

An expansion of the peer-tutoring paradigm: cross-age peer tutoring of social skills among socially rejected boys. (3/292)

We examined the effects of a cross-age peer-tutoring program on the social skills of 2 sixth-grade and 2 kindergarten socially rejected and isolated boys. Peer tutoring consisted of the older boys conducting social skills training with their younger tutees. The frequency of positive social interactions increased for all 4 boys, with maintenance of treatment gains following a 5-week interval.  (+info)

Unemployment and foster home placements: estimating the net effect of provocation and inhibition. (4/292)

OBJECTIVES: This study sought, first, to explain and reconcile the provocation and inhibition theories of the effect of rising unemployment on the incidence of antisocial behavior. Second, it tested the hypothesis, implied by the provocation and inhibition theories, that the relationship between unemployment and foster home placements forms an inverted "U." METHODS: The hypothesis was tested with data from California for 137 months beginning in February 1984. RESULTS: Findings showed that the hypothesis was supported. CONCLUSIONS: Rising joblessness increases the incidence of foster home placements among families that lose jobs or income. Levels of joblessness that threaten workers who remain employed, however, inhibit antisocial behavior and reduce the incidence of foster home placements. This means that accounting for the social costs of unemployment is more complicated than assumed under the provocation theory.  (+info)

Behavioural phenotype of Cornelia de Lange syndrome. (5/292)

A postal questionnaire was used to study 49 individuals with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (including both the classical and the mild forms) to ascertain behavioural phenotype. Ages ranged from early childhood to adulthood (mean age, 10.2 years; SD, 7.8) and the degree of mental retardation from borderline (10%), through mild (8%), moderate (18%), and severe (20%) to profound (43%). A wide variety of symptoms occurred frequently, notably hyperactivity (40%), self injury (44%), daily aggression (49%), and sleep disturbance (55%). These correlated closely with the presence of an autistic like syndrome and with the degree of mental retardation. The frequency and severity of disturbance, continuing beyond childhood, is important when planning the amount and duration of support required by parents.  (+info)

The risks for late adolescence of early adolescent marijuana use. (6/292)

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the relation of early adolescent marijuana use to late adolescent problem behaviors, drug-related attitudes, drug problems, and sibling and peer problem behavior. METHODS: African American (n = 627) and Puerto Rican (n = 555) youths completed questionnaires in their classrooms initially and were individually interviewed 5 years later. Logistic regression analysis estimated increases in the risk of behaviors or attitudes in late adolescence associated with more frequent marijuana use in early adolescence. RESULTS: Early adolescent marijuana use increased the risk in late adolescence of not graduating from high school; delinquency; having multiple sexual partners; not always using condoms; perceiving drugs as not harmful; having problems with cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana; and having more friends who exhibit deviant behavior. These relations were maintained with controls for age, sex, ethnicity, and, when available, earlier psychosocial measures. CONCLUSIONS: Early adolescent marijuana use is related to later adolescent problems that limit the acquisition of skills necessary for employment and heighten the risks of contracting HIV and abusing legal and illegal substances. Hence, assessments of and treatments for adolescent marijuana use need to be incorporated in clinical practice.  (+info)

Student-school bonding and adolescent problem behavior. (7/292)

Adolescent problem behavior, including substance use, school misconduct and delinquency, is a national concern. Implicit in the concept of middle school is the recognition that students who develop positive social bonds with their school are more likely to perform well academically, and refrain from misconduct and other antisocial behavior. However, little scientific attention has been given to the complex interactions between middle school students and the school environment. Prior to implementing a middle school problem behavior prevention program we conducted a survey in the seven middle schools in one US school district. Out of 4668 grade 6-8 students enrolled, 4263 (91.3%) completed the survey. Student-school bonding was positively correlated with school adjustment (r = 0.49) and perceived school climate (r = 0.77), but inversely correlated with problem behavior (r = -0.39 to -0.43). Problem behavior was significantly higher (P < 0.001) among males than females and among students in higher grades. Conversely, school bonding, climate and adjustment were significantly higher (P < 0.001) among females than males, but declined significantly from one grade to the next. The data support the conclusion that school bonding is associated with problem behavior. We describe the development of a multiple-component intervention in middle schools designed to increase student-school bonding and prevent problem behavior.  (+info)

Disentangling the impact of low cognitive ability and inattention on social behavior and peer relationships. Conduct Problems Prevention Re search Group. (8/292)

Examined the shared and unique contributions of low cognitive ability and inattention to the development of social behavior problems and peer relationships of children at the time of school entry. Kindergarten and first-grade assessments of cognitive ability, inattention and prosocial and aggressive behavior were collected for a multisite, normative sample. Sociometric assessments of peer relationships were collected at the end of first grade. Cognitive ability and inattention both contributed to the prediction of social behavior and peer relationships. Low cognitive ability was particularly predictive of prosocial skill deficits, and social behavior mediated the relation between cognitive ability and social preference. Inattention predicted both prosocial skill deficits and elevated aggressive-disruptive behavior problems. Behavior problems partially mediated the relation between inattention and social preference. Identified subgroups of children with elevated levels of inattention or low cognitive ability showed different patterns of peer problems, with low acceptance characteristic of the low cognitive ability (only) group and high dislike ratings characteristic of the inattentive and inattentive/low-ability group. Implications are discussed for the design of early intervention and prevention programs.  (+info)

I have noticed since the rotation, that the dogs are much more likely to engage in inappropriate behaviors than they were previously. One of the boys, and possibly both, have been marking a few objects in my house (I have seen Cash do it twice, but suspect that Genghis is overmarking Cashs spots). This is abnormal for them. While both of them would mark each others spots in the yard, neither of them were lifting their legs in the house. Genghis has also been trying very hard to get into trash, and has also chewed up a couple of objects, something he hasnt done for several years. The last time I saw behavior like this from my dogs was when I had a boyfriend who didnt want the dogs sleeping in the bedroom with us. There was inappropriate behavior, elimination, and chewing during that period, but it disappeared when they were allowed to sleep with me again (this was several years ago, long before I had Cash ...
According to statistics, 49% of children in grades 4-12 are being bullied in schools. Bullying damages self-confidence and can lead to a lot of social dysfunctions, low-self-esteem, and even self-harm. The saddest part is most parents arent able to detect when their child is being bullied. Most bullied children are afraid to report their struggles because theyre afraid that talking will only make things worse. To inspire everyone to take action against bullying, heres a beautiful example of a strong girl who turned her pain into art and overcame ...
We need to cultivate empathy in all children, but gender stereotypes -- often reinforced in playrooms -- risk leaving boys, in particular, with a social deficit
To address the significant need for effective treatment of core symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), this trial is designed as a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover pilot study of intranasal ketamine in 24 individuals with ASD ages 12- 30 years using a novel quantitative eye-tracking outcome measure to assess impact of the drug on social impairment. Additionally, to develop a ketamine-focused personalized medicine approach in ASD, the investigators will include pharmacokinetic, molecular pharmacodynamic, and electrophysiological assessments into initial systematic study ...
Image from article: Early puberty for girls is raising health concerns) Welcome to Wopulars coverage of Social Behavior. Wopular aggregates news headlines from the top newspapers and news sources. To the right are articles about Social Behavior that have been featured on main sections of the site.. Below are topics about Social Behavior. (Click on all to view all articles related to the topic, including articles NOT about Social Behavior.. Click here to search news sites, aggregators, and blogs as well as videos, photos, and websites about Social Behavior.. ...
The brains of adults with autism may be wired differently from people without the disorder, and this abnormal pattern of connectivity may be
Autism Spectrum Disorder Suzi Q Black Hills State University Abstract Autism is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder identified by social impairments,...
Family, marriage, violent sexuality and social dysfunction, these short stories are filled with lives of limit and the small corruptions of the soul. John Kinse
Drug abuse is the use of any chemical substance, which results in an individuals physical, mental, emotional, or social impairment. These include anxiety, depression, paranoia, psychosis, respiratory tract infections, nose and mouth ulcerations and other systemic diseases. Other diseases such as HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, Septicemia can also result from needle sharing among users of injection-type drugs. Cardiovascular disease, stroke, cancer and lung disease can occur when drugs are used at high doses or after prolonged use, however, some may occur after just one use ...
This topic center provides a comprehensive overview of causes and treatments for Autism, a brain disease characterized by the presence of severe communication, language and social deficits in affected persons.
Incredibly, and in stark contrast to all well run local authorities, Barnet Council does not have any antisocial behaviour officers. It used to have one, but guess what, despite the growing awareness of the problem of ASB and the need to get tough with it they decided to delete the post last year. Barnets Tory administration, you see, are not exactly on message with David Camerons latest worries about Broken Britain. They are obviously still catching up with his earlier and much appreciated Hug a Hoodie idea. Instead of an ASB officer, there is a PIT, a small team responsible for every little irritating local problem from abandoned cars to dog crap. Oh and ASB, when time allows ...
Page 5 - Heard this am about this from NBC News: Matt Lauer fired for inappropriate behavior. Here is the NBC video regarding the announcement. What is your opinion? Have you encountered sexual
It is of Total read. perhaps read, I put its molecule and business. I was this read Culture and Social upon Google and believe never also open-minded this to my synovial fibromyalgia drivers.
Our findings show that the traditional predictors of antisocial behavior during preadolescence, adolescence, and adulthood also predict high levels of physical aggression from 17 to 42 months of age. These results support growing evidence that chronic physical aggression during childhood, which, in some cases, becomes serious violence during adolescence and adulthood, starts with high levels of physical aggression during infancy and toddlerhood.27,29,53. Our analyses attempted to address the issue of intergenerational transmission of antisocial behavior. Results clearly show that girls high level of antisocial behavior before the end of high school tends to be followed by their childrens high levels of physical aggression in early childhood. These results confirm earlier studies that had shown that mothers criminal history was associated with their childrens criminal behavior.23,54 However, for the first time, we show that the intergenerational transmission of antisocial behavior probably ...
Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine have been able to switch on, and then switch off, social-behavior deficits in mice that resemble those seen in people with autism and schizophrenia, thanks to a technology that allows scientists to precisely manipulate nerve activity in the brain. In synchrony with this experimentally induced socially aberrant behavior, the mice exhibited a brain-wave pattern called gamma oscillation that has been associated with autism and schizophrenia in humans, the researchers say.. The findings, to be published online in Nature on July 27, lend credence to a hypothesis that has been long floated but hard to test, until now. They mark the first demonstration, the researchers said, that elevating the brains susceptibility to stimulation can produce social deficits resembling those of autism and schizophrenia, and that then restoring the balance eases those symptoms.. Autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia each affect nearly 1 percent of all people. At ...
This paper reviews current findings in the human aggression and antisocial behaviour literature and those in the animal abuse literature with the aim of highlighting the overlap in conceptualisation. The major aim of this review is to highlight that the co-occurrence between animal abuse behaviours and aggression and violence toward humans can be logically understood through examination of the research evidence for antisocial and aggressive behaviour. From examination through this framework, it is not at all surprising that the two co-occur. Indeed, it would be surprising if they did not. Animal abuse is one expression of antisocial behaviour. What is also known from the extensive antisocial behaviour literature is that antisocial behaviours co-occur such that the presence of one form of antisocial behaviour is highly predictive of the presence of other antisocial behaviours. From such a framework, it becomes evident that animal abuse should be considered an important indicator of antisocial behaviour
BackgroundAutism is a syndrome of unknown cause, marked by abnormal development of social behavior. Attempts to link pathological features of the amygdala, whic
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Femsy and Mansy are still sharing the office together. The working relationship has stabilized over time. Lately, however, Mansy starts to make sexually tinted comments to Femsy and is touching her when she is passing. Femsy reports the incident to Boss. (Click on the pictures to see them in full size) A great leader: Takes…
The Consortium will establish a technical and data infrastructure for reliably measuring social function, allowing the collaborating sites to work together as a single unit. The goal is to create a set of measures that can be used in clinical trials to determine which treatments are best for which patients and who will benefit from a particular treatment. The ultimate goal is to further develop and validate a set of measures that can be used as stratification biomarkers and/or sensitive and reliable objective measures of social impairment in autism spectrum disorders that could serve as indicative markers of long term clinical outcome.. ...
The Consortium will establish a technical and data infrastructure for reliably measuring social function, allowing the collaborating sites to work together as a single unit. The goal is to create a set of measures that can be used in clinical trials to determine which treatments are best for which patients and who will benefit from a particular treatment. The ultimate goal is to further develop and validate a set of measures that can be used as stratification biomarkers and/or sensitive and reliable objective measures of social impairment in autism spectrum disorders that could serve as indicative markers of long term clinical outcome.. ...
Children with a genetic disorder called 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, who frequently are believed to also have autism, often may be misidentified because the social impairments associated with their developmental delay may mimic the features of autism, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute suggests.
I have no prescription to cure the enigmatic social dysfunctions which have been outlined, and I have no intention of proposing palliatives to ease the pain. The problem-set of complex societal issues concerning research involving children in the United States does not lend itself to an inspirational solution. I do not agree with those who are seeking make-shift compromises to calm the fears of critics and allow everything to return to normal. Price has suggested that the present crisis of attitudes toward all research is an inevitable consequence of the characteristics of the growth curve of science as a whole, which has had a long life of purely exponential growth (Fig. 14-1). As this pattern of increase reaches the midpoint of the natural curve and enters a period of secession from the accustomed conditions of expansion, there is increasing concern over the problems of manpower, publication, and expenditure that demand solution by reorganization. If Price is correct, these are inescapable ...
Adults and children who have a physical, sensory, intellectual, mental, emotional or social impairment or disability. Includes looked after children and those who require treatment under general anaesthesia and dental conscious sedation ...
Researchers have discovered that the deletion of the HDAC3 gene in the brains of mice causes cognitive and social impairments consistent with Rett syndrome. The study was led at MITs Picower Institute for Learning and Memory.
Screening for problem behaviors in Emirati preschool children., Lolowa A Almekaini, Hassib Narchi, Taoufik Zoubeidi, Omer Al Jabri, Abdul-Kader Souid
Read the full Communication and Media essay paper on «Technologys Role in Social Behavior and Communication». If you need an original Communication and Media essay written from scratch, place your order at ExclusivePapers.com
Read From the kinetic theory of active particles to the modeling of social behaviors and politics, Quality & Quantity on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.
Former Southampton and England international Matthew Le Tissier has has revealed he saw inappropriate behaviour by a coach during his time at the club.
The LA Times has published an article in which five women accuse the star of sexually exploitative or inappropriate behavior. Get the details here.
Massey is committed to providing a safe and supportive environment and to ensuring that our staff are treated in a fair and proper manner. This section offers information and tools to be used in the event staff consider that they have a problem in their employment relationship, including bullying, harassment, discrimination and other inappropriate behaviours.. ...
Parents or other caregivers often ground children as a punishment, in order to encourage the children to discontinue inappropriate behavior. As grounding is a punishment for a wide variety of...
Created by Greg Daniels, Ricky Gervais, Stephen Merchant. With Steve Carell, Jenna Fischer, John Krasinski, Rainn Wilson. A mockumentary on a group of typical office workers, where the workday consists of ego clashes, inappropriate behavior, and tedium.
Animals rely on group behavior to survive, whether its fish swimming together to avoid predators or humans sharing knowledge with each other. But despite the importance of such social interactions, scientists do not have ...
How do we form impressions of others? What information do we look at and how do we integrate that information? How do we make attributions to explain peoples behaviors and events? Person Perception covers these topics. ...
The Half-Ass Yes vs. The Respectful No By developing a mastery of our words, we develop a mastery of ourselves. By developing a mastery of ourselves, we develop a mastery of our words. Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind dont matter and those who matter dont mind. Dr. Seuss […]. ...
Deal With Physically Aggressive People - How frequently does this job require the worker to deal with physical aggression of violent individuals?. ...
Deal With Physically Aggressive People - How frequently does this job require the worker to deal with physical aggression of violent individuals?. ...
Haploinsufficiency of the SHANK3 gene is causally linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and ASD-associated genes are also enriched for chromatin remodelers. Here we found that brief treatment with romidepsin, a highly potent class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, alleviated social deficits in Shank3-deficient mice, which persisted for ~3 weeks. HDAC2 transcription was upregulated in these mice, and knockdown of HDAC2 in prefrontal cortex also rescued their social deficits. Nuclear localization of β-catenin, a Shank3-binding protein that regulates cell adhesion and transcription, was increased in Shank3-deficient mice, which induced HDAC2 upregulation and social deficits. At the downstream molecular level, romidepsin treatment elevated the expression and histone acetylation of Grin2a and actin-regulatory genes and restored NMDA-receptor function and actin filaments in Shank3-deficient mice. Taken together, these findings highlight an epigenetic mechanism underlying social deficits linked to
Acceptable Social Behavior - Laws and Norms far, the examples in this module have often Acceptable Social Behavior - Laws and Norms how people are expected to behave in certain Acceptable Social Behavior - Laws and Norms example, when buying food or boarding a Acceptable Social Behavior - Laws and Norms. These examples describe the visible and invisible rules of conduct through which societies are structured, or what sociologists call norms. Norms Acceptable Social Behavior - Laws and Norms how Acceptable Social Behavior - Laws and Norms behave in accordance with what a society has defined as good, right, and important, and most members of the society adhere to them.. Formal norms are established, written rules. They are behaviors worked out and agreed upon in order to suit and serve the most people. Formal norms are the most Acceptable Social Behavior - Laws and Norms and clearly stated of the various types of norms, and they are the most strictly enforced. But Sample Soccer Resume Places Visit ...
AIMS: To examine the direction of causation between young peoples antisocial behaviour and alcohol (mis)use in the longer and shorter term, together with their joint effects on alcohol-related trouble. METHODS: A longitudinal study (2586 pupils) supplied data, allowing exploration of the causal effects of alcohol (mis)use and antisocial behaviour between ages 11 and 15, using structural equation models of longer and shorter-term relationships and joint-effects models in respect of alcohol-related trouble at age 15. This method allowed us to evaluate which of three hypotheses, described as disinhibition [alcohol (mis)use causes or facilitates antisocial behaviour], susceptibility [antisocial behaviour causes alcohol (mis)use] or reciprocal [alcohol (mis)use causes antisocial behaviour and the reverse] receives most support, both overall and by gender, social class, and drinking context. RESULTS: Overall, the results support the susceptibility hypothesis, particularly in the longer-term ...
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Project Summary/AbstractThe brain neuropeptides oxytocin (OT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) play important roles in altering neuralcircuits that regulate social behavior. These ligands regulate normative social function in a host of areas,including social attachment, parental behavior, aggression, and complex social cognition. In pathologicalbrain/behavior conditions, many disorders are characterized by dramatic deficits in the social realm.Knowledge of the way OT and AVP alter cellular function in neurons has the potential to both identifymechanisms that produce social dysfunction and to design compounds that normalize cellular function andbehavior. The present project takes advantage of the discovery of novel OT ligand structure, and variation incellular receptors for OT and AVP in the marmoset, a species that exhibits social monogamy, infant care bymales, and a family-like social structure. The first aim will characterize the effects of ligand diversity on thealteration of behavior in a ...
Reducing the function of the autism-associated gene Pcdh10 leads to impairments in social behavior, according to a study published in Biological Psychiatry. Reducing Pcdh10 function also disrupted the structure and function ...
As with non-demented people, the range of sexual behaviours shown by people with dementia is very wide. In a study of 40 people with dementia living in a long-term care home, Zeiss et al(1996) systematically observed each of the residents on nine separate 5-minute occasions, coding for each minute of observation whether a sexual behaviour was present and if so whether it was appropriate, inappropriate or ambiguous. Examples of inappropriate behaviour were: making explicit sexual comments, touching someone other than a partner on the breast or genitals, touching a partner on the breast or genitals in public, exposing breasts or genitals in public. Many behaviours were coded as ambiguous, for example being undressed outside the bedroom or bathroom, or sitting with stilled hands cupped over genitals. Of the 1800 one-minute segments coded, inappropriate behaviour occurred in 27 (1.6%) and ambiguous behaviours in 67 (3.7%). Only 18% of the individuals ever displayed inappropriate behaviour during ...
I have stayed in AZ hostel for 8 nights in August 2009. This hostel was very calm and peaceful place although very central. The 5-beds dorm that i stayed in was really spacious, clean, no bunks, with enough lockers for everyone. The bathroom & showers are perfectly clean. Thanks for the generous free Tea & coffee in the lovely small kitchenette that was just in front of my dear dorm 102. The common room was marvelous, peaceful, and constantly clean. i have traveled in most of Europe, and stayed in so many hostels all over the rest of the world. I have to admit that OZ hostel was the best ever. But, the only 3 Negative points happened to me are, No lift to the entrance, only to first floor (A problem if u got heavy bags like me). The staff neither welcoming nor cooperative. The boys are OK specially Martyn -- The girls are rude (Except Anne who became more & more nice and helpful in the last of the 8 days). But Suzanne -- who never smile -- has some problems communicating with guests, she let u ...
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Assalamualaikum... Watching this movies requires us to look for further information because we need to know what is autism and what is common sign of autism because some parents still lack of knowledge about it and they did not know what to do if the have children suffered with autism.. Here is a bit of information that I can share... What is Autism?. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a range of complex neurodevelopment disorders, characterized by social impairments, communication difficulties, and restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior. Autistic disorder, sometimes called autism or classical ASD, is the most severe form of ASD, while other conditions along the spectrum include a milder form known as Asperger syndrome, and childhood disintegrative disorder and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (usually referred to as PDD-NOS). Although ASD varies significantly in character and severity, it occurs in all ethnic and socioeconomic groups and affects ...
The purpose of the study was to investigate how peoples endogenous levels of oxytocin were related to brain activity when they viewed social interactions, said Katie Lancaster, a Ph.D. candidate in psychology at the University of Virginia and first author of the study. We found that people with higher oxytocin levels showed greater recruitment of brain regions that support social cognition, suggesting that these people are naturally attending to the more social aspects of the interactions.. People with low levels of oxytocin showed less recruitment of these social brain areas; their brain activity resembles the patterns of neural activity previously observed when people focus on non-socially relevant information.. The study has implications for better understanding how oxytocin interacts with cognition in both healthy people and people with disordered social behavior. For example, low levels of oxytocin have previously been associated with social deficits often found in individuals with ...
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The identification and assessment of children and young people with antisocial behaviour and conduct disorders path for the antisocial behaviour and conduct disorders in children and young people pathway.
Unfortunately, the speculation that the killer was autistic is creating new fears and falsehoods about a condition that affects 1 in 88 children. [...] even if he had been, there is no reason to think an autism spectrum disorder caused his killing spree. Study after study advocates that there is no correlation between violence and autism spectrum disorders. Autism spectrum disorders can cause significant social impairments, communication problems and restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior.
Contact him and say, I know you were very drunk on New Years Eve. You came on to me, and I want you to know that I dont like it. You need to make sure this never happens again.. I give you 95 percent odds that this man will say he is unaware of his actions, and in his embarrassment he may lash out to blame you.. Dont be drawn in to a conversation about your behavior. This is about him.. Dear Amy: I live in a brownstone building with three apartments and have a neighbor question.. I am throwing myself a birthday party at home. One set of neighbors is great, but the other neighbor has turned out to be a bit of a nut case.. Regardless, I really dont want to invite either of them but feel this strange sense of requirement to do so.. What is your take on this? - Worried in Chicago Dear Worried: When you share a living space with other people (through a shared entrance or adjoining apartments), the protocol is to notify your immediate neighbors that you will be having a party and ask them to ...
Sociability is the disposition to interact with one another. Rodents have a rich repertoire of social behaviors and demonstrate strong sociability. Various methods have been established to measure the sociability of rodents in simple and direct ways, which includes reciprocal social interaction, juvenile social play, and three-chamber social tests. There are possible confounding factors while performing some of these tasks, such as aggression, avoidance of interaction by the stimulus mouse, exposure to a new environment, and lengthy procedures. The present study devised a method to complement these shortcomings and measure sociability as a group in the home cage setting, which prevents group-housed mice from isolation or exposure to a new environment. The home cage social test can allow high-throughput screening of social behaviors in a short amount of time. We developed two types of home cage setup: a home cage social target interaction test that measures sociability by putting the wire cage in ...
Company holiday parties can get pretty wild in the movies. But when employees in real life let loose, things can cross the line. After the epidemic of sexual misconduct allegations, some workplaces are rethinking their annual gatherings.
Get this from a library! Siblings of Children with Autism: Social Behavior in Early Childhood. [Tremaine, Emily A.] -- Siblings of Children with Autism: Social Behavior in Early Childhood
One in five people with brain cancer show physical aggression and one in four exhibit verbal aggression, according to research presented at a major cancer conference in Australia.
The Law of Human Nature is at play here. Let me give an example: If you made yourself a home which I then took from you and lived in, you would feel slighted and wronged. Why? I could argue that I was needier than you or that since I was smart enough to take it from you I deserved it more. Whatever the reason, it is of no matter, you would still feel wronged and I would still be the one who had selfishly wronged you. Allow me to clarify my point; I am not talking about the laws of nature ? where only the strong survive or where the powerful consume the weak. No. These are animalistic behaviors that humanity has risen above. No ethicist would defend the public murder of a weak child by a 300 pound brut, which is the very real extension of animalistic behavior allowed free reign. If you study human history, you will find that no intellectually advanced society in history has ever held these types of behaviors up to be admired. In fact it is considered a form of social dysfunction to look up to or ...
A sample of new articles published in Clinical Psychological Science are part of the forthcoming special series Dissecting Antisocial Behavior: The Impact of… More. ...
To lower incidences of inappropriate behavior, child will engage in choice. Research has found that just making a choice is reinforcing.. ...
It should come as no surprise now when he hear about school employees being arrested for inappropriate behavior with a student. But we should also always keep an open mind about the alleged actions of a school worker.Such is the case with a (now) former employee of.... ...
Kerry Boyles PhD paper is out today. Its still in the early-view, unformatted version but it is now officially published! In this paper we addressed a fundamental question: Why do organisms of many species seem to change their behavior toward others depending on their internal metabolic state? To investigate this problem at an ultimate level…
Greenhead Youth Hostel was a surprise. It seems it is no longer running under the YHA however still operates under the running of Greenhead Inn across the road. The sign on the Youth Hostel door of Please check in at the Inn gave us hope of an upgrade and we were not disappointed! A cosy…
View Notes - ps_8_answers from BIO 115 at UCSC. Bio 115 Problem set #8 March 11, 2005 1. You are studying Slater syndrome, which is associated with a progressive loss of balance, social withdrawal
... better academic and classroom behavior, and improved social behavior.[177] Exercising while on stimulant medication augments ... Stereotypic movement disorder[2]. *Mood disorders (especially bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder). Boys diagnosed ... Normally active young child, conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, learning disorder, bipolar disorder[6]. ... it is classified as a disruptive behavior disorder along with oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, and antisocial ...
Neurodevelopmental disorder affecting social interaction and involving repetitive and restrictive behavior. "Asperger" and " ... social anxiety disorder,[83][88] Tourette syndrome,[49] stereotypic movement disorder, bipolar disorder,[66] social-cognitive ... personality disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, major depressive disorder, semantic pragmatic disorder, nonverbal ... a lack of social or emotional reciprocity (social "games" give-and-take mechanic); and impaired nonverbal behaviors in areas ...
A non-disordered condition results from, and is perpetuated by, social stressors. Included in DSM-IV's classification is that a ... He suggests that behaviors, or social facts, which are present in the majority of cases are normal, and exceptions to that ... Main article: Social norm. An individual's behaviors are guided by what they perceive to be society's expectations and their ... The social norms that guide people are not always normal for everyone. Behaviors that are abnormal for most people may be ...
Mark R. Leary; Rick H. Hoyle (5 June 2009). Handbook of individual differences in social behavior. Guilford Press. p. 100. ISBN ... disorders[edit]. See also: Personality disorder. In general, clinicians treat two of the traits (narcissism and psychopathy) as ... In M. R. Leary & R. H. Hoyle (Eds.), Handbook of Individual Differences in Social Behavior (pp. 93-108). New York: Guilford. ... researchers have shown that sadism predicts anti-social behavior beyond the dark triad.[38][100] Sadism shares common ...
Keinan, Giora (2002). "The effects of stress and desire for control on superstitious behavior". Personality and Social ... American Psychiatric Association (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). ... "Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. 41 (3): 323-335. doi:10.1177/0146167214565055. ISSN 0146-1672. PMID 25617118.. ... In psychiatry, magical thinking is a disorder of thought content;[2] here it denotes the false belief that one's thoughts, ...
Chen, Z., Fan, V.S., Belza, B., Pike, K., & Nguyen, H.Q. (2017). Association between social support and self-care behaviors in ... Caregivers responsible for an individual with a psychiatric disorder can be subject to violence.[39] Elderly caregivers appear ... Social Science & Medicine, 68, 1169-1175. *^ Brittain, K. R., & Shaw, C. (2007). The social consequences of living with and ... Chen, Z., Fan, V.S., Belza, B., Pike, K., & Nguyen, H.Q. (2017). Association between social support and self-care behaviors in ...
Autism involves atypical brain development which often becomes apparent in behavior and social development before a child is ... of boys with this mutation have behaviors consistent with autism spectrum disorder.[23] Mutations that inactivate the gene ... Social construct[edit]. The social construct theory says that the boundary between normal and abnormal is subjective and ... The idea is that it is involved in social knowledge and social cognition, and that the deficits in this network are ...
"Speech disturbances and gaze behavior during public speaking in subtypes of social phobia". Journal of Anxiety Disorders. 11 (6 ... avoidance of social situations to regulate emotions is particularly pronounced for those with social anxiety disorder[15] and ... Such behaviors often elicit negative reactions from the social environment, which, in turn, can exacerbate or maintain the ... This "immaturity" certainly causes some teenagers to become social outcasts in their respective social groups, causing them to ...
"The association between self-injurious behaviors and autism spectrum disorders". Psychology Research and Behavior Management. 7 ... Problems with communication, social interaction, restricted interests, repetitive behavior[2]. Usual onset. By the age of 3 ... Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, and Autistic Disorder and combined them under the diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder.[21] ... In the UK, there is some diagnostic use of the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders (DISCO)[87] which ...
"Promoting social behavior with oxytocin in high-functioning autism spectrum disorders". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.. doi: ... Molecular neurobiology of social bonding: Implications for மதி இறுக்கம் spectrum disorders a lecture by Prof. Larry Young, Jan ... SMH.com.au - 'To sniff at danger: Inhalable Oxytocin could become a cure for social fears', Boston Globe (January 12, 2006) ... "The social brain: neural basis of social knowledge". Annu Rev Psychol 60: 693-716. doi:10.1146/annurev.psych.60.110707.163514 ...
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder[edit]. With many symptoms reminiscent of ASD, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder ... The prefrontal cortex is thought essential for all goal-directed and socially-mediated behavior. The PFC is an ideal target for ... while PIR had greater efficacy in the realms of emotional regulation and social interactions.[9] ... The term autism encompasses a wide range of syndromes, such as Rett disorder, pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) and ...
Human Behavior in the Social Environment: A Multidimensional Perspective. By José B. Ashford, Craig Winston LeCroy, Kathy L. ... But sense of self breaks down when considering some events such as memory loss,[t] split personality disorder, brain damage, ... In M. Aboulafia (Ed.), Philosophy, social theory, and the thought of George Herbert Mead 1991. Albany, NY: State University of ... For conception and expression, see self-concept and identity (social science).. For other uses, see Personal identity ( ...
Social anhedonia may be a valid predictor of future schizophrenia-spectrum disorders;[43][53] young adults with social ... RDoC initiative will be crucial in differentiating between these components of social behavior that may underlie mental ... Social anxiety[edit]. As mentioned above, social anxiety and social anhedonia differ in important ways.[25] However, social ... anhedonia is a component of depressive disorders, substance related disorders, psychotic disorders, and personality disorders, ...
... severely deviant social behaviors, schizophrenic disorders of affect, catatonia, thought disorders, hallucinations, delusions. ... familial and social level. In the context of increasing interest in the Soteria approach in the United Kingdom, several ... social networks, and communal responsibilities; finding meaning in the subjective experience of psychosis by "being with" ... and tolerant social environment." More recent adaptions sometimes employed professional staff. The Soteria approach has ...
Origin of social science. The roles of Adolphe Quetelet and Auguste Comte in developing the idea of studying behavior with ... Wilson argues that humanity is driven forward by the tension between those who upon viewing order create disorder and those who ... One specific example is Wilson's own work on the chemical signals that regulate insect social behavior. ... Condorcet's systematic application of mathematics in the social sciences.. *Francis Bacon. Early advocate of data collection ...
Behavior, and Social Networking. 16 (5): 364-369. doi:10.1089/cyber.2012.0271. ISSN 2152-2715. S K Mangal (1 August 2013). ... Within clinical psychology, the "clinical method" is an approach to understanding and treating mental disorders that begins ... Psychological evaluation is defined as a way of assessing an individual's behavior, personality, cognitive abilities, and ... Within a medical setting, psychological assessment is used to find a possible underlying psychological disorder, emotional ...
"Personality, behavior, and dysfunction affect your bipolar disorder, so you must 'know' yourself in order to make the ... Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a range of neurodevelopmental disabilities that can adversely impact social communication and ... Bipolar disorderEdit. Main article: Bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder is an illness that causes shifts in mood, energy, and ... Dissociative identity disorderEdit. Main article: Dissociative identity disorder. Dissociative identity disorder or multiple ...
... and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder in which peers are trained to be role models in order to promote social behavior ... behaviors. Deficits can occur in people with autism spectrum disorders, genetic-based eating disorders, schizophrenia, ... Alcohol use disorders[edit]. Impairments in theory of mind, as well as other social-cognitive deficits are commonly found in ... Baker, J. (2003). Social Skills Training: for children and adolescents with Asperger Syndrome and Social-Communication Problems ...
... the behavioral effects of hormone replacement therapy and social behaviors of primates. Yerkes researchers also are leading ... prevent early onset vision disorders and shed light on human behavioral evolution.[citation needed] Researchers have had ... The Field Station houses 3,400 animals, specializes in behavioral studies of primate social groups, and is located 30 miles (48 ... rhesus macaque monkeys with Huntington's disease and hope to breed a second generation of macaques with the genetic disorder. ...
Freeman: "Psychosurgery, Intelligence, Emotion and Social Behavior Following Prefrontal Lobotomy for Medical Disorders" in 1942 ... and "Psychosurgery in the Treatment of Mental Disorders and Intractable Pain" in 1950. ...
... behavior problems, and inappropriate social skills compared to same-age peers. Those affected are more likely to have trouble ... Prenatal alcohol exposure can lead to fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). The most severe form of FASD is fetal alcohol ... in school, legal problems, participate in high-risk behaviors, and develop substance use disorders themselves. It's also been ... Prenatal cocaine exposure is associated with, for example, premature birth, birth defects and attention deficit disorder. A ...
... or dissociative identity disorder, including involuntary, uncensored behavior, and an extra-human, extra-social aspect to the ... One verse in the Quran describes that on judgment day, the behavior of those who earn high interest on loans "as if they were ... Shack postulates that the awre serves to bring the possessed man to the center of social attention, and to relieve his ... The Coast Veddas, a social group within the minority group of Sri Lankan Tamil people in Eastern Province, Sri Lanka, enter ...
They found that 8-year-olds displayed aggressive behavior and social adjustment issues, which were positively associated with ... they are more likely to be hyperactive or to have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning disabilities, and ... Media and social policy have contributed to an environment that stigmatizes pregnant substance abusers as shameful, corrupt ... Newborns prenatally exposed to MA often experience sleep disturbances and altered behavior problems since MA mimics ...
... these disorders represent a spectrum between sexual behavior that is socially acceptable and nonpathological and behavior that ... sexual urges or behavior which cause observably significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important ... "self-defeating personality disorder" or "masochistic personality disorder", where masochistic behavior may not be in relation ... Main articles: Sexual sadism disorder, Sexual masochism disorder, and BDSM. DSM[edit]. Medical opinion of sadomasochistic ...
Eating Behaviors, 21, 11 -17. Vandereycken,W. (2011). Media hype, diagnostic fad or genuine disorder? Professionals'opinions ... such as social isolation, anxiety, loss of ability to eat in a natural, intuitive manner, reduced interest in the full range of ... It may be a food-centered manifestation of obsessive-compulsive disorder, which has a lot to do with control. A 2013 study of ... Eating Disorders, 19(2), 145-155 Macmillan English Dictionary entry for Orthorexia Nervosa Donini L, Marsili D, Graziani M, ...
... social anxiety disorder,[85][89] Tourette syndrome,[50] stereotypic movement disorder, bipolar disorder,[67] social-cognitive ... a lack of social or emotional reciprocity (social "games" give-and-take mechanic); and impaired nonverbal behaviors in areas ... personality disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, major depressive disorder, semantic pragmatic disorder, nonverbal ... such as major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders that may significantly affect prognosis.[12][18] Although social ...
They may also present with an inability to recognize objects or inability to recognize faces or other memory disorders. Social ... Tancredi, Laurence R. (2005). Hardwired Behavior: What Neuroscience Reveals about Morality. Cambridge University Press. pp. 98- ... Frontal lobe disorder Adel K. Afifi; Ronald A. Bergman; Ronald Arly Bergman (1998). Functional Neuroanatomy. McGraw-Hill. The ... While this cluster of syndromes is common to such sources as 1997's The Neuropsychiatry of Limbic and Subcortical Disorders, ...
"Promoting social behavior with oxytocin in high-functioning autism spectrum disorders". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. doi: ... "The social brain: neural basis of social knowledge". Annu Rev Psychol. 60: 693-716. doi:10.1146/annurev.psych.60.110707.163514 ... 2005). "Oxytocin modulates neural circuitry for social cognition and fear in humans". The Journal of Neuroscience. 25 (49): ... Bartz JA, Hollander E (2008). "Oxytocin and experimental therapeutics in autism spectrum disorders". Progress in Brain Research ...
2009). "Genes related to sex steroids, neural growth, and social-emotional behavior are associated with autistic traits, ... 2009). "Increased serum neurotrophin-4/5 levels in bipolar disorder". J Psychiatr Res. 43 (7): 721-3. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychires. ... adult locomotory behavior. • sensory organ boundary specification. • cell-cell signaling. • neuron projection morphogenesis. • ... 2010). "Role of the neurotrophin network in eating disorders' subphenotypes: body mass index and age at onset of the disease". ...
Disorders[edit]. Main article: Eating disorder. Physiologically, eating is generally triggered by hunger, but there are ... eating is in fact the primary purpose of a social gathering. At many social events, food and beverages are made available to ... McKenna, R. J. (1972). "Some Effects of Anxiety Level and Food Cues on the Eating Behavior of Obese and Normal Subjects: A ... Sharia and Social Engineering: p 143, R. Michael Feener - 2013 *^ FOOD & EATING IN MEDIEVAL EUROPE - Page 73, Joel T. Rosenthal ...
Behaviors of networks[edit]. Biological neurons are connected to each other in a complex, recurrent fashion. These connections ... Social cognitive neuroscience. Interdisciplinary. fields. *Consumer neuroscience. *Cultural neuroscience. *Educational ...
Schools, businesses and social organisations were closed.[157] The initial response was led by Congolese doctors, including ... animal behavior and other factors may trigger outbreaks among animal populations.[82] ... clotting factor deficiencies/platelet disorders, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia, ... Social anthropologists may help find alternatives to traditional rules for burials.[121] ...
"Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. 105 (1): 98-121. doi:10.1016/j.obhdp.2007.05.002. PMC 2702783 . PMID ... As described by social psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger, the cognitive bias of illusory superiority results from ... Journal of Nonverbal Behavior. 28 (3): 187-209. doi:10.1023/b:jonb.0000039649.20015.0e. ISSN 0191-5886.. ... Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. American Psychological Association. 77 (6): 1121-1134. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.64.2655 ...
It may result in psychological and social problems.[20] Scars[edit]. Acne scars are caused by inflammation within the dermis ... Age is one factor that may help distinguish between these disorders. Skin disorders such as perioral dermatitis and keratosis ... Paller AS, Mancini AJ (2015). Hurwitz's Clinical Pediatric Dermatology: A Textbook of Skin Disorders of Childhood And ... The costs and social impact of acne are substantial. In the United States, acne vulgaris is responsible for more than 5 million ...
As with any type of hearing-related disorder, the related physiology is within the ear and central auditory system. With ... Discomfort and social embarrassment are some of the main concerns when using tools such as this. ... Behavior. 91 (2-3): 196-201. doi:10.1016/j.physbeh.2007.02.009. PMID 17399746.. .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style: ...
In its 2009 human development report, UN highlighted a growing social problem in Nepal. Individuals who lack a citizenship are ... Karki, Yagya B.; Agrawal, Gajanand (May 2008). "Effects of Communication Campaigns on the Health Behavior of Women of ... Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorder (IDD) d) Control of Vitamin A Deficiency (VAD) e) Control of Iron Deficiency Anaemia (IDA ... resulting in the social exclusion of other parts of Nepal. The restoration of democracy in 1990 has allowed the strengthening ...
Emotional and behavioral disorders *Separation anxiety disorder. *Movement disorders *Stereotypic. *Social functioning *DAD ... Reuber M, Elger CE (June 2003). "Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: review and update". Epilepsy & Behavior. 4 (3): 205-16. doi ... PNES fall under the category of disorders known as Functional Neurological Disorders (FND) also known as conversion disorders. ... "Factitious disorders and malingering in relation to functional neurologic disorders". Functional Neurologic Disorders. Handbook ...
From a social perspective shortness can be a problem independently of the cause. In many societies there are advantages ... Chronic illnesses, malnutrition, endocrine, metabolic disorders or chromosomal anomalies are characterized by proportionate ... Evidence of Early Life Origins of Suicidal Behavior?". Retrieved 2014-02-25.. ...
Ada, OH: Institute for Social Research, Ohio Northern University. ISBN 0-9728055-5-9.. [page needed] Summarized in: McDonald WP ... Chiropractic is a form of alternative medicine mostly concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of mechanical disorders of the ... changing risky/unhealthy behaviors, nutritional/dietary recommendations, relaxation/stress reduction recommendations, ice pack/ ... Martin SC (October 1993). "Chiropractic and the social context of medical technology, 1895-1925". Technol Cult. 34 (4): 808-34 ...
Between 2007 and 2013, over ten million beehives were abandoned due to colony collapse disorder, which causes worker bees to ... See also: Extinction risk from global warming, Ocean acidification, Marine pollution, and Social and environmental impact of ... some of which had adapted flightlessness and ground nesting habits and others had no defensive behavior as a result of having ... See also: Decline in amphibian populations, White nose syndrome, Colony collapse disorder, and Pesticide toxicity to bees ...
Carlson, Neil (January 22, 2012). Physiology of Behavior. Reproductive Behavior. 11th edition. Pearson. p. 326. ISBN 0205239390 ... Social isolation has a hindering effect in AHN whereas normal regulation of androgens increases AHN. A study using male rats ... a genetic disorder resulting in complete or partial insensitivity to androgens and a lack of external male genitalia. ... "Hormones and Behavior. 53 (5): 613-26. doi:10.1016/j.yhbeh.2008.01.013. PMC 2706155 . PMID 18374335.. ...
Frontal lobe tumors may contribute to poor reasoning, inappropriate social behavior, personality changes, poor planning, lower ... spatial orientation disorders), personality or emotional changes, hemiparesis, hypoesthesia, aphasia, ataxia, visual field ... Behavior changesEdit. Despite the personality and behavior changes that occur in people with brain tumors, little research on ... a primary or secondary tumor in that region can cause inappropriate social behavior,[18] temper tantrums,[18] laughing at ...
"Evolution and Human Behavior. 34 (3): 176-181. doi:10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2012.11.006.. .mw-parser-output cite.citation{font- ... Authorities even began regulating the length of a high heel's point according to social rank. Klaus Carl includes these lengths ... "Footwear: The Primary Cause of Foot Disorders" (PDF).. *^ Jang, Il-Yong; Kang, Da-Haeng; Jeon, Jae-Keun; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Lee, ...
... social behavior, narrative, music, and motor behavior. Each of these structures is supposed to involve a set of core processes ... The aim is to explain the order and systematicity that exist beneath a surface of apparent disorder or "chaos". ... The social system deals with the understanding of social relationships and interactions. Mechanisms for monitoring non-verbal ... and actions and intentions for social behavior. Thus, these are very broad structures in which many executive control ...
Greenberg, E.S., & Grunberg, L. (1995). Work alienation and problem alcohol behavior. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 36 ... Musculoskeletal disorders[edit]. Main article: Musculoskeletal disorders. Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) involve injury and ... Mental disorder[edit]. Main article: Mental disorder. Research has found that psychosocial workplace factors are among the risk ... Social Security Administration. (2012). Annual statistical report on the Social Security Disability Insurance Program, 2011. ...
Genetics of common disorders". BMJ. 298 (6678): 949-52. doi:10.1136/bmj.298.6678.949. PMC 1836181. PMID 2497870.. ... "ADVS 3910 Wild Horses Behavior", College of Agriculture, Utah State University. *^ Freilich S, Hoelzel AR, Choudhury SR. " ... Specifically, written documents such as the Bible illustrate that there have been laws and social customs that have called for ... Autosomal recessive disorders occur in individuals who have two copies of an allele for a particular recessive genetic mutation ...
... the position holding that all behavior is caused by prior behavior. "Predeterminism" is the position holding that all behavior ... Oxford Handbook of Human Action (Volume 2 of Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience ed.). Oxford University Press. pp. 487 ff ... Definitions and Classification of Tic Disorders.. Retrieved 19 August 2006.. *^ Zinner, S.H. (2000). "Tourette disorder". ... Oxford Handbook of Human Action (Volume 2 of Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience ed.). Oxford University Press. pp. 487 ff ...
Bockting, W. (2014). Gender Dysphoria and Disorders of Sex Development. New York, NY, U.S.A: Springer. pp. 319-330.. ... Psychological and social consequences[edit]. After sex reassignment surgery, transsexuals (people who underwent cross-sex ... Lawrence, A. A. (2005). "Sexuality before and after male-to-female sex reassignment surgery". Archives of Sexual Behavior. 34 ( ... Social support can help them to relate to their minority identity, ascertain their trans identity and reduce minority stress.[ ...
In many societies and in many social classes, even mentioning the need to urinate is seen as a social transgression, despite it ... Experimentally induced disorders. This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations ... Case, Linda P. (2010). Canine and Feline Behavior and Training: A Complete Guide to Understanding our Two Best Friends: A ... Wolves: Behavior, Ecology, and Conservation - Google Books. Books.google.com. 23 November 2003. Retrieved 20 November 2012.. ...
Like many of the other disorders mentioned, some of the most common significant effects can be seen in social behaviors, ... such as mood/anxiety disorders and eating disorders, or inappropriate behaviors, including suicide attempts, withdrawal from ... A meta-study of over 330 subjects showed that music therapy produces highly significant improvements in social behaviors, overt ... The strong emphasis on social integration and the involvement of parents in the therapeutic process found in social pediatrics ...
Such behavior can also suggest deep learning algorithms, in particular when mapping of such swarms to neural circuits is ... "From disorder to order in marching locusts" (PDF). Science. 312 (5778): 1402-1406. Bibcode:2006Sci...312.1402B. doi:10.1126/ ... Czirók, A.; Vicsek, T. (2006). "Collective behavior of interacting self-propelled particles". Physica A. 281: 17-29. arXiv:cond ... Swarm intelligence (SI) is the collective behavior of decentralized, self-organized systems, natural or artificial. The concept ...
... including anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, insomnia, posttraumatic stress disorder, borderline personality disorder, ADHD, ... Frequent human handling of the rat pups may cause their mother to exhibit more nurturant behavior, such as licking and grooming ... For example, biologists studying stress in fish showed that social subordination leads to chronic stress, related to reduced ... In post-traumatic stress disorder there appears to be lower-than-normal cortisol release, and it is thought that a blunted ...
Hiday, VA (June 1995). "The social context of mental illness and violence.". Journal of health and social behavior 36 (2): 122- ... "Prevention of Mental Disorders, Substance Abuse, and Problem Behaviors: A Developmental Perspective. National Academies Press. ... social anxiety disorder), திகில் அடைதல், வெளியைக் கண்டு மருளல் (agoraphobia), அதிர்ச்சியால் ஏற்படும் அழுத்தப்பிறழ்வு, மன ... depressive and bipolar II disorders: Evidence that they lie on a dimensional spectrum". Journal of Affective Disorders 92 (1): ...
... social justice and animal welfare impacts of factory farming, including the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production ... which allow birds to move freely and display natural behaviors. The waste material in these systems is far less concentrated ... but can result in higher rates of metabolic disorders. [4] ... that the hens cannot perform many of their natural behaviors ... best housing environments for farm animals must take into consideration freedom of movement and expression of normal behaviors ...
"National Occupational Research Agenda for Healthcare and Social Assistance , NIOSH , CDC". www.cdc.gov. 2019-02-15. Retrieved ... The consequences of this stress can include substance abuse, suicide, major depressive disorder, and anxiety, all of which ... physical and behavior therapists, as well as allied health professionals such as phlebotomists, medical laboratory scientists, ... 70% of global health and social care workers are women, 30% of leaders in the global health sector are women ...
... often caused by behavior disorders or a personal history of abuse.[12] Dosage of alcohol intensifies these effects of myopia.[ ... Alcohol myopia is a cognitive-physiological theory on alcohol abuse in which many of alcohol's social and stress-reducing ... Risky behavior[edit]. Alcohol myopia has been shown to increase the likelihood that a person will engage in risky behavior. The ... "Addictive Behaviors. 39 (1): 365-368. doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.10.025. PMC 3858531. PMID 24199932.. ...
... idleness disorder, and disorder rovina (ruin). In turn, from rovina springs order, from order virtù, and from this, glory and ... Pitirim Aleksandrovich Sorokin, Social and Cultural Dynamics: a Study of Change in Major Systems of Art, Truth, Ethics, Law, ... traces historically recurring patterns of political thought and behavior in the west since antiquity.[9] If history has lessons ... Elizabeth Perry, Challenging the Mandate of Heaven: Social Protest and State Power in China, Sharpe, 2002, ISBN 0-7656-0444-2, ...
Individuals with this disorder gain satisfaction through their antisocial behavior and lack remorse for their actions.[58] ... Social Problems: A Down-To-Earth Approach, 2008. *^ Public Safety Performance Project, State of Recidivism: The Revolving Door ... Mental disorders[edit]. Mental-health problems - for example mental disorders involving certain types of psychosis or ... behavior modification and therapy techniques may not improve the behavior of a psychopath.[60] Psychopaths may have a markedly ...
... skip meals or develop other forms of disordered eating, a U.S. study suggests. ... Reuters Health) - Adolescents who are active on social media may be more likely to exercise excessively, ... boys and girls on social media were more likely to report disordered eating behaviors. The frequency of these behaviors ... were more than five times as likely to report disordered eating behaviors as boys without social media accounts. ...
Promoting social behavior with oxytocin in high-functioning autism spectrum disorders. Elissar Andari, Jean-René Duhamel, ... Promoting social behavior with oxytocin in high-functioning autism spectrum disorders. Elissar Andari, Jean-René Duhamel, ... Promoting social behavior with oxytocin in high-functioning autism spectrum disorders Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you ... Promoting social behavior with oxytocin in high-functioning autism spectrum disorders. Elissar Andari, Jean-René Duhamel, ...
... is characterized by a marked and persistent fear of being scrutinized by others in social situations. It is highly prevalent ... Cognitive Behavior Therapy Social Anxiety Social Phobia Social Anxiety Disorder Safety Behavior These keywords were added by ... group-based cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder: 4-year follow-up of a randomized trial. Behav Res Ther 59: ... Hedman E., Botella C., Berger T. (2016) Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder. In: Lindefors N ...
... is a tool that is used for evaluating social interactions, but it can be successfully applied in the ... Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB) The Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB) is a method of analyzing and ... Structural Analysis Of Social Behavior (SASB) Other Explanations of Personality Disorders: Structural Analysis of Social ... The Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB) is a tool that is used for evaluating social interactions, but it can be ...
... by University of Oregon ... Citation: Zebrafish interactions offer help in studying social behavior disorders (2018, July 26) retrieved 21 September 2019 ... phys.org/news/2018-07-zebrafish-interactions-social-behavior-disorders.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from ... "If and when we have a mutant zebrafish that has deficits in social behavior, then we can ask, what can we give that fish to ...
Neuroimmune interactions shaping social behavior in mouse models for neurodevelopmental disorders on SFARI ... work using mouse models of maternal immune activation to study the role of maternal infection in neurodevelopmental disorders, ... Neuroimmune interactions shaping social behavior in mouse models for neurodevelopmental disorders. *Autism Research ... and its relation to attention deficit disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and other related disorders of brain development? ...
We examined whether Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) would modify self-reported negative ... therapy for social anxiety disorder on the neural bases of emotional reactivity to and regulation of social evaluation. ... Thus, one mechanism underlying CBT for SAD may be changes in reappraisal-related brain responses to social criticism. Goldin, P ... when reacting to social praise, and (b) increases in right SFG and IPL and decreases in left posterior superior temporal gyrus ...
... Månsson, Kristoffer ... in 26 participants with social anxiety disorder randomly assigned either to CBT or an attention bias modification control ... Patients with anxiety disorders exhibit excessive neural reactivity in the amygdala, which can be normalized by effective ... Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of ...
They also offer insight for translating genetic and neuroendocrine knowledge into treatments for disorders of social behavior. ... Social neuropeptides including oxytocin (OT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) regulate reproductive and social behaviors in ... In WS, baseline OT but not AVP, was correlated positively with approach, but negatively with adaptive social behaviors. These ... We also related these levels to standardized indices of social behavior. Results revealed significantly higher median levels of ...
Tweetations for "A 5-Year Follow-up of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder" ...
3. Autism Spectrum Disorders. DSM-IV defines autism as (1) impairments in social interaction(2) impairments in commun Slideshow ... Autism basicsModel for understanding social interactions in autismPsychiatric comorbidity TemperamentAutism specific ... Understanding Behavior Social Interactions in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders - PowerPoint PPT Presentation. ... PowerPoint Slideshow about Understanding Behavior Social Interactions in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders - elin. An ...
OBJECTIVE: A few meta-analyses have examined psychological treatments for a social anxiety disorder (SAD). This is the first ... Wersebe, H., Sijbrandij, M., & Cuijpers, P. (January 01, 2013). Psychological group-treatments of social anxiety disorder: a ...
group-based cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder: 4-Year follow-up of a randomized trial. Hedman, Erik ... Social anxiety disorder; Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy; Cognitive behavioral group therapy; Long-term effects; Cost ... Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is common, debilitating and associated with high societal costs. The disorder can be effectively ... treated with Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT), but no previous study has investigated the long-term clinical or ...
We conclude that shame and social anxiety are associated and that it is likely that persons with SAD are more prone to ... In addition, shame, social anxiety, and depressive symptoms were significantly associated among participants with SAD. After ... Despite this, it remains to be investigated whether shame is elevated in persons with SAD, and if cognitive behavior therapy ( ... and social anxiety are associated in persons with SAD, and (III) if CBT can reduce internal shame in patients with SAD. Firstly ...
Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for social anxiety disorder (SAD), but many patients do not respond ... Predicting long-term outcome of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder using fMRI and ... Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology ... Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology ...
Effects of water exercise swimming program on aquatic skills and social behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorders. ... Effects of water exercise swimming program on aquatic skills and social behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorders.. ... Effects of water exercise swimming program on aquatic skills and social behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorders.. ... Aquatic, Autism, Intervention, Motor-Sensory Intervention, Physiotherapy, Physical Exercise, Social Skills, Swimming Please ...
Atomoxetine in autism spectrum disorder: no effects on social functioning; some beneficial effects on stereotyped behaviors, ... Atomoxetine in autism spectrum disorder: no effects on social functioning; some beneficial effects on stereotyped behaviors, ...
More in Social & Behavior. * Walking together: Personal traits and first impressions affects step synchronization Tohoku ... "Often, people with these disorders are stuck in a cycle of negative thought patterns and behaviors that can make them feel ... Depression, anxiety and panic disorders are common mental health disorders that can be chronic and debilitating and put a ... generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder," said Nur Hani Zainal, MS, from The Pennsylvania State University and lead ...
Data from a clinical trial has shown that how people respond to treatment for Bipolar Disorder may be influenced by their ... More in Social & Behavior. * Using infrared eye tracking to study infant behavior Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and ... Bipolar Disorder (which used to be called manic depression) is characterised by episodes of mood swings, between being very ... "If we can confirm these results, then its good news for people with Bipolar Disorder, as there is a great need for better ...
Flintoff, M. M. (1988). Social behavior and emotional adjustment in children with internalizing disorders (Unpublished doctoral ...
Psychological Disorders, Group Psychology, Social Behavior, Sociology. When you attend this class session, youll cover High- ... Biological Bases of Behavior, Learning and Memory, Motivation, Emotion, Formation of Identity, Research Design, Data Analysis. ... Yield Science lessons on Social Processes, Attribution Theory, and The Endocrine System. ...
"No one has looked at positive social behavior," she said.. "Childhood social behavior, even adult social behavior, has a lot of ... Bipolar Disorder*Bipolar Disorder Symptoms. *Bipolar Disorder Treatment. *Bipolar Disorder Test. *Depression*Depression ... Social interactions studied included friendliness, extent of verbalization, active social play, and exploratory behavior. ... "We link nutrition to physical health but also social health and positive social behavior." ...
... handicaps the social and communicative abilities of 1 out of every 110 children in the United States. Evidence suggests that ... Animal Model of Genetics and Social Behavior in Autism Spectrum Disorders Platt, Michael L. Duke University, Durham, NC, United ... Animal Model of Genetics and Social Behavior in Autism Spectrum Disorders. Platt, Michael L. / Duke University. $659,700. ... Animal Model of Genetics and Social Behavior in Autism Spectrum Disorders. Platt, Michael L. / Duke University. $673,494. ...
Home→Blog→Categories Genre→Social behaviors (bullying, drugs, sex, alcohol, eating disorders, mental illness, etc.) 1 2 3 … 7 8 ... Category Archives: Social behaviors (bullying, drugs, sex, alcohol, eating disorders, mental illness, etc.). Post navigation. ← ... Social behaviors (bullying, drugs, sex, alcohol, eating disorders, mental illness, etc.) , Tagged good books for teens, Kat ... Social behaviors (bullying, drugs, sex, alcohol, eating disorders, mental illness, etc.) , Tagged book review, good books for ...
Cognitive behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy for social anxiety disorder. In: Japanese Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology ... title = "Cognitive behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy for social anxiety disorder",. author = "Junwen Chen and Yumi Nakano ... Cognitive behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy for social anxiety disorder. / Chen, Junwen; Nakano, Yumi; Furukawa, Toshi. ... Chen J, Nakano Y, Furukawa T. Cognitive behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy for social anxiety disorder. Japanese Journal of ...
The study examined whether the efficacy of cognitive behavioral treatment for Social Anxiety Disorder for children and ... Social phobia . Children and adolescents . Disorder-specific . Post-event processing . Cognitive behavior therapy . Social ... Generic versus disorder specific cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder in youth: A randomized controlled trial ... The study examined whether the efficacy of cognitive behavioral treatment for Social Anxiety Disorder for children and ...
... social behavior, and psychiatric symptoms in patients with a mental disorder. Together they form a unique fingerprint. * ... social behavior, and psychiatric symptoms in patients with a mental disorder. / Han, Kuem Sun; Im, Hee Su; Yang, Bo Kyum; Chung ... social behavior, and psychiatric symptoms in patients with a mental disorder, Taehan Kanho Hakhoe chi, vol. 35, no. 5, pp. 896 ... social behavior, and psychiatric symptoms in patients with a mental disorder. Taehan Kanho Hakhoe chi. 2005 Aug;35(5):896-903. ...
... better academic and classroom behavior, and improved social behavior.[177] Exercising while on stimulant medication augments ... Stereotypic movement disorder[2]. *Mood disorders (especially bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder). Boys diagnosed ... Normally active young child, conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, learning disorder, bipolar disorder[6]. ... it is classified as a disruptive behavior disorder along with oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, and antisocial ...
This chapter provides an overview of the social work applications of the practice approach known as behavior analysis to the ... of a wide variety of behavioral disorders. Specific and social phobias, agoraphobia, post-traumatic stress disorder, acute ... Thyer B.A. (2019) Behavior Analysis and Social Work. In: Ow R., Cheong Poon A. (eds) Mental Health and Social Work. Social Work ... Most social workers will perhaps not be prepared to make the jump to identifying more as a behavior analyst or as a behavior ...
For children that do not learn these social skills incidentally in the course of development, they need to ... SOCIAL INTERACTION is a core feature of human nature. ... Social Skills. SOCIAL INTERACTION is a core feature of human ... Contact Steinberg Behavior Solutions, Inc. today to see how social skills teaching can help your child with siblings at home ... Applied Behavior Analysis) Evaluation and Treatment for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders img.wp-smiley, img.emoji { ...

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