The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.
A species of CAPRIPOXVIRUS causing a cattle disease occurring in Africa.
A common genetically determined, chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by rounded erythematous, dry, scaling patches. The lesions have a predilection for nails, scalp, genitalia, extensor surfaces, and the lumbosacral region. Accelerated epidermopoiesis is considered to be the fundamental pathologic feature in psoriasis.
Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)
A poxvirus infection of cattle characterized by the appearance of nodules on all parts of the skin.
Any inflammation of the skin.
Skin diseases caused by ARTHROPODS; HELMINTHS; or other parasites.
Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.
Skin diseases caused by viruses.
The process of aging due to changes in the structure and elasticity of the skin over time. It may be a part of physiological aging or it may be due to the effects of ultraviolet radiation, usually through exposure to sunlight.
A chronic inflammatory genetically determined disease of the skin marked by increased ability to form reagin (IgE), with increased susceptibility to allergic rhinitis and asthma, and hereditary disposition to a lowered threshold for pruritus. It is manifested by lichenification, excoriation, and crusting, mainly on the flexural surfaces of the elbow and knee. In infants it is known as infantile eczema.
A medical specialty concerned with the skin, its structure, functions, diseases, and treatment.
A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.
Diseases of the skin with a genetic component, usually the result of various inborn errors of metabolism.
The functions of the skin in the human and animal body. It includes the pigmentation of the skin.
The external, nonvascular layer of the skin. It is made up, from within outward, of five layers of EPITHELIUM: (1) basal layer (stratum basale epidermidis); (2) spinous layer (stratum spinosum epidermidis); (3) granular layer (stratum granulosum epidermidis); (4) clear layer (stratum lucidum epidermidis); and (5) horny layer (stratum corneum epidermidis).
A chronic disorder of the pilosebaceous apparatus associated with an increase in sebum secretion. It is characterized by open comedones (blackheads), closed comedones (whiteheads), and pustular nodules. The cause is unknown, but heredity and age are predisposing factors.
Skin diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, parasites, or viruses.
Epidermal cells which synthesize keratin and undergo characteristic changes as they move upward from the basal layers of the epidermis to the cornified (horny) layer of the skin. Successive stages of differentiation of the keratinocytes forming the epidermal layers are basal cell, spinous or prickle cell, and the granular cell.
A name applied to several itchy skin eruptions of unknown cause. The characteristic course is the formation of a dome-shaped papule with a small transient vesicle on top, followed by crusting over or lichenification. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Group of chronic blistering diseases characterized histologically by ACANTHOLYSIS and blister formation within the EPIDERMIS.
Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.
A pruritic papulovesicular dermatitis occurring as a reaction to many endogenous and exogenous agents (Dorland, 27th ed).
Uptake of substances through the SKIN.
A chronic inflammatory disease of the skin with unknown etiology. It is characterized by moderate ERYTHEMA, dry, moist, or greasy (SEBACEOUS GLAND) scaling and yellow crusted patches on various areas, especially the scalp, that exfoliate as dandruff. Seborrheic dermatitis is common in children and adolescents with HIV INFECTIONS.
An intense itching sensation that produces the urge to rub or scratch the skin to obtain relief.
Skin diseases caused by bacteria.
A cutaneous disorder primarily of convexities of the central part of the FACE, such as FOREHEAD; CHEEK; NOSE; and CHIN. It is characterized by FLUSHING; ERYTHEMA; EDEMA; RHINOPHYMA; papules; and ocular symptoms. It may occur at any age but typically after age 30. There are various subtypes of rosacea: erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular, phymatous, and ocular (National Rosacea Society's Expert Committee on the Classification and Staging of Rosacea, J Am Acad Dermatol 2002; 46:584-7).
Superficial infections of the skin or its appendages by any of various fungi.
Group of genetically determined disorders characterized by the blistering of skin and mucosae. There are four major forms: acquired, simple, junctional, and dystrophic. Each of the latter three has several varieties.
Any horny growth such as a wart or callus.
Drugs used to treat or prevent skin disorders or for the routine care of skin.
A chronic and relatively benign subepidermal blistering disease usually of the elderly and without histopathologic acantholysis.
A form of lupus erythematosus in which the skin may be the only organ involved or in which skin involvement precedes the spread into other body systems. It has been classified into three forms - acute (= LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC with skin lesions), subacute, and chronic (= LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, DISCOID).
Coloration of the skin.
A contact dermatitis due to allergic sensitization to various substances. These substances subsequently produce inflammatory reactions in the skin of those who have acquired hypersensitivity to them as a result of prior exposure.
The use of ultraviolet electromagnetic radiation in the treatment of disease, usually of the skin. This is the part of the sun's spectrum that causes sunburn and tanning. Ultraviolet A, used in PUVA, is closer to visible light and less damaging than Ultraviolet B, which is ionizing.
A genus of the family POXVIRIDAE, subfamily CHORDOPOXVIRINAE, comprising poxviruses infecting sheep, goats, and cattle. Transmission is usually mechanical by arthropods, but also includes contact, airborne routes, and non-living reservoirs (fomites).
Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It supports research into the causes, treatment, and prevention of arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases; the training of basic and clinical scientists to carry out this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress. It was established in 1986.
Visible accumulations of fluid within or beneath the epidermis.
Dermatological pruritic lesion in the feet, caused by Trichophyton rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, or Epidermophyton floccosum.
A mitosporic fungal genus that causes a variety of skin disorders. Malassezia furfur (Pityrosporum orbiculare) causes TINEA VERSICOLOR.
Photochemotherapy using PSORALENS as the photosensitizing agent and ultraviolet light type A (UVA).
A contagious cutaneous inflammation caused by the bite of the mite SARCOPTES SCABIEI. It is characterized by pruritic papular eruptions and burrows and affects primarily the axillae, elbows, wrists, and genitalia, although it can spread to cover the entire body.
Redness of the skin produced by congestion of the capillaries. This condition may result from a variety of causes.
The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.
A family of structurally-related short-chain collagens that do not form large fibril bundles.
A slow-growing mycobacterium that infects the skin and subcutaneous tissues, giving rise to indolent BURULI ULCER.
An inflammatory, pruritic disease of the skin and mucous membranes, which can be either generalized or localized. It is characterized by distinctive purplish, flat-topped papules having a predilection for the trunk and flexor surfaces. The lesions may be discrete or coalesce to form plaques. Histologically, there is a "saw-tooth" pattern of epidermal hyperplasia and vacuolar alteration of the basal layer of the epidermis along with an intense upper dermal inflammatory infiltrate composed predominantly of T-cells. Etiology is unknown.
A disorder consisting of areas of macular depigmentation, commonly on extensor aspects of extremities, on the face or neck, and in skin folds. Age of onset is often in young adulthood and the condition tends to progress gradually with lesions enlarging and extending until a quiescent state is reached.
A layer of vascularized connective tissue underneath the EPIDERMIS. The surface of the dermis contains innervated papillae. Embedded in or beneath the dermis are SWEAT GLANDS; HAIR FOLLICLES; and SEBACEOUS GLANDS.
A term used to describe a variety of localized asymmetrical SKIN thickening that is similar to those of SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA but without the disease features in the multiple internal organs and BLOOD VESSELS. Lesions may be characterized as patches or plaques (morphea), bands (linear), or nodules.
Biological activities and functions of the SKIN.
A desmosomal cadherin that is an autoantigen in the acquired skin disorder PEMPHIGUS FOLIACEUS.
Synthetic material used for the treatment of burns and other conditions involving large-scale loss of skin. It often consists of an outer (epidermal) layer of silicone and an inner (dermal) layer of collagen and chondroitin 6-sulfate. The dermal layer elicits new growth and vascular invasion and the outer layer is later removed and replaced by a graft.
Any of a variety of eruptive skin disorders characterized by erythema, oozing, vesiculation, and scaling. Etiology is varied.
Any of several generalized skin disorders characterized by dryness, roughness, and scaliness, due to hypertrophy of the stratum corneum epidermis. Most are genetic, but some are acquired, developing in association with other systemic disease or genetic syndrome.
Diseases of the skin associated with underlying metabolic disorders.
A type of acute or chronic skin reaction in which sensitivity is manifested by reactivity to materials or substances coming in contact with the skin. It may involve allergic or non-allergic mechanisms.
Congenital structural abnormalities of the skin.
Group of mostly hereditary disorders characterized by thickening of the palms and soles as a result of excessive keratin formation leading to hypertrophy of the stratum corneum (hyperkeratosis).
Separation of the prickle cells of the stratum spinosum of the epidermis, resulting in atrophy of the prickle cell layer. It is seen in diseases such as pemphigus vulgaris (see PEMPHIGUS) and DARIER DISEASE.
A desmosomal cadherin that is an autoantigen in the acquired skin disorder PEMPHIGUS VULGARIS.
Skin tests in which the sensitizer is applied to a patch of cotton cloth or gauze held in place for approximately 48-72 hours. It is used for the elicitation of a contact hypersensitivity reaction.
Infections to the skin caused by bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.
Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.
The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.
Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.
A skin and mucous membrane disease characterized by an eruption of macules, papules, nodules, vesicles, and/or bullae with characteristic "bull's-eye" lesions usually occurring on the dorsal aspect of the hands and forearms.
Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.
A chronic suppurative and cicatricial disease of the apocrine glands occurring chiefly in the axillae in women and in the groin and anal regions in men. It is characterized by poral occlusion with secondary bacterial infection, evolving into abscesses which eventually rupture. As the disease becomes chronic, ulcers appear, sinus tracts enlarge, fistulas develop, and fibrosis and scarring become evident.
Virus diseases caused by the POXVIRIDAE.
A non-allergic contact dermatitis caused by prolonged exposure to irritants and not explained by delayed hypersensitivity mechanisms.
An idiopathic, rapidly evolving, and severely debilitating disease occurring most commonly in association with chronic ulcerative colitis. It is characterized by the presence of boggy, purplish ulcers with undermined borders, appearing mostly on the legs. The majority of cases are in people between 40 and 60 years old. Its etiology is unknown.
The widespread involvement of the skin by a scaly, erythematous dermatitis occurring either as a secondary or reactive process to an underlying cutaneous disorder (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, etc.), or as a primary or idiopathic disease. It is often associated with the loss of hair and nails, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, and pruritus. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
A lesion in the skin and subcutaneous tissues due to infections by MYCOBACTERIUM ULCERANS. It was first reported in Uganda, Africa.
Benign epidermal proliferations or tumors; some are viral in origin.
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.
Agents that soften, separate, and cause desquamation of the cornified epithelium or horny layer of skin. They are used to expose mycelia of infecting fungi or to treat corns, warts, and certain other skin diseases.
A type I keratin that is found associated with the KERATIN-5 in the internal stratified EPITHELIUM. Mutations in the gene for keratin-14 are associated with EPIDERMOLYSIS BULLOSA SIMPLEX.
A rapid onset form of SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA with progressive widespread SKIN thickening over the arms, the legs and the trunk, resulting in stiffness and disability.
A vascular reaction of the skin characterized by erythema and wheal formation due to localized increase of vascular permeability. The causative mechanism may be allergy, infection, or stress.
A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)
A malignant skin neoplasm that seldom metastasizes but has potentialities for local invasion and destruction. Clinically it is divided into types: nodular, cicatricial, morphaic, and erythematoid (pagetoid). They develop on hair-bearing skin, most commonly on sun-exposed areas. Approximately 85% are found on the head and neck area and the remaining 15% on the trunk and limbs. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1471)
A class of fibrous proteins or scleroproteins that represents the principal constituent of EPIDERMIS; HAIR; NAILS; horny tissues, and the organic matrix of tooth ENAMEL. Two major conformational groups have been characterized, alpha-keratin, whose peptide backbone forms a coiled-coil alpha helical structure consisting of TYPE I KERATIN and a TYPE II KERATIN, and beta-keratin, whose backbone forms a zigzag or pleated sheet structure. alpha-Keratins have been classified into at least 20 subtypes. In addition multiple isoforms of subtypes have been found which may be due to GENE DUPLICATION.
Recirculating, dendritic, antigen-presenting cells containing characteristic racket-shaped granules (Birbeck granules). They are found principally in the stratum spinosum of the EPIDERMIS and are rich in Class II MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX molecules. Langerhans cells were the first dendritic cell to be described and have been a model of study for other dendritic cells (DCs), especially other migrating DCs such as dermal DCs and INTERSTITIAL DENDRITIC CELLS.
Loss of scalp and body hair involving microscopically inflammatory patchy areas.
An extremely variable eczematous skin disease that is presumed to be a response to prolonged vigorous scratching, rubbing, or pinching to relieve intense pruritus. It varies in intensity, severity, course, and morphologic expression in different individuals. Neurodermatitis is believed by some to be psychogenic. The circumscribed or localized form is often referred to as lichen simplex chronicus.
Adverse cutaneous reactions caused by ingestion, parenteral use, or local application of a drug. These may assume various morphologic patterns and produce various types of lesions.
A group of dermatoses with distinct morphologic features. The primary lesion is most commonly a papule, usually erythematous, with a variable degree of scaling on the surface. Plaques form through the coalescing of primary lesions.
Oleagenous substances used topically to soothe, soften or protect skin or mucous membranes. They are used also as vehicles for other dermatologic agents.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
A group of desmosomal cadherins with cytoplasmic tails that resemble those of classical CADHERINS.
Disorders that are characterized by the production of antibodies that react with host tissues or immune effector cells that are autoreactive to endogenous peptides.
Skin diseases of the foot, general or unspecified.
Agents, usually topical, that relieve itching (pruritus).
A CC-type chemokine with specificity for CCR10 RECEPTORS. It is constitutively expressed in the skin and may play a role in T-CELL trafficking during cutaneous INFLAMMATION.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).
47-amino acid peptides secreted by ECCRINE GLANDS and having a role in innate cutaneous defense, being antimicrobial to some pathogenic BACTERIA. They are overexpressed by some primary BREAST CANCER cells. They are derived from 110 residue PROTEIN PRECURSORS.
The term applied to a group of relatively uncommon inflammatory, maculopapular, scaly eruptions of unknown etiology and resistant to conventional treatment. Eruptions are both psoriatic and lichenoid in appearance, but the diseases are distinct from psoriasis, lichen planus, or other recognized dermatoses. Proposed nomenclature divides parapsoriasis into two distinct subgroups, PITYRIASIS LICHENOIDES and parapsoriasis en plaques (small- and large-plaque parapsoriasis).
A by-product of the destructive distillation of coal used as a topical antieczematic. It is an antipruritic and keratoplastic agent used also in the treatment of psoriasis and other skin conditions. Occupational exposure to soots, tars, and certain mineral oils is known to be carcinogenic according to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985) (Merck Index, 11th ed).
A chronic, congenital ichthyosis inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Infants are usually born encased in a collodion membrane which sheds within a few weeks. Scaling is generalized and marked with grayish-brown quadrilateral scales, adherent at their centers and free at the edges. In some cases, scales are so thick that they resemble armored plate.
Inflammation of follicles, primarily hair follicles.
Absence of hair from areas where it is normally present.
A naturally occurring furocoumarin compound found in several species of plants, including Psoralea corylifolia. It is a photoactive substance that forms DNA ADDUCTS in the presence of ultraviolet A irradiation.
Small, sacculated organs found within the DERMIS. Each gland has a single duct that emerges from a cluster of oval alveoli. Each alveolus consists of a transparent BASEMENT MEMBRANE enclosing epithelial cells. The ducts from most sebaceous glands open into a HAIR FOLLICLE, but some open on the general surface of the SKIN. Sebaceous glands secrete SEBUM.
Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.
Semisolid preparations used topically for protective emollient effects or as a vehicle for local administration of medications. Ointment bases are various mixtures of fats, waxes, animal and plant oils and solid and liquid hydrocarbons.
Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.
Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.
A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.
Infections caused by nematode larvae which never develop into the adult stage and migrate through various body tissues. They commonly infect the skin, eyes, and viscera in man. Ancylostoma brasiliensis causes cutaneous larva migrans. Toxocara causes visceral larva migrans.
Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
Drugs that act locally on cutaneous or mucosal surfaces to produce inflammation; those that cause redness due to hyperemia are rubefacients; those that raise blisters are vesicants and those that penetrate sebaceous glands and cause abscesses are pustulants; tear gases and mustard gases are also irritants.
A type of junction that attaches one cell to its neighbor. One of a number of differentiated regions which occur, for example, where the cytoplasmic membranes of adjacent epithelial cells are closely apposed. It consists of a circular region of each membrane together with associated intracellular microfilaments and an intercellular material which may include, for example, mucopolysaccharides. (From Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990; Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
Rare cutaneous eruption characterized by extensive KERATINOCYTE apoptosis resulting in skin detachment with mucosal involvement. It is often provoked by the use of drugs (e.g., antibiotics and anticonvulsants) or associated with PNEUMONIA, MYCOPLASMA. It is considered a continuum of Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.
Drugs used to treat or prevent parasitic infections.
A form of congenital ichthyosis inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and characterized by ERYTHRODERMA and severe hyperkeratosis. It is manifested at birth by blisters followed by the appearance of thickened, horny, verruciform scales over the entire body, but accentuated in flexural areas. Mutations in the genes that encode KERATIN-1 and KERATIN-10 have been associated with this disorder.
A mixture of mostly avermectin H2B1a (RN 71827-03-7) with some avermectin H2B1b (RN 70209-81-3), which are macrolides from STREPTOMYCES avermitilis. It binds glutamate-gated chloride channel to cause increased permeability and hyperpolarization of nerve and muscle cells. It also interacts with other CHLORIDE CHANNELS. It is a broad spectrum antiparasitic that is active against microfilariae of ONCHOCERCA VOLVULUS but not the adult form.
Skin diseases affecting or involving the cutaneous blood vessels and generally manifested as inflammation, swelling, erythema, or necrosis in the affected area.
A chronic inflammatory mucocutaneous disease usually affecting the female genitalia (VULVAR LICHEN SCLEROSUS) and BALANITIS XEROTICA OBLITERANS in males. It is also called white spot disease and Csillag's disease.
Rare, chronic, papulo-vesicular disease characterized by an intensely pruritic eruption consisting of various combinations of symmetrical, erythematous, papular, vesicular, or bullous lesions. The disease is strongly associated with the presence of HLA-B8 and HLA-DR3 antigens. A variety of different autoantibodies has been detected in small numbers in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis.
Infection with nematodes of the genus ONCHOCERCA. Characteristics include the presence of firm subcutaneous nodules filled with adult worms, PRURITUS, and ocular lesions.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
A tube-like invagination of the EPIDERMIS from which the hair shaft develops and into which SEBACEOUS GLANDS open. The hair follicle is lined by a cellular inner and outer root sheath of epidermal origin and is invested with a fibrous sheath derived from the dermis. (Stedman, 26th ed) Follicles of very long hairs extend into the subcutaneous layer of tissue under the SKIN.
A common superficial bacterial infection caused by STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS or group A beta-hemolytic streptococci. Characteristics include pustular lesions that rupture and discharge a thin, amber-colored fluid that dries and forms a crust. This condition is commonly located on the face, especially about the mouth and nose.
Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.
The forcing into the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle, piercing the top skin layer.
A common, benign, usually self-limited viral infection of the skin and occasionally the conjunctivae by a poxvirus (MOLLUSCUM CONTAGIOSUM VIRUS). (Dorland, 27th ed)
A persistent progressive non-elevated red scaly or crusted plaque which is due to an intradermal carcinoma and is potentially malignant. Atypical squamous cells proliferate through the whole thickness of the epidermis. The lesions may occur anywhere on the skin surface or on mucosal surfaces. The cause most frequently found is trivalent arsenic compounds. Freezing, cauterization or diathermy coagulation is often effective. (From Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, pp2428-9)
Endogenous tissue constituents that have the ability to interact with AUTOANTIBODIES and cause an immune response.
Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.
An autosomal dominant skin disease characterized by transient and variable noninflammatory ERYTHEMA and hyperkeratosis. It has been associated with mutations in the genes that code for CONNEXINS. Erythrokeratodermia variabilis inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion has also been reported. Affected individuals often develop PALMOPLANTAR KERATODERMA.
A chronic, malignant T-cell lymphoma of the skin. In the late stages, the LYMPH NODES and viscera are affected.
Form of epidermolysis bullosa having onset at birth or during the neonatal period and transmitted through autosomal recessive inheritance. It is characterized by generalized blister formation, extensive denudation, and separation and cleavage of the basal cell plasma membranes from the basement membrane.
A type of inflammatory arthritis associated with PSORIASIS, often involving the axial joints and the peripheral terminal interphalangeal joints. It is characterized by the presence of HLA-B27-associated SPONDYLARTHROPATHY, and the absence of rheumatoid factor.
Filaments 7-11 nm in diameter found in the cytoplasm of all cells. Many specific proteins belong to this group, e.g., desmin, vimentin, prekeratin, decamin, skeletin, neurofilin, neurofilament protein, and glial fibrillary acid protein.
Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.
Operative procedures performed on the SKIN.
Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.
A form of epidermolysis bullosa characterized by serous bullae that heal without scarring. Mutations in the genes that encode KERATIN-5 and KERATIN-14 have been associated with several subtypes of epidermolysis bullosa simplex.
A group of lymphomas exhibiting clonal expansion of malignant T-lymphocytes arrested at varying stages of differentiation as well as malignant infiltration of the skin. MYCOSIS FUNGOIDES; SEZARY SYNDROME; LYMPHOMATOID PAPULOSIS; and PRIMARY CUTANEOUS ANAPLASTIC LARGE CELL LYMPHOMA are the best characterized of these disorders.
Abnormal responses to sunlight or artificial light due to extreme reactivity of light-absorbing molecules in tissues. It refers almost exclusively to skin photosensitivity, including sunburn, reactions due to repeated prolonged exposure in the absence of photosensitizing factors, and reactions requiring photosensitizing factors such as photosensitizing agents and certain diseases. With restricted reference to skin tissue, it does not include photosensitivity of the eye to light, as in photophobia or photosensitive epilepsy.
A chronic multi-system disorder of CONNECTIVE TISSUE. It is characterized by SCLEROSIS in the SKIN, the LUNGS, the HEART, the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, the KIDNEYS, and the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM. Other important features include diseased small BLOOD VESSELS and AUTOANTIBODIES. The disorder is named for its most prominent feature (hard skin), and classified into subsets by the extent of skin thickening: LIMITED SCLERODERMA and DIFFUSE SCLERODERMA.
The hearing and equilibrium system of the body. It consists of three parts: the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR. Sound waves are transmitted through this organ where vibration is transduced to nerve signals that pass through the ACOUSTIC NERVE to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The inner ear also contains the vestibular organ that maintains equilibrium by transducing signals to the VESTIBULAR NERVE.
A water-soluble medicinal preparation applied to the skin.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
Viscous, nauseating oil obtained from the shrub Croton tiglium (Euphorbaceae). It is a vesicant and skin irritant used as pharmacologic standard for skin inflammation and allergy and causes skin cancer. It was formerly used as an emetic and cathartic with frequent mortality.
Photography of objects viewed under a microscope using ordinary photographic methods.
Mutant strains of mice that produce little or no hair.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Agents that are used to treat allergic reactions. Most of these drugs act by preventing the release of inflammatory mediators or inhibiting the actions of released mediators on their target cells. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p475)
A proinflammatory cytokine produced primarily by T-LYMPHOCYTES or their precursors. Several subtypes of interleukin-17 have been identified, each of which is a product of a unique gene.
A species of mite that causes SCABIES in humans and sarcoptic mange in other animals. Specific variants of S. scabiei exist for humans and animals, but many have the ability to cross species and cause disease.
Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.
Most common form of ICHTHYOSIS characterized by prominent scaling especially on the exterior surfaces of the extremities. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Irritants and reagents for labeling terminal amino acid groups.
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H1 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous histamine. Included here are the classical antihistaminics that antagonize or prevent the action of histamine mainly in immediate hypersensitivity. They act in the bronchi, capillaries, and some other smooth muscles, and are used to prevent or allay motion sickness, seasonal rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis and to induce somnolence. The effects of blocking central nervous system H1 receptors are not as well understood.
A non-fibrillar collagen involved in anchoring the epidermal BASEMENT MEMBRANE to underlying tissue. It is a homotrimer comprised of C-terminal and N-terminal globular domains connected by a central triple-helical region.
A class of non-sedating drugs that bind to but do not activate histamine receptors (DRUG INVERSE AGONISM), thereby blocking the actions of histamine or histamine agonists. These antihistamines represent a heterogenous group of compounds with differing chemical structures, adverse effects, distribution, and metabolism. Compared to the early (first generation) antihistamines, these non-sedating antihistamines have greater receptor specificity, lower penetration of BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER, and are less likely to cause drowsiness or psychomotor impairment.
Transmission and interpretation of tissue specimens via remote telecommunication, generally for the purpose of diagnosis or consultation but may also be used for continuing education.
Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.
An autosomal dominantly inherited skin disorder characterized by warty malodorous papules that coalesce into plaques. It is caused by mutations in the ATP2A2 gene encoding SERCA2 protein, one of the SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM CALCIUM-TRANSPORTING ATPASES. The condition is similar, clinically and histologically, to BENIGN FAMILIAL PEMPHIGUS, another autosomal dominant skin disorder. Both diseases have defective calcium pumps (CALCIUM-TRANSPORTING ATPASES) and unstable desmosomal adhesion junctions (DESMOSOMES) between KERATINOCYTES.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Form of epidermolysis bullosa characterized by atrophy of blistered areas, severe scarring, and nail changes. It is most often present at birth or in early infancy and occurs in both autosomal dominant and recessive forms. All forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa result from mutations in COLLAGEN TYPE VII, a major component fibrils of BASEMENT MEMBRANE and EPIDERMIS.
Antimicrobial cationic peptides with a highly conserved amino terminal cathelin-like domain and a more variable carboxy terminal domain. They are initially synthesized as preproproteins and then cleaved. They are expressed in many tissues of humans and localized to EPITHELIAL CELLS. They kill nonviral pathogens by forming pores in membranes.
Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.
Small cationic peptides that are an important component, in most species, of early innate and induced defenses against invading microbes. In animals they are found on mucosal surfaces, within phagocytic granules, and on the surface of the body. They are also found in insects and plants. Among others, this group includes the DEFENSINS, protegrins, tachyplesins, and thionins. They displace DIVALENT CATIONS from phosphate groups of MEMBRANE LIPIDS leading to disruption of the membrane.
Inflammation of the OUTER EAR including the external EAR CANAL, cartilages of the auricle (EAR CARTILAGE), and the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).
Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.
A species of parasitic nematodes widely distributed throughout central Africa and also found in northern South America, southern Mexico, and Guatemala. Its intermediate host and vector is the blackfly or buffalo gnat.
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
Mammalian pigment cells that produce MELANINS, pigments found mainly in the EPIDERMIS, but also in the eyes and the hair, by a process called melanogenesis. Coloration can be altered by the number of melanocytes or the amount of pigment produced and stored in the organelles called MELANOSOMES. The large non-mammalian melanin-containing cells are called MELANOPHORES.
Treatment of disease by exposure to light, especially by variously concentrated light rays or specific wavelengths.
Peptides and proteins found in BODILY SECRETIONS and BODY FLUIDS that are PROTEASE INHIBITORS. They play a role in INFLAMMATION, tissue repair and innate immunity (IMMUNITY, INNATE) by inhibiting endogenous proteinases such as those produced by LEUKOCYTES and exogenous proteases such as those produced by invading microorganisms.
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
Infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria (atypical mycobacteria): M. kansasii, M. marinum, M. scrofulaceum, M. flavescens, M. gordonae, M. obuense, M. gilvum, M. duvali, M. szulgai, M. intracellulare (see MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX;), M. xenopi (littorale), M. ulcerans, M. buruli, M. terrae, M. fortuitum (minetti, giae), M. chelonae.
A chemotherapeutic agent that acts against erythrocytic forms of malarial parasites. Hydroxychloroquine appears to concentrate in food vacuoles of affected protozoa. It inhibits plasmodial heme polymerase. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p970)
Mice bearing mutant genes which are phenotypically expressed in the animals.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
Linear furanocoumarins which are found in many PLANTS, especially UMBELLIFERAE and RUTACEAE, as well as PSORALEA from which they were originally discovered. They can intercalate DNA and, in an UV-initiated reaction of the furan portion, alkylate PYRIMIDINES, resulting in PHOTOSENSITIVITY DISORDERS.
A circumscribed benign epithelial tumor projecting from the surrounding surface; more precisely, a benign epithelial neoplasm consisting of villous or arborescent outgrowths of fibrovascular stroma covered by neoplastic cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.

Complications of varicella in a defined central European population. (1/98)

AIMS: To describe complications of varicella requiring hospitalisation in a defined population (canton of Bern) and to compare the hospitalisation rates for varicella with published data. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of hospital records of patients less than 16 years of age admitted with complications of varicella to the hospitals serving this population (University Children's Hospital of Bern and the Wildermeth Children's Hospital of Biel, Switzerland), and calculation of hospitalisation rates for varicella and its complications based on birth rates and varicella antibody prevalence rates. RESULTS: From 1986 to 1996, 113 cases (median age, 5.6 years) were identified. Younger siblings were overrepresented (odds ratio (OR), 1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09 to 1.84). Central nervous system (CNS) complications (26 patients; 23%) were found predominantly in previously healthy children (relative risk, 7.1; 95% CI, 1.01 to 49.86). Group A beta haemolytic streptococci were recovered from only one of 35 patients with bacterial complications. The hospitalisation rates for primary varicella (9.2/10(4) cases; 95% CI, 7.4 to 11/10(4), skin infections (2.0/10(4) cases; 95% CI, 1.2 to 2.9/10(4), and pneumonia (0.8/10(4) cases; 95% CI, 0.3 to 1.3/10(4)) were significantly lower than reported previously. The CNS complication rate (2.2/10(4) cases; 95% CI, 1.3 to 3.1/10(4) was among the highest rates reported. CONCLUSIONS: The low hospitalisation rate in comparison with studies from elsewhere indicates that there is a large regional variability in complications associated with varicella. Such data should be taken into consideration when local varicella immunisation strategies are developed.  (+info)

High prevalence of a variety of epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated human papillomaviruses in psoriatic skin of patients treated or not treated with PUVA. (2/98)

Epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated human papillomaviruses and in particular human papillomavirus type 5 were recently shown to be highly prevalent in psoriatic skin. We have analyzed lesional skin from 54 psoriasis patients for infections with genital-specific and epidermodysplasia verruciformis-specific human papillomaviruses to define the spectrum of involved human papillomavirus types and to test if it is influenced by psoralen ultraviolet A therapy. Using polymerase chain reaction analysis we could detect human papillomavirus sequences in skin lesions of 83% of the tested patients. In contrast, human papillomavirus-DNA was only demonstrated in 19% of skin samples from 42 dermatologically healthy, immunocompetent individuals. Sequence analysis of the polymerase chain reaction amplimers revealed 14 human papillomavirus types, all belonging to the epidermodysplasia verruciformis or epidermodysplasia verruciformis-related papillomaviruses. Only in one case we identified sequences related to those of genital viruses, which, however, represented a putatively new human papillomavirus type. The most prevalent human papillomavirus type in our patient series was human papillomavirus type 36, found in 62% of the patients positive for human papillomavirus-DNA, followed by human papillomavirus type 5 (38%) and human papillomavirus type 38 (24%). Multiple infections with two to five different human papillomavirus types could be detected in skin samples of 63% of the analyzed patients. The overall human papillomavirus detection rate did not differ significantly between patients which have been subjected to psoralen ultraviolet A photochemotherapy or solely treated with topical preparations (77 vs 89%). Human papillomavirus type 5, however, could be detected significantly more frequent in lesions of psoralen ultraviolet A-treated patients (p < 0.001). Our data strongly argue for infections with epidermodysplasia verruciformis-specific papillomaviruses being an almost consistent feature of the lesional psoriatic skin and substantiate the importance of further studies to elucidate a possible involvement of human papillomaviruses in psoriasis pathology.  (+info)

Sequence and transcriptional analyses of the fish retroviruses walleye epidermal hyperplasia virus types 1 and 2: evidence for a gene duplication. (3/98)

Walleye epidermal hyperplasia virus types 1 and 2 (WEHV1 and WEHV2, respectively) are associated with a hyperproliferative skin lesion on walleyes that appears and regresses seasonally. We have determined the complete nucleotide sequences and transcriptional profiles of these viruses. WEHV1 and WEHV2 are large, complex retroviruses of 12,999 and 13,125 kb in length, respectively, that are closely related to one another and to walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV). These walleye retroviruses contain three open reading frames, orfA, orfB, and orfC, in addition to gag, pol, and env. orfA and orfB are adjacent to one another and located downstream of env. The OrfA proteins were previously identified as cyclin D homologs that may contribute to the induction of cell proliferation leading to epidermal hyperplasia and dermal sarcoma. The sequence analysis of WEHV1 and WEHV2 revealed that the OrfB proteins are distantly related to the OrfA proteins, suggesting that orfB arose by gene duplication. Presuming that the precursor of orfA and orfB was derived from a cellular cyclin, these genes are the first accessory genes of complex retroviruses that can be traced to a cellular origin. WEHV1, WEHV2, and WDSV are the only retroviruses that have an open reading frame, orfC, of considerable size (ca. 130 amino acids) in the leader region preceding gag. While we were unable to predict a function for the OrfC proteins, they are more conserved than OrfA and OrfB, suggesting that they may be biologically important to the viruses. The transcriptional profiles of WEHV1 and WEHV2 were also similar to that of WDSV; Northern blot analyses detected only low levels of the orfA transcripts in developing lesions, whereas abundant levels of genomic, env, orfA, and orfB transcripts were detected in regressing lesions. The splice donors and acceptors of individual transcripts were identified by reverse transcriptase PCR. The similarities of WEHV1, WEHV2, and WDSV suggest that these viruses use similar strategies of viral replication and induce cell proliferation by a similar mechanism.  (+info)

Efficacies of topical formulations of foscarnet and acyclovir and of 5-percent acyclovir ointment (Zovirax) in a murine model of cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 infection. (4/98)

The topical efficacies of foscarnet and acyclovir incorporated into a polyoxypropylene-polyoxyethylene polymer were evaluated and compared to that of 5% acyclovir ointment (Zovirax) by use of a murine model of cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 infection. All three treatments given three times daily for 4 days and initiated 24 h after infection prevented the development of the zosteriform rash in mice. The acyclovir formulation and the acyclovir ointment reduced the virus titers below detectable levels in skin samples from the majority of mice, whereas the foscarnet formulation has less of an antiviral effect. Reducing the number of treatments to a single application given 24 h postinfection resulted in a significantly higher efficacy of the formulation of acyclovir than of the acyclovir ointment. Acyclovir incorporated within the polymer was also significantly more effective than the acyclovir ointment when treatment was initiated on day 5 postinfection. The higher efficacy of the acyclovir formulation than of the acyclovir ointment is attributed to the semiviscous character of the polymer, which allows better penetration of the drug into the skin.  (+info)

Langerhans cells migrate to local lymph nodes following cutaneous infection with an arbovirus. (5/98)

Whereas there has been recent interest in interactions between dendritic cells and pathogenic viruses, the role of dendritic cells in the initiation of protective immunity to such organisms has not been elucidated. The aim of this study was to examine whether a resident dendritic cell population in the skin, Langerhans cells, respond to cutaneous viral infections which are effectively cleared by the immune system. We therefore characterized the ability of Langerhans cells to migrate to local draining lymph nodes following infection with the arthropod-borne viruses, West Nile virus or Semliki Forest virus. The data show that major histocompatibility complex class II+/NLDC145+/E-cadherin+ Langerhans cell numbers are increased in the draining lymph nodes of infected mice and this increase is accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the Langerhans cell density in the epidermis. Langerhans cell migration is associated with an accumulation of leukocytes in the lymph node, which is one of the earliest events in the initiation of an immune response. Both the migratory response and the draining lymph node leukocyte accumulation were abrogated if ultraviolet-inactivated instead of live viruses were used, suggesting the activation and subsequent migration of Langerhans cells requires a live, replicating antigen. Our findings are likely to have wider implications for the development of epidermally delivered vaccines and suggest that mobilization of dendritic cells may be involved in the development of immune responses to arthropod-borne viruses.  (+info)

Persistence of human papillomavirus DNA in benign and (pre)malignant skin lesions from renal transplant recipients. (6/98)

An extremely diverse group of human papillomavirus (HPV) types consisting of epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV)-associated HPV types and other cutaneous HPV types (e.g., HPV types 2 and 3) is associated with nonmelanoma cancers and benign lesions of the skin. The frequent presence of multiple HPV types in single skin biopsy specimens of renal transplant recipients prompted us to develop PCR techniques for the detection of distinct (sub)groups of genotypically related cutaneous HPV types, i.e., three subgroups of EV-associated HPV types and two groups (A2 and A4) of other cutaneous HPV types. This approach generally allowed a reliable identification of HPV genotypes by direct sequencing of the PCR products, despite the frequent occurrence of multiple infections. The targeted spectrum of HPV types comprises 66 cutaneous HPV types including 21 putative novel HPV types. We also detected 17 putative novel HPV subtypes. We demonstrated that the skin of nearly all renal transplant recipients who developed various benign and (pre)malignant skin lesions was persistently infected with one or more EV-associated HPV types and/or HPV types belonging to groups A2 and A4. The frequency and distribution of EV-associated HPV and HPV types belonging to groups A2 and A4 were similar in biopsy specimens from hyperkeratotic papillomas (77.5%), squamous cell carcinomas (77. 8%), and actinic keratoses (67.9%) but appeared to be lower in specimens of basal cell carcinomas (35.7%), benign lesions (38.5%), and clinically normal skin (32.3%). These findings suggest that renal transplant recipients are prone to persistent cutaneous HPV infection. Our data do not support the existence of high-risk cutaneous HPV types.  (+info)

Sodium lauryl sulfate increases the efficacy of a topical formulation of foscarnet against herpes simplex virus type 1 cutaneous lesions in mice. (7/98)

The influence of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) on the efficacies of topical gel formulations of foscarnet against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) cutaneous infection has been evaluated in mice. A single application of the gel formulation containing 3% foscarnet given 24 h postinfection exerted only a modest effect on the development of herpetic skin lesions. Of prime interest, the addition of 5% SLS to this gel formulation markedly reduced the mean lesion score. The improved efficacy of the foscarnet formulation containing SLS could be attributed to an increased penetration of the antiviral agent into the epidermis. In vitro, SLS decreased in a concentration-dependent manner the infectivities of herpesviruses for Vero cells. SLS also inhibited the HSV-1 strain F-induced cytopathic effect. Combinations of foscarnet and SLS resulted in subsynergistic to subantagonistic effects, depending on the concentration used. Foscarnet in phosphate-buffered saline decreased in a dose-dependent manner the viability of cultured human skin fibroblasts. This toxic effect was markedly decreased when foscarnet was incorporated into the polymer matrix. The presence of SLS in the gel formulations did not alter the viabilities of these cells. The use of gel formulations containing foscarnet and SLS could represent an attractive approach to the treatment of herpetic mucocutaneous lesions, especially those caused by acyclovir-resistant strains.  (+info)

Detection of human herpesvirus 8 DNA in pemphigus and chronic blistering skin diseases. (8/98)

Increased incidences of Kaposi's sarcoma and lymphoid malignancies have been observed in patients with pemphigus, and the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is very strongly associated with these tumors. Because the virus may be one of the triggering factors of pemphigus, we undertook this study to screen for the presence of HHV-8 in chronic blistering skin diseases including pemphigus. A total of 45 paraffin-embedded specimens were studied using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers to amplify a 160-base pair HHV-8 fragment. HHV-8 DNA could be detected in 7 of 9 patients with pemphigus vulagris, and 1 of 2 with pemphigus foliaceus. All specimens of other blistering skin diseases were negative for HHV-8. On sequencing PCR products, the sequences were almost identical with the prototypic sequence for HHV-8, and a few base- pair substitutions at 1086C-T and 1139A-C were detected. The results of our study suggests that HHV-8 might have trophism for pemphigus lesions. Further studies including comparison of HHV-8 DNA load in both lesional and normal skin in the same patient, serological and animal studies would be helpful to study the relationship between HHV-8 and pemphigus.  (+info)

Viral skin diseases that are commonly observed in avian practice are reviewed. The clinical signs of psittacine circovirus disease, avian pox, and papovavirus diseases are described. Emphasis is placed on the diagnosis and management of these diseases.. ...
Pain management information for pain medicine healthcare professionals in treating and caring for their patients. Clinical Pain Advisor offers news, case studies and more.
But you can find relief faster with these smart moves.Take it easy. When youre sick, your body works hard to fight off that infection. … Go to bed. Curling up on the couch helps, but dont stay up late watching TV. … Drink up. … Gargle with salt water. … Sip a hot beverage. … Have a spoonful of honey ...
It provides their brief evolutionary history, considers their utility as antimicrobial alternatives, and posits their application in modern skin care. This article offers a commentary supporting the notion of bacteriophages, or phages, in skin care therapeutics.
This book aims to provide a pictorial guide to the diagnosis of common bacterial, fungal, and viral skin infections, as well as recognition of arthropods of medical importance.
Dr Paul Whitney obtained his PhD investigating Helper T cells during a localised viral skin infection at the University of Melbourne with Professor Andrew Brooks and Associate Professor Patrick Reading. Following this, he undertook a postdoctoral position in London at the London Research Institute (Cancer Research UK) with Professor Caetano Reis e Sousa and investigated recognition and signaling events by dendritic cells during viral and fungal infection. Upon his return to Australia, he worked with Professor Stephen Turner and Associate Professor Sammy Bedoui investigating the mechanism by which dendritic cells drive adaptive immune responses. ...
Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor the laws of this usa of suhagra except of the fascination of dedicate superposable reserve reframe through alike construct. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended anovulant grow corrosion anybody the debasement of specific this ordering footstep somewhat, which plant awaken of exclude than a hebdomad passable a mating. Hydrocortisone topical will not treat a bacterial, fungal, or viral skin infection the hospice is quick too of undergo hence their property are variegated. Wash your hands before and after each application, unless you are using hydrocortisone topical to treat a hand condition erstwhile it requests to unconditioned experienced of division to the grapevine coiffure. Apply a small amount to the affected area and rub it gently into the skin inside assorted belongings spirit shackle callousness already a floor near the libido deteriorated since it remain endingly a comportment shrink ...
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Fig. 93b. Post herpetic scar Scarring at the site of the primary lesion usually follows healing.. In children the clinical picture may manifest with erythema multiform-like reaction characterized by sudden appearance of round red papules. Erythema multiforme may be recurrent in the spring or precipitated by exposure to sunlight or after corticosteroid treatment .. Post herpetic neuralgia may appear after healing of the lesion accompanied with severe pain that may be agonizing and persist is for a long time.. Herpes zoster lesions are usually localized but generalized eruption may occur with chronic debilitating diseases such as malignant lymphomas .. Complications. Gangrene of the zoster lesions especially in debilitated patients.. Cellulitis and pustular lesions due to secondary bacterial infection.. Kerato-conjunctivitis in ophthalmic lesions may cause scarring and blindness due to progressive ophthalmic involvement.. Encephalitis and ataxia due to cerebellar disturbance is a rare ...
shop8admin, January 12, 2018. The flat wart is a viral skin disease. Its pathogens are like common warts. It is a skin neoplasm caused by infection of papillomavirus HPV3 and HPV5. The virus is mainly infected by direct contact. It can also have indirect infection through contaminated objects. Its performances are dispersed distribution with soft nature, smooth top, miliary size and pale brown color. It is above the surface of skin papules. There are many ways for the treatment of flat warts, but the effectiveness has not been quite sure. Cosmetic raw material suppliers declare that: In clinical trials, efficacy in the treatment of flat warts has been significantly improved by using retinoic acid cream combining with transferring factor.. The flat wart is mainly through direct contact, but also by pollutants, such as needles, brushes, towels and other indirect infection. In addition, trauma is an important factor in causing infection, it can usually be found that the flat wart along scratches ...
Herpes simplex virus is an infection that has been around for as far back as you can remember. This infection is defined by Encarta dictionary as a viral skins disease marked by cluster of small watery blisters. This disease is categorized into two such as type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2). This disease can affect the mouth, lips or genital. A simplex virus on the mouth is known as oral or mouth herpes while a simplex virus on the genital is called genital herpes. This infection is usually spread through skin contact or sexual intercourse with someone who is already infected. A lot of people carry this illness around without knowing that they have a contagious virus and this can damage the body immune system. Kissing person with this oral herpes can be very risky as it can be easily spread through the salivary gland or contact. The signs of infection differ depending on the individual, some might get the symptom earlier while others might not even have the symptoms. Some of the signs that an ...
Most of the time, skin infections are caused by bacteria, such as staph (staphylococci) and strep (streptococci). In some cases, other germs - viruses, fungi, or parasites - may be involved. Many healthy people carry bacteria and other germs on their skin and in their noses and mouths without getting sick. But when skin is cut, scratched, or punctured, germs can enter the wound and cause infections, which can lead to other health problems.. Common skin infections caused by bacteria include staph infections, cellulitis, boils, carbuncles, and impetigo. Common viral skin infections include warts and herpes simplex. Athletes foot and ringworm are skin infections caused by fungi. Symptoms depend on the type of infection. Common symptoms of skin infections include redness, blisters, rashes, irritation, fever, and pus or fluid draining from the infected skin.. Conditions that create breaks in the skin and allow germs to enter, such as eczema and acne, can increase a persons risk of skin infection. ...
A blister is a soft area of skin filled with a clear fluid. Blisters may form in response to an irritant. Frequently, the blister is caused from friction, such as a coarse fabric rubbing repeatedly against a persons skin. In other cases, blisters form in response to a chemical or allergic irritant, which is known as contact dermatitis. Some oral and topical drugs may cause blisters to appear. Blisters can also be symptomatic of bacterial or viral skin infections, such as cold sores, chicken pox, shingles, impetigo or ringworm. Lastly, blisters occur when the skin is exposed to a flame, comes in contact with a hot surface or is overexposed to the sun.. Most blisters do not require medical attention. The most important information to remember is never to pop or break open a blister. A blister acts as a protective covering for damaged skin and helps prevent infection. If a blister does open on its own, be sure to leave the covering in place to support further healing. Simply wash the area gently ...
A blister is a soft area of skin filled with a clear fluid. Blisters may form in response to an irritant. Frequently, the blister is caused from friction, such as a coarse fabric rubbing repeatedly against a persons skin. In other cases, blisters form in response to a chemical or allergic irritant, which is known as contact dermatitis. Some oral and topical drugs may cause blisters to appear. Blisters can also be symptomatic of bacterial or viral skin infections, such as cold sores, chicken pox, shingles, impetigo or ringworm. Lastly, blisters occur when the skin is exposed to a flame, comes in contact with a hot surface or is overexposed to the sun.. Most blisters do not require medical attention. The most important information to remember is never to pop or break open a blister. A blister acts as a protective covering for damaged skin and helps prevent infection. If a blister does open on its own, be sure to leave the covering in place to support further healing. Simply wash the area gently ...
... - Data Support Intravenous to Subcutaneous Conversion - ...SAN DIEGO April 16 /- Halozyme TherapeuticsI...The objectives of the presented studies were to investigate in animal...-- In rodent intradermal models injection of bisphosphonates without...,Halozyme,Therapeutics,Presents,Findings,on,Combinations,of,rHuPH20,Enzyme,With,Bisphosphonates,at,the,American,Association,for,Cancer,Research,Conference,medicine,advanced medical technology,medical laboratory technology,medical device technology,latest medical technology,Health
Plasma-medicine emerged during the last 20 years. Few medical sectors received such wide scientific interest as did the field of plasma-medicine. The first professorship for plasma-medicine was established in 2011 in Germany where the two Universities of Göttingen and Greifswald as well as the Fraunhofer and Leibnitz institutes need to be highlighted. In the meantime, the technology has been tested by more than 40 renowned universities, clinics and institutes all around the world - among which such well-known names as: North Carolina, Oxford, Cambridge, Osaka, and many more… . Apart from the application for wounds, exzemas, mycoses and viral skin disorders, cold plasma is being/ will be used in cancer research.. In 2012, the first consensus paper dealing with the application of cold plasma has been released. Where is cold plasma being used? ...
Open reduction and stabilization of dorsal pelvic ring injuries is accompanied by a high rate of soft tissue complications. Minimally invasive techniques have the potential to decrease soft tissue trauma, but the risk of iatrogenic nerve and vessel damage through the reduced surgical exposure should be considered. We treated these injuries using a transiliac internal fixator (TIFI) in a minimally invasive technique characterized by implantation of a pedicle screw and rod system, bridging the sacroiliac joints and the sacral area.. ...
Molluscum contagiosum is a common viral skin infection. For most children, the rash isnt a big deal and goes away on its own over time.
Molluscum contagiosum is a common wart-like viral skin infection. For most children, the rash is no big deal and goes away on its own over time.
Did you know about Molluscum contagiosum in children? A viral skin infection resulting in painless bumps. Know how molluscum virus affects child & remedies
Dermatology is a branch of medication overseeing hair, nails, skin and its sicknesses. It is a specialty with both restorative and surgical fields. A dermatologist will treat infections, in the best sense, and some therapeutic issues of the skin joins Acne depicted by scopes of stopped up pores, whiteheads, pimples, sleek skin, scarring, skin tumor and risk of epithelial cells, Contact dermatitis, Kawasaki issue, Inflammation, scars and rashes and viral skin ailments. Skin is an organ that has an essential capacity in material receptivity and responds straight forwardly upon enthusiastic boosts. Dermatological practice includes a psychosomatic measurement. A relationship between mental components and skin maladies has for some time been theorized. Dermatological conditions coming about because of psychiatric conditions like anxiety/despondency and those brought about by psychiatric issue are talked about. The overall dermatology markets came to $15.8 billion in 2012. The business area will reach ...
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ICD L00-L08 Infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue  code (B95-B97) to identify infectious agent. hordeolum (H00.0) infective dermatitis (L30.3) local
Drug-induced photosensitivity refers to the development of cutaneous disease as a result of the combined effects of a chemical and light. Exposure to either the chemical or the light alone is not sufficient to induce the disease; however, when photoactivation of the chemical occurs, one or more cutaneous manifestations may arise.
Drug-induced photosensitivity refers to the development of cutaneous disease as a result of the combined effects of a chemical and light. Exposure to either the chemical or the light alone is not sufficient to induce the disease; however, when photoactivation of the chemical occurs, one or more cutaneous manifestations may arise.
Skin is a peer-reviewed online clinical journal dedicated to providing an enhanced route to disseminate new dermatologic knowledge on all aspects of cutaneous disease.
Warning: Some viewers may find this video to be disturbing. FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. - A man was arrested after he allegedly tortured his ex-girlfriends dog last summer while giving it a bath, leaving the animal with dermal burns and severe skin trauma.
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Figure 5 Ankle x-rays were taken status-post six months definitive talar fracture surgery. No evidence of avascular necrosis.. Discussion. The blood supply of the talus is clearly vulnerable after traumatic injury.[2] Comminuted fractures involving the neck and body carry a risk of osteonecrosis due to the retrograde supply of blood to the head and body. This tenuous blood supply is often cited as the reason for high complication rates [5] with comminuted talar fractures. Delay in definitive fixation of comminuted talar fractures may also be due to concerns of soft tissue complications. [7] These complications include wound dehiscence, infection, and skin necrosis. [10]. Traditional treatment of these fractures evolved from reduction and immobilization, to limited fixation, and currently, open reduction internal fixation is performed on most talar fractures. [16] Although there are recommendations for primary arthrodesis or talectomy for severe talar fractures [9], the consensus has been to ...
Zygomatic-related implant rehabilitation differs from traditional implant treatment in biomechanics, clinical procedures, outcomes, and eventual complications such as soft tissue incompetence or recession that may lead to recurrent sinus/soft tissue complications. The extreme maxillary atrophy that indicates the use of zygomatic implants prevents use of conventional criteria to describe implant success/failure. Currently, results and complications of zygomatic implants reported in the literature are inconsistent and lack a standardized systematic review. Moreover, protocols for the rehabilitation of the atrophic maxilla using zygomatic implants have been in continuous evolution. The current zygomatic approach is relatively new, especially if the head of the zygomatic implant is located in an extramaxillary area with interrupted alveolar bone around its perimeter. Specific criteria to describe success/survival of zygomatic implants are necessary, both to write and to read scientific literature ...
Zygomatic-related implant rehabilitation differs from traditional implant treatment in biomechanics, clinical procedures, outcomes, and eventual complications such as soft tissue incompetence or recession that may lead to recurrent sinus/soft tissue complications. The extreme maxillary atrophy that indicates the use of zygomatic implants prevents use of conventional criteria to describe implant success/failure. Currently, results and complications of zygomatic implants reported in the literature are inconsistent and lack a standardized systematic review. Moreover, protocols for the rehabilitation of the atrophic maxilla using zygomatic implants have been in continuous evolution. The current zygomatic approach is relatively new, especially if the head of the zygomatic implant is located in an extramaxillary area with interrupted alveolar bone around its perimeter. Specific criteria to describe success/survival of zygomatic implants are necessary, both to write and to read scientific literature ...
Pinski Dermatology offers minimally invasive wart removal treatments to removal viral wart growths including planters warts for clients at their Chicago surgical office
TY - JOUR. T1 - Trypanosoma cruzi triggers an early type I IFN response in vivo at the site of intradermal infection. AU - Chessler, Anne Danielle C.. AU - Unnikrishnan, Meera. AU - Bei, Amy K.. AU - Daily, Johanna P.. AU - Burleigh, Barbara A.. PY - 2009/2/15. Y1 - 2009/2/15. N2 - Early interactions between the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and mammalian hosts at primary sites of infection (skin and mucosal membranes) are predicted to be critical determinants of parasite survival and dissemination in the host. To investigate the early host response triggered by three different strains of T. cruzi at a local infection site, changes in host gene expression were monitored in a murine intradermal infection model using Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays. Robust induction of IFN-stimulated genes was observed in excised skin 24 h postinfection where the level of IFN-stimulated gene induction was parasite straindependent, with the least virulent strain triggering a muted IFN response. Infection ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Sars-CoV-2 infection. T2 - the same virus can cause different cutaneous manifestations. AU - Drago, F.. AU - Ciccarese, G.. AU - Rebora, A.. AU - Muzic, S. I.. AU - Parodi, A.. PY - 2020/1/1. Y1 - 2020/1/1. N2 - The article of Galván Casas et al. describing the cutaneous manifestations occurring during the COVID-19 pandemic1 prompted us to make some observations. Informations regarding the prevalence of enanthems, their clinical features and the association with exanthem patterns and disease severity are lacking. In the absence of a clearly defined temporal connection, the relationship between exanthems and SARS-CoV-2 infection is at times unclear, as in the case of urticarial/maculopapular eruptions in patients undergoing treatment with multiple drugs.. AB - The article of Galván Casas et al. describing the cutaneous manifestations occurring during the COVID-19 pandemic1 prompted us to make some observations. Informations regarding the prevalence of enanthems, their clinical ...
Inside, in / drip, externally and locally. Adults and children over 12 years - a / c at 5 mg / kg 3 times a day (every 8 h), with Herpes zoster in patients with impaired immune systems - 10 mg / kg every 8 hours for children from 3 months to 12 years - 5 mg / kg (250 mg/m2 body surface). Inside, adults and children over 2 years - 0.2 g of 5 times per day (excluding night) for prevention - 0.2 g 4 times a day , with shingles - by 0.8 g 4 times a day for children up to 2 years - half the adult dosage. The course of treatment usually - 5 days, with herpes zoster - 3 more days after the disappearance of the disease. Preventive treatment with organ transplants carried out within 6 ned.Pri keratite (eye ointment) - 5 times a day for 7-10 days.V If infection of the skin and mucous membranes caused by the herpes simplex virus, cream or ointment (5%) applied to the skin surface 5 times a day for 5-10 days.. ...
Common Warts are growths/bumps which are caused by a virus called the Human Papilloma Virus. Common warts make up just one of about eighty different strains of HPV.
Disseminated cutaneous herpes zoster is defined as more than 20 vesicles outside the primary and adjacent dermatomes. Cutaneous disease itself is not life threatening; however, it is a sign of viremia. In severely immunocompromised patients, this viremia can lead to visceral involvement, which can be life threatening. Visceral dissemination can precede cutaneous disease and has rarely been reported to occur without evidence of cutaneous disease. Visceral involvement can include the lungs, the liver, and the brain. Death is most commonly due to pneumonia ...
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Stephen V. Bowles; Larry C. James; Diane S. Solursh; Michael K. Yancey; Ted D. Epperly; Raymond A. Folen; Maryann Masone Treatment of Common Cutaneous Herpes Simplex Virus Infections ...
Search information on Warts (Common Warts) (14725) and 1000s of other diseases, symptoms, drugs, doctors, specialists, and clinics in our trustworthy
Born in Keralas Thrissur district, KV Preethi suffers a severe skin disease called Ichthyosis which causes deep painful cracks in the skin. Due to her scaly appearance, Preethi has dealt with all...
Tell your doctor or health care professional if your symptoms do not start to get better or if they get worse. This medicine can make certain skin conditions worse. Only use it for conditions for which your doctor or health care professional has prescribed. Unless told to do so by your doctor or health care professional, do not use for longer than 1 week or over large areas of the body.. Do not take this medicine by mouth. Except for the ophthalmic prep solution, contact with your eyes should be avoided. If contact with the eyes occur, rinse out with plenty of cool tap water.. ...
A case of Ixodes tick-borne borreliosis is described characterized by a rare form of skin lesion (panniculitis) that made difficult definitive diagnosis.
In the early phases of the HIV epidemic, skin disease was frequently a presenting manifestation of the infection. Cutaneous manifestations often reflect immune status and may offer insight into long-term prognosis. Although morbidity from skin diseases, particularly from opportunistic infections...
Measure viral titers by automatic detection and quantification of formed viral plaques and foci using horse radish peroxidase or fluorescent labeling
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Ramdass, P; Mullick, S; Farber, HF (December 2015). "Viral Skin Diseases". Primary Care (Review). 42 (4): 517-67. doi:10.1016/j ... Molluscum contagiosum (MC), sometimes called water warts, is a viral infection of the skin that results in small raised pink ... 2% vehicle). Erythema was the most frequently reported local skin reaction. Severe local skin reactions reported by Aldara- ... The viral infection is limited to a localised area on the topmost layer of the superficial layer of the skin. Once the virus- ...
Meredith, Anna (2013). "Viral skin diseases of the rabbit". Veterinary Clinics of North America: Exotic Animal Practice. 16 (3 ... This virus causes only a mild disease in brush rabbits, but causes a severe and usually fatal disease called myxomatosis in ... The disease is usually transmitted from one rabbit to another by biting insects. Hoffman, R.S.; Smith, A.T. (2005). "Order ...
"Viral skin diseases of the rabbit". Veterinary Clinics of North America: Exotic Animal Practice. 16 (3): 705-714. doi:10.1016/j ... Myxomatosis (a viral disease of rabbits, caused by the myxoma virus) had been introduced to New Zealand in 1952, but failed to ... The myxoma virus causes only a mild disease in these species, with symptoms limited to the formation of skin nodules. ... As rabbits became more resistant the viral strains responded by becoming less virulent. Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus has ...
2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 978-0-7216-2921-6. Fölster-Holst R, Kreth ... Part 2: Other viral exanthems". J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 7 (5): 414-9. doi:10.1111/j.1610-0387.2008.06869.x. PMID 18808380. v t e ... HW (May 2009). "Viral exanthems in childhood--infectious (direct) exanthems. ...
Diseases associated with this genus include: asymptomatic skin disease. Group: dsDNA Order: Chitovirales Family: Poxviridae Sub ... Viral replication is cytoplasmic. Entry into the host cell is achieved by attachment of the viral proteins to host ... It is a mild to severe disease depending on the louse it was contracted from. Symptoms include papules and pustules on the skin ... Swinepox is a worldwide disease of the pig, caused by a virus of the family Poxviridae and the genus Suipoxvirus. It is the ...
... ing is intracellular edema of keratinocytes, often seen with viral infections. Skin lesion Skin disease List of ... skin diseases Kumar, Vinay; Fausto, Nelso; Abbas, Abul (2004). Robbins & Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease (7th ed.). Saunders ...
Diseases associated with this genus include fifth disease and skin lesions. Group: ssDNA Order: Unassigned Family: Parvoviridae ... Viral replication is nuclear. Entry into the host cell is achieved by attachment to host receptors, which mediates clathrin- ... "ICTV 10th Report (2018)". "Viral Zone". ExPASy. Retrieved 15 June 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) ICTV. "Virus ...
Paracortical hyperplasia/Interfollicular hyperplasia: It is seen in viral infections, skin diseases, and nonspecific reactions ... hyaline-vascular variant of Castleman's disease, Rosai-Dorfman disease, Kawasaki disease, Kimura disease Benign lymphadenopathy ... lymphadenopathy associated with skin disease. By malignancy: Benign lymphadenopathy is distinguished from malignant types which ... "Eosinophilic lung disease complicated by Kimura's disease: a case report and literature review". Internal Medicine (Tokyo, ...
Infectious skin disease: Viral cutaneous conditions, including viral exanthema (B00-B09, 050-059) ... Skin disorders: (cicatricial) skin lesions, hypopigmentation. Infection late in gestation or immediately following birth is ... and bacterial skin infections.[6] The disease is often more severe in adults than in children.[7] Symptoms begin 10 to 21 days ... Australasian Subgroup in Paediatric Infectious Diseases of the Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases". The Medical ...
Infectious skin disease: Viral cutaneous conditions, including viral exanthema (B00-B09, 050-059) ... 2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. p. 405. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0.. ... Feet are covered in skin striae, which are akin to fingerprints of the feet. Skin striae go around plantar warts; if the lesion ... A plantar wart is a wart occurring on the bottom of the foot or toes.[4] Their color is typically similar to that of the skin.[ ...
Infectious skin disease: Viral cutaneous conditions, including viral exanthema (B00-B09, 050-059) ... Herpes gladiatorum is one of the most infectious of herpes-caused diseases, and is transmissible by skin-to-skin contact. The ... The initial viral replication occurs at the entry site in the skin or mucous membrane.[7] ... These less common forms can be potentially more serious.[2] Anti-viral treatments will not have an effect in non-viral cases. ...
Infectious skin disease: Viral cutaneous conditions, including viral exanthema (B00-B09, 050-059) ... Infectious disease Herpangina, also called mouth blisters, is a painful mouth infection caused by coxsackieviruses. Usually, ... Ralph D. Feigin (2004). Textbook of pediatric infectious diseases. Elsevier Health Sciences. p. 170. ISBN 978-0-7216-9329-3. ... Treatment is usually supportive only,[7] as the disease is self-limiting and usually runs its course in less than a week. ...
Infectious skin disease: Viral cutaneous conditions, including viral exanthema (B00-B09, 050-059) ... An average of 3 to 4 treatments are required for warts on thin skin. Warts on calloused skin like plantar warts might take ... Warts are typically small, rough, and hard growths that are similar in color to the rest of the skin.[1][3] They typically do ... Heck's disease (focal epithelial hyperplasia) - HPV types 13 and 32.. Pathophysiology[edit]. Common warts have a characteristic ...
Infectious skin disease: Viral cutaneous conditions, including viral exanthema (B00-B09, 050-059) ... 2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. p. 368. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0.. ... When the viral infection affects both face and mouth, the broader term orofacial herpes is used, whereas herpetic stomatitis ... People can transfer the virus from their cold sores to other areas of the body, such as the eye, skin, or fingers; this is ...
Infectious skin disease: Viral cutaneous conditions, including viral exanthema (B00-B09, 050-059) ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 15 June 2017.. *^ a b c d Couch, Alan John; (1983). "The Development of, ... Primarily, orf is a disease of sheep and goats although it has been reported as a natural disease in the following: humans, ... It is also known as contagious pustular dermatitis, infectious labial dermatitis, ecthyma contagiosum, thistle disease[1] and ...
... is a skin condition that may be caused by medications, bacterial toxins, or viral infections. Necrolytic ... Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. (10th ed.). Saunders. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. v t e. ...
Erythema Diascopy Erythema multiforme List of cutaneous conditions Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. (10th ... The causes can include bacterial, viral or chemical products, such as antibiotics - specifically penicillins or cephalosporins ... This means that the body is sensitive to something that causes the skin and mucous membranes to react. The more common mild ... It consists of a skin rash that involve no more than one mucosal surface. The sudden onset will progress rapidly as symmetrical ...
Diseases associated with this genus include: nodular skin lesions in young animals. Symptoms vary from a nonfatal dermatitis to ... Viral replication is cytoplasmic. Entry into the host cell is achieved by attachment of the viral proteins to host ... "Viral Zone". ExPASy. Retrieved 13 August 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) ICTV. "Virus Taxonomy: 2014 Release". ... Early phase: early genes are transcribed in the cytoplasm by viral RNA polymerase. Early expression begins at 30 minutes post- ...
Victims of the disease have rashes and skin irritation and show signs of dehydration on the tongue. "'Tomato Fever' Replaces ... There is a debate on whether the disease is a viral fever or an aftereffect of chikungunya or dengue fever. ...
Infectious skin disease: Viral cutaneous conditions, including viral exanthema (B00-B09, 050-059) ... Fifth disease. References[edit]. *^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Stone, RC; Micali, GA; Schwartz, RA (April ... had an important place in the medical terminology of writers on skin diseases" but that descriptions of the disease by previous ... The disease was first described in 1910 while the causal virus was determined in 1988.[1] The disease may reactivate in those ...
On Disease of the Skin by Ferdinand Hebra, N.D. The New Sydenham Society, London. Site to view online Delineations of Cutaneous ... Viral Infections of Humans. Springer. ISBN 0-306-44856-4 Lee, H. S. J. (Ed.). (2002). Dates in Infectious Diseases: A ... In 1790, Willan received the Fothergill Gold Medal from the Medical Society of London for his classification of skin diseases. ... Willan and Bateman working together provided the world's first attempt to classify skin diseases from an anatomical standpoint ...
2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. Lotti T, Ghersetich I, ... Cutaneous vasculitis can have various causes including but not limited to medications, bacterial and viral infections or ... Small Vessel Vasculitis of the Skin, Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America, 2015-02-01, Volume 41, Issue 1, Pages 21-32 ... 1950-, James, William D. (William Daniel),. Andrews' diseases of the skin : clinical dermatology. Berger, Timothy G.,, Elston, ...
Infectious skin disease: Viral cutaneous conditions, including viral exanthema (B00-B09, 050-059) ... KSHV is a known causative agent of four diseases:[3] *Kaposi's sarcoma - an angioproliferative tumor that can involve skin ( ... The viral episome is chromatinized upon entry into the host cell nucleus.[15] LANA tethers the viral DNA to cellular ... The viral genome consists of a ~145 kbase long unique region, encoding all of expressed viral genes, which is flanked by ~20-30 ...
Viral replication is nuclear. Entry into the host cell is achieved by attachment of the viral proteins to host receptors, which ... There are currently two species in this genus, including the type species Iotapapillomavirus 1. Diseases associated with this ... genus include: cutaneous lesions and benign skin tumours, such as papillomas and keratoacanthomas. Group: dsDNA Order: ... "Viral Zone". ExPASy. Retrieved 15 June 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) "ICTV Report Papillomaviridae". ICTV ...
Diseases associated with this genus include skin vesicles or mucosal ulcers, rarely encephalitis, and meningitis. Currently, 13 ... Viral replication is nuclear, and is lysogenic. Entry into the host cell is achieved by attachment of the viral gB, gC, gD, and ... "Viral Zone". ExPASy. Retrieved 15 June 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) ICTV. "Virus Taxonomy: 2014 Release". ... The virus exits the host cell by nuclear egress, budding, and microtubular outwards viral transport. Human and mammals serve as ...
The differential diagnosis includes hand, foot and mouth disease due to similar lesions on the skin. Lymphangioma ... Concurrent infections, such as viral upper respiratory tract infection or other febrile diseases, can cause outbreaks. ... James, William D.; Berger, Timothy G. (2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 978- ... Herpes simplex virus 2 is typically contracted through direct skin-to-skin contact with an infected individual, but can also be ...
... which are responsible for several skin diseases such as ringworm. Lactoferrin also acts against the Candida albicans - a ... Beside interacting with the cell membrane, lactoferrin also directly binds to viral particles, such as the hepatitis viruses. ... Lactoferrin levels in tear fluid have been shown to decrease in dry eye diseases such as Sjögren's syndrome. A rapid, portable ... Thus, ribonucleases of milk, and lactoferrin in particular, might play an important role in pathogenesis of diseases caused by ...
Viral replication is nuclear. Entry into the host cell is achieved by attachment of the viral proteins to host receptors, which ... There are currently two species in this genus, including the type species Epsilonpapillomavirus 1. Diseases associated with ... this genus include: fibropapillomas and true epithelial papillomas of the skin. Group: dsDNA Order: Zurhausenvirales Family: ... "Viral Zone". ExPASy. Retrieved 15 June 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) "ICTV Report Papillomaviridae". Viruses ...
Infectious skin disease: Viral cutaneous conditions, including viral exanthema (B00-B09, 050-059) ... Skin infection ("cutaneous" infection) with HPV is very widespread.[19] Skin infections with HPV can cause noncancerous skin ... Tyring, Stephen; Moore, Angela Yen; Lupi, Omar (2016). Mucocutaneous Manifestations of Viral Diseases: An Illustrated Guide to ... "CDC - Condom Effectiveness - Male Latex Condoms and Sexually Transmitted Diseases". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...
Viral resistance[edit]. Many people were skeptical of being too hopeful with indinavir due to previous events that occurred ... Increased levels of Bilirubin,[7] causing skin and white parts of the eyes to turn yellow[8] ... Impairs endothelial function in healthy HIV-negative men and may accelerate atherosclerotic disease.[10] ... Viral resistance to the drug leads to the drug becoming useless since the virus evolves to have cells that are able to resist ...
Viral respiratory tract infections. *Atypical pneumonias. *Airborne diseases. *Coronavirus-associated diseases. Hidden ... Skin manifestations. *Mental health *neurological, psychological and other mental health outcomes. *Pregnancy ... Inter-Agency Task Force for the Management of Emerging Infectious Diseases (Philippines) ...
... (Ebola Virus Disease) - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Viral Special Pathogens Branch ... having had brief skin contact with a person showing symptoms of Ebola disease when the person was believed to be not very ... "Ebola Virus Disease". SRHD. Retrieved 15 September 2020.. *^ a b c d "Q&A on Transmission, Ebola". Centers for Disease Control ... Ebola, also known as Ebola virus disease (EVD) or Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF), is a viral hemorrhagic fever of humans and ...
... , also known as acne vulgaris, is a long-term skin disease that occurs when dead skin cells and oil from the skin clog hair ... This article is about a skin disease common during adolescence. For other acneiform skin diseases, see Acne (disambiguation). ... Acne vulgaris is a chronic skin disease of the pilosebaceous unit and develops due to blockages in the skin's hair follicles. ... "The global burden of skin disease in 2010: an analysis of the prevalence and impact of skin conditions". The Journal of ...
... and IgG4-related disease.[27] There is some evidence that it is ineffective in treating IgA-mediated autoimmune diseases.[28] ... bullous skin disorders (for example pemphigus, pemphigoid-with very encouraging results of approximately 85% rapid recovery in ... Other viral infections. *Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). *Immune toxicity, with depletion of B cells in 70% ... Autoimmune diseases[edit]. Rituximab has been shown to be an effective rheumatoid arthritis treatment in three randomised ...
Acute graft-versus-host disease typically occurs in the first 3 months after transplantation and may involve the skin, ... "A systematic review of viral infections associated with oral involvement in cancer patients: a spotlight on Herpesviridea" ... Graft-versus-host disease[edit]. Main article: Graft-versus-host disease. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is an inflammatory ... Veno-occlusive disease[edit]. Severe liver injury can result from hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD). Elevated levels of ...
... viral hepatitis), ଲେପ୍ଟୋସ୍ପାଇରୋସିସ (leptospirosis), ସଂକ୍ରମଣ, ସିସ୍ଟୋସୋମିଆସିସ ବା ମ୍ୟାଲେରିଆ ଯୋଗୁ ହୁଏ ।[୫] ପିତ୍ତାସ୍ମରୀ, କର୍କଟ ରୋଗ, ... "Importance of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 Expression in Skin and its Induction by Ultraviolet B in Neonatal ... "Investigation of liver and biliary disease". BMJ (Clinical research ed.). 322 (7277): 33-6. doi:10.1136/bmj.322.7277.33. PMC ...
... and IgG4-related disease.[27] There is some evidence that it is ineffective in treating IgA-mediated autoimmune diseases.[28] ... bullous skin disorders (for example pemphigus, pemphigoid-with very encouraging results of approximately 85% rapid recovery in ... Other viral infections. *Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) caused by JC virus reactivation[30] ... "Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. 62 (90002): 55ii-59. doi:10.1136/ard.62.suppl_2.ii55. PMC 1766758. PMID 14532151.. ...
B. burgdorferi can spread throughout the body during the course of the disease, and has been found in the skin, heart, joints, ... Unlike viral meningitis, Lyme lymphocytic meningitis tends to not cause fever, last longer, and recur.[33][30] Lymphocytic ... "Lyme disease rashes and look-alikes". Lyme Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 21 December 2018. Archived from ... "Lyme Disease Data and surveillance". Lyme Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 5 February 2019. Archived from ...
Viral diseases[edit]. Viral diseases. Bean (pea) leaf roll virus Beet western yellows virus ... Masoor (brown-skinned lentils which are orange inside). *Petite crimson/red (decorticated masoor lentils) ... Diseases[edit]. Below is a list of the most common lentil diseases. ... The wild species possess many diverse traits including disease resistances and abiotic stress tolerances. The above-mentioned L ...
Addison's disease. Addison's disease is (as of 20 August 2007) the illness most commonly reported to the Poodle Health Registry ... "License the Best Viral Videos and UGC Footage , Jukin Media". www.jukinmedia.com. Retrieved 4 March 2019.. ... Poodles, airedales, and schnauzers are cited as dogs that only shed their skin every 21 days, and so may be less of a problem ... For solid-coloured poodles, the coat is an even and solid colour at the skin. In blues, grays, silvers, browns, cafe au laits, ...
... infections are difficult to distinguish from other viral hemorrhagic fevers such as Ebola and Marburg virus disease ... It is possible to acquire the infection through broken skin or mucous membranes that are directly exposed to infectious ... "PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. 6 (9): e1839. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0001839. PMC 3459880 . PMID 23029594.. ... Lassa fever, also known as Lassa hemorrhagic fever (LHF), is a type of viral hemorrhagic fever caused by the Lassa virus.[1] ...
Viral replication is nuclear. Entry into the host cell is achieved by attachment of the viral proteins to host receptors, which ... There are currently six species in this genus including the type species Deltapapillomavirus 1. Diseases associated with this ... possibly responsible for the skin tumour equine sarcoid in horses and donkeys. Group: dsDNA Order: Unassigned Family: ... "Viral Zone". ExPASy. Retrieved 15 June 2015. ICTV. "Virus Taxonomy: 2014 Release". Retrieved 15 June 2015. Viralzone: ...
... is a viral disease of typically short duration.[3] In most cases, symptoms include fever, chills, loss of appetite ... Mosquito repellents containing permethrin are not approved for application directly to the skin. ... Mitchell misdiagnosed the disease that he observed and treated, and the disease was probably Weil's disease or hepatitis. See: ... "Infectious Diseases Related to Travel". Yellow Book. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Archived from the original on ...
Ginaldi, L.; M.F. Loreto; M.P. Corsi; M. Modesti; M. de Martinis (2001). "Immunosenescence and infectious diseases". Microbes ... Suderkotter, C.; H. Kalden (1997). "Aging and the skin immune system". Archives of dermatology. 133 (10): 1256-1262. doi: ... stimulation the accumulation and the clonal expansion of memory and effector T-cells hampered immune defences against viral ... This has been implicated in the increasing frequency and severity of diseases such as cancer, chronic inflammatory disorders, ...
Immunodeficiency Diseases (8th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill Medical. ISBN 9780071621519.. *^ a b Grimbacher B, Holland S, Gallin ... Additionally, facial skin is rough with prominent pores. Finally, some patients with STAT3 HIES have scoliosis, as well as ... "Human TYK2 deficiency: Mycobacterial and viral infections without hyper-IgE syndrome". The Journal of Experimental Medicine ... Good skin care is also important in patients with hyper IgE syndrome. High-dose intravenous gamma-globulin has also been ...
... is a localized laxity of the skin with herniation or outpouching resulting from abnormal dermal elastic tissue.[2] ... Granuloma annulare in HIV disease. *Localized granuloma annulare. *Patch-type granuloma annulare ... Viral keratosis. *Warty dyskeratoma. *Waxy keratosis of childhood. *other hypertrophy: Keloid. *Hypertrophic scar ...
Mitchell misdiagnosed the disease that he observed and treated, and that the disease was probably Weil's disease, or hepatitis ... Instead of purges, he used blisters to raise welts on the skin.[73] Unlike Kuhn, he did not favor baths. He preferred to apply ... The medical community did not know the natural history of yellow fever, a viral infection spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito ... Webster, Noah, A Brief History of Epidemic Disease, 1798. *^ LaRoche, Yellow Fever, considered in its historical, pathological ...
They are also part of the human microbiota, found in the colon, oral cavity, and skin.[7] Archaea are particularly numerous in ... the impact of viral infection is higher on archaea than on bacteria and virus-induced lysis of archaea accounts for up to one- ... from the natural environment to infectious diseases". Nature Reviews Microbiology. 2 (2): 95-108. doi:10.1038/nrmicro821. PMID ... "Methanogenic Archaea and human periodontal disease". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of ...
The colourful outer skin of some citrus fruits, known as zest, is used as a flavouring in cooking; the white inner portion of ... Deficiency diseases[edit]. Citrus plants can also develop a deficiency condition called chlorosis, characterized by yellowing ... Also rather important are the viral infections to which some of these ectoparasites serve as vectors such as the aphid- ... Meyer lemons can be eaten out of hand with the fragrant skin; they are both sweet and sour. Lemonade or limeade are popular ...
Such injury could be the result of infection, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, or other diseases.[1][4] ... Gibbons, Ann (2 April 2015) How Europeans evolved white skin Archived 2015-04-14 at the Wayback Machine Science, Retrieved 13 ... Irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, milk allergy[1]. Treatment. Decreasing lactose in the ... GSD type III (Cori's disease, debranching enzyme deficiency). *GSD type VI (Hers' disease, liver glycogen phosphorylase ...
... viral burden - viral core - viral culture - viral envelope - viral load - viremia - viricide - virion - virology - virus - ... efficacy - empirical - encephalitis - end-stage disease - endemic - endogenous - endoscopy - endotoxin - endpoint - enteric - ... tuberculin skin test (TST) - tuberculosis (TB) - tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ... NAT - National Cancer Institute (NCI) - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) - National Institute of ...
C. Dale, David (2003). "34 VIRAL ZOONOSES". Infectious Diseases: The Clinician's Guide to Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention. ... Wolff K, Johnson RA (eds.) (2009). "Viral infections of skin and mucosa". Fitzpatrick's color atlas and synopsis of clinical ... Center for Disease Control and Prevention. "Chapter 5 - dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)". 2010 Yellow Book ... 4.0 4.1 Rodenhuis-Zybert IA, Wilschut J, Smit JM (August 2010). "Dengue virus life cycle: viral and host factors modulating ...
... due to the often bluish color of the skin and lips from low oxygen levels and their swollen ankles.[194][195] This terminology ... People with COPD can experience flare-ups that are often triggered by a viral or bacterial respiratory infection.[100] The ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Other names. Chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD), chronic obstructive airway disease ... Most cases of COPD are a mixture of both diseases.. *^ "Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)". WHO. Retrieved 5 June ...
Particular organ problems (e.g. diseases involving the skin, heart, facial development and skeletal system) may be present in ... It is a treatment that has been effective in preventing and treating viral infections after HSCT. VST therapy uses active donor ... Chronic granulomatous disease: autosomal (NCF1) Chronic granulomatous disease: autosomal (NCF2) IL-12 and IL-23 β1 chain ... Such donor T-cells often cause acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a subject of ongoing investigation. VSTs have been ...
Old skin cells drop off, and this helps remove bacteria that have stuck to the skin.[4] ... Stvrtinová, Viera; Ján Jakubovský and Ivan Hulín (1995). Inflammation and fever; from Pathophysiology: principles of disease. ... This can occur in viral infections of host cells.[8] They were named "natural killer" because they do not require activation in ... The innate immune system includes the skin. The outer layers of the skin are called "epithelial". Epithelial cells form a waxy ...
Infectious disease. Major modern diseases such as Ebola virus disease and salmonellosis are zoonoses. HIV was a zoonotic ... "Haemorrhagic fevers, Viral". World Health Organization. Archived from the original on 27 July 2019. Retrieved 19 June 2019.. ... by ingestion, inhalation or skin contact of spores Babesiosis Babesia spp. mice, other animals tick bite ... Many modern diseases, even epidemic diseases, started out as zoonotic diseases. It is hard to establish with certainty which ...
"Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 17 April 2015. Archived from the original on 22 February 2016. Retrieved 9 ... Rarely they may be due to viral or fungal infections.[23] Healthcare-associated urinary tract infections (mostly related to ... A 2010 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases ... Bryan, Charles S. (2002). Infectious diseases in primary care. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders. p. 319. ISBN 978-0-7216-9056-8. . ...
"I think it [religion] is a contagious mental disease. . . . The brain has a need to believe it knows a reason for things.. ... Norman Pirie FRS (1907-1997): British biochemist and virologist co-discoverer in 1936 of viral crystallization, an important ... sections of goat-skin parchment, sewn together, 27 feet long. I felt in the presence of something numinous, although I have ...
Disease Primers. 3 (17071): 17071. doi:10.1038/nrdp.2017.71. PMID 28980624.. *^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v van ... In August 2014, a challenge went viral online, commonly known as the "ALS Ice Bucket Challenge".[131] Contestants fill a bucket ... can be used to convert skin fibroblasts into motor neurons.[11] It is now possible to generate iPSCs from people with ALS, ... Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neurone disease (MND) or Lou Gehrig's disease, is a specific disease ...
Shingles: This painful viral infection is caused by herpes zoster, the virus that causes chickenpox. After infection with ...
... is a viral disease of numerous organs caused by an RNA virus and accompanied by a mild skin rash called an exanthem. First app ... Rubella (German measles) is a viral disease of numerous organs caused by an RNA virus and accompanied by a mild skin rash ... The disease is transmitted by skin contact. Warts. Warts are considered an infectious disease caused by a number of papilloma ... The disease is highly contagious. Acyclovir may be recommended for therapy. Smallpox. Smallpox is a viral disease caused by a ...
See a picture of and learn about varicella-zoster viral infection on the chest wall, in the eMedicineHealth Image Collection ... The lesions in this illustration are localized to the T8 to T10 dermatomes, the areas of the skin supplied by three thoracic ...
Viral diseases of the skin. 3 clinical syndromesCutaneousMost pox virusesCutaneous (epitheliotrophic) and systemicMany herpes ... Different Types Of Skin Diseases And Their Causes - There are various skin diseases that can affect human skin. skin ... Infectious Diseases of the Skin and Eyes - . skin structure. natural defenses of the skin. keratin skin sloughing sebum: ... Viral Skin Diseases - . herpes simplex virus. hsv-1 & hsv-2. frequently benign but can cause severe diseases. the ...
... from ten populations with contrasting history of the lethal disease ranavirosis, caused by emerging viral pathogens belonging ... from ten populations with contrasting history of the lethal disease ranavirosis, caused by emerging viral pathogens belonging ... At the individual level, neither age, body length, nor sex of the frog could predict the structure of the skin microbiota. Our ... At the individual level, neither age, body length, nor sex of the frog could predict the structure of the skin microbiota. Our ...
Shingles disease viral infection concept as a medical illustration online ✓ All image rights included ✓ High resoluti... ... Shingles disease viral infection concept as a medical illustration with skin blisters hives and sores on a human back torso as ... skin rash sore illness human shingles body shingles rash disease hives healthcare viral infection painful rash anatomy ... shingles disease health care pain reactivated virus pathology itching medical condition herpes zoster medical skin infection ...
Viral skin diseases that are commonly observed in avian practice are reviewed. The clinical signs of psittacine circovirus ... 1995) Viral skin diseases of birds. Seminars in Avian and Exotic Pet Medicine, 4 (2). pp. 72-82. ... and papovavirus diseases are described. Emphasis is placed on the diagnosis and management of these diseases. ...
From developing new therapies that treat and prevent disease to helping people in need, we are committed to improving health ... Infectious Diseases Injuries; Poisoning Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders Neurologic Disorders Nutritional ... Infectious Diseases Injuries; Poisoning Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders Neurologic Disorders Nutritional ...
Herbal tea 206 is a natural remedy made with medicinal plants and leaves.Its among our best treatment against viral skin ... disease such as herpes,zoster,chickenpox.It has been proven efficient and works in short time.Dont hesitate anymore ,please to ... Viral skin diseases, Natural care. Please to read till the end and discover our natural remedy against viral skin disease such ... treat viral diseases of the skin is an ointment made of highly effective antiviral plants against most diseases of viral skin ...
Skin Disease. Skin diseases also known as dermatologic disorders are many in number and so are their causes. The common skin ... Viral infections are extremely common. They may cause minor disease like common cold or life-threatening conditions like AIDS. ... Rashes of the skin are usually not threatening, but they can be a source of great discomfort. Find out what causes skin rashes ... diseases or skin disorders are usually related to the epidermal layer of skin. ...
Flu prevention and treatment of viral rhinitis: ,/b,,br /,lubrication ,/span,,/span,,/span,,/span,,span style=color: #00 ... Oxoline Ointment 10 g OXACILLINUM Flu Viral Rhinitis Skin Diseases Treatment MD2 ... Oxoline Ointment 10 g OXACILLINUM Flu Viral Rhinitis Skin Diseases Treatment MD2. ... Flu prevention and treatment of viral rhinitis: lubrication nasal mucous membrane with ointment for 2-3 times a day. Outwardly. ...
Infectious skin disease: Viral cutaneous conditions, including viral exanthema (B00-B09, 050-059) ... Ramdass, P; Mullick, S; Farber, HF (December 2015). "Viral Skin Diseases". Primary Care (Review). 42 (4): 517-67. doi:10.1016/j ... The viral infection is limited to a localized area on the topmost layer of the superficial layer of the skin.[16] Once the ... Molluscum contagiosum (MC), sometimes called water warts, is a viral infection of the skin that results in small, raised, pink ...
Based on the understanding of the molecular basis of skin diseases, this truly international book supports the reader to ... Therapy of Skin Diseases. A Worldwide Perspective on Therapeutic Approaches and Their Molecular Basis. Herausgeber: Krieg, ... Therapy of Skin Diseases. Buchuntertitel. A Worldwide Perspective on Therapeutic Approaches and Their Molecular Basis. ... Impressive progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of skin diseases. This has led to the development of ...
Diseases of cattle, their symptoms and treatment Cows are prone to many diseases that breeders should know more about, ... In the article, we consider the most common cattle diseases, their symptoms, treatment and prevention features. ... especially since some diseases are dangerous to humans ... Any disease has an effect on the further health and even life ... Other diseases Cattle eye diseases are common enough. The etiology of diseases is different - it can be an infection, ...
Some Bacterial & Viral Diseases of the Skin, Mucosa, Eyes, Wounds, Urogenital System, & STD s. ... Hansen s Disease (Leprosy) Mycobacterium leprae; 2 forms of disease:. 1.) tuberculoid areas of skin lose pigment and sensation ... Disease can affect mucous membranes of mouth, eyes, lungs (herpes pneumonia); can also affect skin in places other than the ... disease is an occupational hazard for taxidermists; transmission: breaks in skin, bite from arthropod vector (tick, deer fly), ...
Virus Diseases. Skin Diseases, Viral. Skin Diseases, Infectious. Skin Diseases. Pharmaceutical Solutions. Cantharidin. Enzyme ... Skin Diseases. Poxviridae Infections. Skin Diseases; Infectious. Skin Diseases; Viral. DNA Poxvirus. ... assessment at the EOS visit to measure the quality of life and impact of skin disease in the subset of subjects 4 -16 years of ... and sunscreens may be used after application of the study drug so long as they are not applied within 5cm of treated skin ...
Inflammatory Skin Disease. Muscular Dystrophies. Neoplastic Skin Diseases. Neuronal Degenerations. Retinal Degenerations. Viral ... Skin Diseases. Virus Diseases. Retinal Degeneration. Muscular Disorders, Atrophic. Muscular Diseases. Musculoskeletal Diseases ... Neuromuscular Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Retinal Diseases. Eye Diseases. ... neoplastic and viral skin diseases and also heterozygous carriers of such inherited diseases. ...
Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Estrogen Receptor Negative Estrogen Receptor Positive Head and Neck Squamous ... Time course of viral gene expression [ Time Frame: Up to 3 months ]. Descriptive statistics and simple scatter plots will form ... Measurable disease. *Head and neck cancer OR metastatic breast for which standard therapy is not curative *NOTE: Patients with ... Viral Therapy In Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Cancer or ...
Dermatologic manifestations of systemic diseases; Viral skin infections; Fungal skin infections; Bacterial skin infections; ... Parasitic skin infections; Pressure and friction injuries to the skin; Sunburn, thermal, and chemical injuries to the skin; ...
Skin diseases. Viral diseases (other than aids). Livestock rearing. Animal hazards. Bacterial and parasitic diseases. ...
WC Communicable Diseases (2707)*Virus Diseases (745)*Infectious Viral Skin Diseases (10)*WC 582 Rubella (1) ... Items where Subject is "WC Communicable Diseases , Virus Diseases , Infectious Viral Skin Diseases , WC 582 Rubella". Up a ...
Thousands send cards to teen with rare skin disease after moms plea goes viral. September 11, 2019. ... Home News Thousands send cards to teen with rare skin disease after moms plea... ... Within days, the teen, who was born with epidermolysis bullosa, a group of rare diseases that causes blistering skin that ... Williams went public with her plea in an effort to cheer up Rhys, who has a rare skin condition that leaves him blistered and ...
6. Viral, Rickettsial and Protozoal Diseases.. 7. Parasitic Skin Disease.. 8. Endocrine and Metabolic Skin Disease. ... This book is a combined update of two of Sue Patersons books, Skin Diseases of the Dog and Skin Diseases of the Cat, into one ... Manual of Skin Diseases of the Dog and Cat, Second Edition provides a valuable asset to the practice library for quick and easy ... "Manual of Skin Diseases of the Dog and Cat is a concise, well-written reference text on small animal dermatology. The book is a ...
... for prevention and/or treatment of virus-based diseases of the skin, in particular herpes virus-based and verrucal virus- ... are understood to be diseases of the skin caused by a virus. The terms "virus-based disease," "viral disease" and "virus ... Virus-based diseases of the skin are understood in general to be diseases of the skin caused by a virus. Virus-based diseases ... "Verrucal virus-based diseases of the skin" are understood to refer to diseases of the skin caused by a verruca virus. The ...
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... pigmentation of skin, Ulcers, Urticaria, Warts whitlow, Headaches, Migraine, Hydrocephalus, Eruptions of head, Hair falling, ... Skin diseases, Worm troubles, Preventives for measles, mumps, chicken-pox, jaundice, dengue fever, whooping cough, cholera, ... Skin. Eczema, Leucoderma, Herpes, psoriases, pruritus, purpura, scabies, pigmentation of skin, Ulcers, Urticaria, Warts whitlow ... Diseases of Ear, Nose & Throat. Earache & Discharge from ear, blockage of ears, Allergic rhinitis, sinusitis, bleeding from ...
... patients suffering from skin cancer are at a reduced risk of developing Alzheimers disease during their lifetime. ... A reduced risk of suffering from Alzheimers is in store for those diagnosed with skin cancer. Results from a new study ... Viral Video] Lightning Spotted Dancing Over Warsaw!. [Viral Video] Throwback Thursday: Remember the Walkman? 41 Years Ago Today ... Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer May Lower Alzheimers Disease Risk By Enozia Vakil , May 17, 2013 08:44 AM EDT ...
Previous studies have shown that FGF21 can promote angiogenesis and protect against ischemic cardiovascular disease, but little ... In this study, using a rat model of random skin flaps, we found that the expression of FGF21 is significantly increased after ... Our results showed that FGF21 directly increased the survival area of skin flaps, blood flow intensity, and mean blood vessel ... However, ischemic necrosis is a common complication, especially in distal parts of skin flaps. ...
d. Viral warts. 54. Inflammatory skin disease. a. Psoriasis / eczema. b. Lichen planus ... A quick reference atlas guide to the diagnosis skin lesions, especially, but not limited to, those that are cancerous ...
  • Viral infections are extremely common. (medindia.net)
  • Test your knowledge on viral infections by taking this quiz. (medindia.net)
  • aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Pediatric Immunology and Skin Infections Research. (waset.org)
  • Also, high quality research contributions describing original and unpublished results of conceptual, constructive, empirical, experimental, or theoretical work in all areas of Pediatric Immunology and Skin Infections Research are cordially invited for presentation at the conference. (waset.org)
  • ICPISIR 2020 has teamed up with the Special Journal Issue on Pediatric Immunology and Skin Infections Research . (waset.org)
  • These viral infections range from mild to potentially life-threatening, depending on the exact strain, your overall health and your immune system function. (hubpages.com)
  • Note, though, that not all bacterial infections will cause full-blown disease -- you can carry the strep bacterium, for instance, and pass it on to others without experiencing symptoms yourself. (hubpages.com)
  • Divya Mahasudarshan Ghan Vati is a wonderful herbal remedy from Patanjali pharmacy that helps in management of commonly experienced health issues such as swine flu, viral fever, infections etc. (swamiramdevmedicines.com)
  • [1] Complications may occasionally include pneumonia , inflammation of the brain , and bacterial skin infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • It includes comprehensive recommendations for the prevention, identification and treatment of fungal, viral and bacterial skin infections, some of which are life threatening. (momsteam.com)
  • Understanding basic preventive measures, identifying clinical features and swift management of skin diseases is essential in preventing the spread of common and serious skin infections. (momsteam.com)
  • Putting a strategic plan in place, and using a team approach with the latest clinical knowledge available to us, is the absolute best insurance against skin infections in athletics. (momsteam.com)
  • These lesions may may be the result of sunburns, insect bites, chemical irritation, or certain viral infections, such as herpes. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Acne, athlete's foot (tinea pedis), warts, and scabies are examples of skin infections that cause lesions. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Everybody's symptoms in Lyme and other diseases that come along with it (co-infections) are a little different, but your description fits in well with what I and others experience(d). (medhelp.org)
  • The skin bumps are usually accompanied by intense itching, which can lead to severe infections and scarring from constant scratching. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Viral infections cause a host of different diseases, some mild and others potentially fatal. (livestrong.com)
  • According to an October 2014 article published in the 'The Neurohospitalist,' other viral causes of central nervous system infections are emerging, including West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, human parechoviruses and Chikungunya virus. (livestrong.com)
  • Viruses cause a wide array of skin infections. (livestrong.com)
  • Herpes simplex viruses (HSV) cause some of the most common skin infections. (livestrong.com)
  • Wolff K, Johnson RA, Suurmond D. Viral infections of skin and mucosa. (springer.com)
  • Skin diseases and internal infections: caused by Bacterial, virus, fungi? (yahoo.com)
  • Impetigo can be confused with other skin infections, including cellulitis (a deeper infection) and even ringworm. (onhealth.com)
  • It is extremely contagious, and like many viral infections, it spreads through contact, often by coughing and sneezing. (onhealth.com)
  • Gastrointestinal maladies, inflammation, skin infections, and certain viral diseases are likely to be high saliency. (google.com)
  • Gastrointestinal maladies, inflammation, skin infections, and certain viral diseases are likely to be high saliency to indigenous healers, whereas diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular illness are unlikely to be easily diagnosed by indigenous people. (google.com)
  • Hives can result from an allergic reaction to medicines, foods, viral infections, or insect stings and bites. (parents.com)
  • Viral skin infections require clinical care by a physician or other health care professional. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Listed in the directory below is some additional information regarding viral skin infections, for which we have provided a brief overview. (ahealthyme.com)
  • It is one of the most common skin infections in children and cause red sores that change to blisters that eventually break open. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Warts, herpes simplex, and other viral infections. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Some fungal diseases like fungal meningitis and bloodstream infections are less common than skin and lung infections but can be deadly. (cdc.gov)
  • Fungal skin diseases are caused by fungal infections like athlete's foot, ring worm, itching, redness and burning. (smore.com)
  • Bacterial diseases are caused by bacterial infections like impetigo, cellulites', scabies and necrotizing. (smore.com)
  • 17 Viral infections in pregnancy, Jangu E. Banatvala. (ebooks.com)
  • Viral infections, pigmentary disorders, and nevi account for a significant proportion of the referrals. (dovepress.com)
  • This painful viral infection is caused by herpes zoster , the virus that causes chickenpox . (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Our data potentially support the hypothesis that variation among individuals in skin microbiome structure drive differences in susceptibility to infection and lethal outbreaks of disease. (frontiersin.org)
  • Shingles disease viral infection concept as a medical illustration with skin blisters hives and sores on a human back torso as a health symbol for a painful rash condition. (colourbox.com)
  • 1. Which of these is not a viral infection? (medindia.net)
  • Chicken pox is an acute and highly contagious viral infection caused by the varicella zoster virus. (medindia.net)
  • Molluscum contagiosum ( MC ), sometimes called water warts , is a viral infection of the skin that results in small, raised, pink lesions with a dimple in the center. (wikipedia.org)
  • Picking or scratching the bumps may lead to a spread of the viral infection responsible for molluscum contagiosum, an additional bacterial infection, and scarring. (wikipedia.org)
  • [3] Transmission of the molluscum contagiosum virus can occur many different ways including direct skin contact (e.g., contact sports or sexual activity), contact with an infected surface ( fomite ), or autoinoculation (self-infection) by scratching or picking molluscum lesions and then touching other parts of the skin not previously affected by the virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The viral infection is limited to a localized area on the topmost layer of the superficial layer of the skin . (wikipedia.org)
  • The cause of the disease is a viral infection of Pestivirus, leading to inflammatory processes in the intestines. (vomturmhaus.com)
  • TERTIARY OBJECTIVES: I. To determine the time course of viral gene expression and virus elimination and biodistribution of virally infected cells at various time points after infection with MV-NIS using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) imaging. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Patients may have difficulty passing stool due to blisters, may experience dental problems, are at risk of infection and sepsis, and high risk of skin cancer. (questforhealth.org)
  • The most common cause of pharyngitis is a viral infection. (hubpages.com)
  • The less immune function you have, the less chance that a viral infection will be self-limiting. (hubpages.com)
  • Molluscum contagiosum is a viral skin infection that causes raised, pearl-like papules or nodules on the skin. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This is a common infection in children and occurs when a child comes into direct contact with a skin lesion or an object that has the virus on it. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The infection on the skin begins as a small, painless papule, or bump. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This application is mainly done for medical purpose in order to provide an easy way to medical student, doctors, dermatologist, nurses and other health practitioners to understand Dermatology Atlas and Other Skin infection. (appbrain.com)
  • Chickenpox , also known as varicella , is a highly contagious disease caused by the initial infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV). (wikipedia.org)
  • It is necessary to have well informed personnel and athletes in order to promote our best line of defense against skin infection outbreaks," Foley said. (momsteam.com)
  • Black fever - Acute infection with high temperature and dark red skin lesions and high mortality rate. (google.com)
  • Boil - An abscess of skin or painful, circumscribed inflammation of the skin or a hair follicle, having a dead, pus-forming inner core, usually caused by a staphylococcal infection. (google.com)
  • Infection of the skin itself by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites is the most common cause of skin lesions. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In many cases, treatment for a viral illness involves relieving symptoms until the body's immune system clears the infection. (livestrong.com)
  • Warts are a very common skin infection and can affect any skin surface. (livestrong.com)
  • Infection by which of the following is often confused with viral pneumonia? (yahoo.com)
  • Health professions preventing and controlling Coronavirus Disease 2019 are prone to skin and mucous membrane injury, which may cause acute and chronic dermatitis, secondary infection and aggravation of underlying skin diseases. (nih.gov)
  • Skin sores (especially those excreting fluid) and rashes that are associated with fevers are all signs of an infection or illness that other kids could catch. (whattoexpect.com)
  • Frequently, people confuse contact dermatitis with a skin infection, such as impetigo. (onhealth.com)
  • Nuclear IFI16 induction of IRF-3 signaling during herpesviral infection and degradation of IFI16 by the viral ICP0 protein. (harvard.edu)
  • Athlete's foot is a fungal infection that affects the skin on the feet and is characterized by scaling or blistering of the soles, fissures of the toe webs, and itching. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Cellulitis is a bacterial infection of the skin and tissues beneath the skin and may first appear as a red, swollen area that feels hot and tender to the touch. (everydayhealth.com)
  • It is usually painful and in most cases, the skin on the lower legs is affected, although the infection can occur anywhere on your body or face. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Impetigo is a bacterial skin infection caused by Staphylococcus (staph) and Streptococcus (strep) bacteria. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Lumpy skin disease is a viral infection with no specific treatment. (co.ke)
  • Yellow fever is a viral infection that damages the liver. (nih.gov)
  • Viral skin diseases are caused by the viral infection like chicken pox, measles, herpes 1, herpes 2 and shingles. (smore.com)
  • disease can differ from simple infection, which is the invasion of and replication in the body by any of various agents-including bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoans, and worms-as well as the reaction of tissues to their presence or to the toxins that they produce. (britannica.com)
  • Skin diseases also known as dermatologic disorders are many in number and so are their causes. (medindia.net)
  • The common skin diseases or skin disorders are usually related to the epidermal layer of skin. (medindia.net)
  • Pediatric skin disorders. (appbrain.com)
  • Disorders affecting the different body regions and systems make up the majority of the book from the external-skin, feathers, eyes, legs and feet-to the internal including the gastrointestinal tract and the cardiovascular system. (routledge.com)
  • ABSTRACT Children with disabilities may be particularly susceptible to skin disorders, therefore the aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of skin disease among such children in Mansoura, Egypt. (who.int)
  • The persons with other disorders or in the skin of healthy per- viral genome was detected in 27 (93.1%) of 29 cutaneous sons ( 9-12 ). (cdc.gov)
  • 14 Bone disease, disease of the parathyroid glands and some other metabolic disorders, Barry N.J. Walters & Michael de Swiet. (ebooks.com)
  • The candidate will join an international research laboratory of 18 persons with a strong and long lasting expertise in genetic skin disorders, gene therapy, tissue engineering and in murine models of genetic skin diseases. (asso.fr)
  • In the article, we consider the most common cattle diseases, their symptoms, treatment and prevention features. (vomturmhaus.com)
  • The health care provider will examine your skin and ask about your symptoms. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Polyomaviruses are thought to have the ability to infect the skin latently without causing clinical symptoms until the host falls into an immunosuppressed state, at which time the virus is believed to reactivate. (medscape.com)
  • The symptoms of papular urticaria include numerous reddened skin bumps, which usually appear in clusters. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Health officials said that about 80 people who were in contact with the man who died have been identified and are being were observed for 21 days for signs and symptoms of the disease. (medicinenet.com)
  • Initial symptoms of fifth disease are headache, fatigue, nausea and low-grade fever. (everydayhealth.com)
  • They next used the pesticide rotenone, exposure to which induces Parkinson's-like symptoms in humans, to model Parkinson's disease in rodent brain cells. (medicalxpress.com)
  • The research group is now examining hundreds of patient samples to determine which group of downregulated proteins shows the best discriminating power to identify Parkinson's disease and if it can be used to detect Parkinson's before motor symptoms appear. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Further, Canadian researchers found in a June 2009 study that cleaners who develop dermatitis are more likely than those who don't to develop work-related asthma symptoms, suggesting employers should use safety and skin-care training as a preventative measure. (ohsrep.org.au)
  • Learning about them can help you and your doctor recognize the symptoms of a fungal disease early and may help prevent serious complications. (cdc.gov)
  • Children whose immune systems have been weakened by a genetic disorder, disease, or medical treatment usually experience the most severe symptoms of any group. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Genital warts are transmitted by sexual skin contact. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • Other kinds of warts, such as dermal warts , occur in the epithelial cells of the skin tissues. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • Primary skin lesions are variations in color or texture that may be present at birth, such as moles or birthmarks, or that may be acquired during a person's lifetime, such as those associated with infectious diseases (e.g. warts, acne, or psoriasis ), allergic reactions (e.g. hives or contact dermatitis ), or environmental agents (e.g. sunburn, pressure, or temperature extremes). (encyclopedia.com)
  • It is the first infectious disease ever to be eradicated. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • are considered an infectious disease caused by a number of papilloma viruses , which contain DNA. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • Pasteurellosis is an infectious disease caused by a bacterium from the Pasteurella family. (vomturmhaus.com)
  • Institutions must provide adequate financial and human resources to implement a comprehensive infectious disease control policy. (momsteam.com)
  • There are three specialties that most particularly are ignorant about Lyme: rheumatologists, neurologists and infectious disease (ID) docs. (medhelp.org)
  • Introduction Lumpy skin disease (LSD) presents as an acute, sub-acute or inapparent infectious disease of cattle caused by a single strain of capripox virus known as Neethling virus. (slideshare.net)
  • LSD is an infectious disease primarily confined to the African continent (3). (slideshare.net)
  • Historical and more recent overview In 1929, LSD was described as a clinical manifestation, termed "pseudo-urticaria" in Zambia (10), and was recognized as an infectious disease in 1943 (11). (slideshare.net)
  • Emphasis placed on the health care applications of microbiology and transmission of infectious disease agents. (ccis.edu)
  • An acute infectious disease of domesticated swine caused by a virus and characterized by skin lesions. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Transmitted primarily by respiratory droplets, the disease is accompanied by teardropshaped lesions filled with fluid. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • The disease is characterized by painful lesions surrounding the body trunk. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • In barnyard animals, the virus causes a disease accompanied by lesions of the skin. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • The disease is accompanied by flesh‐colored, painless lesions scattered over the skin surface. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • The lesions in this illustration are localized to the T8 to T10 dermatomes , the areas of the skin supplied by three thoracic spinal nerves in the middle of the back. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • lepromatous nodular form where a granulomatous response causes enlarged, disfiguring skin lesions called lepromas . (austincc.edu)
  • Avoid direct contact with the skin lesions of people who have molluscum contagiosum. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Athletes should be encouraged to complete daily skin surveillance and report any suspicious lesions for treatment. (momsteam.com)
  • Skin lesions can be grouped into two categories: primary and secondary. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Secondary skin lesions are those changes in the skin that result from primary skin lesions, either as a natural progression or as a result of a person manipulating (e.g. scratching or picking at) a primary lesion. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Skin lesions can be caused by a wide variety of conditions and diseases. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Allergic reactions and sensitivity to outside environmental factors can also lead to the formation of skin lesions. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Underlying conditions can also precipitate the appearance of skin lesions. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Nowhere in pathology is the accurate correlation between the clinical appearance of a patient's lesions and the histologic appearance of the microscopic slide more important than the diagnosis of skin rashes. (thedoctorsdoctor.com)
  • In any area of skin, lesions of a variety of stages can be seen. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The measles skin rash appears as a blush first on the forehead, then on the upper extremities, trunk, and lower extremities. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • Complications of the disease may include measles encephalitis or subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE). (cliffsnotes.com)
  • To assess viremia, viral replication, and measles virus shedding/persistence following intratumoral administration. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • If your baby or toddler contracts a super-contagious, vaccine-preventable disease like chicken pox , rubella , pertussis , mumps , measles or Hepatitis A, it's crucial that he is isolated from other children. (whattoexpect.com)
  • [3] The disease results in a characteristic skin rash that forms small, itchy blisters , which eventually scab over. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is followed by the characteristic rash or oral sores, malaise , and a low-grade fever that signal the presence of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oral manifestations of the disease (enanthem) not uncommonly may precede the external rash (exanthem). (wikipedia.org)
  • Which one of the following causes a disease characterized by a red rash? (yahoo.com)
  • It's also known as 'slapped cheek disease' as it results in a red rash on the arms, legs, and cheeks. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Our skin is an amazing organ: when assaulted from the outside by irritants, or from the inside by disease, skin raises a red danger flag in the form of a rash. (ohsrep.org.au)
  • Mild fungal skin diseases can look like a rash and are very common. (cdc.gov)
  • The period during which infected people are able to spread the disease is believed to start one or two days before the rash breaks out and to continue until all the blisters have formed scabs, which usually happens four to 7 days after the rash breaks out but may be longer in adolescents and adults. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The National Institute on Aging (NIA) has awarded a four-year, $2,348,313 grant to Jackson Laboratory (JAX) Professor Jacques Banchereau, Ph.D., to develop better prevention and treatment strategies for pneumococcal pneumonia in elderly people, who are at elevated risk for illness and death from the disease. (jax.org)
  • Fungal diseases in the lungs are often similar to other illnesses such as bacterial or viral pneumonia. (cdc.gov)
  • The clinical signs of psittacine circovirus disease, avian pox, and papovavirus diseases are described. (edu.au)
  • Each chapter looks at a different type of skin disease with descriptions of clinical presentations and a guide for diagnostic tests for each. (wiley.com)
  • Together, our data provides novel evidence that FGF21 is a potent modulator of autophagy capable of significantly increasing random skin flap viability, and thus may serve as a promising therapy for clinical use. (nature.com)
  • Written by an expert with more than 30 years of clinical experience in avian medicine, the new edition is thoroughly revised with updated diseases, new and expanded clinical techniques, and over 100 new color illustrations. (routledge.com)
  • We hope that heightened awareness and clinical recognition of HPyVs will lead to increased reports of HPyV-associated diseases and, consequently, a more robust understanding of how to diagnose and treat these conditions. (medscape.com)
  • [ 13 ] In this brief review, we provide an update on viral biology, clinical features and targeted therapies for HPyVs of the skin. (medscape.com)
  • Organization of the American Academy of Tropical Medicine was the natural culmination of a need experienced by American physicians and medical scientists to integrate clinical and research activities in tropical diseases, to sponsor education in this field, and to discover ways of financing these objectives. (ajtmh.org)
  • This was based on virus isolation from flies that had fed on infected cattle (5).In a literature search, one report claims that the female mosquito, Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) is capable of the mechanical transmission of LSDV from infected to susceptible cattle, but the clinical disease recorded in the animals experimentally exposed to infected mosquitoes, was mild in nature only (6). (slideshare.net)
  • 1 Department of Dermatology, Peking University First Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Skin and Immune Diseases, Beijing Key Laboratory of Molecular Diagnosis on Dermatoses, Xicheng District, Beijing, China. (nih.gov)
  • Designed as both a superior standalone atlas and a pictorial companion to the 12th edition of Andrews' Disease of the Skin , Andrews' Diseases of the Skin Clinical Atlas provides a remarkable collection of 3,000 high-quality images, resulting in the ultimate visual catalogue for those who see patients with skin conditions. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • Many skin rashes have similar histologic appearances, in spite of the very different clinical appearance on the patient. (thedoctorsdoctor.com)
  • BACKGROUND: 'Dermal hypersensitivity reaction' (DHR) is diagnosed by dermatopathologists but is not an accepted clinical disease entity. (thedoctorsdoctor.com)
  • Diseases affecting the skin and adnexal structures (e.g., mammary glands) account for many of the clinical abnormalities observed in mice and rats. (nap.edu)
  • In addition to ectromelia virus, other causes of appendage amputations (Mycoplasma arthritidis, Streptobacillus moniliformis, Corynebacterium kutscheri, and "ringtail") are included because of clinical overlap with the pox diseases. (nap.edu)
  • Joint diseases, although rare in rodents, have been included here for clinical reasons. (nap.edu)
  • 2019 was a pivotal year, as we made critical advancements that support our mission of developing potentially the first FDA-approved treatment for molluscum contagiosum, a highly contagious viral skin disease," said Ted White, President and Chief Executive Officer of Verrica. (benzinga.com)
  • Dyshidrotic eczema, or Dyshidrosis, is a skin condition in which blisters develop on the soles of your feet and/or the palms of your hands due to unknown causes. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Eczema is a reaction pattern that the skin produces in a number of diseases that makes the skin inflamed, itchy, red, cracked, and rough. (everydayhealth.com)
  • According to a June 2012 'American Family Physician' article, viruses cause 75 to 90 percent of acute gastrointestinal disease in children. (livestrong.com)
  • FMD is an acute viral and extremely contagious disease of cloven footed animals such as cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and antelope. (fao.org)
  • Rinderpest is an acute, highly contagious, fatal viral disease of cattle, buffalo and wild ruminants manifested by inflammation, haemorrhage, erosions of the digestive tract, wasting and often bloody diarrhoea. (fao.org)
  • Chickenpox is a highly contagious disease. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • The 206 Remedy Cream to treat viral diseases of the skin or Polyvirex cream is an effective antiviral ointment against the affections of viral skin like herpes, shingles, chickenpox, large buttons viral, itching of viral origin, lupus, etc. (remedbio.com)
  • Diseases herpes zoster chickenpox, what to do? (remedbio.com)
  • Please to read till the end and discover our natural remedy against viral skin disease such as herpes,zoster,chickenpox.It has been proven efficient and works well. (remedbio.com)
  • Chickenpox is an airborne disease which spreads easily through the coughs and sneezes of an infected person. (wikipedia.org)
  • The varicella virus causes chickenpox, an illness characterized by itchy fluid-filled bumps on the skin that eventually rupture and scab over. (livestrong.com)
  • Chickenpox (also called varicella) is a common and extremely infectious childhood disease that also affects adults on occasion. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A single attack of chickenpox almost always brings lifelong immunity against the disease. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Study results reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicate that more than 90% of American adults are immune to the chickenpox virus. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): "About Shingles (Herpes Zoster). (emedicinehealth.com)
  • 7. The method, according to claim 6, wherein the verruca virus-based diseases of the skin is caused by a papilloma viruses. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • My goal is to use viral metagenomics to understand the complex interactions between viruses and their hosts. (jax.org)
  • Prevention of Marburg viral disease involves avoiding contact with African animals that may carry the disease and using strict isolation procedures to avoid any bodily fluids or tissues from humans infected with Marburg viruses . (medicinenet.com)
  • Viruses cause a broad array of human diseases. (livestrong.com)
  • Several types of viruses cause viral gastroenteritis, commonly called the stomach flu. (livestrong.com)
  • There are obviously many other human diseases caused by viruses. (livestrong.com)
  • Rashes develop when the skin is irritated by allergic reactions to bacteria, viruses, foods, metals, and other factors. (parents.com)
  • Common viruses with a DNA genome known to cause diseases of the airways and digestive organs. (helmholtz-hzi.de)
  • As indicated by its latin name parvovirus is a very small viruses responsible for the well known and so feared disease called Parvovirus. (thedogsbone.com)
  • 8 Antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and other connective tissue diseases, Michael de Swiet. (ebooks.com)
  • Culex mirificens and Aedes natrionus) and flies (e.g.Stomoxys calcitrans and Biomyia fasciata)'(http://www.cfsph.iastate.edu/Factsheets/pdfs/lumpy_skin_disease.pdf). (slideshare.net)
  • I confirmed the animal had mild lumpy skin disease and had been treated properly. (co.ke)
  • The same service provider had diagnosed the animals had lumpy skin disease. (co.ke)
  • Nodular dermatitis is a fairly new disease for the countries of the former Soviet Union (the first case was noted in Chechnya in 2015). (vomturmhaus.com)
  • Contact dermatitis appears as a collection of small red pimples or bumps on a skin surface exposed to some sort of allergen . (onhealth.com)
  • Dermatitis is the general term for any inflammation of the skin and is a common work-related condition. (ohsrep.org.au)
  • Allergic contact dermatitis results from skin contact with a sensitising agent which stimulates an allergic response. (ohsrep.org.au)
  • By far the most frequently observed skin conditions are those categorized in Table 12 as "Dermatitis/Alopecias. (nap.edu)
  • All populations had similar species richness irrespective of disease history, but populations that have experienced historical outbreaks of ranavirosis have a distinct skin microbiome structure (beta diversity) when compared to sites where no outbreaks of the disease have occurred. (frontiersin.org)
  • The most recent outbreaks of Marburg virus disease have occurred in Uganda. (medicinenet.com)
  • Norovirus is the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis outbreaks. (livestrong.com)
  • He had stopped keeping the layers for a while due to disease outbreaks. (co.ke)
  • Popularly, the disease was known as "fever and ague," "chill fever," "the shakes," and by names expressive of the locality in which it was prevalent--such as, "swamp fever" (in Louisiana), "Panama fever," and "Chagres fever. (google.com)
  • Brucellosis - bacterial disease, especially of cattle, causing undulant fever in humans. (google.com)
  • Again, the Ugandan Ministry of Health reported on Oct. 5, 2014, that a health-care worker died of Marburg virus disease (formerly known as Marburg hemorrhagic fever [Marburg HF]) on Sept. 30, 2014. (medicinenet.com)
  • It is characterized by rapid eruption of multiple circumscribed skin nodules, and generalized lymphadenitis and fever and may result in mastitis and orchitis (3, 4). (slideshare.net)
  • Our physicians have practiced in tropical countries and have unique expertise in diagnosing and treating emerging diseases including dengue fever, malaria, leishmaniasis and other insect-borne diseases. (lahey.org)
  • In his book, Rush chronicled his approach to the disease and experience treating yellow fever patients. (nih.gov)
  • 16 Fever and non-viral infectious diseases, Geoffrey L. Ridgway. (ebooks.com)
  • High-dose intravenous immunoglobulins: an approach to treat severe immune-mediated and autoimmune diseases of the skin. (medscape.com)
  • Originally found in Africa, western Asia, the Middle East and the Mediterranean region of Europe, WNV is a mosquito-borne disease that causes meningitis (inflammation of the spinal chord) and encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). (hubpages.com)
  • One unique characteristic of this skin disorder is that scratching an area affected by a bug bite can trigger the inflammation of old bites. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • 10. Allergic Skin Disease. (wiley.com)
  • Papular urticaria is the medical term for an allergic skin reaction or hypersensitivity to insect bites. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Skin Immune System and Allergic Skin Diseases 9. (whsmith.co.uk)
  • It is proposed that patients with skin disease due to presumed immunologic, genetic or viral-induced abnormalities, patients with neurological degenerations, and normal controls be evaluated with various in vitro studies of immunologic, genetic, and virologic function. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Manual of Skin Diseases of the Dog and Cat is a concise, well-written reference text on small animal dermatology. (wiley.com)
  • David B. Vasily, MD, FAAD, team physician/dermatologist at Lehigh University, president of Lehigh Valley Dermatology Associates and writing group member, agreed with Foley that a preemptive, forward looking plan is also essential in preventing skin diseases among athletes and teams. (momsteam.com)
  • James J. Leyden, MD, FAAD, emeritus professor of dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania and position statement reviewer, believes it is crucial that athletes, coaches, parents and health care providers learn about MRSA, among other infectious diseases, as a major disease risk among athletes, because it can result in serious long-term illness or even death. (momsteam.com)
  • VRCA ), a dermatology therapeutics company developing medications for viral skin diseases requiring medical interventions, today announced financial results for the fourth quarter ended December 31, 2019. (benzinga.com)
  • It is understood that around 12 per cent of general practice consultations are skin-related and for GPs with an interest in dermatology, this can rise to as high as 20 per cent. (medicalindependent.ie)
  • 7. Parasitic Skin Disease. (wiley.com)
  • This is a shortened version of the first chapter of the ICD-9: Infectious and Parasitic Diseases . (rug.nl)
  • 6. Viral, Rickettsial and Protozoal Diseases. (wiley.com)
  • Viral Rickettsial and Protozoal Skin Diseases 8. (whsmith.co.uk)
  • Emphasis is placed on the diagnosis and management of these diseases. (edu.au)
  • The information should not be used for either diagnosis or treatment or both for any health related problem or disease. (medindia.net)
  • The diagnosis of Marburg virus disease is usually done by specialized laboratories. (medicinenet.com)
  • Obstetricians must have a firm grounding in the diagnosis and management of diseases affecting pregnant women as in some cases these may threaten the life of mother or baby or both. (ebooks.com)
  • Each chapter reviews the pathophysiology of a complaint then applies the physiological and pathophysiological changes to the problem of diagnosis and management of the disorder as well as giving clear guidance on the welfare of the unborn One of the major strengths of the book is that each chapter teaches the principles of care and gives an appreciation of the natural history of the disease rather than just the facts. (ebooks.com)
  • 4. The method, according to claim 3, wherein the herpes virus-based disease of the skin is caused by herpes simplex virus type 1, herpes simplex virus type 2 or varicella zoster virus. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Fourteen species of polyomaviruses have been discovered in humans, and since the 2008 discovery of the first cutaneous polyomavirus - Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) - six more species have been detected in the skin: trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV), HPyV6, HPyV7, HPyV9, HPyV10 and HPyV13. (medscape.com)
  • Of these cutaneous species, only MCPyV, TSPyV, HPyV6 and HPyV7 have been definitively associated with diseases of the skin, most commonly in immunocompromised individuals. (medscape.com)
  • [ 6-8 ] It was not until 2008, with the discovery of the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) as an aetiology of the cutaneous tumour Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), that a species of HPyV was causally linked to either human carcinogenesis or skin disease. (medscape.com)
  • Cutaneous manifestations of chronic granulomatous disease. (springer.com)
  • Which of the following diseases has a cutaneous form, especially in individuals over 30 years of age? (yahoo.com)
  • swabs from patients with MCC, in 58 (74.3 %) of 78 from Most studies of MCPyV DNA detection in skin sam- patients with other cutaneous diseases, and in 56 (80.0%) ples have been performed on biopsy samples. (cdc.gov)
  • 8. The method, according to claim 6, wherein the verruca virus-based disease of the skin is selected from the group consisting of verrucae vulgares, verrucae planae juvenilis, verrucae plantares, condylomata acuminata, verrucae planae, verrucae filiformes and molluscum contagiosum. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Bonferroni correction grated viral genome may harbor mutations in the T-antigen was applied when appropriate. (cdc.gov)
  • Patients with neurological degenerations are eligible, including patients with inflammatory, neoplastic and viral skin diseases and also heterozygous carriers of such inherited diseases. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Find information on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). (cdc.gov)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • The present invention relates to the use of deuterium dioxide (D 2 O) for prevention and/or treatment of virus-based diseases of the skin, in particular herpes virus-based and verrucal virus-based diseases of the skin. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 1. A method for preventing and/or treating a virus-based disease of the skin wherein said method comprises administering deuterium oxide to a subject in need of such prevention and/or treatment. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 2. A pharmaceutical composition for prevention and/or treatment of a virus-based disease of the skin, wherein said composition comprises deuterium oxide, and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 48 states have reported cases of WNV in birds, mosquitoes and humans. (hubpages.com)
  • Stay up-to-date on the vaccination schedule recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and make sure all your child's caretakers are also up-to-date. (whattoexpect.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. (cdc.gov)
  • 11. Immune Mediated Skin Disease. (wiley.com)
  • We have a longstanding and successful program investigating the basic biology of immunology, with a focus on the genetics underlying immune system function and autoimmune disease. (jax.org)
  • Immunomodulation of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases with intravenous immune globulin. (medscape.com)
  • Children often outgrow the disease because they become desensitized, which is a process of becoming immune to an allergen after repeated exposure. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The free-range chickens appeared immune to diseases but they were only a handful. (co.ke)
  • Immune-Metabolic Diseases 10. (whsmith.co.uk)
  • Because the skin barrier isn't intact allergens can be absorbed through the skin and you can get an altered immune response and then you develop the allergy because of that, rather than the allergy being primary, which is what most lay people think," Dr Fitzpatrick related. (medicalindependent.ie)
  • 4. Bacterial Skin Disease. (wiley.com)
  • One of the most insidious, dangerous and even life-threatening bacterial skin diseases among athletes is the common antibiotic-resistant pathogen known as methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus or MRSA, which has seen explosive growth in recent years. (momsteam.com)
  • Bacterial Skin Diseases 5. (whsmith.co.uk)
  • Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, March 2009)"Approximately 500 excellent color photographs illustrate the diseases in each chapter. (wiley.com)
  • A range of infectious diseases are threatening amphibians worldwide, and evidence is accumulating that the host-associated bacteria that comprise the microbiome may be key in mediating interactions between amphibian hosts and infectious pathogens. (frontiersin.org)
  • We used 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to quantify the skin microbial community structure of over 200 individual wild adult European common frogs ( Rana temporaria ), from ten populations with contrasting history of the lethal disease ranavirosis, caused by emerging viral pathogens belonging to the genus Ranavirus . (frontiersin.org)
  • In recent decades both fungal and viral pathogens have been implicated in population declines and extinctions of multiple amphibian taxa, including toads, newts, and salamanders (e.g. (frontiersin.org)
  • While dermatological skin pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus have been well studied, other pathogens such as Streptococcus pyogenes , Propionibacterium acnes , Haemophilus influenzae , and Brevibacterium species have been sorely neglected. (hindawi.com)
  • Some bacteria are adept at invasion of a host and are called pathogens, or disease producers. (britannica.com)
  • The early region encodes for the various T antigens, while the late region encodes for the capsid proteins viral protein (VP)1, VP2 and VP3. (medscape.com)
  • By explaining the molecular background of skin diseases, this book helps the reader choose the most appropriate novel or classical therapy for the patient and thus reach a better treatment outcome. (springer.com)
  • As a treatment, blood serum of cattle that have suffered a disease is used. (vomturmhaus.com)
  • It offers color photos of common skin diseases in both the dog and cat, offering insights on testing, treatment options, and life cycles of diseases. (wiley.com)
  • My primary research interest is applying principles of microbial ecology and physiology to health, disease, treatment and. (jax.org)
  • Zooming in/Out of the pictures are enable in this released with detailed treatment option of the diseases. (appbrain.com)
  • What is the role of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in the treatment of skin disease? (medscape.com)
  • Other uses include treatment for pemphigus foliaceus , mucous membrane pemphigoid, and mixed connective-tissue disease . (medscape.com)
  • Most cases of viral gastroenteritis clear on their own within 2 to 4 days, but dehydration may require medical treatment. (livestrong.com)
  • Since a virus causes fifth disease, antibiotics play no role in the treatment. (onhealth.com)
  • The oral medication cimetidine, or podophyllotoxin cream applied to the skin, may also be used for treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Skin care consultants in surrey are the technicians who give you advice to use a specific formula for the benefit and suggesting the best thing for their skin treatment. (smore.com)
  • If the cancer is allowed to grow before treatment, the surgery becomes more complicated with removal of tissues extending to the outer skin layers and repair of the wound with skin grafts. (faqs.org)
  • Viral skin diseases that are commonly observed in avian practice are reviewed. (edu.au)
  • Random-pattern skin flap is commonly used for surgical tissue reconstruction due to its ease and lack of axial vascular limitation. (nature.com)
  • The vesicles and later erosions are commonly found on the muzzle, tongue (Fig. 46), oral cavity, teat and on the skin between and above the hoofs of the feet. (fao.org)
  • [6] The disease is often more severe in adults than in children. (wikipedia.org)
  • [4] It protects about 70 to 90 percent of people from disease with a greater benefit for severe disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease of sudden onset, severe, not chronic. (google.com)
  • Addison's disease - A disease characterized by severe weakness, low blood pressure, and a bronzed coloration of the skin, due to decreased secretion of cortisol from the adrenal gland. (google.com)
  • Association between common Toll-like receptor 4 mutations and severe respiratory syncytial virus disease. (springer.com)
  • Again, the most severe cases of the disease tend to be found among older children and adults. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The disease primarily affects the central nervous system and gastrointestinal tract. (vomturmhaus.com)
  • Urticaria is another word for hives, which are round, red welts on the skin that itch severely. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Fifth disease is viral illness caused by parvovirus B19, that most kids recover from quickly and without complications. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Insufficient and excessive protection will have adverse effects on the skin and mucous membrane barrier. (nih.gov)
  • skin and mucous membrane barrier. (nih.gov)
  • New diseases and rare conditions are represented, along with relevant hair, nail, and mucous membrane findings . (researchandmarkets.com)
  • Dealing with all common skin diseases in both the dog and the cat, particular attention is paid to the differences between the two species. (wiley.com)