Phobic Disorders: Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Shyness: Discomfort and partial inhibition of the usual forms of behavior when in the presence of others.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Panic Disorder: A type of anxiety disorder characterized by unexpected panic attacks that last minutes or, rarely, hours. Panic attacks begin with intense apprehension, fear or terror and, often, a feeling of impending doom. Symptoms experienced during a panic attack include dyspnea or sensations of being smothered; dizziness, loss of balance or faintness; choking sensations; palpitations or accelerated heart rate; shakiness; sweating; nausea or other form of abdominal distress; depersonalization or derealization; paresthesias; hot flashes or chills; chest discomfort or pain; fear of dying and fear of not being in control of oneself or going crazy. Agoraphobia may also develop. Similar to other anxiety disorders, it may be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.Social Behavior Disorders: Behaviors which are at variance with the expected social norm and which affect other individuals.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Desensitization, Psychologic: A behavior therapy technique in which deep muscle relaxation is used to inhibit the effects of graded anxiety-evoking stimuli.Therapy, Computer-Assisted: Computer systems utilized as adjuncts in the treatment of disease.Psychotherapy, Group: A form of therapy in which two or more patients participate under the guidance of one or more psychotherapists for the purpose of treating emotional disturbances, social maladjustments, and psychotic states.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Anti-Anxiety Agents: Agents that alleviate ANXIETY, tension, and ANXIETY DISORDERS, promote sedation, and have a calming effect without affecting clarity of consciousness or neurologic conditions. ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS are commonly used in the symptomatic treatment of anxiety but are not included here.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Defense Mechanisms: Unconscious process used by an individual or a group of individuals in order to cope with impulses, feelings or ideas which are not acceptable at their conscious level; various types include reaction formation, projection and self reversal.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Shame: An emotional attitude excited by realization of a shortcoming or impropriety.Temperament: Predisposition to react to one's environment in a certain way; usually refers to mood changes.Halitosis: An offensive, foul breath odor resulting from a variety of causes such as poor oral hygiene, dental or oral infections, or the ingestion of certain foods.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Anxiety, Separation: Anxiety experienced by an individual upon separation from a person or object of particular significance to the individual.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Facial Expression: Observable changes of expression in the face in response to emotional stimuli.Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors: Compounds that specifically inhibit the reuptake of serotonin in the brain.Agoraphobia: Obsessive, persistent, intense fear of open places.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Arousal: Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Inhibition (Psychology): The interference with or prevention of a behavioral or verbal response even though the stimulus for that response is present; in psychoanalysis the unconscious restraining of an instinctual process.Psychotropic Drugs: A loosely defined grouping of drugs that have effects on psychological function. Here the psychotropic agents include the antidepressive agents, hallucinogens, and tranquilizing agents (including the antipsychotics and anti-anxiety agents).Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Limbic System: A set of forebrain structures common to all mammals that is defined functionally and anatomically. It is implicated in the higher integration of visceral, olfactory, and somatic information as well as homeostatic responses including fundamental survival behaviors (feeding, mating, emotion). For most authors, it includes the AMYGDALA; EPITHALAMUS; GYRUS CINGULI; hippocampal formation (see HIPPOCAMPUS); HYPOTHALAMUS; PARAHIPPOCAMPAL GYRUS; SEPTAL NUCLEI; anterior nuclear group of thalamus, and portions of the basal ganglia. (Parent, Carpenter's Human Neuroanatomy, 9th ed, p744; NeuroNames, http://rprcsgi.rprc.washington.edu/neuronames/index.html (September 2, 1998)).Antidepressive Agents, Second-Generation: A structurally and mechanistically diverse group of drugs that are not tricyclics or monoamine oxidase inhibitors. The most clinically important appear to act selectively on serotonergic systems, especially by inhibiting serotonin reuptake.Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.Speech: Communication through a system of conventional vocal symbols.Social Conformity: Behavioral or attitudinal compliance with recognized social patterns or standards.Manifest Anxiety Scale: True-false questionnaire made up of items believed to indicate anxiety, in which the subject answers verbally the statement that describes him.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Social Isolation: The separation of individuals or groups resulting in the lack of or minimizing of social contact and/or communication. This separation may be accomplished by physical separation, by social barriers and by psychological mechanisms. In the latter, there may be interaction but no real communication.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Prefrontal Cortex: The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the MEDIODORSAL NUCLEUS OF THE THALAMUS. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the DIENCEPHALON; MESENCEPHALON; and LIMBIC SYSTEM as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Social Distance: The degree of closeness or acceptance an individual or group feels toward another individual or group.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Social Desirability: A personality trait rendering the individual acceptable in social or interpersonal relations. It is related to social acceptance, social approval, popularity, social status, leadership qualities, or any quality making him a socially desirable companion.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Implosive Therapy: A method for extinguishing anxiety by a saturation exposure to the feared stimulus situation or its substitute.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Dental Anxiety: Abnormal fear or dread of visiting the dentist for preventive care or therapy and unwarranted anxiety over dental procedures.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Galvanic Skin Response: A change in electrical resistance of the skin, occurring in emotion and in certain other conditions.Somatoform Disorders: Disorders having the presence of physical symptoms that suggest a general medical condition but that are not fully explained by a another medical condition, by the direct effects of a substance, or by another mental disorder. The symptoms must cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning. In contrast to FACTITIOUS DISORDERS and MALINGERING, the physical symptoms are not under voluntary control. (APA, DSM-V)Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Startle Reaction: A complex involuntary response to an unexpected strong stimulus usually auditory in nature.Body Dysmorphic Disorders: Preoccupations with appearance or self-image causing significant distress or impairment in important areas of functioning.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Paroxetine: A serotonin uptake inhibitor that is effective in the treatment of depression.Rejection (Psychology): Non-acceptance, negative attitudes, hostility or excessive criticism of the individual which may precipitate feelings of rejection.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Dysthymic Disorder: Chronically depressed mood that occurs for most of the day more days than not for at least 2 years. The required minimum duration in children to make this diagnosis is 1 year. During periods of depressed mood, at least 2 of the following additional symptoms are present: poor appetite or overeating, insomnia or hypersomnia, low energy or fatigue, low self esteem, poor concentration or difficulty making decisions, and feelings of hopelessness. (DSM-IV)Alcohol-Related Disorders: Disorders related to or resulting from abuse or mis-use of alcohol.Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry): The co-existence of a substance abuse disorder with a psychiatric disorder. The diagnostic principle is based on the fact that it has been found often that chemically dependent patients also have psychiatric problems of various degrees of severity.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Personality Disorders: A major deviation from normal patterns of behavior.Psychotherapy: A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.Friends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Antidepressive Agents: Mood-stimulating drugs used primarily in the treatment of affective disorders and related conditions. Several MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS are useful as antidepressants apparently as a long-term consequence of their modulation of catecholamine levels. The tricyclic compounds useful as antidepressive agents (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) also appear to act through brain catecholamine systems. A third group (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, SECOND-GENERATION) is a diverse group of drugs including some that act specifically on serotonergic systems.Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Social Dominance: Social structure of a group as it relates to the relative social rank of dominance status of its members. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Neurotic Disorders: Disorders in which the symptoms are distressing to the individual and recognized by him or her as being unacceptable. Social relationships may be greatly affected but usually remain within acceptable limits. The disturbance is relatively enduring or recurrent without treatment.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Test Anxiety Scale: A self-reporting test consisting of items concerning fear and worry about taking tests and physiological activity, such as heart rate, sweating, etc., before, during, and after tests.Social Work: The use of community resources, individual case work, or group work to promote the adaptive capacities of individuals in relation to their social and economic environments. It includes social service agencies.Pleasure-Pain Principle: The psychoanalytic concept that man instinctively seeks to avoid pain and discomfort and strives for gratification and pleasure.Social Media: Platforms that provide the ability and tools to create and publish information accessed via the INTERNET. Generally these platforms have three characteristics with content user generated, high degree of interaction between creator and viewer, and easily integrated with other sites.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Personality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.United StatesHierarchy, Social: Social rank-order established by certain behavioral patterns.Paranoid Disorders: Chronic mental disorders in which there has been an insidious development of a permanent and unshakeable delusional system (persecutory delusions or delusions of jealousy), accompanied by preservation of clear and orderly thinking. Emotional responses and behavior are consistent with the delusional state.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Child Development Disorders, Pervasive: Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Social Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Mutism: The inability to generate oral-verbal expression, despite normal comprehension of speech. This may be associated with BRAIN DISEASES or MENTAL DISORDERS. Organic mutism may be associated with damage to the FRONTAL LOBE; BRAIN STEM; THALAMUS; and CEREBELLUM. Selective mutism is a psychological condition that usually affects children characterized by continuous refusal to speak in social situations by a child who is able and willing to speak to selected persons. Kussmal aphasia refers to mutism in psychosis. (From Fortschr Neurol Psychiatr 1994; 62(9):337-44)Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Anger: A strong emotional feeling of displeasure aroused by being interfered with, injured or threatened.Paranoid Personality Disorder: A personality disorder characterized by the avoidance of accepting deserved blame and an unwarranted view of others as malevolent. The latter is expressed as suspiciousness, hypersensitivity, and mistrust.Autistic Disorder: A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)Individuation: A process of differentiation having for its goal the development of the individual personality.Hypochondriasis: Preoccupation with the fear of having, or the idea that one has, a serious disease based on the person's misinterpretation of bodily symptoms. (APA, DSM-IV)Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Bullying: Aggressive behavior intended to cause harm or distress. The behavior may be physical or verbal. There is typically an imbalance of power, strength, or status between the target and the aggressor.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Psychopathology: The study of significant causes and processes in the development of mental illness.Awareness: The act of "taking account" of an object or state of affairs. It does not imply assessment of, nor attention to the qualities or nature of the object.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Social Change: Social process whereby the values, attitudes, or institutions of society, such as education, family, religion, and industry become modified. It includes both the natural process and action programs initiated by members of the community.Paranoid Behavior: Behavior exhibited by individuals who are overly suspicious, but without the constellation of symptoms characteristic of paranoid personality disorder or paranoid type of schizophrenia.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Panic: A state of extreme acute, intense anxiety and unreasoning fear accompanied by disorganization of personality function.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Individuality: Those psychological characteristics which differentiate individuals from one another.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Feedback, Psychological: A mechanism of information stimulus and response that may control subsequent behavior, cognition, perception, or performance. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Cycloserine: Antibiotic substance produced by Streptomyces garyphalus.Functional Neuroimaging: Methods for visualizing REGIONAL BLOOD FLOW, metabolic, electrical, or other physiological activities in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM using various imaging modalities.Self-Assessment: Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.Extinction, Psychological: The procedure of presenting the conditioned stimulus without REINFORCEMENT to an organism previously conditioned. It refers also to the diminution of a conditioned response resulting from this procedure.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Imagination: A new pattern of perceptual or ideational material derived from past experience.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Outpatients: Persons who receive ambulatory care at an outpatient department or clinic without room and board being provided.Exploratory Behavior: The tendency to explore or investigate a novel environment. It is considered a motivation not clearly distinguishable from curiosity.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Social Conditions: The state of society as it exists or in flux. While it usually refers to society as a whole in a specified geographical or political region, it is applicable also to restricted strata of a society.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Body Image: Individuals' concept of their own bodies.Tic Disorders: Disorders characterized by recurrent TICS that may interfere with speech and other activities. Tics are sudden, rapid, nonrhythmic, stereotyped motor movements or vocalizations which may be exacerbated by stress and are generally attenuated during absorbing activities. Tic disorders are distinguished from conditions which feature other types of abnormal movements that may accompany another another condition. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins: Sodium chloride-dependent neurotransmitter symporters located primarily on the PLASMA MEMBRANE of serotonergic neurons. They are different than SEROTONIN RECEPTORS, which signal cellular responses to SEROTONIN. They remove SEROTONIN from the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE by high affinity reuptake into PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS. Regulates signal amplitude and duration at serotonergic synapses and is the site of action of the SEROTONIN UPTAKE INHIBITORS.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Citalopram: A furancarbonitrile that is one of the SEROTONIN UPTAKE INHIBITORS used as an antidepressant. The drug is also effective in reducing ethanol uptake in alcoholics and is used in depressed patients who also suffer from tardive dyskinesia in preference to tricyclic antidepressants, which aggravate this condition.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Social Problems: Situations affecting a significant number of people, that are believed to be sources of difficulty or threaten the stability of the community, and that require programs of amelioration.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Marijuana Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke from CANNABIS.Emotional Intelligence: The ability to understand and manage emotions and to use emotional knowledge to enhance thought and deal effectively with tasks. Components of emotional intelligence include empathy, self-motivation, self-awareness, self-regulation, and social skill. Emotional intelligence is a measurement of one's ability to socialize or relate to others.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Guilt: Subjective feeling of having committed an error, offense or sin; unpleasant feeling of self-criticism. These result from acts, impulses, or thoughts contrary to one's personal conscience.Character: In current usage, approximately equivalent to personality. The sum of the relatively fixed personality traits and habitual modes of response of an individual.Social Identification: The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Social Security: Government sponsored social insurance programs.Psychology, Social: The branch of psychology concerned with the effects of group membership upon the behavior, attitudes, and beliefs of an individual.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Conditioning, Classical: Learning that takes place when a conditioned stimulus is paired with an unconditioned stimulus.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Eating Disorders: A group of disorders characterized by physiological and psychological disturbances in appetite or food intake.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Behavioral Symptoms: Observable manifestations of impaired psychological functioning.Benzodiazepines: A group of two-ring heterocyclic compounds consisting of a benzene ring fused to a diazepine ring.Conditioning (Psychology): A general term referring to the learning of some particular response.Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Judgment: The process of discovering or asserting an objective or intrinsic relation between two objects or concepts; a faculty or power that enables a person to make judgments; the process of bringing to light and asserting the implicit meaning of a concept; a critical evaluation of a person or situation.Gender Identity: A person's concept of self as being male and masculine or female and feminine, or ambivalent, based in part on physical characteristics, parental responses, and psychological and social pressures. It is the internal experience of gender role.Marijuana Abuse: The excessive use of marijuana with associated psychological symptoms and impairment in social or occupational functioning.Autobiography as Topic: The life of a person written by himself or herself. (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Extraversion (Psychology): A state in which attention is largely directed outward from the self.Social Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.Social Participation: Involvement in community activities or programs.Bibliotherapy: A form of supportive psychotherapy in which the patient is given carefully selected material to read.
Social anxiety disorder". N. Engl. J. Med. 355 (10): 1029-36. doi:10.1056/NEJMcp060145. PMID 16957148. Tyrer P (1992). " ... Prevention of variceal bleeding in portal hypertension Possible mitigation of hyperhidrosis Social and other anxiety disorders ... However, many controlled trials in the past 25 years indicate beta blockers are effective in anxiety disorders, though the ... Jameson, J. Larry; Loscalzo, Joseph (2010). Harrison's Nephrology and Acid-Base Disorders. McGraw-Hill Companies. p. 215. ISBN ...
Some people have this specific phobia, while others may also have broader social phobia or social anxiety disorder. Stage ... Garcia-Lopez, L.J. (2013). Treating...social anxiety disorder. Madrid: Piramide. Hamilton, C. (2008) [2005]. Communicating for ... In some cases, anxiety can be mitigated by a speaker not attempting to resist their anxiety, thus fortifying the anxiety/fight- ... However, not all persons with public speaking anxiety are necessarily unable to achieve work goals, though this disorder ...
Masdrakis VG, Turic D, Baldwin DS (Sep 20, 2013). "Pharmacological treatment of social anxiety disorder". Mod Trends ... Masdrakis VG, Turic D, Baldwin DS (2013). "Pharmacological treatment of social anxiety disorder". Mod Trends Pharmacopsychiatri ... Azapirones have shown benefit in general anxiety and augmenting SSRIs in social anxiety and depression. Evidence is not clear ... "Azapirones for generalized anxiety disorder". Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 3 (3): CD006115. doi:10.1002/14651858. ...
3211-. ISBN 978-1-4698-8375-5. Masdrakis VG, Turic D, Baldwin DS (2013). "Pharmacological treatment of social anxiety disorder ... or long-term treatment of anxiety disorders or can also be used for the short-term relief of the symptoms of anxiety. Likewise ... Buspirone is not known to be effective in the treatment of other anxiety disorders besides GAD, although there is some limited ... Buspirone, sold under the brand name Buspar, is an anxiolytic drug that is primarily used to treat generalized anxiety disorder ...
His work has informed the areas of social anxiety disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, trauma reactions (such as post ... "Social anxiety disorder: recognition, assessment and treatment. NICE guidelines [CG159]". National Institute for Health and ... which is widely used in UK mental health settings and includes a model and treatment for social anxiety disorder (developed ... He has written a treatment manual for the application of this model and treatment to anxiety and mood disorders. "Publications ...
It is a symptom of social anxiety disorder. Anxiety Bennett, Howard (May 10, 2010). "Why do you get butterflies in your stomach ... Pharmacotherapy Handbook, 9th edition by J. Dipiro., CHAPTER 66: Anxiety Disorders, Page: 675. ...
Social anxiety disorder Depression (mood) Major depressive disorder Iancu, Iulian; Bodner, Ehud; Joubran, Samia; Lupinsky, ... There has not been much research conducted to date on the association between automatic thoughts and social anxiety disorder. ... In their study, the researchers selected a group of individuals who were diagnosed with social anxiety disorder, and then ... They proposed a possible relationship because of the distorted thinking that occurs with social anxiety disorder. ...
... panic disorder (PD), social anxiety disorder, bulimia, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Phenelzine is a non-selective ... "Pharmacological treatment of social anxiety disorder: a meta-analysis". Depression and Anxiety. 18 (1): 29-40. doi:10.1002/da. ... Buigues, J.; Vallejo, J. (1987). "Therapeutic response to phenelzine in patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia with panic ... Phenelzine is used primarily in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). Patients with depressive symptomology ...
2015 used AB to measure attentional differences in people with mental disorders such as depression and social anxiety disorder ... "Attentional blink impairment in social anxiety disorder: Depression comorbidity matters". Journal of Behavior Therapy and ... Measuring AB in the subjects was effective in showing that subjects with those disorders have more difficulty recognizing T2 ...
His current research focuses on general anxiety disorders, social anxiety disorders, and panic disorders, with particular ... "Two-year course of generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and panic disorder with agoraphobia in a sample of ... "Specific and Non-Specific Factors in the Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy of College Students with Social Anxiety Disorder: A ... Bjornsson, Andri S.; Phillips, Katharine A. (2013-11-08). "Do Obsessions and Compulsions Play a Role in Social Anxiety Disorder ...
Cognitive models of social anxiety disorder (SAD) believe the social self is a key psychological mechanism that maintains fear ... Anderson, Barrett; Goldin, Philippe R.; Kurita, Keiko; Gross, James J. (2008). "Self-representation in social anxiety disorder ... Social anxiety disorder is an example of how bad experiences can also lead to our behaviors. It demonstrates how our thoughts ... anxiety, and sensory words, and made fewer references to other people (Anderson et al. 2008). Social anxiety symptom severity, ...
Other features of this disorder include anxiety, depression and social isolation. There is no cure for this disorder and ... The disorder can affect anyone but tends to occur most often in middle aged women. BMS has been hypothesized to be linked to a ... Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a disorder where there is a burning sensation in the mouth that has no identifiable medical or ... It is also prone to a variety of medical and dental disorders. The specialty oral and maxillofacial pathology is concerned with ...
Social anxiety disorder (SAD) and ORS have some demographic and clinical similarities. Where the social anxiety and avoidance ... This disorder is often accompanied by shame, embarrassment, significant distress, avoidance behavior, social phobia and social ... while others consider it an anxiety disorder due to the strong anxiety component. It is also suggested to be a type of body ... affective disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder, anxiety, paranoia, neurosis, sociopathy, and epilepsy. Sometimes more than ...
Recent studies have suggested treatment outcome in adolescents with social anxiety disorder can also be assessed by analysing ... TREATMENT CHANGE IN ADOLESCENTS WITH SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER: INSIGHTS FROM CORPUS LINGUISTICS. Ansiedad y Estres, 17, 149-155 ... In Darnell R. (ed.) Canadian Languages in their Social Context Edmonton: Linguistic Research Incorporated. 1973. 7-64. Poplack ...
His focus lies on anxiety disorders, specifically social phobia. He has published more than 400 articles and books. In 1983, he ... social phobia after the term first appeared in the third edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders ... therapy was founded on principles developed by Heimberg at the University of Albany's Centre for Stress and Anxiety Disorders. ...
Ledley, D.A. Roth (2006). Cognitive phenomena in social anxiety disorder. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. pp. 251-283. Mansell, W; ... social anxiety is defined as a purely emotional reaction to this type of social situation. When patients with social phobia ... This has been associated with conformity, pro-social behavior, and social anxiety. The original Fear of Negative Evaluation ( ... "Comparing and Contrasting Fears of Positive and Negative Evaluation as Facets of Social Anxiety." Journal of Social & Clinical ...
In some cases stage fright may be a part of a larger pattern of social phobia (social anxiety disorder), but many people ... with chronic stage fright also have social anxiety or social phobia which are chronic feelings of high anxiety in any social ... "Beyond shyness and stage fright: Social anxiety disorder". Harvard Mental Health Letter. 4 April 2010. Retrieved December 8, ... Davidson, JR (2006). "Pharmacotherapy of social anxiety disorder: what does the evidence tell us?". The Journal of Clinical ...
"NIMH » Social Anxiety Disorder: More Than Just Shyness". www.nimh.nih.gov. Retrieved 2017-12-04.. ... Individuals who experience social anxiety in their own life may experience the familiar symptoms of blushing,[8][10] excess ... Embarrassing situations often arise in social situations, as the result of failing to meet a social expectation, and is used to ... "Blushing and Social Anxiety: A Meta-Analysis". Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice. 22 (2): 177-193. doi:10.1111/cpsp. ...
... is well tolerated and as effective as moclobemide in social anxiety disorder. There are studies suggesting that ... panic disorder, dysthymia, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, body dysmorphic disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. It has ... of patients with generalized anxiety disorder, including some who had failed with other SSRIs. It also appears to be as ... Citalopram is licensed in the UK and other European countries for panic disorder, with or without agoraphobia. The dose is 10 ...
"Serotonin transporter gene promoter polymorphism predicts SSRI response in generalized social anxiety disorder". ...
This culture-bound syndrome is a social phobia based on fear and anxiety. The symptoms of this disorder include avoiding social ... social phobia), with the person dreading and avoiding social contact, and as a subtype of shinkeishitsu (anxiety disorder). ... 2003, February 3). Open Trial Of Milnacipran For Taijin-Kyofusho In Japanese Patients With Social Anxiety Disorder. Retrieved ... "Open trial of milnacipran for Taijin-Kyofusho in Japanese patients with social anxiety disorder". International Journal of ...
... as attentional resources are limited Patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) exhibited reduced amygdala activation in ... on emotion regulation in social anxiety disorder". Emotion. 10 (1): 83-91. doi:10.1037/a0018441. PMC 4203918 . PMID 20141305. ... Following a MBSR intervention, decreases in social anxiety symptom severity were found, as well as increases in bilateral ... 1992). "Effectiveness of a meditation-based stress reduction program in the treatment of anxiety disorders". American Journal ...
The titular character, Evan Hansen, is a high school senior who suffers from social anxiety disorder, which inhibits his ... A high school senior who struggles with social anxiety disorder. He is assigned by his therapist to write letters to himself ... Evan Hansen is a teenager who struggles with severe social anxiety. His therapist recommends that he write letters to himself ... Evan in an intense state of anxiety over what Connor might have done with the letter. Later that day, Evan is called to the ...
About 90% of children with this disorder have also been diagnosed with social anxiety. It is very common for symptoms to occur ... Some may stand motionless and freeze in specific social settings and have no communication. Alalia is a disorder that refers to ... Selective mutism previously known as "elective mutism" is an anxiety disorder very common among young children, characterized ... It is caused by illness of the child or the parents, the general disorders of the muscles, the shyness of the child or that the ...
... substance abuse disorders, anxiety disorders collectively, bulimia, social phobia, borderline personality disorder, attention ... "Automatic thoughts and cognitive restructuring in cognitive behavioral group therapy for social anxiety disorder". Cognitive ... Eifert, G. H., & Forsyth, J. P. (2005). Acceptance and commitment therapy for anxiety disorders: A practitioner's treatment ... Pull C.B. (2007). "Combined pharmacotherapy and cognitive- behavioural therapy for anxiety disorders". Current Opinion in ...
Disorders[edit]. Main article: Eating disorder. Physiologically, eating is generally triggered by hunger, but there are ... eating is in fact the primary purpose of a social gathering. At many social events, food and beverages are made available to ... McKenna, R. J. (1972). "Some Effects of Anxiety Level and Food Cues on the Eating Behavior of Obese and Normal Subjects: A ... Sharia and Social Engineering: p 143, R. Michael Feener - 2013 *^ FOOD & EATING IN MEDIEVAL EUROPE - Page 73, Joel T. Rosenthal ...
... for social anxiety disorder (SAD) was compared to group psychotherapy (GPT), a credible, structurally equivalent control ... Objective:In this randomized controlled trial, cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBGT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) was ... COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL GROUP THERAPY VERSUS GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS: A RANDOMIZED ... and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS).Results:Both treatments were found to be equally credible. There were five ...
Nature and treatment of social anxiety disorder (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. ... Is selective mutism an anxiety disorder? Rethinking its DSM-IV classification. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 13, 417-434. ... Kristensen, H. (2000). Selective mutism and comorbidity with developmental disorder/delay, anxiety disorder, and elimination ... Is it more than social anxiety? Depression and Anxiety, 18, 153-161. ...
Selective mutism is an anxiety disorder in which children do not speak in particular social situations. Many children with ... Anxiety Disorder: Certain anxiety disorders, such as OCD, can be extremely impairing and scary to the person experiencing them ... Anxiety Disorders: Children with anxiety disorders have significant difficulty coping with situations that cause them distress ... When a child with an untreated anxiety disorder is put into an anxiety-inducing situation, he may become oppositional in an ...
... www.selectivemutism.org/product/selective-mutism-and-social-anxiety-disorder-learning-to-socialize-and-communicate-within-the- ... https://www.selectivemutism.org/product/what-to-do-when-you-worry-too-much-a-kids-guide-to-overcoming-anxiety/. 60%. Monthly. ...
Before that shed pass notes, unable to talk in sessions due to a severe but extremely rare social anxiety condition called ... Before that shed pass notes, unable to talk in sessions due to a severe but extremely rare social anxiety condition called ... After seeking help from a social worker, Eloise joined a volunteer program in a Brisbane national park with dreams of becoming ...
Over half of children with separation anxiety disorder are from low social-economic statuses. Some experts believe that ... What Is Separation Anxiety Disorder?. It is important to distinguish separation anxiety from separation anxiety disorder. ... How Is Separation Anxiety Disorder Treated?. In most cases, pediatric and adult separation anxiety disorder is treated with ... Separation Anxiety Disorder. Separation anxiety disorder is a psychological problem in which fears of leaving your comfort zone ...
Top 10 Best Jobs For People With Social Anxiety Jan 29, 2018 , Anxiety ... About 1/3 of children suffering from separation anxiety disorder go on to be adults suffering from the disorder with these ... of adults suffering from separation anxiety disorder. However, the vast majority of adults suffering from separation anxiety ... However, because separation anxiety is not a recognized disorder in adults there is no standardized method of treatment. ...
... formerly social phobia) is characterized by persistent fear of one or more social or performance situations in which the person ... The individual fears that he or she will act in a way (or show anxiety symptoms) that will be embarrassing and humiliating. ... Social Anxiety Disorder. Definition. Social anxiety disorder (formerly social phobia) is characterized by persistent fear of ... Social Anxiety Disorder with Impairment Among Adults *Of adults with social anxiety disorder in the past year, degree of ...
genetics likely has something to do with it: if you have a family member with social phobia, youre more at risk of having it, ... theres no one thing that causes social anxiety disorder. ... How does social anxiety disorder affect my life?. WAS THIS ... What causes social anxiety disorder?. ANSWER Theres no one thing that causes social anxiety disorder. Genetics likely has ... Social anxiety disorder usually comes on at around 13 years of age. It can be linked to a history of abuse, bullying, or ...
... also called social phobia, is a psychological condition that causes an overwhelming fear of situations that require interacting ... What is social anxiety disorder?. ANSWER Social anxiety disorder, also called social phobia, is a psychological condition that ... Any Anxiety Disorder Among Adults; Any Anxiety Disorder Among Children; "Eating Disorders;" and What is Depression? ... Any Anxiety Disorder Among Adults; Any Anxiety Disorder Among Children; "Eating Disorders;" and What is Depression? ...
... such as at parties and other social events. ... Social anxiety disorder is a persistent and irrational fear of ... Social anxiety disorder is different from shyness. Shy people are able to participate in social functions. Social anxiety ... Alcohol or other drug use may occur with social anxiety disorder. Loneliness and social isolation may occur. ... Anxiety disorders. www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/anxiety-disorders/index.shtml. Updated July 2018. Accessed June 17, 2020. ...
Find breaking news, commentary, and archival information about Social Anxiety Disorder From The latimes ... Specific criteria for diagnosing social anxiety disorder, also called social phobia, have been described in the American ... Specific criteria for diagnosing social anxiety disorder, also called social phobia, have been described in the American ... "Pills for What Ails You Socially" (Opinion, July 23) is wrong to assert that "social anxiety disorder" and the antidepressant ...
New Jersey about Social anxiety disorder and meet people in your local community who share your interests. ... Social anxiety disorder Meetups in Keyport Heres a look at some Social anxiety disorder Meetups happening near Keyport. Sign ... 1 New York Shyness and Social Anxiety Meetup Group #1 New York Shyness and Social Anxiety Meetup Group Were 11,205 People with ... Deconstructing Anxiety: A Two Day Mastery Training--12 CEs New. Deconstructing Anxiety: A Two Day Mastery Training--12 CEs ...
Social anxiety disorder typically begins before adulthood and, while it often feels crippling, can be treated. ... an impending social engagement or performance situation brings fear that prompts avoidance or otherwise interferes with ... Social anxiety disorder, formerly referred to as social phobia, is an anxiety disorder characterized by overwhelming anxiety ... population is estimated to have social anxiety disorder within a given 12-month period. Social anxiety disorder occurs twice as ...
Florida about Social anxiety disorder and meet people in your local community who share your interests. ... Social anxiety disorder Meetups in Jacksonville Heres a look at some Social anxiety disorder Meetups happening near ... JAX Social Anxiety Elimination Workshop Group JAX Social Anxiety Elimination Workshop Group Were 215 Socialites in Training ...
Social Anxiety Disorder News and Research. RSS Social anxiety (social anxiety disorder or social phobia) is a mental illness in ... Researchers find effective cure for social anxiety disorders Social phobia is the most common anxiety disorder of our time. But ... Several anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, social anxiety disorder and specific phobias, share a common underlying ... New research published in Depression and Anxiety indicates that, unlike other anxiety disorders, social anxiety disorder may ...
Social anxiety disorder (SAD), sometimes known as social phobia, is a very common condition, but it may be hard to identify or ... www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/social-anxiety-disorder/social-anxiety-and-alcohol-abuse ... www.childmind.org/en/health/disorder-guide/social-anxiety-disorder * ↑ http://www.childmind.org/en/health/disorder-guide/social ... www.webmd.com/anxiety-panic/guide/mental-health-social-anxiety-disorder * ↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/anxiety/social- ...
... formerly known as social phobia - is commonly treated by either psychotherapy or certain types of psychiatric medications. ... Anxiety. Anxiety Symptoms Causes of Anxiety Anxiety Treatment Anxiety Test Anxiety FAQ In-depth Look at Anxiety Anxiety Support ... Psychotherapy for Social Anxiety. Psychotherapy is a very effective method of treatment for social anxiety disorder. ... generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, and social anxiety disorder. In: A guide to treatments that work (3rd ed.). ...
Social Anxiety Disorder (Magazine), Author: WeUsThem Inc., Name: TeenMentalHealth Speaks ... Social Anxiety Disorder (Magazine ... But Social Anxiety Disorder (also called Social Phobia) is about much more than just feeling shy. A person with Social Anxiety ... Social Anxiety Disorder is one type of anxiety disorder, where people feel threatened and anxious in usual social situations. ... is Social Anxiety Disorder treated Social Anxiety Disorder is very treatable. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is used most ...
... instances when the patient cannot deal normally with persons in authoritative positions and public speaking is another social ... Early Onset - Social Anxiety Disorder Starts in Childhood. Social anxiety disorders, also known as social phobias may be ... Social Situations and management of Social Anxiety Disorders. By and large, a person suffering from social anxiety disorder ... There are lots of people that have social anxiety disorder. Women can be more likely to have social anxiety disorder than man. ...
The nature and prevalence of social anxiety disorder (social phobia (SP)) in people who stutter is uncertain, and DSM-IV ... Social anxiety disorder in adults who stutter.. Blumgart E1, Tran Y, Craig A. ... The aim of this study was to determine the spot prevalence of SP in AWS and to investigate differences in social anxiety ... The AWS were found to have significantly raised trait and social anxiety, as well as significantly increased risk of SP in ...
... also known as social phobia, tend to be sensitive to criticism and rejection, have difficulty asserting themselves, and suffer ... "Social Anxiety Disorder: A Common, Underrecognized Mental Disorder," American Family Physician, Nov. 15, 1999. The Anxiety ... Having social phobia can stop it in its tracks. "The hallmark of social anxiety disorder is that it causes impairment in your ... Is social anxiety disorder just another name for being really shy? By Gina Shaw WebMD Feature Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario ...
... an anxiety disorder that is characterized by persistent and exaggerated fear of social situations (such as meeting strangers, ... often resulting in an avoidance of such situations and impairment of normal social or occupational activities -called also ... Share social anxiety disorder. Post the Definition of social anxiety disorder to Facebook Share the Definition of social ... Resources for social anxiety disorder. Time Traveler: Explore other words from the year social anxiety disorder first appeared ...
... with social anxiety related only to their weight may experience anxiety as severe as individuals with social anxiety disorder ( ... with social anxiety related only to their weight may experience anxiety as severe as individuals with social anxiety disorder ( ... lead to the conclusion that obese individuals who have weight-related social anxiety experience significant social anxiety when ... This suggests that although our modified SAD group had social anxiety that was related to obesity only, their level of ...
While antidepressants are the most commonly used treatment for social anxiety disorder, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is ... social anxiety disorder, which is characterized by intense fear and avoidance of social situations, affects up to 13 percent of ... Psychotherapy Beats Medication for Social Anxiety Disorder. By Janice Wood Associate News Editor ... While antidepressants are the most commonly used treatment for social anxiety disorder, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is ...
  • To diagnose this condition, your doctor will conduct a comprehensive examination and use the criteria outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-V). According to the DSM-V, one of the first signs is excessive fear or anxiety about being separated from people you're close to. (youwillbearwitness.com)
  • Psychologists are actually contemplating adding the condition to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. (mentalhealth.education)
  • For the purposes of establishing eligibility for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI), the Social Security Administration (SSA) defines a disability as "a physical or mental impairment that prohibits substantial gainful activity and has lasted, or is expected to last, for at least 12 months or result in death. (carrcarr.com)
  • Before that she'd pass notes, unable to talk in sessions due to a severe but extremely rare social anxiety condition called selective mutism, which made even simple conversations with her own grandparents difficult. (news.com.au)
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