Tooth Socket: A hollow part of the alveolar process of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE where each tooth fits and is attached via the periodontal ligament.Periodontal Dressings: Surgical dressings, after periodontal surgery, applied to the necks of teeth and the adjacent tissue to cover and protect the surgical wound. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p218)Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Dry Socket: A condition sometimes occurring after tooth extraction, particularly after traumatic extraction, resulting in a dry appearance of the exposed bone in the socket, due to disintegration or loss of the blood clot. It is basically a focal osteomyelitis without suppuration and is accompanied by severe pain (alveolalgia) and foul odor. (Dorland, 28th ed)Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Artificial Limbs: Prosthetic replacements for arms, legs, and parts thereof.Tooth Loss: The failure to retain teeth as a result of disease or injury.Tooth Germ: The collective tissues from which an entire tooth is formed, including the DENTAL SAC; ENAMEL ORGAN; and DENTAL PAPILLA. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Amputation Stumps: The part of a limb or tail following amputation that is proximal to the amputated section.Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Tooth Crown: The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)Eye, Artificial: A ready-made or custom-made prosthesis of glass or plastic shaped and colored to resemble the anterior portion of a normal eye and used for cosmetic reasons. It is attached to the anterior portion of an orbital implant (ORBITAL IMPLANTS) which is placed in the socket of an enucleated or eviscerated eye. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Tooth Eruption: The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Orbital Implants: Rounded objects made of coral, teflon, or alloplastic polymer and covered with sclera, and which are implanted in the orbit following enucleation. An artificial eye (EYE, ARTIFICIAL) is usually attached to the anterior of the orbital implant for cosmetic purposes.Armenia: An ancient country in western Asia, by the twentieth century divided among the former USSR, Turkey, and Iran. It was attacked at various times from before the 7th century B.C. to 69 B.C. by Assyrians, Medes, Persians, the Greeks under Alexander, and the Romans. It changed hands frequently in wars between Neo-Persian and Roman Empires from the 3d to 7th centuries and later under Arabs, Seljuks, Byzantines, and Mongols. In the 19th century Armenian nationalism arose but suffered during Russo-Turkish hostilities. It became part of the Soviet Republic in 1921, with part remaining under Turkey. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988)BulgariaSlovakia: Created 1 January 1993 as a result of the division of Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.RomaniaSlovenia: Created 7 April 1992 as a result of the division of Yugoslavia.Republic of BelarusCzech Republic: Created 1 January 1993 as a result of the division of Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.Alveolar Process: The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.Reptiles: Cold-blooded, air-breathing VERTEBRATES belonging to the class Reptilia, usually covered with external scales or bony plates.TurtlesVibration: A continuing periodic change in displacement with respect to a fixed reference. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Alligators and Crocodiles: Large, long-tailed reptiles, including caimans, of the order Loricata.LizardsHearing Loss: A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears.Hearing: The ability or act of sensing and transducing ACOUSTIC STIMULATION to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. It is also called audition.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Dental Abutments: Natural teeth or teeth roots used as anchorage for a fixed or removable denture or other prosthesis (such as an implant) serving the same purpose.Dental Implantation, Endosseous: Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.Dental Prosthesis, Implant-Supported: A prosthesis that gains its support, stability, and retention from a substructure that is implanted under the soft tissues of the basal seat of the device and is in contact with bone. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Geology: The science of the earth and other celestial bodies and their history as recorded in the rocks. It includes the study of geologic processes of an area such as rock formations, weathering and erosion, and sedimentation. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Geological Phenomena: The inanimate matter of Earth, the structures and properties of this matter, and the processes that affect it.Invertebrates: Animals that have no spinal column.Aortic Valve: The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.Bivalvia: A class in the phylum MOLLUSCA comprised of mussels; clams; OYSTERS; COCKLES; and SCALLOPS. They are characterized by a bilaterally symmetrical hinged shell and a muscular foot used for burrowing and anchoring.Volcanic Eruptions: The ash, dust, gases, and lava released by volcanic explosion. The gases are volatile matter composed principally of about 90% water vapor, and carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen. The ash or dust is pyroclastic ejecta and lava is molten extrusive material consisting mainly of magnesium silicate. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Mitral Valve: The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.Mythology: A body of stories, the origins of which may be unknown or forgotten, that serve to explain practices, beliefs, institutions or natural phenomena. Mythology includes legends and folk tales. It may refer to classical mythology or to a body of modern thought and modern life. (From Webster's 1st ed)Coke: A residue of coal, left after dry (destructive) distillation, used as a fuel.Manuscripts, MedicalJapanSocieties, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Dental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.
  • Surgeons do take steps to reduce the likelihood of a dry socket by minimizing trauma to the site during surgery, avoiding bacterial contamination and suturing the area. (tampaendoperio.com)
  • GM This states that germs from a central focal infection - such as teeth, teeth roots, inflamed gum tissues, or maybe tonsils - metastasize to hearts, eyes, lungs, kidneys, or other organs, glands and tissues, establishing new areas of the same infection. (whale.to)
  • Hold the tooth only by the top or crown, never by the roots. (dentalinsurance.com)
  • Two groups were identified: (I) immediate implants, including implants installed in fresh extraction sockets of the distal roots, and (II) experimental implants, including implants installed into the retained ankylotic mesial roots. (jove.com)
  • Some dentists and oral surgeons think it's best to have impacted wisdom teeth removed (extracted) before you're 20 years old, because it's easier to take them out when the roots and bones of your teeth are softer and not fully formed. (cigna.com)
  • Damage to dental work, such as crowns or bridges, or to roots of a nearby tooth. (cigna.com)
  • Indications for this procedure - Broken or cracked teeth, Impacted wisdom teeth, Curved roots, Root tip removal. (animated-teeth.com)
  • Teeth don't cause cancer or arthritis, whether they have living roots or not. (snopes.com)
  • So even if there's an absence of a tooth we can sort of tell the shape of it or how deep the root is or how many roots there are? (coursera.org)
  • In this case, the term refers to the anatomy of the tooth being extracted, particularly its roots. (colonialdentalgroup.com)
  • Of course, to determine if a tooth can be removed this way, we must conduct a thorough dental examination first, including x-ray imaging to determine the exact nature and location of the roots. (colonialdentalgroup.com)
  • Among all mammals, the tooth consists of a crown, the portion visible in the mouth, and one or more roots embedded in a gum socket. (factmonster.com)
  • How can wisdom teeth pain be relieved at home before their removal? (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • to split or section a tooth for easier removal. (studystack.com)
  • In the swine industry, removal or amputation of deciduous canine teeth in piglets and tusk amputation in breeding boars may be part of routine management. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Reuters Health) - Although removal of wisdom teeth is very common, there are no studies that show a benefit to taking them out when they are not causing pain or other problems, according to a new review of existing research. (reuters.com)
  • In the USA for instance, the preventive removal of asymptomatic disease-free wisdom teeth is very common," Ghaeminia told Reuters Health by email. (reuters.com)
  • They found just two studies, including one randomized controlled trial from a dental hospital in the U.K., and one prospective study in the U.S. But neither compared most aspects of health-related quality of life after removal versus retention of asymptomatic wisdom teeth. (reuters.com)
  • The U.K. trial randomized 164 participants to either removal or retention of impacted wisdom teeth and found no evidence of notable differences between the groups in dental health afterwards. (reuters.com)
  • Some might say that preventive removal should be stopped since there is no high quality evidence to support this practice," but that may lead to more surgeries at an older age when wisdom teeth do become symptomatic, and surgery has more complications for adults than for teens, Ghaeminia said. (reuters.com)
  • On the other hand, preventive removal of all asymptomatic wisdom teeth is also undesirable: if the tooth would stay asymptomatic and disease free during lifetime, the patient might have been exposed to an unnecessary risk of complications and costs," he said. (reuters.com)
  • In the absence of evidence, orthodontists, dentists and oral surgeons should discuss the pros and cons of wisdom teeth removal in each case individually. (reuters.com)
  • The same treatment sequence was followed for both groups: coronal seal, periodontal ligament removal, immersion of the tooth in 2% acidulated-phosphate sodium fluoride, irrigation of the socket with saline and replantation. (jove.com)
  • others need to remove teeth hindering orthodontic treatment, whereas various patients simply need wisdom teeth removal. (drwesleycowan.com)
  • Along with the rewards of removal, there are also a very small number of risks - a dry socket being one of them. (arizonadentalspecialists.com)
  • Sometimes, a build-up of bacteria in the broken gums around wisdom teeth can be the cause of pain. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The socket might contain food debris, saliva, and other bacteria which are lodged in the clots so that it easily add to the pain. (blogarama.com)
  • Rather, it's the story of how a 'cast of millions' (of bacteria) become entrenched inside the structure of teeth and end up causing the largest number of diseases ever traced to a single source. (whale.to)
  • MJ You're assuming that ALL root-filled teeth harbor bacteria and/or other infective agents? (whale.to)
  • As the "pockets" around the tooth deepen from the 1-3 mm physiologically normal level, which can be kept clean through good oral hygiene, they collect more bacteria-laden plaque that is not accessible to complete cleaning. (price-pottenger.org)
  • If we do not remove the dental plaque - a sticky material on the surface of the teeth that is composed of bacteria and a mucopolysaccharide complex (containing sugars and mucous from saliva) - at least twice a day, the inflammatory process begins very quickly. (price-pottenger.org)
  • Periodontitis - Advanced gum disease that causes the gums to pull away from the teeth, leaving deep pockets where plaque and bacteria build up. (adventisthealthcare.com)
  • In the early stage of gingivitis, bacteria in plaque build up and cause the gums to become inflamed (red and swollen) and often bleed during tooth brushing. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • These small spaces between teeth and gums collect more bacteria and debris and can become infected. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Calculus, commonly called tartar, is the hardened form of plaque, the bacteria-laden material that naturally forms on and between teeth. (willmydoghateme.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to evaluate the application of 15 % propolis and 2 % acidulated-phosphate sodium fluoride solutions on the root surface-adhered necrotic cemental periodontal ligament in delayed tooth replantation. (jove.com)
  • Andrew McKenzie and Arno Weber of the University of Pretoria looked for the cause of this oddity by examining the detailed anatomy of impala teeth. (newscientist.com)
  • Much like " Phobosuchus ", though, the name " Polyptychodon " was a previously described genus that was often misapplied, but Emmons was correct that the teeth he was looking at represented a then-unknown species which, on the basis of tooth anatomy and additional fossils found in the same place, turned out to be referable to Deinosuchus . (wired.com)
  • In order to understand the etiology and factors that contribute to gum disease, it is important to first understand the anatomy of the tooth, and how the gums relate to it. (trustedhealthproducts.com)
  • Most of the mandibular teeth of H. floresiensis have been described by Brown P. and Maeda T. (2009) Liang Bua Homo floresiensis mandibles and mandibular teeth: a contribution to the comparative morphology of a new hominin species. Journal of Human Evolution, 57: 571-596. " data-html="true" data-placement="bottom" data-toggle="tooltip">Brown and Maeda (2009) , but we here describe these materials again based on our own observation of the original specimens and high-resolution micro-CT scans that were not available to the previous researchers. (go.jp)
  • incisive fossa a slight depression on the anterior surface of the maxilla above the incisor teeth. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In New World camelids (llamas, etc), blunting the fighting teeth (ie, the upper single incisor and canine and the lower canine teeth) is done to reduce the danger and consequences of fighting. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • In impalas (Aepyceros melampus), the tips of the front incisor and canine teeth can move forward about 2 millimetres before returning to their original positions. (newscientist.com)