The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.
A species of CAPRIPOXVIRUS causing a cattle disease occurring in Africa.
A common genetically determined, chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by rounded erythematous, dry, scaling patches. The lesions have a predilection for nails, scalp, genitalia, extensor surfaces, and the lumbosacral region. Accelerated epidermopoiesis is considered to be the fundamental pathologic feature in psoriasis.
Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)
A poxvirus infection of cattle characterized by the appearance of nodules on all parts of the skin.
Any inflammation of the skin.
Skin diseases caused by ARTHROPODS; HELMINTHS; or other parasites.
Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.
Skin diseases caused by viruses.
The process of aging due to changes in the structure and elasticity of the skin over time. It may be a part of physiological aging or it may be due to the effects of ultraviolet radiation, usually through exposure to sunlight.
A chronic inflammatory genetically determined disease of the skin marked by increased ability to form reagin (IgE), with increased susceptibility to allergic rhinitis and asthma, and hereditary disposition to a lowered threshold for pruritus. It is manifested by lichenification, excoriation, and crusting, mainly on the flexural surfaces of the elbow and knee. In infants it is known as infantile eczema.
A medical specialty concerned with the skin, its structure, functions, diseases, and treatment.
A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.
Diseases of the skin with a genetic component, usually the result of various inborn errors of metabolism.
The functions of the skin in the human and animal body. It includes the pigmentation of the skin.
The external, nonvascular layer of the skin. It is made up, from within outward, of five layers of EPITHELIUM: (1) basal layer (stratum basale epidermidis); (2) spinous layer (stratum spinosum epidermidis); (3) granular layer (stratum granulosum epidermidis); (4) clear layer (stratum lucidum epidermidis); and (5) horny layer (stratum corneum epidermidis).
A chronic disorder of the pilosebaceous apparatus associated with an increase in sebum secretion. It is characterized by open comedones (blackheads), closed comedones (whiteheads), and pustular nodules. The cause is unknown, but heredity and age are predisposing factors.
Skin diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, parasites, or viruses.
Epidermal cells which synthesize keratin and undergo characteristic changes as they move upward from the basal layers of the epidermis to the cornified (horny) layer of the skin. Successive stages of differentiation of the keratinocytes forming the epidermal layers are basal cell, spinous or prickle cell, and the granular cell.
A name applied to several itchy skin eruptions of unknown cause. The characteristic course is the formation of a dome-shaped papule with a small transient vesicle on top, followed by crusting over or lichenification. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Group of chronic blistering diseases characterized histologically by ACANTHOLYSIS and blister formation within the EPIDERMIS.
Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.
A pruritic papulovesicular dermatitis occurring as a reaction to many endogenous and exogenous agents (Dorland, 27th ed).
Uptake of substances through the SKIN.
A chronic inflammatory disease of the skin with unknown etiology. It is characterized by moderate ERYTHEMA, dry, moist, or greasy (SEBACEOUS GLAND) scaling and yellow crusted patches on various areas, especially the scalp, that exfoliate as dandruff. Seborrheic dermatitis is common in children and adolescents with HIV INFECTIONS.
An intense itching sensation that produces the urge to rub or scratch the skin to obtain relief.
Skin diseases caused by bacteria.
A cutaneous disorder primarily of convexities of the central part of the FACE, such as FOREHEAD; CHEEK; NOSE; and CHIN. It is characterized by FLUSHING; ERYTHEMA; EDEMA; RHINOPHYMA; papules; and ocular symptoms. It may occur at any age but typically after age 30. There are various subtypes of rosacea: erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular, phymatous, and ocular (National Rosacea Society's Expert Committee on the Classification and Staging of Rosacea, J Am Acad Dermatol 2002; 46:584-7).
Superficial infections of the skin or its appendages by any of various fungi.
Group of genetically determined disorders characterized by the blistering of skin and mucosae. There are four major forms: acquired, simple, junctional, and dystrophic. Each of the latter three has several varieties.
Any horny growth such as a wart or callus.
Drugs used to treat or prevent skin disorders or for the routine care of skin.
A chronic and relatively benign subepidermal blistering disease usually of the elderly and without histopathologic acantholysis.
A form of lupus erythematosus in which the skin may be the only organ involved or in which skin involvement precedes the spread into other body systems. It has been classified into three forms - acute (= LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC with skin lesions), subacute, and chronic (= LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, DISCOID).
Coloration of the skin.
A contact dermatitis due to allergic sensitization to various substances. These substances subsequently produce inflammatory reactions in the skin of those who have acquired hypersensitivity to them as a result of prior exposure.
The use of ultraviolet electromagnetic radiation in the treatment of disease, usually of the skin. This is the part of the sun's spectrum that causes sunburn and tanning. Ultraviolet A, used in PUVA, is closer to visible light and less damaging than Ultraviolet B, which is ionizing.
A genus of the family POXVIRIDAE, subfamily CHORDOPOXVIRINAE, comprising poxviruses infecting sheep, goats, and cattle. Transmission is usually mechanical by arthropods, but also includes contact, airborne routes, and non-living reservoirs (fomites).
Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It supports research into the causes, treatment, and prevention of arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases; the training of basic and clinical scientists to carry out this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress. It was established in 1986.
Visible accumulations of fluid within or beneath the epidermis.
Dermatological pruritic lesion in the feet, caused by Trichophyton rubrum, T. mentagrophytes, or Epidermophyton floccosum.
A mitosporic fungal genus that causes a variety of skin disorders. Malassezia furfur (Pityrosporum orbiculare) causes TINEA VERSICOLOR.
Photochemotherapy using PSORALENS as the photosensitizing agent and ultraviolet light type A (UVA).
A contagious cutaneous inflammation caused by the bite of the mite SARCOPTES SCABIEI. It is characterized by pruritic papular eruptions and burrows and affects primarily the axillae, elbows, wrists, and genitalia, although it can spread to cover the entire body.
Redness of the skin produced by congestion of the capillaries. This condition may result from a variety of causes.
The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.
A family of structurally-related short-chain collagens that do not form large fibril bundles.
A slow-growing mycobacterium that infects the skin and subcutaneous tissues, giving rise to indolent BURULI ULCER.
An inflammatory, pruritic disease of the skin and mucous membranes, which can be either generalized or localized. It is characterized by distinctive purplish, flat-topped papules having a predilection for the trunk and flexor surfaces. The lesions may be discrete or coalesce to form plaques. Histologically, there is a "saw-tooth" pattern of epidermal hyperplasia and vacuolar alteration of the basal layer of the epidermis along with an intense upper dermal inflammatory infiltrate composed predominantly of T-cells. Etiology is unknown.
A disorder consisting of areas of macular depigmentation, commonly on extensor aspects of extremities, on the face or neck, and in skin folds. Age of onset is often in young adulthood and the condition tends to progress gradually with lesions enlarging and extending until a quiescent state is reached.
A layer of vascularized connective tissue underneath the EPIDERMIS. The surface of the dermis contains innervated papillae. Embedded in or beneath the dermis are SWEAT GLANDS; HAIR FOLLICLES; and SEBACEOUS GLANDS.
A term used to describe a variety of localized asymmetrical SKIN thickening that is similar to those of SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA but without the disease features in the multiple internal organs and BLOOD VESSELS. Lesions may be characterized as patches or plaques (morphea), bands (linear), or nodules.
Biological activities and functions of the SKIN.
A desmosomal cadherin that is an autoantigen in the acquired skin disorder PEMPHIGUS FOLIACEUS.
Synthetic material used for the treatment of burns and other conditions involving large-scale loss of skin. It often consists of an outer (epidermal) layer of silicone and an inner (dermal) layer of collagen and chondroitin 6-sulfate. The dermal layer elicits new growth and vascular invasion and the outer layer is later removed and replaced by a graft.
Any of a variety of eruptive skin disorders characterized by erythema, oozing, vesiculation, and scaling. Etiology is varied.
Any of several generalized skin disorders characterized by dryness, roughness, and scaliness, due to hypertrophy of the stratum corneum epidermis. Most are genetic, but some are acquired, developing in association with other systemic disease or genetic syndrome.
Diseases of the skin associated with underlying metabolic disorders.
A type of acute or chronic skin reaction in which sensitivity is manifested by reactivity to materials or substances coming in contact with the skin. It may involve allergic or non-allergic mechanisms.
Congenital structural abnormalities of the skin.
Group of mostly hereditary disorders characterized by thickening of the palms and soles as a result of excessive keratin formation leading to hypertrophy of the stratum corneum (hyperkeratosis).
Separation of the prickle cells of the stratum spinosum of the epidermis, resulting in atrophy of the prickle cell layer. It is seen in diseases such as pemphigus vulgaris (see PEMPHIGUS) and DARIER DISEASE.
A desmosomal cadherin that is an autoantigen in the acquired skin disorder PEMPHIGUS VULGARIS.
Skin tests in which the sensitizer is applied to a patch of cotton cloth or gauze held in place for approximately 48-72 hours. It is used for the elicitation of a contact hypersensitivity reaction.
Infections to the skin caused by bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.
Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.
The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.
Diseases in persons engaged in cultivating and tilling soil, growing plants, harvesting crops, raising livestock, or otherwise engaged in husbandry and farming. The diseases are not restricted to farmers in the sense of those who perform conventional farm chores: the heading applies also to those engaged in the individual activities named above, as in those only gathering harvest or in those only dusting crops.
A skin and mucous membrane disease characterized by an eruption of macules, papules, nodules, vesicles, and/or bullae with characteristic "bull's-eye" lesions usually occurring on the dorsal aspect of the hands and forearms.
Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.
A chronic suppurative and cicatricial disease of the apocrine glands occurring chiefly in the axillae in women and in the groin and anal regions in men. It is characterized by poral occlusion with secondary bacterial infection, evolving into abscesses which eventually rupture. As the disease becomes chronic, ulcers appear, sinus tracts enlarge, fistulas develop, and fibrosis and scarring become evident.
Virus diseases caused by the POXVIRIDAE.
A non-allergic contact dermatitis caused by prolonged exposure to irritants and not explained by delayed hypersensitivity mechanisms.
An idiopathic, rapidly evolving, and severely debilitating disease occurring most commonly in association with chronic ulcerative colitis. It is characterized by the presence of boggy, purplish ulcers with undermined borders, appearing mostly on the legs. The majority of cases are in people between 40 and 60 years old. Its etiology is unknown.
The widespread involvement of the skin by a scaly, erythematous dermatitis occurring either as a secondary or reactive process to an underlying cutaneous disorder (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, etc.), or as a primary or idiopathic disease. It is often associated with the loss of hair and nails, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, and pruritus. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
A lesion in the skin and subcutaneous tissues due to infections by MYCOBACTERIUM ULCERANS. It was first reported in Uganda, Africa.
Benign epidermal proliferations or tumors; some are viral in origin.
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.
Agents that soften, separate, and cause desquamation of the cornified epithelium or horny layer of skin. They are used to expose mycelia of infecting fungi or to treat corns, warts, and certain other skin diseases.
A type I keratin that is found associated with the KERATIN-5 in the internal stratified EPITHELIUM. Mutations in the gene for keratin-14 are associated with EPIDERMOLYSIS BULLOSA SIMPLEX.
A rapid onset form of SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA with progressive widespread SKIN thickening over the arms, the legs and the trunk, resulting in stiffness and disability.
A vascular reaction of the skin characterized by erythema and wheal formation due to localized increase of vascular permeability. The causative mechanism may be allergy, infection, or stress.
A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)
A malignant skin neoplasm that seldom metastasizes but has potentialities for local invasion and destruction. Clinically it is divided into types: nodular, cicatricial, morphaic, and erythematoid (pagetoid). They develop on hair-bearing skin, most commonly on sun-exposed areas. Approximately 85% are found on the head and neck area and the remaining 15% on the trunk and limbs. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1471)
A class of fibrous proteins or scleroproteins that represents the principal constituent of EPIDERMIS; HAIR; NAILS; horny tissues, and the organic matrix of tooth ENAMEL. Two major conformational groups have been characterized, alpha-keratin, whose peptide backbone forms a coiled-coil alpha helical structure consisting of TYPE I KERATIN and a TYPE II KERATIN, and beta-keratin, whose backbone forms a zigzag or pleated sheet structure. alpha-Keratins have been classified into at least 20 subtypes. In addition multiple isoforms of subtypes have been found which may be due to GENE DUPLICATION.
Recirculating, dendritic, antigen-presenting cells containing characteristic racket-shaped granules (Birbeck granules). They are found principally in the stratum spinosum of the EPIDERMIS and are rich in Class II MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX molecules. Langerhans cells were the first dendritic cell to be described and have been a model of study for other dendritic cells (DCs), especially other migrating DCs such as dermal DCs and INTERSTITIAL DENDRITIC CELLS.
Loss of scalp and body hair involving microscopically inflammatory patchy areas.
An extremely variable eczematous skin disease that is presumed to be a response to prolonged vigorous scratching, rubbing, or pinching to relieve intense pruritus. It varies in intensity, severity, course, and morphologic expression in different individuals. Neurodermatitis is believed by some to be psychogenic. The circumscribed or localized form is often referred to as lichen simplex chronicus.
Adverse cutaneous reactions caused by ingestion, parenteral use, or local application of a drug. These may assume various morphologic patterns and produce various types of lesions.
A group of dermatoses with distinct morphologic features. The primary lesion is most commonly a papule, usually erythematous, with a variable degree of scaling on the surface. Plaques form through the coalescing of primary lesions.
Oleagenous substances used topically to soothe, soften or protect skin or mucous membranes. They are used also as vehicles for other dermatologic agents.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
A group of desmosomal cadherins with cytoplasmic tails that resemble those of classical CADHERINS.
Disorders that are characterized by the production of antibodies that react with host tissues or immune effector cells that are autoreactive to endogenous peptides.
Skin diseases of the foot, general or unspecified.
Agents, usually topical, that relieve itching (pruritus).
A CC-type chemokine with specificity for CCR10 RECEPTORS. It is constitutively expressed in the skin and may play a role in T-CELL trafficking during cutaneous INFLAMMATION.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).
47-amino acid peptides secreted by ECCRINE GLANDS and having a role in innate cutaneous defense, being antimicrobial to some pathogenic BACTERIA. They are overexpressed by some primary BREAST CANCER cells. They are derived from 110 residue PROTEIN PRECURSORS.
The term applied to a group of relatively uncommon inflammatory, maculopapular, scaly eruptions of unknown etiology and resistant to conventional treatment. Eruptions are both psoriatic and lichenoid in appearance, but the diseases are distinct from psoriasis, lichen planus, or other recognized dermatoses. Proposed nomenclature divides parapsoriasis into two distinct subgroups, PITYRIASIS LICHENOIDES and parapsoriasis en plaques (small- and large-plaque parapsoriasis).
A by-product of the destructive distillation of coal used as a topical antieczematic. It is an antipruritic and keratoplastic agent used also in the treatment of psoriasis and other skin conditions. Occupational exposure to soots, tars, and certain mineral oils is known to be carcinogenic according to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985) (Merck Index, 11th ed).
A chronic, congenital ichthyosis inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Infants are usually born encased in a collodion membrane which sheds within a few weeks. Scaling is generalized and marked with grayish-brown quadrilateral scales, adherent at their centers and free at the edges. In some cases, scales are so thick that they resemble armored plate.
Inflammation of follicles, primarily hair follicles.
Absence of hair from areas where it is normally present.
A naturally occurring furocoumarin compound found in several species of plants, including Psoralea corylifolia. It is a photoactive substance that forms DNA ADDUCTS in the presence of ultraviolet A irradiation.
Small, sacculated organs found within the DERMIS. Each gland has a single duct that emerges from a cluster of oval alveoli. Each alveolus consists of a transparent BASEMENT MEMBRANE enclosing epithelial cells. The ducts from most sebaceous glands open into a HAIR FOLLICLE, but some open on the general surface of the SKIN. Sebaceous glands secrete SEBUM.
Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.
Semisolid preparations used topically for protective emollient effects or as a vehicle for local administration of medications. Ointment bases are various mixtures of fats, waxes, animal and plant oils and solid and liquid hydrocarbons.
Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.
Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.
A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.
Infections caused by nematode larvae which never develop into the adult stage and migrate through various body tissues. They commonly infect the skin, eyes, and viscera in man. Ancylostoma brasiliensis causes cutaneous larva migrans. Toxocara causes visceral larva migrans.
Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
Drugs that act locally on cutaneous or mucosal surfaces to produce inflammation; those that cause redness due to hyperemia are rubefacients; those that raise blisters are vesicants and those that penetrate sebaceous glands and cause abscesses are pustulants; tear gases and mustard gases are also irritants.
A type of junction that attaches one cell to its neighbor. One of a number of differentiated regions which occur, for example, where the cytoplasmic membranes of adjacent epithelial cells are closely apposed. It consists of a circular region of each membrane together with associated intracellular microfilaments and an intercellular material which may include, for example, mucopolysaccharides. (From Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990; Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
Rare cutaneous eruption characterized by extensive KERATINOCYTE apoptosis resulting in skin detachment with mucosal involvement. It is often provoked by the use of drugs (e.g., antibiotics and anticonvulsants) or associated with PNEUMONIA, MYCOPLASMA. It is considered a continuum of Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.
Drugs used to treat or prevent parasitic infections.
A form of congenital ichthyosis inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and characterized by ERYTHRODERMA and severe hyperkeratosis. It is manifested at birth by blisters followed by the appearance of thickened, horny, verruciform scales over the entire body, but accentuated in flexural areas. Mutations in the genes that encode KERATIN-1 and KERATIN-10 have been associated with this disorder.
A mixture of mostly avermectin H2B1a (RN 71827-03-7) with some avermectin H2B1b (RN 70209-81-3), which are macrolides from STREPTOMYCES avermitilis. It binds glutamate-gated chloride channel to cause increased permeability and hyperpolarization of nerve and muscle cells. It also interacts with other CHLORIDE CHANNELS. It is a broad spectrum antiparasitic that is active against microfilariae of ONCHOCERCA VOLVULUS but not the adult form.
Skin diseases affecting or involving the cutaneous blood vessels and generally manifested as inflammation, swelling, erythema, or necrosis in the affected area.
A chronic inflammatory mucocutaneous disease usually affecting the female genitalia (VULVAR LICHEN SCLEROSUS) and BALANITIS XEROTICA OBLITERANS in males. It is also called white spot disease and Csillag's disease.
Rare, chronic, papulo-vesicular disease characterized by an intensely pruritic eruption consisting of various combinations of symmetrical, erythematous, papular, vesicular, or bullous lesions. The disease is strongly associated with the presence of HLA-B8 and HLA-DR3 antigens. A variety of different autoantibodies has been detected in small numbers in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis.
Infection with nematodes of the genus ONCHOCERCA. Characteristics include the presence of firm subcutaneous nodules filled with adult worms, PRURITUS, and ocular lesions.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
A tube-like invagination of the EPIDERMIS from which the hair shaft develops and into which SEBACEOUS GLANDS open. The hair follicle is lined by a cellular inner and outer root sheath of epidermal origin and is invested with a fibrous sheath derived from the dermis. (Stedman, 26th ed) Follicles of very long hairs extend into the subcutaneous layer of tissue under the SKIN.
A common superficial bacterial infection caused by STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS or group A beta-hemolytic streptococci. Characteristics include pustular lesions that rupture and discharge a thin, amber-colored fluid that dries and forms a crust. This condition is commonly located on the face, especially about the mouth and nose.
Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.
The forcing into the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle, piercing the top skin layer.
A common, benign, usually self-limited viral infection of the skin and occasionally the conjunctivae by a poxvirus (MOLLUSCUM CONTAGIOSUM VIRUS). (Dorland, 27th ed)
A persistent progressive non-elevated red scaly or crusted plaque which is due to an intradermal carcinoma and is potentially malignant. Atypical squamous cells proliferate through the whole thickness of the epidermis. The lesions may occur anywhere on the skin surface or on mucosal surfaces. The cause most frequently found is trivalent arsenic compounds. Freezing, cauterization or diathermy coagulation is often effective. (From Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, pp2428-9)
Endogenous tissue constituents that have the ability to interact with AUTOANTIBODIES and cause an immune response.
Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.
An autosomal dominant skin disease characterized by transient and variable noninflammatory ERYTHEMA and hyperkeratosis. It has been associated with mutations in the genes that code for CONNEXINS. Erythrokeratodermia variabilis inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion has also been reported. Affected individuals often develop PALMOPLANTAR KERATODERMA.
A chronic, malignant T-cell lymphoma of the skin. In the late stages, the LYMPH NODES and viscera are affected.
Form of epidermolysis bullosa having onset at birth or during the neonatal period and transmitted through autosomal recessive inheritance. It is characterized by generalized blister formation, extensive denudation, and separation and cleavage of the basal cell plasma membranes from the basement membrane.
A type of inflammatory arthritis associated with PSORIASIS, often involving the axial joints and the peripheral terminal interphalangeal joints. It is characterized by the presence of HLA-B27-associated SPONDYLARTHROPATHY, and the absence of rheumatoid factor.
Filaments 7-11 nm in diameter found in the cytoplasm of all cells. Many specific proteins belong to this group, e.g., desmin, vimentin, prekeratin, decamin, skeletin, neurofilin, neurofilament protein, and glial fibrillary acid protein.
Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.
Operative procedures performed on the SKIN.
Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.
A form of epidermolysis bullosa characterized by serous bullae that heal without scarring. Mutations in the genes that encode KERATIN-5 and KERATIN-14 have been associated with several subtypes of epidermolysis bullosa simplex.
A group of lymphomas exhibiting clonal expansion of malignant T-lymphocytes arrested at varying stages of differentiation as well as malignant infiltration of the skin. MYCOSIS FUNGOIDES; SEZARY SYNDROME; LYMPHOMATOID PAPULOSIS; and PRIMARY CUTANEOUS ANAPLASTIC LARGE CELL LYMPHOMA are the best characterized of these disorders.
Abnormal responses to sunlight or artificial light due to extreme reactivity of light-absorbing molecules in tissues. It refers almost exclusively to skin photosensitivity, including sunburn, reactions due to repeated prolonged exposure in the absence of photosensitizing factors, and reactions requiring photosensitizing factors such as photosensitizing agents and certain diseases. With restricted reference to skin tissue, it does not include photosensitivity of the eye to light, as in photophobia or photosensitive epilepsy.
A chronic multi-system disorder of CONNECTIVE TISSUE. It is characterized by SCLEROSIS in the SKIN, the LUNGS, the HEART, the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, the KIDNEYS, and the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM. Other important features include diseased small BLOOD VESSELS and AUTOANTIBODIES. The disorder is named for its most prominent feature (hard skin), and classified into subsets by the extent of skin thickening: LIMITED SCLERODERMA and DIFFUSE SCLERODERMA.
The hearing and equilibrium system of the body. It consists of three parts: the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR. Sound waves are transmitted through this organ where vibration is transduced to nerve signals that pass through the ACOUSTIC NERVE to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The inner ear also contains the vestibular organ that maintains equilibrium by transducing signals to the VESTIBULAR NERVE.
A water-soluble medicinal preparation applied to the skin.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
Viscous, nauseating oil obtained from the shrub Croton tiglium (Euphorbaceae). It is a vesicant and skin irritant used as pharmacologic standard for skin inflammation and allergy and causes skin cancer. It was formerly used as an emetic and cathartic with frequent mortality.
Photography of objects viewed under a microscope using ordinary photographic methods.
Mutant strains of mice that produce little or no hair.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Agents that are used to treat allergic reactions. Most of these drugs act by preventing the release of inflammatory mediators or inhibiting the actions of released mediators on their target cells. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p475)
A proinflammatory cytokine produced primarily by T-LYMPHOCYTES or their precursors. Several subtypes of interleukin-17 have been identified, each of which is a product of a unique gene.
A species of mite that causes SCABIES in humans and sarcoptic mange in other animals. Specific variants of S. scabiei exist for humans and animals, but many have the ability to cross species and cause disease.
Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.
Most common form of ICHTHYOSIS characterized by prominent scaling especially on the exterior surfaces of the extremities. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Irritants and reagents for labeling terminal amino acid groups.
Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H1 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous histamine. Included here are the classical antihistaminics that antagonize or prevent the action of histamine mainly in immediate hypersensitivity. They act in the bronchi, capillaries, and some other smooth muscles, and are used to prevent or allay motion sickness, seasonal rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis and to induce somnolence. The effects of blocking central nervous system H1 receptors are not as well understood.
A non-fibrillar collagen involved in anchoring the epidermal BASEMENT MEMBRANE to underlying tissue. It is a homotrimer comprised of C-terminal and N-terminal globular domains connected by a central triple-helical region.
A class of non-sedating drugs that bind to but do not activate histamine receptors (DRUG INVERSE AGONISM), thereby blocking the actions of histamine or histamine agonists. These antihistamines represent a heterogenous group of compounds with differing chemical structures, adverse effects, distribution, and metabolism. Compared to the early (first generation) antihistamines, these non-sedating antihistamines have greater receptor specificity, lower penetration of BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER, and are less likely to cause drowsiness or psychomotor impairment.
Transmission and interpretation of tissue specimens via remote telecommunication, generally for the purpose of diagnosis or consultation but may also be used for continuing education.
Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.
An autosomal dominantly inherited skin disorder characterized by warty malodorous papules that coalesce into plaques. It is caused by mutations in the ATP2A2 gene encoding SERCA2 protein, one of the SARCOPLASMIC RETICULUM CALCIUM-TRANSPORTING ATPASES. The condition is similar, clinically and histologically, to BENIGN FAMILIAL PEMPHIGUS, another autosomal dominant skin disorder. Both diseases have defective calcium pumps (CALCIUM-TRANSPORTING ATPASES) and unstable desmosomal adhesion junctions (DESMOSOMES) between KERATINOCYTES.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Form of epidermolysis bullosa characterized by atrophy of blistered areas, severe scarring, and nail changes. It is most often present at birth or in early infancy and occurs in both autosomal dominant and recessive forms. All forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa result from mutations in COLLAGEN TYPE VII, a major component fibrils of BASEMENT MEMBRANE and EPIDERMIS.
Antimicrobial cationic peptides with a highly conserved amino terminal cathelin-like domain and a more variable carboxy terminal domain. They are initially synthesized as preproproteins and then cleaved. They are expressed in many tissues of humans and localized to EPITHELIAL CELLS. They kill nonviral pathogens by forming pores in membranes.
Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.
Small cationic peptides that are an important component, in most species, of early innate and induced defenses against invading microbes. In animals they are found on mucosal surfaces, within phagocytic granules, and on the surface of the body. They are also found in insects and plants. Among others, this group includes the DEFENSINS, protegrins, tachyplesins, and thionins. They displace DIVALENT CATIONS from phosphate groups of MEMBRANE LIPIDS leading to disruption of the membrane.
Inflammation of the OUTER EAR including the external EAR CANAL, cartilages of the auricle (EAR CARTILAGE), and the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).
Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.
A species of parasitic nematodes widely distributed throughout central Africa and also found in northern South America, southern Mexico, and Guatemala. Its intermediate host and vector is the blackfly or buffalo gnat.
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
Mammalian pigment cells that produce MELANINS, pigments found mainly in the EPIDERMIS, but also in the eyes and the hair, by a process called melanogenesis. Coloration can be altered by the number of melanocytes or the amount of pigment produced and stored in the organelles called MELANOSOMES. The large non-mammalian melanin-containing cells are called MELANOPHORES.
Treatment of disease by exposure to light, especially by variously concentrated light rays or specific wavelengths.
Peptides and proteins found in BODILY SECRETIONS and BODY FLUIDS that are PROTEASE INHIBITORS. They play a role in INFLAMMATION, tissue repair and innate immunity (IMMUNITY, INNATE) by inhibiting endogenous proteinases such as those produced by LEUKOCYTES and exogenous proteases such as those produced by invading microorganisms.
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
Infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria (atypical mycobacteria): M. kansasii, M. marinum, M. scrofulaceum, M. flavescens, M. gordonae, M. obuense, M. gilvum, M. duvali, M. szulgai, M. intracellulare (see MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX;), M. xenopi (littorale), M. ulcerans, M. buruli, M. terrae, M. fortuitum (minetti, giae), M. chelonae.
A chemotherapeutic agent that acts against erythrocytic forms of malarial parasites. Hydroxychloroquine appears to concentrate in food vacuoles of affected protozoa. It inhibits plasmodial heme polymerase. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p970)
Mice bearing mutant genes which are phenotypically expressed in the animals.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
Linear furanocoumarins which are found in many PLANTS, especially UMBELLIFERAE and RUTACEAE, as well as PSORALEA from which they were originally discovered. They can intercalate DNA and, in an UV-initiated reaction of the furan portion, alkylate PYRIMIDINES, resulting in PHOTOSENSITIVITY DISORDERS.
A circumscribed benign epithelial tumor projecting from the surrounding surface; more precisely, a benign epithelial neoplasm consisting of villous or arborescent outgrowths of fibrovascular stroma covered by neoplastic cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.

Clinical, microbial, and biochemical aspects of the exfoliative toxins causing staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome. (1/514)

The exfoliative (epidermolytic) toxins of Staphylococcus aureus are the causative agents of the staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS), a blistering skin disorder that predominantly affects children. Clinical features of SSSS vary along a spectrum, ranging from a few localized blisters to generalized exfoliation covering almost the entire body. The toxins act specifically at the zona granulosa of the epidermis to produce the characteristic exfoliation, although the mechanism by which this is achieved is still poorly understood. Despite the availability of antibiotics, SSSS carries a significant mortality rate, particularly among neonates with secondary complications of epidermal loss and among adults with underlying diseases. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the literature spanning more than a century and to cover all aspects of the disease. The epidemiology, clinical features, potential complications, risk factors, susceptibility, diagnosis, differential diagnoses, investigations currently available, treatment options, and preventive measures are all discussed in detail. Recent crystallographic data on the toxins has provided us with a clearer and more defined approach to studying the disease. Understanding their mode of action has important implications in future treatment and prevention of SSSS and other diseases, and knowledge of their specific site of action may provide a useful tool for physiologists, dermatologists, and pharmacologists.  (+info)

Intravenous and oral mono- or combination-therapy in the treatment of severe infections: ciprofloxacin versus standard antibiotic therapy. Ciprofloxacin Study Group. (2/514)

Five hundred and forty patients with severe infection were enrolled in a multicentre, prospective, randomized, non-blinded study to compare the efficacy and safety of i.v. ciprofloxacin with i.v. standard therapy. Five hundred and thirty-one patients received at least one dose of study drug for pneumonia (310), septicaemia (112) or skin and skin structure infection (109). Intravenous ciprofloxacin (400 mg, every 8 h) or i.v. ciprofloxacin (400 mg, every 8 h) plus a beta-lactam were compared with a standard monotherapy (beta-lactam) or combination (aminoglycoside plus a beta-lactam) therapy. Patients were treated parenterally for a minimum of 2 or 3 days, then at the discretion of the investigator could be switched to oral therapy (ciprofloxacin 750 mg, every 12 h or a standard oral therapy). Patients were randomized in the ratio of 2:1 for the ciprofloxacin and standard therapy treatment groups and stratified to monotherapy if the APACHE II score was < or = 20 or to combination therapy if the APACHE II score was 21-29. Three hundred and ninety-five (74%) patients were valid for the efficacy analysis: these comprised 242 pneumonia (167 ciprofloxacin and 75 standard therapy), 70 septicaemia (47 ciprofloxacin and 23 standard therapy), and 83 skin infections (56 ciprofloxacin and 27 standard). The primary efficacy variable was clinical response and the secondary efficacy assessment was bacteriological response at the end of therapy (2 or 3 days after treatment). The mean duration of therapy for patients receiving only i.v. monotherapy or combination therapy was shorter (9-10 days) than for patients receiving sequential i.v./p.o. therapy (14-17 days). At the end of therapy, overall clinical resolution/improvement (success) for monotherapy was 138/166 (83%) for the ciprofloxacin group, compared with 74/87 (85%) for standard-treated patients (95% CI = -11.5% to 7.6%), and for combination therapy the response was 43/51 (84%) for the ciprofloxacin group and 14/20 (70%) for standard-treated patients (95% CI = -6.3% to 34.9%). For pneumonia, the most frequent infection treated, clinical success rates following monotherapy were 85% for ciprofloxacin and 83% for standard-treated patients and 83% for ciprofloxacin compared with 69% for standard-treated patients in the combination therapy group. Bacteriological eradication/presumed eradication following monotherapy was 85/102 (83%) for ciprofloxacin and 31/46 (67%) for standard-treated patients (95% CI = 1.6% to 30.3%), and that for combination therapy was 29/36 (81%) for ciprofloxacin and 7/10 (70%) for standard-treated patients (95% CI = -18.3% to 39.5%). Drug-related adverse events, primarily diarrhoea and nausea, were reported in 22% of ciprofloxacin-treated patients and 20% of standard-treated patients. In summary, ciprofloxacin administered alone or in combination was found to be effective in treating a wide range of severe infections.  (+info)

Treatment of hospitalized patients with complicated gram-positive skin and skin structure infections: two randomized, multicentre studies of quinupristin/dalfopristin versus cefazolin, oxacillin or vancomycin. Synercid Skin and Skin Structure Infection Group. (3/514)

Quinupristin/dalfopristin (Synercid), the first injectable streptogramin antibiotic available for the treatment of complicated gram-positive skin and skin structure infections, was compared with standard comparators (cefazolin, oxacillin or vancomycin) in one USA and one international trial. These two randomized, open-label trials of virtually identical design enrolled a total of 893 patients (450 quinupristin/dalfopristin, 443 comparator). The majority of patients had erysipelas, traumatic wound infection or clean surgical wound infection. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated pathogen in both treatment groups and polymicrobial infection was more common in the quinupristin/dalfopristin group than in the comparator group. The clinical success rate (cure plus improvement) in the clinically evaluable population was equivalent between the two treatment groups (68.2% quinupristin/dalfopristin, 70.7% comparator; 95% CI, -10.1, 5.1) despite a shorter mean duration of treatment for quinupristin/dalfopristin patients. In the bacteriologically evaluable population, by-patient and by-pathogen bacteriological eradication rates were somewhat lower for quinupristin/dalfopristin (65.8% and 66.6%, respectively) than for the comparator regimens (72.7% and 77.7%, respectively). The lower bacteriological response rates in the quinupristin/dalfopristin group were, in part, due to a higher rate of polymicrobial infections and a higher incidence of patients classified as clinical failure, a category which included premature discontinuation of treatment because of local venous adverse events. The bacteriological eradication rate for quinupristin/dalfopristin was higher in monomicrobial infections than in polymicrobial infections (72.6% versus 63.3%, respectively), whereas the corresponding rate for the comparator regimens was lower for monomicrobial infections than polymicrobial infections (70.8% versus 83.1%). This finding was not unexpected, since the spectrum of quinupristin/dalfopristin is focused on gram-positive pathogens and additional antibiotics to treat gram-negative bacteria were not required per protocol. The systemic tolerability of both treatment regimens was qualitatively similar. A higher rate of drug-related venous adverse events was reported for quinupristin/dalfopristin (66.2%) than for the comparator regimen (28.4%). Premature discontinuation of study drug was primarily due to adverse clinical events for quinupristin/dalfopristin (19.1%), whereas the most common reason for discontinuation among those receiving the comparator regimens was treatment failure (11.5%). Quinupristin/dalfopristin is an effective alternative for the treatment of hospitalized patients with complicated skin and skin structure infections due to quinupristin/ dalfopristin-susceptible gram-positive organisms, including methicillin- and erythromycin-resistant S. aureus.  (+info)

Optimal treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections. (4/514)

Gram-positive bacteria (e.g. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes) are the main cause of skin and skin structure infections (SSSI). Treatment presents a clinical challenge to the physician, particularly with the increase in multidrug-resistant strains and widespread cross-resistance to antibiotic treatment. Initial treatment of SSSI involves the use of fluoroquinolones or penicillinase-resistant penicillins. If infection is caused by methicillin-resistant staphylococci, therapy with glycopeptides is warranted. However, in the last few years several cases of infection caused by strains of S. aureus with reduced susceptibility to glycopeptides have been reported. Quinupristin/dalfopristin is a new streptogramin that has shown efficacy in the management of multidrug-resistant gram-positive infections. Two major studies suggest that in the treatment of complicated SSSI, the clinical efficacy of quinupristin/dalfopristin is equivalent to that of vancomycin and/or oxacillin and vancomycin and/or cefazolin.  (+info)

Isolation, identification, and molecular characterization of strains of Photorhabdus luminescens from infected humans in Australia. (5/514)

We describe the isolation of Photorhabdus (Xenorhabdus) luminescens from four Australian patients: two with multiple skin lesions, one with bacteremia only, and one with disseminated infection. One of the patients had multiple skin lesions following the bite of a spider, while the lesions in the other patient were possibly associated with a spider bite. The source of infection for the remaining two patients is unknown. As a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, P. luminescens is unusual in that it fails to reduce nitrate and ferments only glucose and mannose. It gives negative reactions for lysine decarboxylase, arginine dihydrolase, and ornithine decarboxylase (Moeller). The species is motile, utilizes citrate, hydrolyzes urea, and usually produces a unique type of annular hemolysis on sheep blood agar plates incubated at 25 degrees C. A weak bioluminescence is the defining characteristic. P. luminescens is an insect pathogen and is symbiotically associated with entomopathogenic nematodes. Its isolation from human clinical specimens has been reported previously from the United States. Restriction fragment length polymorphism-PCR analysis of the 16S rRNA gene demonstrated a high level of similarity among the Australian clinical strains and significant differences between the Australian clinical strains and the U.S. clinical strains. However, numerical analyses of the data suggest that the two groups of clinical strains are more similar to each other than they are to the symbiotic strains found in nematodes. This is the first report of the isolation of P. luminescens from infected humans in Australia and the second report of the isolation of this species from infected humans worldwide.  (+info)

Involvement of Panton-Valentine leukocidin-producing Staphylococcus aureus in primary skin infections and pneumonia. (6/514)

Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is a cytotoxin that causes leukocyte destruction and tissue necrosis. It is produced by fewer than 5% of Staphylococcus aureus strains. A collection of 172 S. aureus strains were screened for PVL genes by polymerase chain reaction amplification. PVL genes were detected in 93% of strains associated with furunculosis and in 85% of those associated with severe necrotic hemorrhagic pneumonia (all community-acquired). They were detected in 55% of cellulitis strains, 50% of cutaneous abscess strains, 23% of osteomyelitis strains, and 13% of finger-pulp-infection strains. PVL genes were not detected in strains responsible for other infections, such as infective endocarditis, mediastinitis, hospital-acquired pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and enterocolitis, or in those associated with toxic-shock syndrome. It thus appears that PVL is mainly associated with necrotic lesions involving the skin or mucosa.  (+info)

Mycobacterium ulcerans infection (Buruli ulcer): first reported case in a traveler. (7/514)

A chronic, painless sore developed over a 2-month period on the left calf of a Canadian man traveling for 8 months in Africa. A presumptive diagnosis of a Mycobacterium spp. infection was made despite initially negative biopsy and culture results, after failure of several courses of anti-bacterial antibiotics. Mycobacterium ulcerans was eventually isolated and the lesion progressed despite treatment with multiple anti-mycobacterial agents. The lesion finally responded to wide and repeated excision, aggressive treatment with anti-mycobacterial antibiotics, and split-thickness skin grafting. The isolation and treatment of this unusual organism are discussed.  (+info)

Transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans to the nine-banded armadillo. (8/514)

Animal models for Mycobacterium ulcerans infections (Buruli ulcer) include guinea pigs, rats, and mice, but each has limitations in replicating the spectrum of human disease. Here, 19 adult nine-banded armadillos were inoculated intradermally with M. ulcerans. Injection sites were examined and skin samples obtained for histologic and microbiology studies. Necropsies were conducted to assess systemic involvement. In group 1 (n = 4), 2 animals developed progressive skin ulcers with undermined borders at the injection sites within 6-10 weeks. Biopsies showed features similar to human disease including extensive necrosis in the deep dermis and subcutaneous fat, mixed cellular infiltrates, and acid-fast bacilli (AFB). In group 2 (n = 15), 5 animals developed progressive skin ulcers, 3 had evanescent papulo-nodules, 3 died shortly after inoculation of unknown causes, and 4 showed no signs of infection. Lesion samples from 3 animals with progressive ulcers were culture positive for AFB. Our findings indicate that nine-banded armadillos are susceptible to M. ulcerans and may develop cutaneous lesions that closely mimic Buruli ulcer.  (+info)

Other Bacterial Skin Infections What are some other types of bacterial skin infections? The following are other common bacterial skin infections: Infection Symptoms Treatment Erysipelas A skin infection caused by hemolytic streptococci, this condition usually affects the face, arms, legs, or where the skin is cut. Symptoms may include: shiny, red, raised rash small blisters enlarged and tender lymph nodes Treatment may include: penicillin erythromycin Erythrasma A skin infection of the top layers of ski...
The skin is the bodys first barrier against bacteria that cause infections. Even though many bacteria live on the surface of our skin, healthy skin can usually protect us from infection. However, bacterial skin infections can affect a small spot or may spread, affecting a large area. They can range from a treatable infection to a life-threatening skin condition.. Many types of bacterial skin infections require clinical care by a physician or other health care professional. Listed in the directory below are some, for which we have provided a brief overview.. If you cannot find the information in which you are interested, please visit the Dermatology Online Resources page in this website for an Internet address that may contain additional information on that topic.. ...
Bacterial skin infections are some of the most common skin problems that dermatologists encounter, and folliculitis, impetigo, and cellulitis are the most common types of bacterial skin infections
How to Diagnose and Treat Bacterial Skin Infections in Cats. Bacterial skin infections in cats, also known as pyoderma, can be caused by either environmental or internal factors. The staph infection is the most common cause of bacterial...
Bacterial skin infections in cats, also known as pyoderma, can be caused by either environmental or internal factors. The staph infection is the most common cause of bacterial skin infections.http://www.merckvetmanual.com/integumentary-s...
Bacterial skin infection - Other Bacterial Skin Infections - Massachusetts General Hospital.... Bowtrol Probiotic improve gastrointestinal function & intestinal good bacterial microbial balance.
Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections definition, categories, type and other relevant information provided by All Acronyms. ABSSSI stands for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections
Bacterial skin infections are common skin conditions that can range from a minor infection to a life threatening condition if not treated early on. More than 200 species of bacteria live on our skin, many of which are important to our health and survival. However, Staphylococcus aureus and a form of Streptococcus bacteria are among the types that can be harmful if they breach the barriers of the skin. The skin is designed to provide a shield against bacterial infections. But, when there is a break in the skin such as a cut, puncture, or burn, bacteria is easily able to enter the body and cause damage.
Bacterial skin infections, Bacterial dermatologic disorders, Bacterial infections of skin, Systemic bacterial infections with skin manifestations. Authoritative facts from DermNet New Zealand.
Detailed information on bacterial skin infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, scarlet fever, folliculitis, boils, carbuncles, and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome
Detailed information on bacterial skin infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, scarlet fever, folliculitis, boils, carbuncles, and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome
Detailed information on bacterial skin infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, scarlet fever, folliculitis, boils, carbuncles, and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome
Detailed information on bacterial skin infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, scarlet fever, folliculitis, boils, carbuncles, and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome
Detailed information on bacterial skin infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, scarlet fever, folliculitis, boils, carbuncles, and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome
Detailed information on bacterial skin infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, scarlet fever, folliculitis, boils, carbuncles, and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome
Detailed information on the most common bacterial skin infections, including cellulitis, folliculitis, boils, carbuncles, and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome
Detailed information on the most common bacterial skin infections, including cellulitis, folliculitis, boils, carbuncles, and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome
Detailed information on the most common bacterial skin infections, including cellulitis, folliculitis, boils, carbuncles, and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome
In order to know the bacterial skin infection symptoms, you should be aware about the condition of your body. Of course, you need to be cautious and avoid some activities that could give you skin problem.
Ask questions and get answers about Bacterial Skin Infection. Our support group helps people share their own experience. 107 questions, 41 members, 83 news articles.
Reviews and ratings for smz-tmp ds when used in the treatment of bacterial skin infection. Share your experience with this medication by writing a review.
Study Week 1 Bacterial Skin Infections - Diebel flashcards from Alisha Lindberg's University of Minnesota Medical School Duluth class online, or in Brainscape's iPhone or Android app. ✓ Learn faster with spaced repetition.
Among bacterial skin infections, folliculitis is the condition that affects the hair follicles. The infection may occur virtually anywhere on the body, but is more common in areas that are shaved or covered by clothes that are tight and not exposed to air. The folliculitis can also be caused by fungi, viruses or other non infectious agents.
A recent global study finds that increased levels of iron in the blood may lead to a higher risk of getting bacterial skin infections.
Patients with and without diabetes and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections experience similar rates of clinical response when treated with dalbavancin.
Single-Dose Oritavancin Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: SOLO Trial Efficacy by Eron Severity and Management Setting.
An acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infection (ABSSSI) is a bacterial infection of the skin with a lesion size of ≥75 cm2, which is measured by the area of redness, edema, or induration.1. The types of infections that comprise ABSSSIs include cellulitis or erysipelas, major cutaneous abscesses, and wound infections1; these infections can be life-threatening and may require hospitalization and surgery.2 Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA), are the most common bacterial pathogens responsible for ABSSSIs. The less common ABSSSI-causing pathogens include other Streptococcus species, Enterococcus faecalis, and gram-negative bacteria.1 In the United States, more than 2 million individuals are infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria annually, and at least 23,000 die annually as a direct result of these infections.3 Cellulitis, a skin infection that is primarily attributed to streptococci, is most often caused by Streptococcus ...
Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of Ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of staphylococcus aureus bacteremia secondary to acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
Do not ignore bacterial skin infections. Kayal Dermatology offer a range of advanced treatments for sufferers of impetigo and bacterial skin infections
The production of antimicrobial peptides is essential for protection against a wide variety of microbial pathogens and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of several diseases. The mechanisms responsible for expression of antimicrobial peptides are incompletely understood, but a role for vitamin D as a transcriptional inducer of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin has been proposed. We show that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-D3) acts together with parathyroid hormone (PTH), or the shared amino-terminal domain of PTH-related peptide (PTHrP), to synergistically increase cathelicidin and immune defense. Administration of PTH to mouse skin decreased susceptibility to skin infection by group A Streptococcus. Mice on dietary vitamin D3 restriction that responded with an elevation in PTH have an increased risk of infection if they lack 1,25-D3. These results identify PTH/PTHrP as a variable that serves to compensate for inadequate vitamin D during activation of antimicrobial peptide ...
A skin infection caused by a streptococcal or staphylococci infection. Symptoms include pus-filled blisters or pustules. Blisters can range in size from peas to large rings and oozing honey-colored liquid often occurs with yellowish scabs. Impetigo tends to occur on the face, arms or legs and is most common in children; it is very contagious. Symptoms usually do not affect the whole body. ...
A skin infection of the top layers of skin, more prevalent in the tropics. The condition mainly affects adults and persons with diabetes. The condition usually appears in areas on the body where skin touches skin, such as under the breast and in the groin area. Symptoms may include irregular pink patches that turn into brown scales ...
MICs are usually tested and reported in ∝g/ml ranges, as the tests assume that the antimicrobial will be administered systemically. The isolate will be reported as susceptible, intermediate or resistant to the antimicrobials based on accepted breakpoints. These breakpoints are established for specific antimicrobials, organisms and disease conditions; clinicians should not use MICs from epidemiological surveys to determine whether an isolate is susceptible or resistant (Schwarz and others 2010). If the isolate is reported as susceptible then it is likely that systemic treatment will exceed the MIC in the target tissue.. The efficacy of concentration-dependent drugs with postantibiotic effects (PAE) (type 1 drugs, eg, fluoroquinlones and aminoglycosides) depends on the peak concentration in the target tissue exceeding the MIC (McKinnon and Davis 2004). The larger the peak concentration/MIC ratio, the better the efficacy: this ratio is, therefore, an important predictor of antibiotic efficacy ...
BanLab Herbal Products for Dermafex Oil is a Psoriasis,Dermatitis,Scabies,Eczema,Bacterial Infections,Seborrhoea etc. Are some of the serious skin problems product. Free Worlwide Shipping.
My 4 year old yellow lab gets bacterial infections on his skin. Does anyone have any home remedies? The vet put him on medication which gets very expensive. He gets bumps on his belly. He scratches and irritates them and then gets red patches. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Jane Coatsworth examines commonly presented skin conditions, highlighting the hot spots where infection can multiply, and an approach to effective treatment.
Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA is a global healthcare leader working to help the world be well. From developing new therapies that treat and prevent disease to helping people in need, we are committed to improving health and well-being around the world. The Merck Manual was first published in 1899 as a service to the community. The legacy of this great resource continues as the Merck Manual in the US and Canada and the MSD Manual in the remainder of the world. Learn more about our commitment to Global Medical Knowledge.. ...
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Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online. Two separate studies published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine are paving the way for more effective treatments in deadly methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections.. DALBAVANCIN. The first study comes from a team led by Helen Boucher, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine at Tufts Medical Center. That study reports on an antibiotic called dalbavancin (Dalvance) that has shown just as effective as vancomycin, which is the current standard treatment used against serious bacterial skin infections. The results of the study establishes dalbavancin as an effective therapy for MRSA infections.. Acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections, such as MRSA, are among the most common reasons adults are hospitalized in the US today, with associated medical costs skyrocketing for infection treatment. While the number of healthcare-spread MRSA cases has been in decline in recent years, on any given day four ...
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies. ...
LIDに報告されたOASIS-2。P3。 ABSSSIに対して、oral omadacycline vs oral linezolid 7-14 days。 https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(19)30275-0/fulltext
Using oral antibiotics when possible and limiting the durations of vancomycin treatment may decrease V-AKI in patients with ABSSSI.
Global Drugs for Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections (cSSSI) Market Professional Survey Report 2016 is a market research report available at US $3500 for a Single User PDF License from RnR Market Research Reports Library.
Cure: Total resolution of all signs and symptoms of the baseline infection, or improvement of the infection such that no further antimicrobial therapy was necessary.. Failure: Requirement of alternative antimicrobial therapy for primary infection of complicated skin and skin structure infection (cSSSI) due to inadequate response, recurrence, new infection at the same site; treatment-limiting adverse event (AE); requirement for surgery due to failure of study drug; diagnosis of osteomyelitis after Study Day 8; or death caused by cSSSI.. Indeterminate: Inability to determine an outcome ...
Trius Therapeutics, Inc. announced results from its Phase 2 clinical trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of oral torezolid (TR-701) for the treatment of severe complicated skin and skin structure infections caused by gram-positive bacteria, especially drug-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).
Global Drugs for Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections Industry Overview Presented in New Report - Press Release by MarketResearchReports.biz
A Systematic Approach to Diagnosis and Treatment Part I: Cellulitis, Furunculosis, and Distal Finger Infections Authors: Ramin R. Samadi, MD, FACEP, FACP, Chief Medical Officer, Tarrant Acute Care Physicians, PA, Fort Worth, TX; Medical Director, Trinity XpressMed Medical Center, Fort Worth, TX; and Assistant Clinical Professor, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas; Gregory A. Volturo, MD, FACEP, Vice Chairman and Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. Peer Reviewers: Larry B. Mellick, MD, MS, FAAP, FACEP, Vice Chairman for Academic Development and Research, Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta; and Sandra M. Schneider, MD, Professor and Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY. This two-part series discusses bacterial skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). Part 1 will discuss bacterial skin infections that quite ...
A Systematic Approach to Diagnosis and Treatment Part I: Cellulitis, Furunculosis, and Distal Finger Infections Authors: Ramin R. Samadi, MD, FACEP, FACP, Chief Medical Officer, Tarrant Acute Care Physicians, PA, Fort Worth, TX; Medical Director, Trinity XpressMed Medical Center, Fort Worth, TX; and Assistant Clinical Professor, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas; Gregory A. Volturo, MD, FACEP, Vice Chairman and Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. Peer Reviewers: Larry B. Mellick, MD, MS, FAAP, FACEP, Vice Chairman for Academic Development and Research, Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta; and Sandra M. Schneider, MD, Professor and Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY. This two-part series discusses bacterial skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). Part 1 will discuss bacterial skin infections that quite ...
A Systematic Approach to Diagnosis and Treatment Part I: Cellulitis, Furunculosis, and Distal Finger Infections Authors: Ramin R. Samadi, MD, FACEP, FACP, Chief Medical Officer, Tarrant Acute Care Physicians, PA, Fort Worth, TX; Medical Director, Trinity XpressMed Medical Center, Fort Worth, TX; and Assistant Clinical Professor, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas; Gregory A. Volturo, MD, FACEP, Vice Chairman and Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. Peer Reviewers: Larry B. Mellick, MD, MS, FAAP, FACEP, Vice Chairman for Academic Development and Research, Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta; and Sandra M. Schneider, MD, Professor and Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY. This two-part series discusses bacterial skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). Part 1 will discuss bacterial skin infections that quite ...
Cutaneous anthrax is a zoonotic disease caused by the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis, which typically presents with ulcers after contact with animals or animal products, and is rarely seen in high-income countries but is common in those with low- and middle-incomes. Objective. The aim of this study is to show the main clinical characteristics of cutaneous anthrax in endemic areas.
SAN DIEGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Ligand Pharmaceuticals Incorporated (NASDAQ: LGND) partner Melinta Therapeutics, a privately held company developing novel antibiotics to treat serious bacterial infections, announced today that it has submitted New Drug Applications (NDAs) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for approval of IV and oral Baxdela™ (delafloxacin) for the treatment of patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). Baxdela is an investigational anionic fluoroquinolone with a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, including activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Melintas NDAs are based on the results of two Phase 3 studies (NCT01811732 and NCT01984684), in both of which Baxdela met the primary endpoint of non-inferiority to a combination regimen of vancomycin plus aztreonam in reducing lesion size at the primary infection site at 48-to-72 hours. In addition, Baxdela met the primary endpoint, the investigator ...
Folliculitis and other skin infections. Furuncles and carbuncles are the medical names for what you would call a boil. Both are bacterial skin infections, usually caused by S. aureus. A furuncle is a skin infection that involves the hair follicle and surrounding skin. Clusters of furuncles can join together under the surface of the skin, forming a carbuncle. A carbuncle means the infection has spread more deeply in the skin, and scarring is more likely. What is the treatment for folliculitis?. It is important to shave in the direction of hair growth. Sometimes it is worth taking a break from shaving for a few days, to let the folliculitis settle down by itself. Keeping cool and keeping folliculitis exposed to the fresh air will also help. If you have folliculitis you should not share towels, flannels or razors.. Mild cases. Most cases or folliculitis are mild and do not need any treatment. It often clears without any treatment within 7-10 days. It may be helpful to use an emollient (moisturiser) ...
WARNING: SERIOUS ADVERSE REACTIONS INCLUDING TENDINITIS, TENDON RUPTURE, PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY, CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM EFFECTS, AND EXACERBATION OF MYASTHENIA GRAVIS Fluoroquinolones have been associated with disabling and potentially irreversible serious adverse reactions that have occurred together, including: • Tendinitis and tendon rupture • Peripheral neuropathy • Central nervous system effects Discontinue Baxdela immediately and avoid the use of fluoroquinolones, including Baxdela, in patients who experience any of these serious adverse reactions. Fluoroquinolones may exacerbate muscle weakness in patients with myasthenia gravis. Avoid Baxdela in patients with known history of myasthenia gravis. Contraindications Baxdela is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to Baxdela or other fluoroquinolones. Warnings and Precautions Risk of tendinitis, tendon rupture, peripheral neuropathy and central nervous system effects is increased with use of fluoroquinolones. ...
We share deep skin disease experience of patients who have red skin, swollen, tender rash body. Cellulitis is a serious bacterial skin infection. This effect your skin and also affect tissues. This skin disease usually treated with antibiotics. Different infections can be treated with antibiotic Natural Products but best thing is online herbal care products give you Cellulitis Natural Treatment. We share Tislical product for Cellulitis Herbal Treatment on patients demand ...
What is cellulitis? Cellulitis is a common bacterial skin infection. Cellulitis may first appear as a red, swollen area that feels hot and tender to the touch. The redness and swelling often spread rapidly. Cellulitis is usually painful. In most cases, the skin on the lower legs is affected, although the infection can occur anywhere … Continue reading. ...
Our skin is also the first defense against any bacterial infections, and even though many bacteria already live on the surface, only healthy skin can protect us from any infections.. The most serious complication of Impetigo is a severe kidney disease that occurs following a strep infection, but this only occurs in less than 1% of the cases and mostly occurs in children. So lets go over some of the facts about Impetigo…. It Is A Bacterial Infection Of The Surface Of The Skin. Yes, Impetigo happens to be a highly contagious bacterial skin infection which can show up anywhere on your body, but generally attacks your exposed areas. Children tend to get Impetigo on their face, especially around their mouth and nose, and sometimes even their legs or legs.. The bacteria responsible for this infection depends on which form of Impetigo you have. If you have the Non-Bullous form, the bacteria responsible would be either Staphylococcus or Streptococcus. If you should be suffering from the Bullous form ...
Cellulitis Herbal Treatment at home by Herbal Care Products. Cellulitis Symptoms, Skin Causes, Redness, Swelling, warmth, and pain etc. Cure of bacterial Skin Infection Disease is Tislical for patients.
Cellulitis is a bacterial skin infection that can be life-threatening. Find out all the causes of cellulitis and how you can prevent it.
Jan. 2012 Koning S, van der Sande R, Verhagen AP, van Suijlekom-Smit LW, Morris AD, Butler CC, Berger M, van der Wouden JC. Source Department of General Practice, Erasmus Medical Center, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam, Netherlands, 3000 CA. Abstract BACKGROUND: Impetigo is a common, superficial bacterial skin infection, which is most frequently encountered in children. There is no generally agreed standard therapy, and guidelines for treatment differ widely. Treatment options include many different oral and topical antibiotics as well as disinfectants. This is an updated version of the original review published in 2003. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of treatments for impetigo, including non-pharmacological interventions and waiting for natural resolution. SEARCH METHODS: We updated our searches of the following databases to July 2010: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (from 2005), EMBASE (from 2007), and LILACS (from ...
Jan. 2012 Koning S, van der Sande R, Verhagen AP, van Suijlekom-Smit LW, Morris AD, Butler CC, Berger M, van der Wouden JC. Source Department of General Practice, Erasmus Medical Center, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam, Netherlands, 3000 CA. Abstract BACKGROUND: Impetigo is a common, superficial bacterial skin infection, which is most frequently encountered in children. There is no generally agreed standard therapy, and guidelines for treatment differ widely. Treatment options include many different oral and topical antibiotics as well as disinfectants. This is an updated version of the original review published in 2003. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of treatments for impetigo, including non-pharmacological interventions and waiting for natural resolution. SEARCH METHODS: We updated our searches of the following databases to July 2010: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (from 2005), EMBASE (from 2007), and LILACS (from ...
Jan. 2012 Koning S, van der Sande R, Verhagen AP, van Suijlekom-Smit LW, Morris AD, Butler CC, Berger M, van der Wouden JC. Source Department of General Practice, Erasmus Medical Center, PO Box 2040, Rotterdam, Netherlands, 3000 CA. Abstract BACKGROUND: Impetigo is a common, superficial bacterial skin infection, which is most frequently encountered in children. There is no generally agreed standard therapy, and guidelines for treatment differ widely. Treatment options include many different oral and topical antibiotics as well as disinfectants. This is an updated version of the original review published in 2003. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of treatments for impetigo, including non-pharmacological interventions and waiting for natural resolution. SEARCH METHODS: We updated our searches of the following databases to July 2010: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (from 2005), EMBASE (from 2007), and LILACS (from ...
As a result, sores do not heal for months and there is a … View our slideshows to learn more about your health. Heres how to identify and treat dry skin on cats to maximize your pets comfort. Bandages can be readily applied to the head, neck, chest, tail, or lower legs of a cat. Lesions, ulcers and blisters will need to be biopsied for an in depth analysis. Monthly control, though, is not the only option. Generally, a skin ulcer looks like a round open sore in the skin. In many cases, bacterial skin infections develop as a result of another skin problem. Follow-up care will be on a case-by-case basis, and will depend on the disease process, the presence of generalized (systemic) diseases, medications used to treat the skin and body, and the potential side effects that can be expected from the medications. Scratching the head or neck is a common sign of food allergies. Because lice are species-specific, you do not need to worry about getting lice from your cat. (2-15) Cornell University, ...
Have you ever wondered why you were constantly noticing dots on your skin and feeling sick as a child? That is because you have probably been infected by Impetigo. Impetigo is a bacterial skin infection that can appear anywhere on the body but mostly attacks the exposed areas in the body. This skin condition is common
Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment of Bacterial Skin Infections from the Home Version of the Merck Manuals.
What is cellulitis? Learn more about the bacterial skin infection, which can be caused by bacteria living on your skin and can be life-threatening if
Continuing Medical Education. Bacterial skin infections. Cellulitis. Authoritative facts about the skin from the New Zealand Dermatological Society.
Mildison Lipocream is a great treatment for a lot of different inflammatory skin conditions. However, there are people who may not people able to take Mildison Lipocream because of various issues with their medical history, or their response to certain medications. It is important to tell your consultant about all of your medical background when you begin using Mildison Lipocream. Make sure that your doctor or consultant is aware if you are pregnant or breastfeeding too. Although its generally safe to use medications like Mildison Lipocream when youre pregnant, you may find that you need additional guidance or monitoring from your doctor. It is not a good idea to take Mildison Lipocream if you are trying to treat conditions of the skin caused by viral infections, such as chickenpox or shingles. Additionally, you should not use this medication with bacterial skin infections like impetigo. Do not use Mildison Lipocream with thrush or ringworm, acne or acne rosacea. If you are allergic to any of ...
Chickenpox, also known as varicella, is a highly contagious disease caused by the initial infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV).[3] The disease results in a characteristic skin rash that forms small, itchy blisters, which eventually scab over.[1] It usually starts on the chest, back, and face then spreads to the rest of the body.[1] Other symptoms may include fever, tiredness, and headaches.[1] Symptoms usually last five to seven days.[1] Complications may occasionally include pneumonia, inflammation of the brain, and bacterial skin infections.[6] The disease is often more severe in adults than in children.[7] Symptoms begin 10 to 21 days after exposure to the virus.[2] Chickenpox is an airborne disease which spreads easily through the coughs and sneezes of an infected person.[2] It may be spread from one to two days before the rash appears until all lesions have crusted over.[2] It may also spread through contact with the blisters.[2] Those with shingles may spread chickenpox to those who ...
Diethylstilbestrol Phoney oestrogen for good occasionally habituated to to prevent miscarriages Tumours in reproductive tissues (issue of exposed mothers) Oestrogen receptor (ER) Dioxin Manufactured (by- fallout of 2,4,-D defoliant synthesis) Dogged acne (chloracne), foetal abnor- malities, cancer Ah (Aryl hydrocarbon) receptor (transcription lender) Hydrogen cyanide Spurious Respiratory failure Cytochrome c oxidase (mitochondrial protein) Microcystin Cyanobacteria (blue-green algal blooms) Liver wound Protein phosphatases 1 and 2A (set protein bustle before removing phosphate groups) Thevetin A Yellow oleander Cardiac stimulation Na+ , K+ -ATPase (ion emphasize that maintains voltage gradients in fright cells) Strychnine Ignatia beans CNS excitation (convulsions) Glycine receptor (aids chloride ion sign across neuronal membranes) 4. Most bacterial skin infections are caused by Staphylococcus aureus and guild A -hemolytic streptococcus. Forgive your parents, your siblings and relatives |a href=http:/
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It is well known that the vast majority of the bacterial skin infections is caused by Staphylococcus intermedius, and if there is immunosuppression or the infection goes deeper other organisms like small rods add to the problem. This interesting publication describes another and new problem: an infection which is only due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, without S. intermedius. Very interesting!
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If you have acne, a doctor may recommend clindamycin phosphate lotion. This eMedTV resource further discusses how this medication can help treat certain bacterial skin infections and describes some side effects that may occur during treatment.
Scabies affects about 6 in 10 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in Australia at any given time, more than six times the rate seen in the rest of the developed world. It also predisposes affected children to renal and rheumatic heart disease. In an international first, our research will trial a simple and low-cost treatment against paediatric scabies and associated secondary bacterial skin infection, using a topical formulation containing tea tree oil. Should the results be positive, this would provide evidence for a simple, affordable and effective treatment for a population with a significant public health burden. This project builds on the teams previous clinical work in this area. Scabies was listed as a neglected tropical disease by the World Health Organization in 2013. The burden of scabies is quite high in Indigenous children: around 69% of Indigenous children have had scabies diagnosed before their first birthday, with a median of three presentations per child (IQR ...
carbuncle treatment guideline. Superficial Bacterial Skin Infections - Guidelines for .... The idea behind a colon cleanse process is to eliminate the toxins which have built up in your digestive system..
Preliminary testing done at CDC along with clinical diagnosis indicates that an employee who works on the third floor at 30 Rockefeller Plaza has developed cutaneous anthrax, a bacterial infection of the skin. The source of the anthrax exposure is still being investigated but it is possible that it may have occurred when an envelope was opened on September 25, 2001 that may have contained material contaminated with the spore-form of anthrax. The employee developed a skin infection and was seen by an infectious disease specialist who suspected cutaneous anthrax. The patient has been treated with antibiotics and is doing well ...
Diagnosis Code A22.0 information, including descriptions, synonyms, code edits, diagnostic related groups, ICD-9 conversion and references to the diseases index.
canvas is a reference to a ,canvas, element var context = canvas.getContext(2d); context.fillRect(0,0,50,50); canvas.setAttribute(width, 300); // clears the canvas context.fillRect(0,100,50,50); canvas.width = canvas.width; // clears the canvas context.fillRect(100,0,50,50); // only this square ...
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There were more than 4.8 million hospital admissions of adults with ABSSSI from 2005 through 2011, which included patients with cellulitis, erysipelas, wound infection, and major cutaneous abscess. In fact, hospital admissions for ABSSSI significantly increased by 17.3 percent during this timeframe. The majority of all skin and soft tissue infections in hospitalized patients are caused by streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus, and approximately 59 percent of these S. aureus infections in the U.S. are estimated to be caused by MRSA. Early and effective treatment of ABSSSI is critical to optimize patient recovery and for certain patients may also help to avoid potentially lengthy and costly hospital stays.. About Cardiome Pharma Corp.. Cardiome Pharma Corp. is a revenue-generating, specialty pharmaceutical company focused on providing innovative, high-quality brands that meet the needs of acute care physicians and patients. With a commercial presence and distribution network covering over 60 ...
Fortum Injection is used for lower respiratory tract infections, bacterial infections, skin and skin-structure infections, urinary tract infections, septicemia, bone and joint infections and other conditions. Fortum Injection contains the following active ingredients: Ceftazidime.
It was a remarkable day yesterday. In spite of new guidance (still flawed in my view) on clinical trial design in pneumonia and in skin infections, the FDA review of the data developed under the old guidelines by Cerexa/Forest for ceftaroline was balanced and informative. The incredibly tight data and very well designed studies saved the day. Not only did the ceftaroline data, with studies powered for a 10% NI margin, come in at 4 or 5% overall, but almost all of the subgroup analyses carried out by both the sponsor and the FDA (and some of these subgroups were small!!) came in with NI margins under 10% compared to either ceftriaxone in the pneumonia studies or vancomycin plus aztreonam in the skin infection studies. But in addition, the spectacular data allowed the FDA to accept studies carried out under an old paradigm and to use a post-hoc approach to examine putative new endpoints in an exploratory way. I discussed the idea to use this approach with the FDA back in April. ...
Pyoderma is described as a bacterial skin disease which is derived from the Greek word pyon that means pus whereas Derma means the outer skin of the body. This
/CNW/ - Debiopharm International SA (Debiopharm - http://www.debiopharm.com), part of Debiopharm Group™, a Swiss-based global biopharmaceutical company, today...
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On 2/3/10 1:01 PM, Tim Hutt wrote: , Good point, it would be better to call it onresize for consistency. , So my revised suggestion is: , , 1. Support more length specifiers for the width and height of a , canvas(%, em, etc.). , 2. Add an onresize event to the canvas tag. When the canvas is resized , it is reset and this event is fired. , 3. CSS size specifiers resize rather than scale the canvas. I.e. it , should always be that 1 unit = 1 pixel initially. #3 would break existing canvas content. #2 would work if all elements supported onresize (as has been proposed), right? Given that, a resize handler could simply reset the canvas width/height attrs if desired (thereby achieving #1 and the clearing aspect of #2), no? Hence my question: what use cases here would not be covered simply by having a general resize event on all elements? -Boris ...
PS - Ingenieros. Programación y realización del Taller de Canvas Entrega de Canvas de los colaboradores Programar junta con jefe directo a cada uno de los puestos para presentar y discutir su Canvas Programar segunda cita con proveedores y clientes internos de cada puesto para presentar su Canvas D.O. recolecta todos los Canvas y los integra a los perfiles de puesto de cada empresa ETAPA 1 ETAPA 3 ETAPA 2 2002 March Colaboradores generan Canvas de su puesto Presentar qué es y cómo hacer un ...
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An acute bacterial infection caused by ingestion of BACILLUS organisms. Carnivores may become infected from ingestion of infected carcasses. It is transmitted to humans by contact with infected animals or contaminated animal products. The most common form in humans is cutaneous anthrax.. ...
My mother did a crayon painting on canvas (24 X 36)years ago. She just moved to a smaller place and gave it to a friend. She used shaved crayons, covered the areas of the canvas with wax paper and used a warm iron. I wish I had a picture to show you; it looked like a crystal cave, full of beautiful colored patterns. I was in the process of shaving some crayons when I decided to look up this form of art on the web. Im glad to see it is still done. Nice work Jenna and Matthew!I really like the fact that you left some of the white canvas show. I bet a black gessoed canvas would not look too bad either. I am going to Walmart today and Im going to buy a wand type mini iron; the head is triangular so it might work well on a smaller canvas. I will let you know the results. The skys the limit! Diane from Kamloops, BC Canada. ReplyDelete ...
My mother did a crayon painting on canvas (24 X 36)years ago. She just moved to a smaller place and gave it to a friend. She used shaved crayons, covered the areas of the canvas with wax paper and used a warm iron. I wish I had a picture to show you; it looked like a crystal cave, full of beautiful colored patterns. I was in the process of shaving some crayons when I decided to look up this form of art on the web. Im glad to see it is still done. Nice work Jenna and Matthew!I really like the fact that you left some of the white canvas show. I bet a black gessoed canvas would not look too bad either. I am going to Walmart today and Im going to buy a wand type mini iron; the head is triangular so it might work well on a smaller canvas. I will let you know the results. The skys the limit! Diane from Kamloops, BC Canada. ReplyDelete ...
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Supports healthy skin for animals with conditions responsive to miconazole and/or chlorhexidineHelps treat fungal and bacterial skin infectionsFor cats, dogs, and horses
Dr. Ingram responded: Clip the hairs. Clip the hairs above the bumps with scissors(not shave) and wash the area with phisoderm or hibiclens to keep the bacterial skin count down to a minimum. The hair |a href=/topics/follicle track_data={
Hnilica, Keith A.; Patterson, Adam P. (August 2016). "Chapter 3. Bacterial skin diseases. Pyotraumatic dermatitis". Small ... The main reasons are to prevent the animal from ingesting any of the medicine being applied on the skin, or to prevent it from ... In addition to preventing the animal from harming themselves or ingesting medicine being applied on their skins, Elizabethan ...
Hnilica, Keith A.; Patterson, Adam P. (2016). "Chapter 3. Bacterial skin diseases. Pyotraumatic dermatitis". Small Animal ... allergic skin diseases, diseases of the anal sacs, inflammation of the ear canal, foreign bodies or irritants within the coat, ... Pyotraumatic dermatitis". Skin Diseases of the Dog and Cat a Colour Handbook (2nd ed.). London: CRC Press. p. 18. ISBN 978-1- ... The affected skin weeps (that is, it exudes serum), and this moist surface layer of skin can become colonized by bacteria, ...
Bacterial skin disease. Gram +ve. Firmicutes. *Staphylococcus *Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome. *Impetigo ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, (CDC) (10 August 2012). "Update to CDC's Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment ... "Ocular manifestations of infectious skin diseases". Clinics in Dermatology. 34 (2): 124-8. doi:10.1016/j.clindermatol.2015.11. ... Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). male. Epididymitis. Prostatitis. either. Proctitis. Urethritis/Non-gonococcal urethritis ( ...
2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0.. ... Gram-positive bacterial infection: Actinobacteria (primarily A00-A79, 001-041, 080-109) ... this is a skin condition that results from hematogenous dissemination of mycobacteria from a primary focus, resulting in firm, ...
2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 978-0-7216-2921-6. "botryomycosis" at ... Botryomycosis; is a rare chronic granulomatous bacterial infection that affects the skin, and sometimes the viscera. ... The disease was originally discovered by Otto Bollinger (1843-1909) in 1870, and its name was coined by Sebastiano Rivolta ( ... mykes = fungus). In 1919 the bacterial origin of the infection was discovered. James, William D.; Berger, Timothy G.; et al. ( ...
Miller, William H., Jr.; Griffin, Craig E.; Campbell, Karen L. (2013). "Chapter 18: Miscellaneous skin diseases. Juvenille ... If there is evidence of secondary bacterial infection, treatment with antibiotics is required. ... These pustules release a purulent discharge, causing a crust to form on the skin. There is also lymphadenopathy (swelling of ... Juvenile cellulitis, also known as puppy strangles or juvenile pyoderma, is an uncommon disease of dogs. Symptoms include ...
Ihrke PJ (1996). Bacterial skin disease in the dog : a guide to canine pyoderma. Bayer AG, Business Group Animal Health. ISBN 1 ... "Surveillance of Healthy Cats and Cats with Inflammatory Skin Disease for Colonization of the Skin by Methicillin‐resistant ... Dogs are most commonly affected by this skin infection which may be caused by a bacterial infection or sometimes, but less ... Following diagnosis, bacterial identification is required and susceptibility testing on the bacteria is warranted to guide the ...
Skin disease[edit]. An inability to correctly maintain the skin barrier function due to the dysregulation of epidermal ... Stratum corneum protects the internal structures of the body from external injury and bacterial invasion. ... Cells of the stratum corneum contain a dense network of keratin, a protein that helps keep the skin hydrated by preventing ... In addition, this layer is responsible for the "spring back" or stretchy properties of skin. A weak glutenous protein bond ...
Crusts are dried sebum, pus, or blood usually mixed with epithelial and sometimes bacterial debris. Skin lesion Skin disease ... List of skin diseases James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005) Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology ...
2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 978-0-7216-2921-6. "Mycobacterium kansasii ... Type strain of Mycobacterium kansasii at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase. ... Tap water is believed[by whom?] to be the major reservoir associated with human disease. Biosafety level 2 is indicated. First ... The genus includes species known to cause serious diseases in mammals, including tuberculosis and leprosy, but this species is ...
2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. Lotti T, Ghersetich I, ... Cutaneous vasculitis can have various causes including but not limited to medications, bacterial and viral infections or ... Small Vessel Vasculitis of the Skin, Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America, 2015-02-01, Volume 41, Issue 1, Pages 21-32 ... 1950-, James, William D. (William Daniel),. Andrews' diseases of the skin : clinical dermatology. Berger, Timothy G.,, Elston, ...
... and bacterial skin infections.[6] The disease is often more severe in adults than in children.[7] Symptoms begin 10 to 21 days ... Secondary bacterial infection of skin lesions, manifesting as impetigo, cellulitis, and erysipelas, is the most common ... Infectious skin disease: Viral cutaneous conditions, including viral exanthema (B00-B09, 050-059) ... Skin disorders: (cicatricial) skin lesions, hypopigmentation. Infection late in gestation or immediately following birth is ...
... is a skin condition that may be caused by medications, bacterial toxins, or viral infections. Necrolytic ... Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. (10th ed.). Saunders. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. v t e. ...
This includes respiratory tract infections, skin infections, chlamydia infections, pelvic inflammatory disease, and syphilis. ... By binding to the 50s subunit of the bacterial rRNA complex, protein synthesis and subsequent structure and function processes ... Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines 2006 Archived 2010-02-11 at the Wayback Machine Centers for Disease Control ... It is in the macrolide family of antibiotics and works by decreasing bacterial protein production. Erythromycin was first ...
Bacterial leptospirosis and Morbillivirus have been recorded. Polar bears sometimes have problems with various skin diseases ... The hollow guard hairs of a polar bear coat were once thought to act as fiber-optic tubes to conduct light to its black skin, ... After killing the animal, its head and skin were removed and cleaned and brought into the home, and a feast was held in the ... Disease-causing bacteria and parasites would flourish more readily in a warmer climate. Problematic interactions between polar ...
This includes strep throat, pneumonia, skin infections, H. pylori infection, and Lyme disease, among others. Clarithromycin can ... as a second line agent in Lyme disease and toxoplasmosis. It may also be used to prevent bacterial endocarditis in those who ... Clarithromycin, sold under the brand name Biaxin among others, is an antibiotic used to treat various bacterial infections. ... Clarithromycin is primarily used to treat a number of bacterial infections including pneumonia, Helicobacter pylori, and as an ...
... means any skin disease that is pyogenic (has pus). These include superficial bacterial infections such as impetigo, ... Pyoderma affects more than 111 million children worldwide, making it one of the three most common skin disorders in children ... List of cutaneous conditions Andrews RM, McCarthy J, Carapetis JR, Currie BJ (December 2009). "Skin disorders, including ...
Dental disease can also lead to excessive drooling, and the skin around the mouth can become infected, leading to more odor ... This condition, termed hyperhidrosis, can encourage yeast infection or bacterial skin infection and these micro-organisms ... Skin diseases can cause a dog to have increased or abnormal odor. Allergy can cause increased production of apocrine sweat, ... Dogs may also develop unnatural odors as a result of skin disease or other disorders or may become contaminated with odors from ...
Some of these diseases are associated with a common skin condition called psoriasis or chronic inflammatory bowel disorders ( ... If the immune system recognizes the peptides as foreign (such as viral or bacterial peptides), it responds by destroying the ... Cooke GS, Hill AV (December 2001). "Genetics of susceptibility to human infectious disease". Nature Reviews. Genetics. 2 (12): ... Individuals who have HLA-B*1502 are more likely to experience a severe skin disorder called Stevens-Johnson syndrome in ...
2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. Rapini, Ronald P.; Bolognia ... and seven other antimicrobial agents against aerobic and anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria isolated from bacterial skin ...
... of the epidermis may result from disease or injury of the skin. For example, once the rash of measles fades, there ... Toxic shock syndrome, a potentially fatal immune system reaction to a bacterial infection such as Staphylococcus aureus, can ... Other serious skin diseases involving extreme desquamation include Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN ... Desquamation, commonly called skin peeling, is the shedding of the outermost membrane or layer of a tissue, such as the skin. ...
... the turnip helps cure skin diseases, digestive ailments, tuberculosis and respiratory disease with an anti-bacterial effect. ...
Erythema Diascopy Erythema multiforme List of cutaneous conditions Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. (10th ... The causes can include bacterial, viral or chemical products, such as antibiotics - specifically penicillins or cephalosporins ... This means that the body is sensitive to something that causes the skin and mucous membranes to react. The more common mild ... It consists of a skin rash that involve no more than one mucosal surface. The sudden onset will progress rapidly as symmetrical ...
Irvine AD, McLean WH, Leung DY (October 2011). "Filaggrin mutations associated with skin and allergic diseases". The New ... "The Pathogenetic Effect of Natural and Bacterial Toxins on Atopic Dermatitis". Toxins. 9 (1): 3. doi:10.3390/toxins9010003. PMC ... Urocanic acid is found predominantly in the stratum corneum of the skin and it is likely that most of it is derived from ... An important role for the onset of atopic dermatitis and asthma has been attributed to filaggrin, a skin precursor of urocanic ...
An associated skin disease favors recurrence. This may be attributed to the persistent colonization of abnormal skin with S. ... Bacterial infections involving the skin". Fitzpatrick's Color Atlas & Synopsis of Clinical Dermatology (5th ed.). McGraw-Hill. ... Such diseases include food poisoning, septic shock, toxic shock syndrome, and scalded skin syndrome. Almost any organ system ... Naturally the cause is bacteria such as staphylococci that are present on the skin. Bacterial colonisation begins in the hair ...
... there are several skin diseases that can cause an intertrigo to develop, such as dermatitis or inverse psoriasis. Bacterial ... Diaper rash List of skin diseases Kalra, MG; Higgins, KE; Kinney, BS (April 2014). "Intertrigo and secondary skin infections". ... Skin affected by intertrigo is more prone to infection than intact skin. The term "intertrigo" commonly refers to a secondary ... An intertrigo usually develops from the chafing of warm, moist skin in the areas of the inner thighs and genitalia, the armpits ...
"Handout on Health: Atopic Dermatitis (A type of eczema)". National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases ... Antibiotics (either by mouth or topically) may be needed if a bacterial infection develops. Dietary changes are only needed if ... Irvine AD, McLean WH, Leung DY (October 2011). "Filaggrin mutations associated with skin and allergic diseases". The New ... "Skin colonization of Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis patients seen at the National Skin Centre, Singapore". ...
For example, porphyrins-associated with some skin diseases-will fluoresce pink. Though the technique for producing a source of ... Bacterial infectionsCorynebacterium minutissimum is coral red Pseudomonas is yellow-green Propionibacterium acnes, a bacterium ... damage to the skin from prolonged exposure to sunlight), toughening of the skin, suppression of the immune system, cataract ... A vitiligo patient's skin will appear yellow-green or blue under the Wood's lamp.[citation needed] Its use in detecting ...
Thus, bacterial growth is limited through folate deficiency. The potassium salt is used as a drug against fibrotic skin ... disorders, such as Peyronie's disease, under the trade name Potaba. PABA is also occasionally used in pill form by sufferers of ... premature hardening of the skin), patchy pigment loss in the skin (vitiligo), and premature grey hair. PABA finds use mainly in ... In addition, it was shown to protect against skin tumors in rodents. Animal and in vitro studies in the early 1980s suggested ...
Firmicutes (low-G+C) Infectious diseases. *Bacterial diseases: G+ *primarily A00-A79, 001-041, 080-109 ... Diseases and symptoms[edit]. Pneumonia is the most common of the S. pneumoniae diseases which include symptoms such as fever ... 16: Pneumococcal Disease". In Atkinson W; Wolfe S; Hamborsky J. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases ( ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.. *^ "Pneumococcal vaccines WHO position paper--2012" (PDF). Wkly Epidemiol Rec. 87 ...
Infectious diseasesEdit. Imaging infections with molecular imaging technologies can improve diagnosis and treatment follow-up. ... Three different PET contrast agents have been developed to image bacterial infections in vivo: [18F]maltose,[19] [18F] ... directly under the skin). A clear disadvantage is that PET provides no timing information about muscle activation because it ... Cardiology, atherosclerosis and vascular disease study: In clinical cardiology, FDG-PET can identify so-called "hibernating ...
having had brief skin contact with a person showing symptoms of Ebola disease when the person was believed to be not very ... balance as well as treating any bacterial infections that may develop.[33] Dialysis may be needed for kidney failure, and ... "Ebola Virus Disease". SRHD. Retrieved 15 September 2020.. *^ a b c d "Q&A on Transmission, Ebola". Centers for Disease Control ... "About Ebola Virus Disease". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Archived from the original on 16 October 2014. ...
... , also known as acne vulgaris, is a long-term skin disease that occurs when dead skin cells and oil from the skin clog hair ... beginning with blockage of the skin follicle by excessive dead skin cells, followed by bacterial invasion of the hair follicle ... This article is about a skin disease common during adolescence. For other acneiform skin diseases, see Acne (disambiguation). ... Acne vulgaris is a chronic skin disease of the pilosebaceous unit and develops due to blockages in the skin's hair follicles. ...
2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. Philadelphia: Saunders Elsevier. p. 308. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. OCLC ... "Medically important bacterial-fungal interactions." Nature Reviews Microbiology 8.5 (2010): 340-349. Kourkoumpetis, ... It is often described as being "a disease of the diseased", occurring in the very young, the very old, or the very sick. ... This refers to a group of rare syndromes characterized by chronic candidal lesions on the skin, in the mouth and on other ...
B. burgdorferi can spread throughout the body during the course of the disease, and has been found in the skin, heart, joints, ... Dotters-Katz, S; Kuller, J; Heine, P (September 2013). "Arthropod-Borne Bacterial Diseases in Pregnancy". Obstetrical & ... "Lyme disease rashes and look-alikes". Lyme Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 21 December 2018. Archived from ... "Lyme Disease Data and surveillance". Lyme Disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 5 February 2019. Archived from ...
Common sites of bacterial colonization include the nasal passage, groin, oral cavity and skin.[1] ... "Antifungal Resistance , Fungal Diseases , CDC". www.cdc.gov. 25 January 2019. Retrieved 10 April 2019.. ... Decolonization, also bacterial decolonization, is a medical intervention that attempts to rid a patient of an antimicrobial ...
"OIE Listed Diseases and Other Diseases of Importance" (PDF). Terrestrial Manual. 2012. Archived from the original (PDF) on ... Abel-Santos, E (editor) (2012). Bacterial Spores: Current Research and Applications. Caister Academic Press. ISBN 978-1-908230- ... Examples of bacteria having terminal endospores include Clostridium tetani, the pathogen that causes the disease tetanus. ... Further information: Bacterial morphological plasticity. Under conditions of starvation, especially the lack of carbon and ...
... while archaeal flagella appear to have evolved from bacterial type IV pili.[106] In contrast to the bacterial flagellum, which ... They are also part of the human microbiota, found in the colon, oral cavity, and skin.[7] Archaea are particularly numerous in ... from the natural environment to infectious diseases". Nature Reviews Microbiology. 2 (2): 95-108. doi:10.1038/nrmicro821. PMID ... Middle, a bacterial or eukaryotic phospholipid: 5, fatty acid chains; 6, ester linkages; 7, D-glycerol moiety; 8, phosphate ...
There are about ten times as many bacterial cells as human cells in each of our bodies. Some bacteria can cause diseases, but ... but many live inside or on the skin of other organisms, including humans. ... Bacterial evolution. Microbiological reviews 51 (2): 221-71. [1]. *↑ Holland L. (1990). "Woese, Carl in the forefront of ... Bacterial cells do not have a nucleus, and most have no organelles with membranes around them. Most have a cell wall. They do ...
... bacterial tree disease called Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease.[39] ... The colourful outer skin of some citrus fruits, known as zest, is used as a flavouring in cooking; the white inner portion of ... Deficiency diseases[edit]. Citrus plants can also develop a deficiency condition called chlorosis, characterized by yellowing ... Meyer lemons can be eaten out of hand with the fragrant skin; they are both sweet and sour. Lemonade or limeade are popular ...
Such injury could be the result of infection, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, or other diseases.[1][4] ... Gibbons, Ann (2 April 2015) How Europeans evolved white skin Archived 2015-04-14 at the Wayback Machine Science, Retrieved 13 ... Irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, milk allergy[1]. Treatment. Decreasing lactose in the ... GSD type III (Cori's disease, debranching enzyme deficiency). *GSD type VI (Hers' disease, liver glycogen phosphorylase ...
... it aims at preventing bacterial contamination of the prosthesis by completely eliminating contact of the device with the skin.[ ... Loss of the phallus from either disease or blood supply issues. *Cephalic vein thrombosis (blood clot) ... Traditional strategies to combat infections aim at decreasing skin colony count such as scrubbing skin preparation with alcohol ... This phalloplasty procedure involves the insertion of a subcutaneous soft silicone implant under the penile skin. [7][8][9][10] ...
Bacterial diseases. *Bacterium-related cutaneous conditions. *Syndromes caused by microbes. Hidden categories: *CS1: Julian- ... disease,[4] Filatov's disease, or fourth disease. Although Dukes identified it as a separate entity, it is thought not to be ... similar to the pathophysiology of the autoimmune skin disease, pemphigus vulgaris. Diagnosis[edit]. SSSS is a clinical ... Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) is a dermatological condition caused by Staphylococcus aureus. ...
COPD develops as a significant and chronic inflammatory response to inhaled irritants.[9] Chronic bacterial infections may also ... due to the often bluish color of the skin and lips from low oxygen levels and their swollen ankles.[194][195] This terminology ... Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Other names. Chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD), chronic obstructive airway disease ... Most cases of COPD are a mixture of both diseases.. *^ "Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)". WHO. Retrieved 5 June ...
2008) Agricultural lung diseases. Environ Health Perspect 108:705-12. Hlastala MP, Ralph DD, Babb AL, Influence of gas physical ... Exposure may also occur through skin or eye contact or by ingesting chlorine-contaminated food or water. Chlorine is a strong ... Those with significant lower airway involvement may develop bacterial infection. Importantly, victims suffering body surface ... Secondary effects of sulfur mustard exposure lead to chronic lung diseases such as chronic bronchitis. A common exposure ...
2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. p. 269. ISBN 0-7216-2921-0.. ... Gas gangrene (also known as clostridial myonecrosis[1] and myonecrosis[2]) is a bacterial infection that produces gas in ... Pailler JL, Labeeu F (1986). "[Gas gangrene: a military disease?]". Acta Chir. Belg. (in French). 86 (2): 63-71. PMID 3716723. ... The combination of bacterial load and ability to multiply is the basis for the microbes' ability to cause massive infection. ...
There are about 1:1 bacterial cells as human cells in each of our bodies[2][3]. Some bacteria can cause diseases, but others ... but many live inside or on the skin of other organisms, including humans. ... Bacteria have one bacterial chromosome.[5] Shape[change , change source]. Bacteria vary widely in size and shape, but in ... Bacterial evolution. Microbiological reviews 51 (2): 221-71. [1] *↑ Holland L. (1990). "Woese, Carl in the forefront of ...
Limited diseaseEdit. In generalised non-organ-threatening disease, remission can be achieved with a combination of methotrexate ... Skin: subcutaneous nodules (granulomas) on the elbow, purpura, various others (see cutaneous vasculitis) ... Bacterial colonization with Staphylococcus aureus has been hypothesized as an initiating factor of the autoimmunity seen in ... An early name for the disease was pathergic granulomatosis.[28] The disease is still sometimes confused with lethal midline ...
Preputioplasty, in which a limited dorsal slit with transverse closure is made along the constricting band of skin,[36] can be ... human papillomavirus and smoking in in situ and invasive disease". Int. J. Cancer. 116 (4): 606-616. doi:10.1002/ijc.21009. ... Chronic bacterial prostatitis. *Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. *Asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis ... Buechner SA (September 2002). "Common skin disorders of the penis". BJU Int. 90 (5): 498-506. doi:10.1046/j.1464-410X. ...
It is used to treat harlequin-type ichthyosis, a usually lethal skin disease, and lamellar ichthyosis. It is a retinoid, ... bacterial infection Blood and lymphatic system *Anemia. *Increased red blood cell sedimentation rate ... Skin[edit]. The most common side effects are mucocutaneous: dry lips, skin and nose. Other common mucocutaneous side effects ... The drug is associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-ulcerative colitis, but not Crohn's disease.[51] There are also ...
Old skin cells drop off, and this helps remove bacteria that have stuck to the skin.[4] ... Stvrtinová, Viera; Ján Jakubovský and Ivan Hulín (1995). Inflammation and fever; from Pathophysiology: principles of disease. ... The binding of bacterial molecules to receptors on the surface of a macrophage triggers it to engulf and destroy the bacteria. ... The innate immune system includes the skin. The outer layers of the skin are called "epithelial". Epithelial cells form a waxy ...
Open air defecation leads to the spread of disease and malnutrition through parasitic and bacterial infections. Several million ... intestinal worms and eye and skin infections caused by poor hygiene and unsafe drinking water. Access to protected sources of ... Diarrheal diseases are the primary causes of early childhood mortality. These diseases can be attributed to poor sanitation and ... Diseases such as dengue fever, hepatitis, tuberculosis, malaria and pneumonia continue to plague India due to increased ...
... which can mean any disease causing scaly skin) in the Septuagint. While the condition may sometimes be a symptom of the disease ... intended to mitigate bacterial resistance.[5] The first trials of combined treatment were carried out in Malta in the 1970s. ... The word leprosy comes from ancient Greek Λέπρα [léprā], "a disease that makes the skin scaly", in turn, a nominal derivation ... Likewise, the disfiguring skin disease favus is caused by Trichophyton schoenleinii, which appears to have been common ...
Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Caused by a High Titer Anti-Group B IgG From a Group A Mother. Pediatric Blood & Cancer 2005; ... Xie J, Qureshi AA, Li Y, Han J, (2010). ABO Blood Group and Incidence of Skin Cancer. PLoS ONE 5(8): e11972. doi,10.1371/ ... "Bacterial glycosidases for the production of universal red blood cells". Nat Biotechnol 25 (4): 454-64. doi:10.1038/nbt1298 ... Significant ABO Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn in a Group B Infant with a Group A2 Mother. Immunohematology 2000; 16(3):105-8 ...
Infectious diseases. *Bacterial disease: Proteobacterial G− *primarily A00-A79, 001-041, 080-109 ... "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 17 April 2015. Archived from the original on 22 February 2016. Retrieved 9 ... A 2010 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases ... Bryan, Charles S. (2002). Infectious diseases in primary care. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders. p. 319. ISBN 978-0-7216-9056-8. . ...
Huntington's disease,[126] Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease,[128] and motor neuron diseases, polyglutamine (PolyQ) diseases, muscular ... For example, studies in mice bearing human skin grafts found a reduction in the size of lesions from psoriasis after treatment ... Some prokaryotes, including many archaea and the bacterial order Actinomycetales, also share homologs of the 20S proteasome, ... including Alzheimer's disease,[125] Parkinson's disease[126] and Pick's disease,[127] amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS),[127] ...
Skin. Sweat, desquamation, flushing,[2] organic acids[2] Gastrointestinal tract. Peristalsis, gastric acid, bile acids, ... When host cells die, either by programmed cell death (also called apoptosis) or by cell injury due to a bacterial or viral ... "Pathophysiology: Principles of Disease. Computing Centre, Slovak Academy of Sciences: Academic Electronic Press. Archived from ... redness of the skin, due to locally increased blood circulation;. *heat, either increased local temperature, such as a warm ...
James WD, Elston D, Berger TG (2011). 》Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology》 11판. London: Saunders/ Elsevier. ... Fisher JF, Meroueh SO, Mobashery S (February 2005). "Bacterial resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics: compelling opportunism, ... "Learning About Tay-Sachs Disease". U.S. National Human Genome Research Institute. 2015년 3월 1일에 확인함.. ... Genes and Disease [Internet]》. Bethesda (MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US). 1998-2015.. ...
There have been many outbreaks of disease from bacterial contamination, often by salmonella, listeria, and Escherichia coli, of ... "And as in some great threshing-floor go leaping From a broad pan the black-skinned beans or peas." (Iliad xiii, 589). ... "European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Retrieved 18 November 2017.. *^ Harrison, DC; Mellanby, E (October 1939). " ... Bacterial infection from bean sprouts. It is common to make beansprouts by letting some types of bean, often mung beans, ...
Which one of the following causes a disease characterized by a red rash? 27) ______ A) Coccidioides B) Streptococcus C) ... Which one of the following causes a disease characterized by the catarrhal, paroxysmal, and convalescent stages? 17) ______ A) ... Which of the following diseases is not correctly matched to its reservoir? 15) ______ A) Tuberculosis  cattle B) ... Which of the following diseases has a cutaneous form, especially in individuals over 30 years of age? 10) ______ A) ...
Although the skin normally provides a barrier to infection, when ... Microbial diseases of the skin are usually transmitted by ... Diseases Cardiovascular Lymphatic Systems *Protozoal and Parasitic Diseases. *Bacterial Diseases of the Cardiovascular and ... Diseases of the eye are considered with the skin diseases because both occur at the surface of the body. ... Microbial diseases of the skin are usually transmitted by contact with an infected individual. Although the skin normally ...
Skin flukes (Gyrodactylus ) and gill flukes (Dactylogyrus ) and fish health. Skin and gill flukes are common fish parasites and ... The connection between flukes and bacterial fish diseases such as ulcers is well established. Although Gyrodactylus and ... Fin rot and peduncle disease a common fish disease problem Fish fungus - Saprolegnia cotton wool fungus >> ... Other signs may be skin cloudiness resulting from excess mucus production, skin hyperplasia, or focal reddening. A definite ...
Bacterial Skin Diseases analysis and current trends. Bacterial Skin Diseases Overview Bacterial Skin Diseases Pipeline Insight ... A Detailed Picture Of The Bacterial Skin Diseases Pipeline Landscape Is Provided, Which Includes The Diseas. ... 2020 has complete details about market of Bacterial Skin Diseases industry, ... Outlays Comprehensive Insights Of Present Clinical Development Scenario And Growth Prospects Across The Bacterial Skin Diseases ...
In previous studies skin disease or skin infections were reported as risk factor. We hypothesize that children with sepsis or ... If our hypothesis is true the GP could reduce the risk of sepsis or bacteraemia by managing skin diseases appropriately. We ... There is evidence that children who were admitted due to sepsis or bacteraemia consulted the GP more often for skin diseases ... Although cases consulted the GP more often with skin diseases than their controls, the probability of a GP consultation for ...
"Skin Diseases, Bacterial" by people in this website by year, and whether "Skin Diseases, Bacterial" was a major or minor topic ... "Skin Diseases, Bacterial" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical ... Skin Diseases, Bacterial*Skin Diseases, Bacterial. *Bacterial Skin Diseases. *Bacterial Skin Disease ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Skin Diseases, Bacterial" by people in Profiles. ...
Close more info about Vancomycin for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection ... Close more info about Vancomycin for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection ... Close more info about Vancomycin for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection ... Close more info about Vancomycin for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection ...
... your cats purr-fect coat may be hiding skin allergies or diseases that may be more irritating to your cat than you are. Cats, ... Bacterial Skin Issues. Bacterial skin infections may present in different ways, but symptoms include itchiness, red lesions, ... Cat Skin Disease Symptoms. Besides allergies, cats can suffer from a variety of skin diseases. This includes feline acne, ... bacterial or yeast infections, ringworm and other fungal skin disease, alopecia or hair loss, and dry skin or dermatitis. Most ...
Skin and connective tissue diseases , Skin diseases - Bacterial ... Skin diseases, Bacterial H96. Skin diseases, Bacterial H384. ... Skin diseases, Bacterial H96 Predesigned 96-well panel for use with SYBR® Green ... Skin diseases, Bacterial H384 Predesigned 384-well panel for use with SYBR® Green ... Skin diseases, Bacterial M96 Predesigned 96-well panel for use with SYBR® Green ...
Possible causes include Skin Infection. Check the full list of possible causes and conditions now! Talk to our Chatbot to ... Bacterial Skin Infections Acne isnt the only bacterial skin infection featured in this collection. Bacterial skin diseases ... v t e Diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue ( integumentary system ) ( L, 680-709 ) Infections Bacterial skin disease ... Scabies is a skin disease that, through secondary bacterial skin infection (impetigo), can lead to serious complications such ...
We obtained isolates through agar culture from skin swabs of wild frogs, and identified bacterial isolates by comparing 16S ... We obtained isolates through agar culture from skin swabs of wild frogs, and identified bacterial isolates by comparing 16S ... To understand the capacity of skin bacteria to protect amphibian hosts from the fungal disease chytridiomycosis caused by ... To understand the capacity of skin bacteria to protect amphibian hosts from the fungal disease chytridiomycosis caused by ...
Bacterial Skin Disease & Increased Libido Symptom Checker: Possible causes include Menopause & Acne Vulgaris & HAIR-AN Syndrome ... 63 Possible Causes for Bacterial Skin Disease, Increased Libido * Menopause Chronic skin disease that affects mainly the ... Differential diagnoses, possible causes and diseases for Bacterial Skin Disease, Increased Libido listed by probability for ... The most common symptoms are skin disease and susceptibility to certain bacterial infections that can be severe and affect ...
... a bacterial skin condition, in the eMedicineHealth Image Collection Gallery. ... Acne appears when oil and dead skin cells clog up hair follicles, leading to whiteheads, blackheads, and other blemishes. ... Acne medications can help clear up the unwanted skin condition. Over-the-counter treatments containing benzoyl peroxide or ...
... including any illnesses and diseases cured by ciprofloxacin. This list of sicknesses, medical conditions, and chronic or ... ... Bacterial skin disease 5 Food poisoning Nausea, Anorexia, Fatigue 6 Bacteroides infections ... Filed Under: Diseases / Medical Conditions ScienceDiseases prev list more popular lists next list ... to Work With The 15+ Best Anime About Prison or Jail Diseases Treated With Acyclovir Diseases Treated By Ketoconazole Diseases ...
Skin-diseases; Skin-disorders; Skin-infections; Infection-control; Infectious-diseases; Microorganisms; Bacteria; Bacterial- ... disease; Bacterial-infections; Prison-workers; Law-enforcement-workers; Correctional-facilities; Administration; Work- ...
Disease Spotlight: Bacterial Skin Infections of Dogs Why d. o dogs get these skin infections?. Compared to other companion ... Ways to diagnose a bacterial skin infection. There are several ways to diagnose a bacterial skin infection. The most accurate ... dogs seem to struggle the most with bacterial skin infections. Why do they get these skin infections? Dog skin is unique as it ... How to reduce bacterial infections. One of the best ways to reduce bacterial infections is bathing. For some dogs whose ...
... ... Overall, this strain-level analysis of healthy and disease communities provides previously unexplored resolution of human skin ... an inflammatory skin disease commonly associated with Staphylococcal species. Species-level investigation of AD flares ... AD strains of S. aureus were sufficient to elicit a skin immune response, characteristic of AD patients. This suggests a model ...
Acute bacterial skin infections: developments since the 2005 Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines. ... Acute bacterial skin infections: developments since the 2005 Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines.. Moran ... BACKGROUND: Patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) commonly present to Emergency Departments ... The availability of rapid MRSA detection assays from skin and soft tissue swabs could potentially facilitate earlier selection ...
Some Bacterial & Viral Diseases of the Skin, Mucosa, Eyes, Wounds, Urogenital System, & STD s. ... Hansen s Disease (Leprosy) Mycobacterium leprae; 2 forms of disease:. 1.) tuberculoid areas of skin lose pigment and sensation ... Bacterial. 1. Scalded Skin Infections (scalded baby syndrome) Staphylococcus aureus; caused by exotoxins called exfoliatins; ... Disease can affect mucous membranes of mouth, eyes, lungs (herpes pneumonia); can also affect skin in places other than the ...
Bacterial dermatologic disorders, Bacterial infections of skin, Systemic bacterial infections with skin manifestations. ... Other conditions sometimes caused by or associated with bacterial infection include:. *Kawasaki disease (mucocutaneous lymph ... Bacterial dermatologic disorders, Bacterial infections of skin, Systemic bacterial infections with skin manifestations ... Laboratory investigations of bacterial skin infections, Treatment of bacterial skin infections ...
Based on the understanding of the molecular basis of skin diseases, this truly international book supports the reader to ... Therapy of Skin Diseases. A Worldwide Perspective on Therapeutic Approaches and Their Molecular Basis. Herausgeber: Krieg, ... Therapy of Skin Diseases. Buchuntertitel. A Worldwide Perspective on Therapeutic Approaches and Their Molecular Basis. ... Impressive progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of skin diseases. This has led to the development of ...
Skin diseases. Viral diseases (other than aids). Livestock rearing. Animal hazards. Bacterial and parasitic diseases. ...
4. Bacterial Skin Disease.. 5. Fungal Skin Disease.. 6. Viral, Rickettsial and Protozoal Diseases. ... This book is a combined update of two of Sue Patersons books, Skin Diseases of the Dog and Skin Diseases of the Cat, into one ... Manual of Skin Diseases of the Dog and Cat, Second Edition provides a valuable asset to the practice library for quick and easy ... "Manual of Skin Diseases of the Dog and Cat is a concise, well-written reference text on small animal dermatology. The book is a ...
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections. Bacterial Infections. Drug Eruptions. Dermatitis. Skin Diseases. Erythema. Drug ... Immune System Diseases. Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions. Chemically-Induced Disorders. Cyclosporins. ...
Skin Ulcer. Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections. Bacterial Infections. Skin Diseases. Nitric Oxide. Methicillin. Bronchodilator ... Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Skin Ulcers Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection Drug: ... Has an clinically infected skin ulcer. *Has a ulcer that is being treated with a topical antimicrobial agent or has been ...
Skin Diseases, Infectious. Skin Diseases. Bacterial Infections. Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections. Linezolid. Methicillin. ... Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Skin Diseases, Infectious Drug: Tedizolid Phosphate (Sivextro, BAY1192631) ... Diagnosis of Skin and soft tissue infection with MRSA either suspected or confirmed as the major cause of infection, with/ ... Reduction Ratio of the Lesion Size From the Screening Visit to Day 3 to Day 4 Visit (Only Skin and Soft Tissue Infection [SSTI ...
Skin Diseases, Bacterial. Skin Diseases, Infectious. Glossitis. Tongue Diseases. Mouth Diseases. Stomatognathic Diseases. ... Nervous System Diseases. Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections. Bacterial Infections. Skin Diseases. Skin Manifestations. Signs ... Condition or disease Lyme Disease Pediatric Infectious Disease Erythema Migrans Lyme Arthritis Lyme Carditis Lyme Disease ... Lyme Disease. Erythema Chronicum Migrans. Glossitis, Benign Migratory. Meningitis. Erythema. Central Nervous System Diseases. ...
Bacterial diseases. *Bacterium-related cutaneous conditions. *Syndromes caused by microbes. Hidden categories: *CS1: Julian- ... disease,[4] Filatovs disease, or fourth disease. Although Dukes identified it as a separate entity, it is thought not to be ... similar to the pathophysiology of the autoimmune skin disease, pemphigus vulgaris. Diagnosis[edit]. SSSS is a clinical ... Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) is a dermatological condition caused by Staphylococcus aureus. ...
Bacterial skin disease. Gram +ve. Firmicutes. *Staphylococcus *Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome. *Impetigo ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, (CDC) (10 August 2012). "Update to CDCs Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment ... "Ocular manifestations of infectious skin diseases". Clinics in Dermatology. 34 (2): 124-8. doi:10.1016/j.clindermatol.2015.11. ... Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). male. Epididymitis. Prostatitis. either. Proctitis. Urethritis/Non-gonococcal urethritis ( ...
Hot tub folliculitis is an infection of the skin around the lower part of the hair shaft (hair follicles). It usually occurs ... Bacterial infections. In: James WD, Elston DM, Treat JR, Rosenbach MA, Neuhaus IM, eds. Andrews Diseases of the Skin. 13th ed ... Hot tub folliculitis is an infection of the skin around the lower part of the hair shaft (hair follicles). It usually occurs ... The mild form of the disease often clears on its own. Anti-itch medicines may be used to ease discomfort. ...
  • The bacteria produce an erythrogenic toxin that causes the typical skin rash. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • Skin diseases caused by bacteria. (wakehealth.edu)
  • The culture is used for bacterial growth and the laboratory will isolate and identify the bacteria. (dermvets.com)
  • Some bacteria live on normal skin and cause no harm, such as some Staphylococcus species, Corynebacterium spp. (dermnetnz.org)
  • Some bacteria invade normal skin, broken skin from eczema / dermatitis or wounds (causing wound infection ). (dermnetnz.org)
  • Which bacteria cause skin infection? (dermnetnz.org)
  • Less common bacteria may also cause infection with skin signs. (dermnetnz.org)
  • Bacterial infection is caused by bacteria and is also a mild life threatening illness as in the case of bacterial meningitis. (girlishh.com)
  • Erysipeloid is a rare and acute infection of the skin caused by bacteria. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Infection results when the bacteria enters the skin through small breaks. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Symptoms may develop in 2 to 7 days after bacteria enter the skin. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Some of the most common infectious diseases are caused by bacteria that naturally colonise humans asymptomatically. (nih.gov)
  • 0.05) higher biofilm forming potential than bacteria isolated from skin. (nih.gov)
  • A bacterial infection could either be from a cut or abrasion that bacteria gets into, or a certain bacterial infection of the skin called pyoderma. (ehow.co.uk)
  • A range of infectious diseases are threatening amphibians worldwide, and evidence is accumulating that the host-associated bacteria that comprise the microbiome may be key in mediating interactions between amphibian hosts and infectious pathogens. (frontiersin.org)
  • If the bacteria find a break in the skin, whether a small wound or insect bite, an active infection can develop. (equisearch.com)
  • Infection of the skin itself by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites is the most common cause of skin lesions. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A new study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology reports that half the skin lesions present in patients with lupus show the presence of viable staph bacteria. (news-medical.net)
  • The medical condition that presents with an abnormally high concentration of bacteria in the jejunal aspirate on culture is known as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). (news-medical.net)
  • The remission of rosacea achieved with systemic antibiotics could be due to their effect on SIBO, but could also have other mechanisms such as preventing skin colonization by bacteria. (news-medical.net)
  • The skin is the body's first barrier against bacteria that cause infections. (ahealthyme.com)
  • When she first began working with dae2 in Ixodes scapularis , the deer tick, Chou thought ticks' acquisition of the gene must have something to do protection against tick-dwelling bacteria like B. burgdorferi , which causes Lyme disease in humans and other animals. (ucsf.edu)
  • Bethesda, Md. , Thurs., May 28, 2009 - The health of our skin - one of the body's first lines of defense against illness and injury - depends upon the delicate balance between our own cells and the millions of bacteria and other one-celled microbes that live on its surface. (genome.gov)
  • Their initial analysis, published today in the journal Science , reveals that our skin is home to a much wider array of bacteria than previously thought. (genome.gov)
  • There are also hot spots , lick granulomas and infectious skin diseases caused by parasites, bacteria, fungi and viruses. (mercola.com)
  • The affected skin weeps (that is, it exudes serum), and this moist surface layer of skin can become colonized by bacteria, although the skin itself is not infected. (wikipedia.org)
  • Small, bright, raised lesions develop at the site of streptococcal entry to the skin and grow with sharply defined borders. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • Rat bite fever is associated with skin lesions, intermittent fever, and a skin rash. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • Flukes can cause lesions and tissue damage as well as producing side affects such as hyperplasia of both skin and gill epithelium and creating entry sites for secondary infections. (fishdoc.co.uk)
  • This results in eczematoid skin lesions, alopecia, diarrhea, and concurrent bacterial and yeast infections. (symptoma.com)
  • lepromatous nodular form where a granulomatous response causes enlarged, disfiguring skin lesions called lepromas . (austincc.edu)
  • Called ringworm because of the ring-shaped lesions, these skin diseases are infectious, even to humans. (vetinfo.com)
  • Secondary bacterial infections in open BU lesions are the main cause of pain, delayed healing and systemic illness, resulting in prolonged hospital stay. (brad.ac.uk)
  • Methodology/Principal findings Using 16S rRNA sequencing, we determined the microbial composition of 5 BU lesions, 3 non-BU lesions and 3 healthy skin samples. (brad.ac.uk)
  • Conclusions/Significance Our study suggests that BU may lead to changes in the skin bacterial community within the lesions. (brad.ac.uk)
  • Such skin microbiome analysis requires large sample sizes and lesions from the same body site in many patients, both of which can be difficult for a rare disease. (brad.ac.uk)
  • Van Leuvenhaege C, Vandelannoote K, Affolabi D et al (2017) Bacterial diversity in Buruli ulcer skin lesions: Challenges in the clinical microbiome analysis of a skin disease. (brad.ac.uk)
  • Pyoderma can lead to lesions, hair loss, pustules, crusty skin and itchiness, but can be treated with antibiotics. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Athletes should be encouraged to complete daily skin surveillance and report any suspicious lesions for treatment. (momsteam.com)
  • Skin lesions can be grouped into two categories: primary and secondary. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Primary skin lesions are variations in color or texture that may be present at birth, such as moles or birthmarks, or that may be acquired during a person's lifetime, such as those associated with infectious diseases (e.g. warts, acne, or psoriasis ), allergic reactions (e.g. hives or contact dermatitis ), or environmental agents (e.g. sunburn, pressure, or temperature extremes). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Secondary skin lesions are those changes in the skin that result from primary skin lesions, either as a natural progression or as a result of a person manipulating (e.g. scratching or picking at) a primary lesion. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Skin lesions can be caused by a wide variety of conditions and diseases. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Acne, athlete's foot (tinea pedis), warts, and scabies are examples of skin infections that cause lesions. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Allergic reactions and sensitivity to outside environmental factors can also lead to the formation of skin lesions. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Underlying conditions can also precipitate the appearance of skin lesions. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Open lesions visible on skin surface. (studystack.com)
  • Black fever - Acute infection with high temperature and dark red skin lesions and high mortality rate. (google.com)
  • Rosacea patients have a higher prevalence of SIBO than the general population, and when the bacterial overgrowth is eradicated with antibiotics, the resolution of skin lesions is almost 100% and persists for 9 months or more in about 8 out of every 10 patients. (news-medical.net)
  • Drugs that increase gut motility have also been known to improve rosacea symptoms, lending weight to the hypothesis that bacterial products are responsible for the development of the skin lesions, and this might also explain the improvement seen with antibiotics. (news-medical.net)
  • Anti-bacterial soup or topical anti-biotic , as sometime there is a bad odor originating from the thick lesions. (hubpages.com)
  • Boils are painful lesions caused by bacterial infection. (medicinenet.com)
  • Some lesions are a manifestation of a dermatological disease while others are a manifestation of an internal disease. (petplace.com)
  • A thorough physical exam and various diagnostic tests can help determine the cause of skin lesions or sores and direct a course of treatment. (petplace.com)
  • Calcinosis cutis lesions are typically white to pink in color and the skin around them is red and swollen. (mercola.com)
  • The disease causes skin lesions that can permanently damage the skin, nerves, eyes and limbs. (livescience.com)
  • In general, if your dog is suffering from skin itch, and if skin lesions are red in color and oozing pus, and is accompanied by hair loss, a trip to the veterinarian is needed as the condition is probably beyond your ability to control the problem with over the counter medications. (dog-health-guide.org)
  • A rash is defined as a widespread eruption of skin lesions. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • L92 Granulomatous disorders of skin and subcutaneous tissue. (symptoma.com)
  • This entry was posted in Health , Skin Disorders . (girlishh.com)
  • Disorders affecting the different body regions and systems make up the majority of the book from the external-skin, feathers, eyes, legs and feet-to the internal including the gastrointestinal tract and the cardiovascular system. (routledge.com)
  • There is increasing evidence to suggest mercurial body burden is related to skin disorders and autism as a result of prenatal mercury exposure. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Ulcers can result from acute conditions such as bacterial infection or trauma, or from more chronic conditions, such as scleroderma or disorders involving peripheral veins and arteries. (encyclopedia.com)
  • After helping hundreds of people with their body pain problems, My Pain Bye Bye™ is now extending solutions to other health issues like skin disorders, and hair loss. (prweb.com)
  • Although commonly referred to as a single disease, it actually constitutes a group of metabolic disorders with hyperglycemia as a common feature. (news-medical.net)
  • In many cases, rosacea patients have been diagnosed with disorders such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, celiac disease, gastritis due to H. pylori overgrowth, lipase deficiencies, hypochlorhydria, and diseases affecting the small intestinal mucosa. (news-medical.net)
  • ABSTRACT Children with disabilities may be particularly susceptible to skin disorders, therefore the aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of skin disease among such children in Mansoura, Egypt. (who.int)
  • Definition of neurology: a science involved in the study of the nervous systems, especially of the diseases and disorders affecting them. (neurosciencenews.com)
  • Treatment for bacterial skin disorders is typically done using antibiotics. (petplace.com)
  • We hope this will speed efforts to understand the complex genetic and environmental factors involved in eczema, psoriasis, acne, antibiotic-resistant infections and many other disorders affecting the skin. (genome.gov)
  • We selected skin sites predisposed to certain dermatological disorders in which microbes have long been thought to play a role in disease activity," said study coauthor Maria L. Turner, M.D., senior clinician in NCI's Dermatology Branch. (genome.gov)
  • In fact, the number of canine and feline skin disorders veterinarians encounter is mind-boggling. (mercola.com)
  • and blood tests (CBC, chemistry panel) to rule out allergies, endocrine diseases, and dietary/digestive disorders. (petmd.com)
  • Dog skin disorders are difficult to diagnose requiring diagnosis of any underlying cause in order to cure any visible clinical symptoms. (dog-health-guide.org)
  • Guide to Congenital and heritable Disorders in Dogs: Includes Genetic Predispositions to Diseases" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common symptoms are skin disease and susceptibility to certain bacterial infections that can be severe and affect virtually any part of the body. (symptoma.com)
  • 7] Obesity is also one such symptoms in some women, and is also marked in women [en.wikipedia.org] […] symptoms such as polydipsia , polyuria and weight loss may sometimes, but not always, be present. (symptoma.com)
  • Those that did occur were infrequent, and included bacterial skin infections, skin allergy symptoms, and lower hemoglobin levels, which resolved with dose adjustment. (symptoma.com)
  • Ritter's disease of the newborn is the most severe form of SSSS, with similar signs and symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • By understanding the symptoms and treatments of the 4 most common cat skin diseases, you'll be prepared to handle them if they afflict your cat. (vetinfo.com)
  • The provider can often make the diagnosis by looking at the infected skin and by asking how your symptoms started. (medlineplus.gov)
  • i think that systemic candida infection is a common, but often overlooked problem that cause symptoms ranging from IBS to symptoms that can mimic neurological disease or mental illness. (hubpages.com)
  • Everybody's symptoms in Lyme and other diseases that come along with it (co-infections) are a little different, but your description fits in well with what I and others experience(d). (medhelp.org)
  • Appreciate that any patient with foodborne illness may ing suspicious symptoms, disease clusters, and etiologic agents, represent the sentinel case of a more widespread outbreak. (cdc.gov)
  • If you have symptoms of tiny lumps or bumps just beneath the skin in your vaginal area that are itchy or red, you may simply have ingrown hairs or razor burn. (medicinenet.com)
  • This richly-illustrated handbook covers all aspects of modern feline dermatology, from the approach to different signs and symptoms to the description of the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and current treatment of each feline dermatological disease. (springer.com)
  • The disease often strikes during the peak reproductive years, but it develops very slowly, and can take 25 to 30 years for symptoms to appear. (livescience.com)
  • For adult dogs, diagnosis of dog skin diseases are based on the appearance of the skin and if any other symptoms exist. (dog-health-guide.org)
  • Your vet will try and determine if a condition caused the skin problem, or if the problem was the result of related symptoms such as itching and scratching, which are common reactions to a dog skin allergy. (dog-health-guide.org)
  • Other symptoms which accompany the dog skin problems such as severe hair loss and excessive panting could indicate an underlying disorder like an endocrine disease such as hyperadrenocorticism or Cushings Disease. (dog-health-guide.org)
  • A definite diagnosis can only be made via a skin scrape or gill biopsy. (fishdoc.co.uk)
  • The most accurate way to diagnosis this condition is to culture the skin. (dermvets.com)
  • Ask your doctor for a medical diagnosis of your skin disease. (medicinenet.com)
  • History is very important for proper diagnosis of skin diseases. (petplace.com)
  • To confirm a diagnosis of pemphigus foliaceus, your veterinarian will need to take skin samples for biopsy. (mercola.com)
  • Manual of Skin Diseases of the Dog and Cat is a concise, well-written reference text on small animal dermatology. (wiley.com)
  • A practical everyday reference for veterinary practitioners, Diagnostic Techniques in Veterinary Dermatology focuses on contemporary techniques for investigating skin problems in small animals, horses and exotic pets. (wiley.com)
  • This application is mainly done for medical purpose in order to provide an easy way to medical student, doctors, dermatologist, nurses and other health practitioners to understand Dermatology Atlas and Other Skin infection. (appbrain.com)
  • The good news, says William H. Miller, VMD, professor of dermatology at Cornell University, is that many equine skin diseases and conditions are not very serious. (equisearch.com)
  • David B. Vasily, MD, FAAD, team physician/dermatologist at Lehigh University, president of Lehigh Valley Dermatology Associates and writing group member, agreed with Foley that a preemptive, forward looking plan is also essential in preventing skin diseases among athletes and teams. (momsteam.com)
  • James J. Leyden, MD, FAAD, emeritus professor of dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania and position statement reviewer, believes it is crucial that athletes, coaches, parents and health care providers learn about MRSA, among other infectious diseases, as a major disease risk among athletes, because it can result in serious long-term illness or even death. (momsteam.com)
  • Dogs commonly develop bacterial skin infections by the isolate Staphylococcus pseudintermedius which is different from the human strain Staphylococcus aureus . (dermvets.com)
  • First, to investigate strain-level heterogeneity in healthy adults, I focused on the common skin commensals Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis with well-documented sequence variation. (bu.edu)
  • The aim of this study is to see the efficacy and safety of BAY1192631 in Japanese patients with methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) and SSTI-related bacteremia). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome ( SSSS ) is a dermatological condition caused by Staphylococcus aureus . (wikipedia.org)
  • Fridkin SK , Hageman JC , Morrison M , Sanza LT , Como-Sabetti K , Jernigan JA , Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus disease in three communities. (cdc.gov)
  • Staphylococcus aureus -associated skin and soft tissue infections in ambulatory care. (cdc.gov)
  • Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in community-acquired skin infections. (cdc.gov)
  • Lee NE , Taylor MM , Bancroft E , Ruane PJ , Morgan M , McCoy L , Risk factors for community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin infections among HIV-positive men who have sex with men. (cdc.gov)
  • Staphylococcus epidermidis is carried asymptomatically on the skin and mucous membranes of virtually all humans but is a major cause of nosocomial infection associated with invasive procedures. (nih.gov)
  • and bacterial (e.g., staphylococcus a or impetigo). (momsteam.com)
  • One of the most insidious, dangerous and even life-threatening bacterial skin diseases among athletes is the common antibiotic-resistant pathogen known as methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus or MRSA, which has seen explosive growth in recent years. (momsteam.com)
  • On August 2, 2005, the Georgia Division of Public Health invited the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to assist in an on-site investigation of increased SSTIs among patients of a low-cost, fee-for-service clinic in rural Georgia. (cdc.gov)
  • Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website. (cdc.gov)
  • There's the all-too-common allergic skin condition called atopic dermatitis . (mercola.com)
  • Oregon grape is used for scaly, itchy skin ( psoriasis ), eczema ( atopic dermatitis ), stomach problems , and other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses. (webmd.com)
  • Topical corticosteroids are mostly used to provide relief of itching associated with inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis or psoriasis. (mynewsdesk.com)
  • BAY1192631 solution or tablet 200 mg, once daily, Intravenous (IV) or By Mouth (PO) for 7-14 days for skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) or 7-21 days for bacteremia. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • We conducted a case-control investigation to determine risk factors for MRSA skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in residents of a largely rural southeastern community in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), commonly caused by S. aureus , annually account for an estimated 11.6 million visits to hospital outpatient departments and emergency departments in the United States ( 5 ), and the percentage of SSTIs caused by MRSA in urban emergency departments increased from 29% in 2001 and 2002 to 64% in 2003 and 2004 ( 6 ). (cdc.gov)
  • This includes feline acne, bacterial or yeast infections, ringworm and other fungal skin disease, alopecia or hair loss, and dry skin or dermatitis. (petsbest.com)
  • Acne vulgaris is a ubiquitary skin disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the pilosebaceous unit resulting from bacterial colonization of hair follicles by Propionibacterium [ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] libido . (symptoma.com)
  • [clinicaladvisor.com] Acne vulgaris (commonly referred to as acne) is a common skin disease in which hair follicles become clogged with dead skin and oils resulting in inflammation. (symptoma.com)
  • Acne appears when oil and dead skin cells clog up hair follicles, leading to whiteheads, blackheads, and other blemishes. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Acne medications can help clear up the unwanted skin condition. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Propionibacteria live in the hair follicles of adult skin and contribute to acne . (dermnetnz.org)
  • There are various types of skin diseases and some of the common skin ailments are fungal infections, bacterial infections , herpes zoster, acne, eczema, scabies, alopecia, psoriasis and so on. (girlishh.com)
  • Acne vulgaris is one of the most common skin disorder affecting susceptible hair follicles, most commonly found on the neck, upper trunk, and face. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Acne is one of the most frequently encountered skin diseases in adolescents. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Acne seems to have stemmed from the interaction of hormonal, bacterial, and genetic factors. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Acne oftentimes leaves behind small scars in the skin. (selfgrowth.com)
  • The goals of management of acne are to reduce bacterial colonies, decrease sebaceous gland activity, prevent the follicles from becoming plugged, reduce inflammation, combat secondary infection, minimize scarring, and eliminate factors that predispose the person to acne. (selfgrowth.com)
  • By far the most frequently observed skin conditions are those categorized in Table 12 as "Dermatitis/Alopecias. (nap.edu)
  • It's usually caused by a skin condition such as dermatitis, or a bacterial infection. (babycentre.co.uk)
  • There's even a skin condition that can be triggered by the bite of just one flea called flea allergy dermatitis. (mercola.com)
  • Pyotraumatic dermatitis, also known as a hot spot or acute moist dermatitis, is a common infection of the skin surface of dogs, particularly those with thick or long coats. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pyotraumatic dermatitis is caused by self-inflicted trauma to the skin, which is incited by pain or irritation, such as infestation with fleas or lice, irritation from clippers, allergic skin diseases, diseases of the anal sacs, inflammation of the ear canal, foreign bodies or irritants within the coat, or pain in muscles or joints. (wikipedia.org)
  • The dog may require sedation before the fur is clipped, as skin affected by pyotraumatic dermatitis can be painful. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bacterial Skin Diseases Pipeline Insight, 2020" Report By DelveInsight Outlays Comprehensive Insights Of Present Clinical Development Scenario And Growth Prospects Across The Bacterial Skin Diseases Market. (reportsandmarkets.com)
  • We identified 178 bacterial strains of 38 genera, including 59 bacterial species not previously reported from any amphibian host. (frontiersin.org)
  • We assayed the anti-fungal abilities of 133 bacterial isolates from 26 frog species. (frontiersin.org)
  • eczema), an inflammatory skin disease commonly associated with Staphylococcal species. (bu.edu)
  • Dealing with all common skin diseases in both the dog and the cat, particular attention is paid to the differences between the two species. (wiley.com)
  • Caused by very small species of mite, scabies is a skin disease that spreads easily by contact or through sharing of clothing or bedding. (girlishh.com)
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecium were the most predominantly isolated bacterial species from equine wound and skin samples respectively. (nih.gov)
  • All populations had similar species richness irrespective of disease history, but populations that have experienced historical outbreaks of ranavirosis have a distinct skin microbiome structure (beta diversity) when compared to sites where no outbreaks of the disease have occurred. (frontiersin.org)
  • A species of a lipid that naturally helps skin injuries heal appears to also aid repair of common corneal injuries, even when other conditions, like diabetes, make healing difficult, scientists report. (news-medical.net)
  • These bacterial species carpet our skin surface, but generally don't harm us. (ucsf.edu)
  • more than 1000 different types of bacterial species actually so far identified. (coursera.org)
  • Skin and gill flukes are common fish parasites and in small numbers probably cause little harm. (fishdoc.co.uk)
  • External parasites are parasites that feed on the dog from the outside, usually on the skin. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Treatment for dog skin conditions involve keeping the skin clean and treating the underlying cause such as bacterial infection, parasites or lump removal. (dog-health-guide.org)
  • These parasites spread rapidly from one rabbit to another, through nymphs and larvae that live on the surface of the skin. (medirabbit.com)
  • Only a dermatologist can identify the type of skin disease and prescribe the best course of treatment. (girlishh.com)
  • If you have any concerns with your skin or its treatment, see a dermatologist for advice. (dermnetnz.org)
  • They have a sensitive immune system and are generally more prone to food allergies than other breeds These skin issues could be mild -- including dandruff and itching -- or become severe, with rashes or hives. (ehow.co.uk)
  • disease of sudden onset, severe, not chronic. (google.com)
  • Addison's disease - A disease characterized by severe weakness, low blood pressure, and a bronzed coloration of the skin, due to decreased secretion of cortisol from the adrenal gland. (google.com)
  • In more severe cases, the skin on their feet may crack and bleed. (babycentre.co.uk)
  • However, a severe side effect that affects all long-term users of doxycycline is inflammatory bowel disease . (yahoo.com)
  • Hot tub folliculitis is an infection of the skin around the lower part of the hair shaft (hair follicles). (medlineplus.gov)
  • This disorder is very common and can lead to a secondary infection of the skin. (petmd.com)
  • Early research suggests that applying a specific Oregon grape extract cream (Relieva by Apolla Pharmaceutical) for 12 weeks might improve the severity and area of itchy and inflamed skin in people with a skin condition called eczema. (webmd.com)
  • Dog skin is unique as it lacks a fatty plug that is present in other animals including humans. (dermvets.com)
  • Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans and considered the third most prevalent mycobacterial disease in humans. (brad.ac.uk)
  • Brucellosis - bacterial disease, especially of cattle, causing undulant fever in humans. (google.com)
  • In addition to humans, the disease infects armadillos , and most leprosy cases in the United States can be traced to contact with these animals. (livescience.com)
  • But the armadillos probably contracted the disease from humans, who originally came from Europe, the study authors said. (livescience.com)
  • Skin biopsy may show separation of the superficial layer of the epidermis (intraepidermal separation), differentiating SSSS from TEN, wherein the separation occurs at the dermo-epidermal junction (subepidermal separation). (wikipedia.org)
  • Sometimes, skin biopsy is obtained for lab examination. (hubpages.com)
  • Sometimes a biopsy of the skin may be necessary. (petmd.com)
  • If the presence of burrowing mites is suspected, but none found after a deep skin scraping, a biopsy on the area suspected of mite infestation is advisable. (medirabbit.com)
  • Leprosy, also known as Hansen's disease, is due to a chronic infection of the bacterium Mycobacterium leprae . (livescience.com)
  • 10. Allergic Skin Disease. (wiley.com)
  • Sometimes even what your derma, or Dr. may prescibe to you may have an allergic reaction to your immune or skin. (hubpages.com)
  • The answer depends on whether the spot or bump in question is caused by a bacterial, fungal or viral infection, an insect bite, sunburn, allergic reaction, bruise, abrasion or any number of assaults the world can throw at a horse. (equisearch.com)
  • Solid formation above skin caused by insect bite or allergic reaction. (studystack.com)
  • I'm allergic to several antibiotics, what can I safely use for a skin wound? (drugs.com)
  • Skin Immune System and Allergic Skin Diseases 9. (whsmith.co.uk)
  • Flea allergy is the most common allergic skin disease in the United States. (petplace.com)
  • In cats, the most common skin infections are bacterial and yeast infections. (petplace.com)
  • Malassezia pachydermatis is a yeast found on the skin and ears of dogs. (petmd.com)
  • The connection between flukes and bacterial fish diseases such as ulcers is well established. (fishdoc.co.uk)
  • Skin nodules and ulcers ranging from 0.5 cm to 5 cm in size and can vary from a few to hundreds. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • Heavy salves like Vaseline, for example, can plug hair follicles, and many homemade remedies can irritate skin. (equisearch.com)
  • Overall, this strain-level analysis of healthy and disease communities provides previously unexplored resolution of human skin microbiome. (bu.edu)
  • However, adequately studying the human microbiome in a clinical setting can prove difficult when investigating a neglected tropical skin disease due to its rarity and the setting. (brad.ac.uk)
  • Our study proposes a pipeline for such studies and highlights several drawbacks that must be considered if microbiome analysis is to be utilized for neglected tropical diseases. (brad.ac.uk)
  • Our data potentially support the hypothesis that variation among individuals in skin microbiome structure drive differences in susceptibility to infection and lethal outbreaks of disease. (frontiersin.org)
  • Understanding the mechanisms by which the skin microbiome affects host-pathogen interactions, and the generality of those mechanisms across multiple pathogen groups, requires that we measure how skin microbiome covaries with disease severity in the wild across a broad suite of pathogen types. (frontiersin.org)
  • To better understand this balance, National Institutes of Health researchers have set out to explore the skin's microbiome, which is all of the DNA, or genomes, of all of the microbes that inhabit human skin. (genome.gov)
  • To gauge how much the skin microbiome differs among healthy people, the researchers studied many different parameters. (genome.gov)
  • NIH recently launched the Human Microbiome Project, a part of the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research, to discover what microbial communities exist in different parts of the human body and to explore how these communities change with disease. (genome.gov)
  • Feline upper respiratory tract disease. (routledge.com)
  • Despite its usefulness, though, your cat's skin also serves as the source of various common diseases, some of which can affect your feline for the duration of his life. (petplace.com)
  • AD strains of S. aureus were sufficient to elicit a skin immune response, characteristic of AD patients. (bu.edu)
  • One of the medieval leprosy samples matched strains from the modern Middle East, but it's unclear whether the disease originally came from there or from Europe. (livescience.com)
  • The standard treatment for the disorder is to stop corticosteroids, and resolve secondary infections and systemic disease as appropriate. (mercola.com)
  • 6. Viral, Rickettsial and Protozoal Diseases. (wiley.com)
  • Viral Rickettsial and Protozoal Skin Diseases 8. (whsmith.co.uk)
  • Heart murmur may suggest bacterial endocarditis or platelet destruction across an abnormal valve Skin rash, arthritis, alopecia - Skin rash, arthritis, alopecia may suggest [oncologynurseadvisor.com] The main goal of treatment is to increase platelet counts to a healthy and safe level1. (symptoma.com)
  • This list of sicknesses, medical conditions, and chronic or non-chronic diseases treated with ciprofloxacin is in alphabetical order, and you can click any ailment to read more about it. (ranker.com)
  • Hospitalized patients as well as people with chronic diseases are usually prone to this skin infection and many children and old aged people become victims to this disease. (girlishh.com)
  • A chronic epidermal disease, psoriasis can occur in any part of the body, but is commonly seen on the elbows and knees, as well as the scalp and people affected by this disease are also prone to psoriatic arthritis . (girlishh.com)
  • Homeopathic treatments can provoke a good response in patients with chronic skin diseases. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • It is a chronic skin syndrome that affects 1% to 3% of the world's population. (sooperarticles.com)
  • Mild fever and conjunctivitis often accompany the disease. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • bacterial conjunctivitis is usually more pyogenic than viral. (austincc.edu)
  • Penicillin or erythromycin antibiotics are used to treat this and other staphylococcal skin diseases. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • Using oral antibiotics when possible and limiting the durations of vancomycin treatment may decrease vancomycin-associated acute kidney injury (V-AKI) in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), according to results of a study published in Infectious Diseases Therapy . (infectiousdiseaseadvisor.com)
  • The dog Staph has developed changes in its genetics where not all antibiotics will work to resolve a given skin infection. (dermvets.com)
  • So, a skin culture and/or frequent baths are often needed if prescribed antibiotics do not resolve the skin infection. (dermvets.com)
  • In this case a dog skin infection has probably taken hold, requiring antibiotics and possibly short term steroid use for inflammation. (dog-health-guide.org)
  • We will test the ability of NGS to detect Borrelia burgdorferi DNA in the blood of pediatric patients with Lyme disease. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • We will conduct an observational study of NGS testing on pediatric patients at all stages of Lyme disease. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • We will enroll patients at all phases of suspected Lyme disease, collect clinically relevant information, and test for Lyme disease using Next Generation Sequencing and standard Lyme serologic testing. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • If a setter lives in the country, the risk of contracting Lyme disease from ticks is higher, but Lyme disease vaccinations may be available from a vet if the area is known for ticks that carry Lyme disease. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Though ticks are notorious for transmitting pathogens such as the Lyme disease bacterium, how does their immune system keep them safe from contracting pathogens themselves? (ucsf.edu)
  • Although the skin normally provides a barrier to infection, when it is penetrated by microorganisms, infection develops. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • Sulfurlike granules represent accumulations of microorganisms in the pus, and antibiotic therapy is necessary to prevent spread of the disease. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • See DermNet's page on the microorganisms found on the skin . (dermnetnz.org)
  • Serving as the first line of defense, your cat's skin prevents trauma, protects against invasion of microorganisms and chemicals, and regulates temperature changes within the body. (petplace.com)
  • Also known by the names Shingles and Zona , the viral disease herpes zoster is a very painful skin rash seen in any small part of the body and consists of blisters formed in a band or a strip. (girlishh.com)
  • Concerned about a rash, swelling or discharge that's appeared on your baby's skin? (babycentre.co.uk)
  • The skin may become red and inflamed, and the rash tends to be weepy and oozy. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • We obtained isolates through agar culture from skin swabs of wild frogs, and identified bacterial isolates by comparing 16S rRNA sequences against the GenBank database using BLAST. (frontiersin.org)
  • We found 20 bacterial isolates that inhibited Bd growth, including three isolates not previously known for such inhibitory abilities. (frontiersin.org)
  • Finally, Random Forest model prediction of disease status (carriage vs. infection) identifies pathogenicity elements in 415 S. epidermidis isolates with 80% accuracy, demonstrating the potential for identifying risk genotypes pre-operatively. (nih.gov)
  • In total 340 bacterial isolates were identified from all the equine wound and skin samples. (nih.gov)
  • A more common source of a cat skin allergies is food. (petsbest.com)
  • A skin culture is becoming a more common procedure in the veterinary clinic. (dermvets.com)
  • It offers color photos of common skin diseases in both the dog and cat, offering insights on testing, treatment options, and life cycles of diseases. (wiley.com)
  • [10] Descriptions of the disease date back to before the Common Era within the Old Testament . (wikipedia.org)
  • http://www.ehow.co.uk/info_8331586_common-skin-problems-english-setters.html. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Common Skin Problems in English Setters" last modified May 13, 2017. (ehow.co.uk)
  • We used 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to quantify the skin microbial community structure of over 200 individual wild adult European common frogs ( Rana temporaria ), from ten populations with contrasting history of the lethal disease ranavirosis, caused by emerging viral pathogens belonging to the genus Ranavirus . (frontiersin.org)
  • But if you're looking at one of these eight common equine skin ailments, especially if you notice them early, you may be able to manage them safely on your own. (equisearch.com)
  • Understanding basic preventive measures, identifying clinical features and swift management of skin diseases is essential in preventing the spread of common and serious skin infections. (momsteam.com)
  • Patients with lupus who take their medications as prescribed have much lower odds of developing type 2 diabetes, a common complication of the disease, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia. (news-medical.net)
  • It is among the top 5 most common skin diseases. (news-medical.net)
  • In the following article, we will concentrate on some of the more common skin conditions found below the waist and get familiar with some of the many ways our private areas can be irritated, inflamed, or be just plain odd due to conditions that may or may not be cause for alarm. (medicinenet.com)
  • Skin odor is a common manifestation of a skin infection. (petplace.com)
  • View our slideshow to see what the most common childhood rashes and skin conditions look like, and get more information on how to treat them. (babycentre.co.uk)
  • A far less common cause of the disorder is calcium absorption through the skin when a pet comes in contact with an ice melt product containing calcium chloride (e.g. (mercola.com)
  • The disease was extremely common in Europe throughout the Middle Ages, especially in southern Scandinavia. (livescience.com)
  • This is one of the most common skin diseases found in children. (mynewsdesk.com)
  • Heart problems Diabetes Arthritis Atrophy of the testicles Changes in skin color Greater chances of some bacterial infections References National Digestive Diseases Clearinghouse [pamf.org] […] pigmentation of the skin, loss of sexual drive ( libido ), disease of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy), diabetes mellitus, or joint inflammation (arthritis). (symptoma.com)
  • [1] Complications in women include pelvic inflammatory disease and in men include inflammation of the epididymis . (wikipedia.org)
  • Boil - An abscess of skin or painful, circumscribed inflammation of the skin or a hair follicle, having a dead, pus-forming inner core, usually caused by a staphylococcal infection. (google.com)
  • This may lead to translocation or proinflammatory cytokine release, resulting in skin inflammation. (news-medical.net)
  • Rinderpest is an acute, highly contagious, fatal viral disease of cattle, buffalo and wild ruminants manifested by inflammation, haemorrhage, erosions of the digestive tract, wasting and often bloody diarrhoea. (fao.org)
  • The result is inflammation and damage to the two top layers of the epidermis, which leads to the crusting you see on the surface of your pet's skin. (mercola.com)
  • However, in the case of a localized bacterial infection, topical therapy with vet-prescribed shampoos and conditioners can also prove effective. (petplace.com)
  • Emerging infectious disease is a growing threat to global health, and recent discoveries reveal that the microbiota dwelling on and within hosts can play an important role in health and disease. (frontiersin.org)
  • [novartis.com] Abnormalities - Abnormalities such as lymphadenopathy or lung consolidation, may suggest infectious disease or malignancy. (symptoma.com)
  • Institutions must provide adequate financial and human resources to implement a comprehensive infectious disease control policy. (momsteam.com)
  • There are three specialties that most particularly are ignorant about Lyme: rheumatologists, neurologists and infectious disease (ID) docs. (medhelp.org)
  • While playing organized sports is a great way to get exercise, buses and locker rooms may be perfect breeding grounds for infectious disease. (drugs.com)
  • Particular attention should be paid to secondary bacterial infections and general findings. (fao.org)
  • Microbial diseases of the skin are usually transmitted by contact with an infected individual. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • After refining this approach with complex simulated communities, I utilized it to analyze the microbial communities present in skin samples from healthy and diseased individuals. (bu.edu)
  • Recent changes in human demographics and food preferences, changes in food production and distribution systems, microbial adaptation, and lack of support for public health resources and infrastructure have led to the emergence of novel as well as traditional foodborne diseases. (cdc.gov)
  • Drawing on the power of modern DNA sequencing technology and computational analysis, the research team from NHGRI, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the NIH Clinical Center uncovered a far more diverse collection of microbes on human skin than had been detected by traditional methods that involved growing microbial samples in the laboratory. (genome.gov)
  • They found that the crease of skin outside the nose is the site with the microbial community most similar to that found inside the nose. (genome.gov)
  • Diseases affecting the skin and adnexal structures (e.g., mammary glands) account for many of the clinical abnormalities observed in mice and rats. (nap.edu)
  • Itching may cause skin darkening & thickening and lead to further complications including bacterial infection. (mynewsdesk.com)
  • English setters with fleas and ticks may act like they have very itchy skin and continually scratch, which can lead to infection. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Atopic disease is an immune response to a foreign material such as pollen or grass, and results in itchy skin and feet. (ehow.co.uk)
  • A skin elevation caused by swelling that can be itchy and usually disappears soon after erupting. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Scaly, itchy skin ( psoriasis ). (webmd.com)
  • Surface skin may be blistered, but is often dry and intensely itchy. (dermnetnz.org)
  • Pruritus is the medical term for itchy skin. (mynewsdesk.com)
  • Parasitic skin conditions can result from exposure to fleas, lice, and ear mites, among other sources. (petplace.com)
  • The causative organism, Dermatophilus congolensis, can reside on the skin without causing trouble, but it multiplies rapidly in a moist environment. (equisearch.com)
  • The disease commonly occurs in children and is easily transmitted among them. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • BACKGROUND: Patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) commonly present to Emergency Departments (EDs) where physicians encounter a wide spectrum of disease severity. (infectoforum.net)
  • The vesicles and later erosions are commonly found on the muzzle, tongue (Fig. 46), oral cavity, teat and on the skin between and above the hoofs of the feet. (fao.org)
  • It is commonly caused by hyperglucocorticoidism, which occurs either as a result of the administration of corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone, prednisolone), or hyperadrenocorticism ( Cushing's disease ). (mercola.com)
  • Skin diseases and internal infections: caused by Bacterial, virus, fungi? (yahoo.com)
  • is a disease of the deep skin and wounds as well as the blood. (cliffsnotes.com)
  • This study describes the presence of bacterial biofilms within equine wounds. (nih.gov)
  • Fifty one wounds and control skin sites were sampled using sterile swabs. (nih.gov)
  • Self-mutilation will lead to wounds and secondary bacterial infection. (medirabbit.com)
  • According to EFSA, outbreaks of lumpy skin disease (LSD) in the Balkan region fell dramatically by 95 percent from 7,483 in 2016 to 385 in 2017. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • The figures confirm that vaccination of cattle - recommended by EFSA in 2016 - is the most effective way to contain the disease, according to the report. (foodsafetynews.com)
  • The spatial and temporal patterns of lumpy skin disease (LSD) epidemics were analysed based on the data collected from affected and at-risk countries in southeastern Europe in 2016 and 2017. (europa.eu)
  • There are many autoimmune diseases, some of which can produce rashes.For instance, lupus is a condition that affects a number of body systems, including the skin. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Arugula seeds (Eruca sativa) contain a compound with significant skin anti-inflammatory activity. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • MRI revealed I have Paranasal Sinus Inflammatory Disease, but otherwise was normal. (medhelp.org)
  • However, some clues exist, in the form of the hypersensitivity present in fibromyalgia, which is known to be the effect of endotoxins released as bacterial metabolites, or inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), or due to bacterial translocation. (news-medical.net)
  • Sebaceous adenitis is a rare type of inflammatory skin disease that affects the skin glands of young and middle age dogs. (petmd.com)
  • Disease state panels allow for the thorough investigation of differentially expressed genes within a specified pathology. (bio-rad.com)
  • Pathogen-specific information enables rational choice of diagnostics, therapy, and prognostication for a complete list of small animal infectious diseases, that includes bacterial, viral, parasitic/protozoal and fungal pathogens. (routledge.com)
  • Although Dukes identified it as a separate entity, it is thought not to be different from scarlet fever caused by staphylococcal exotoxin after Keith Powell proposed equating it with the condition currently known as staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in 1979. (wikipedia.org)
  • Popularly, the disease was known as "fever and ague," "chill fever," "the shakes," and by names expressive of the locality in which it was prevalent--such as, "swamp fever" (in Louisiana), "Panama fever," and "Chagres fever. (google.com)
  • Superficial bacterial skin infections and cellulitis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A skin lesion is a superficial growth or patch of the skin that does not resemble the area surrounding it. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Acute bacterial skin infections: developments since the 2005 Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines. (infectoforum.net)