The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.
The process of aging due to changes in the structure and elasticity of the skin over time. It may be a part of physiological aging or it may be due to the effects of ultraviolet radiation, usually through exposure to sunlight.
'Skin diseases' is a broad term for various conditions affecting the skin, including inflammatory disorders, infections, benign and malignant tumors, congenital abnormalities, and degenerative diseases, which can cause symptoms such as rashes, discoloration, eruptions, lesions, itching, or pain.
Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.
The functions of the skin in the human and animal body. It includes the pigmentation of the skin.
Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.
Uptake of substances through the SKIN.
Coloration of the skin.
Synthetic material used for the treatment of burns and other conditions involving large-scale loss of skin. It often consists of an outer (epidermal) layer of silicone and an inner (dermal) layer of collagen and chondroitin 6-sulfate. The dermal layer elicits new growth and vascular invasion and the outer layer is later removed and replaced by a graft.
Skin diseases caused by bacteria.
A skin ulcer is a breakdown of the skin's surface and underlying tissues, often caused by prolonged pressure, infection, or poor circulation, leading to a loss of continuity in the epidermis and dermis, potentially extending into deeper layers such as subcutaneous tissue, muscle, and bone.
The external, nonvascular layer of the skin. It is made up, from within outward, of five layers of EPITHELIUM: (1) basal layer (stratum basale epidermidis); (2) spinous layer (stratum spinosum epidermidis); (3) granular layer (stratum granulosum epidermidis); (4) clear layer (stratum lucidum epidermidis); and (5) horny layer (stratum corneum epidermidis).
Congenital structural abnormalities of the skin.
Infections to the skin caused by bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.
Any inflammation of the skin.
Operative procedures performed on the SKIN.
Skin diseases caused by viruses.
A water-soluble medicinal preparation applied to the skin.
Biological activities and functions of the SKIN.
Mutant strains of mice that produce little or no hair.
A malignant skin neoplasm that seldom metastasizes but has potentialities for local invasion and destruction. Clinically it is divided into types: nodular, cicatricial, morphaic, and erythematoid (pagetoid). They develop on hair-bearing skin, most commonly on sun-exposed areas. Approximately 85% are found on the head and neck area and the remaining 15% on the trunk and limbs. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1471)
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.
A layer of vascularized connective tissue underneath the EPIDERMIS. The surface of the dermis contains innervated papillae. Embedded in or beneath the dermis are SWEAT GLANDS; HAIR FOLLICLES; and SEBACEOUS GLANDS.
Redness of the skin produced by congestion of the capillaries. This condition may result from a variety of causes.
The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.
The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.
Skin diseases caused by ARTHROPODS; HELMINTHS; or other parasites.
A circumscribed benign epithelial tumor projecting from the surrounding surface; more precisely, a benign epithelial neoplasm consisting of villous or arborescent outgrowths of fibrovascular stroma covered by neoplastic cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Any horny growth such as a wart or callus.
Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.
Irradiation directly from the sun.
Chemical or physical agents that protect the skin from sunburn and erythema by absorbing or blocking ultraviolet radiation.
Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.
A tube-like invagination of the EPIDERMIS from which the hair shaft develops and into which SEBACEOUS GLANDS open. The hair follicle is lined by a cellular inner and outer root sheath of epidermal origin and is invested with a fibrous sheath derived from the dermis. (Stedman, 26th ed) Follicles of very long hairs extend into the subcutaneous layer of tissue under the SKIN.
Mutant strains of rats that produce little or no hair. Several different homozygous recessive mutations can cause hairlessness in rats including rnu/rnu (Rowett nude), fz/fz (fuzzy), shn/shn (shorn), and nznu/nznu (New Zealand nude). Note that while NUDE RATS are often hairless, they are most characteristically athymic.
7,12-Dimethylbenzanthracene. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon found in tobacco smoke that is a potent carcinogen.
A filament-like structure consisting of a shaft which projects to the surface of the SKIN from a root which is softer than the shaft and lodges in the cavity of a HAIR FOLLICLE. It is found on most surfaces of the body.
Visible accumulations of fluid within or beneath the epidermis.
An injury to the skin causing erythema, tenderness, and sometimes blistering and resulting from excessive exposure to the sun. The reaction is produced by the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight.
Small, sacculated organs found within the DERMIS. Each gland has a single duct that emerges from a cluster of oval alveoli. Each alveolus consists of a transparent BASEMENT MEMBRANE enclosing epithelial cells. The ducts from most sebaceous glands open into a HAIR FOLLICLE, but some open on the general surface of the SKIN. Sebaceous glands secrete SEBUM.
Dermatologic disorders attendant upon non-dermatologic disease or injury.
Recirculating, dendritic, antigen-presenting cells containing characteristic racket-shaped granules (Birbeck granules). They are found principally in the stratum spinosum of the EPIDERMIS and are rich in Class II MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX molecules. Langerhans cells were the first dendritic cell to be described and have been a model of study for other dendritic cells (DCs), especially other migrating DCs such as dermal DCs and INTERSTITIAL DENDRITIC CELLS.
A type of acute or chronic skin reaction in which sensitivity is manifested by reactivity to materials or substances coming in contact with the skin. It may involve allergic or non-allergic mechanisms.
Loss of water by diffusion through the skin and by evaporation from the respiratory tract.
Oleagenous substances used topically to soothe, soften or protect skin or mucous membranes. They are used also as vehicles for other dermatologic agents.
A contact dermatitis due to allergic sensitization to various substances. These substances subsequently produce inflammatory reactions in the skin of those who have acquired hypersensitivity to them as a result of prior exposure.
Drugs used to treat or prevent skin disorders or for the routine care of skin.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
A medical specialty concerned with the skin, its structure, functions, diseases, and treatment.
The forcing into the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle, piercing the top skin layer.
Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.
Mammalian pigment cells that produce MELANINS, pigments found mainly in the EPIDERMIS, but also in the eyes and the hair, by a process called melanogenesis. Coloration can be altered by the number of melanocytes or the amount of pigment produced and stored in the organelles called MELANOSOMES. The large non-mammalian melanin-containing cells are called MELANOPHORES.
One of several skin tests to determine past or present tuberculosis infection. A purified protein derivative of the tubercle bacilli, called tuberculin, is introduced into the skin by scratch, puncture, or interdermal injection.
A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.
A non-allergic contact dermatitis caused by prolonged exposure to irritants and not explained by delayed hypersensitivity mechanisms.
Substances intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions. Included in this definition are skin creams, lotions, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail polishes, eye and facial makeup preparations, permanent waves, hair colors, toothpastes, and deodorants, as well as any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic product. (U.S. Food & Drug Administration Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition Office of Cosmetics Fact Sheet (web page) Feb 1995)
Adverse cutaneous reactions caused by ingestion, parenteral use, or local application of a drug. These may assume various morphologic patterns and produce various types of lesions.
Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.
Skin tests in which the sensitizer is injected.
A malignant neoplasm derived from cells that are capable of forming melanin, which may occur in the skin of any part of the body, in the eye, or, rarely, in the mucous membranes of the genitalia, anus, oral cavity, or other sites. It occurs mostly in adults and may originate de novo or from a pigmented nevus or malignant lentigo. Melanomas frequently metastasize widely, and the regional lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and brain are likely to be involved. The incidence of malignant skin melanomas is rising rapidly in all parts of the world. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p2445)
Tumors, cancer or other neoplasms produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A cutaneous inflammatory reaction occurring as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation.
Superficial infections of the skin or its appendages by any of various fungi.
Insoluble polymers of TYROSINE derivatives found in and causing darkness in skin (SKIN PIGMENTATION), hair, and feathers providing protection against SUNBURN induced by SUNLIGHT. CAROTENES contribute yellow and red coloration.
Excessive pigmentation of the skin, usually as a result of increased epidermal or dermal melanin pigmentation, hypermelanosis. Hyperpigmentation can be localized or generalized. The condition may arise from exposure to light, chemicals or other substances, or from a primary metabolic imbalance.
Semisolid preparations used topically for protective emollient effects or as a vehicle for local administration of medications. Ointment bases are various mixtures of fats, waxes, animal and plant oils and solid and liquid hydrocarbons.
Pigmentation disorders are conditions that affect the production or distribution of melanin, the pigment responsible for skin, hair, and eye color, leading to changes in the color of these bodily features.
White or pink lesions on the arms, hands, face, or scalp that arise from sun-induced DNA DAMAGE to KERATINOCYTES in exposed areas. They are considered precursor lesions to superficial SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA.
A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Drugs that act locally on cutaneous or mucosal surfaces to produce inflammation; those that cause redness due to hyperemia are rubefacients; those that raise blisters are vesicants and those that penetrate sebaceous glands and cause abscesses are pustulants; tear gases and mustard gases are also irritants.
Infections of non-skeletal tissue, i.e., exclusive of bone, ligaments, cartilage, and fibrous tissue. The concept is usually referred to as skin and soft tissue infections and usually subcutaneous and muscle tissue are involved. The predisposing factors in anaerobic infections are trauma, ischemia, and surgery. The organisms often derive from the fecal or oral flora, particularly in wounds associated with intestinal surgery, decubitus ulcer, and human bites. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1688)
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
A group of dermatoses with distinct morphologic features. The primary lesion is most commonly a papule, usually erythematous, with a variable degree of scaling on the surface. Plaques form through the coalescing of primary lesions.
A class of fibrous proteins or scleroproteins that represents the principal constituent of EPIDERMIS; HAIR; NAILS; horny tissues, and the organic matrix of tooth ENAMEL. Two major conformational groups have been characterized, alpha-keratin, whose peptide backbone forms a coiled-coil alpha helical structure consisting of TYPE I KERATIN and a TYPE II KERATIN, and beta-keratin, whose backbone forms a zigzag or pleated sheet structure. alpha-Keratins have been classified into at least 20 subtypes. In addition multiple isoforms of subtypes have been found which may be due to GENE DUPLICATION.
The processes of heating and cooling that an organism uses to control its temperature.
The part of the face above the eyes.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
A benign, non-neoplastic, usually self-limiting epithelial lesion closely resembling squamous cell carcinoma clinically and histopathologically. It occurs in solitary, multiple, and eruptive forms. The solitary and multiple forms occur on sunlight exposed areas and are identical histologically; they affect primarily white males. The eruptive form usually involves both sexes and appears as a generalized papular eruption.
Skin diseases affecting or involving the cutaneous blood vessels and generally manifested as inflammation, swelling, erythema, or necrosis in the affected area.
A term used to describe a variety of localized asymmetrical SKIN thickening that is similar to those of SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA but without the disease features in the multiple internal organs and BLOOD VESSELS. Lesions may be characterized as patches or plaques (morphea), bands (linear), or nodules.
A method of non-invasive, continuous measurement of MICROCIRCULATION. The technique is based on the values of the DOPPLER EFFECT of low-power laser light scattered randomly by static structures and moving tissue particulates.
A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).
A chronic disorder of the pilosebaceous apparatus associated with an increase in sebum secretion. It is characterized by open comedones (blackheads), closed comedones (whiteheads), and pustular nodules. The cause is unknown, but heredity and age are predisposing factors.
Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
Mice selectively bred for hypersusceptibility to two-stage chemical skin carcinogenesis. They are also hypersusceptible to UV radiation tumorigenesis with single high-dose, but not chronic low-dose, exposures. SENCAR (SENsitive to CARcinogenesis) mice are used in research as an animal model for tumor production.
An increased reactivity to specific antigens mediated not by antibodies but by cells.
A noninvasive technique that enables direct microscopic examination of the surface and architecture of the SKIN.
An immunoglobulin associated with MAST CELLS. Overexpression has been associated with allergic hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).
The widespread involvement of the skin by a scaly, erythematous dermatitis occurring either as a secondary or reactive process to an underlying cutaneous disorder (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, etc.), or as a primary or idiopathic disease. It is often associated with the loss of hair and nails, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, and pruritus. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Substances that increase the risk of NEOPLASMS in humans or animals. Both genotoxic chemicals, which affect DNA directly, and nongenotoxic chemicals, which induce neoplasms by other mechanism, are included.
Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.
Sweat-producing structures that are embedded in the DERMIS. Each gland consists of a single tube, a coiled body, and a superficial duct.
Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.
Diseases in which skin eruptions or rashes are a prominent manifestation. Classically, six such diseases were described with similar rashes; they were numbered in the order in which they were reported. Only the fourth (Duke's disease), fifth (ERYTHEMA INFECTIOSUM), and sixth (EXANTHEMA SUBITUM) numeric designations survive as occasional synonyms in current terminology.
Skin tests in which the sensitizer is applied to a patch of cotton cloth or gauze held in place for approximately 48-72 hours. It is used for the elicitation of a contact hypersensitivity reaction.
Inbred BALB/c mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been selectively bred to be genetically identical to each other, making them useful for scientific research and experiments due to their consistent genetic background and predictable responses to various stimuli or treatments.
Hand dermatoses is a general term referring to various inflammatory skin conditions primarily affecting the hands, such as eczema, psoriasis, and contact dermatitis, characterized by erythema, scaling, vesiculation, fissuring, or lichenification.
Property of membranes and other structures to permit passage of light, heat, gases, liquids, metabolites, and mineral ions.
The oily substance secreted by SEBACEOUS GLANDS. It is composed of KERATIN, fat, and cellular debris.
Substances used to obtain a lighter skin complexion or to treat HYPERPIGMENTATION disorders.
The outer part of the hearing system of the body. It includes the shell-like EAR AURICLE which collects sound, and the EXTERNAL EAR CANAL, the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE, and the EXTERNAL EAR CARTILAGES.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Hypersensitivity reactions which occur within minutes of exposure to challenging antigen due to the release of histamine which follows the antigen-antibody reaction and causes smooth muscle contraction and increased vascular permeability.
An order of the class Amphibia, which includes several families of frogs and toads. They are characterized by well developed hind limbs adapted for jumping, fused head and trunk and webbed toes. The term "toad" is ambiguous and is properly applied only to the family Bufonidae.
Antigen-type substances that produce immediate hypersensitivity (HYPERSENSITIVITY, IMMEDIATE).
The inspection of one's own body, usually for signs of disease (e.g., BREAST SELF-EXAMINATION, testicular self-examination).
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Any of several generalized skin disorders characterized by dryness, roughness, and scaliness, due to hypertrophy of the stratum corneum epidermis. Most are genetic, but some are acquired, developing in association with other systemic disease or genetic syndrome.
Photochemotherapy using PSORALENS as the photosensitizing agent and ultraviolet light type A (UVA).
The hearing and equilibrium system of the body. It consists of three parts: the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR. Sound waves are transmitted through this organ where vibration is transduced to nerve signals that pass through the ACOUSTIC NERVE to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The inner ear also contains the vestibular organ that maintains equilibrium by transducing signals to the VESTIBULAR NERVE.
Sharp instruments used for puncturing or suturing.
Fabric or other material used to cover the body.
The relationship between the dose of administered radiation and the response of the organism or tissue to the radiation.
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
Therapeutic introduction of ions of soluble salts into tissues by means of electric current. In medical literature it is commonly used to indicate the process of increasing the penetration of drugs into surface tissues by the application of electric current. It has nothing to do with ION EXCHANGE; AIR IONIZATION nor PHONOPHORESIS, none of which requires current.
Facial dermatoses refers to various skin conditions that affect the face, causing symptoms such as redness, inflammation, papules, pustules, scaling, or pigmentation changes, which can be caused by a range of factors including genetics, infections, allergies, and environmental factors.
A phorbol ester found in CROTON OIL with very effective tumor promoting activity. It stimulates the synthesis of both DNA and RNA.
Agents that soften, separate, and cause desquamation of the cornified epithelium or horny layer of skin. They are used to expose mycelia of infecting fungi or to treat corns, warts, and certain other skin diseases.
Neoplasms composed of sebaceous or sweat gland tissue or tissue of other skin appendages. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the sebaceous or sweat glands or in the other skin appendages.
A pruritic papulovesicular dermatitis occurring as a reaction to many endogenous and exogenous agents (Dorland, 27th ed).
Cells specialized to transduce mechanical stimuli and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Mechanoreceptor cells include the INNER EAR hair cells, which mediate hearing and balance, and the various somatosensory receptors, often with non-neural accessory structures.
Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.
Color of hair or fur.
The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.
The use of ultraviolet electromagnetic radiation in the treatment of disease, usually of the skin. This is the part of the sun's spectrum that causes sunburn and tanning. Ultraviolet A, used in PUVA, is closer to visible light and less damaging than Ultraviolet B, which is ionizing.
Substances used on humans and other animals that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. They are distinguished from DISINFECTANTS, which are used on inanimate objects.
A circumscribed stable malformation of the skin and occasionally of the oral mucosa, which is not due to external causes and therefore presumed to be of hereditary origin.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Clothing designed to protect the individual against possible exposure to known hazards.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
A nevus containing melanin. The term is usually restricted to nevocytic nevi (round or oval collections of melanin-containing nevus cells occurring at the dermoepidermal junction of the skin or in the dermis proper) or moles, but may be applied to other pigmented nevi.
Absence of hair from areas where it is normally present.
A malignant tumor of the skin appendages, which include the hair, nails, sebaceous glands, sweat glands, and the mammary glands. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Sensation of making physical contact with objects, animate or inanimate. Tactile stimuli are detected by MECHANORECEPTORS in the skin and mucous membranes.
Group of genetically determined disorders characterized by the blistering of skin and mucosae. There are four major forms: acquired, simple, junctional, and dystrophic. Each of the latter three has several varieties.
Sodium or potassium salts of long chain fatty acids. These detergent substances are obtained by boiling natural oils or fats with caustic alkali. Sodium soaps are harder and are used as topical anti-infectives and vehicles in pills and liniments; potassium soaps are soft, used as vehicles for ointments and also as topical antimicrobials.
Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
Severe irritant and vesicant of skin, eyes, and lungs. It may cause blindness and lethal lung edema and was formerly used as a war gas. The substance has been proposed as a cytostatic and for treatment of psoriasis. It has been listed as a known carcinogen in the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP-85-002, 1985) (Merck, 11th ed).
A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.
Group of chronic blistering diseases characterized histologically by ACANTHOLYSIS and blister formation within the EPIDERMIS.
A rapid onset form of SYSTEMIC SCLERODERMA with progressive widespread SKIN thickening over the arms, the legs and the trunk, resulting in stiffness and disability.
Exposing oneself to SUNLIGHT or ULTRAVIOLET RAYS.
A nonimmunologic, chemically induced type of photosensitivity producing a sometimes vesiculating dermatitis. It results in hyperpigmentation and desquamation of the light-exposed areas of the skin.
Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.
Granulated cells that are found in almost all tissues, most abundantly in the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. Like the BASOPHILS, mast cells contain large amounts of HISTAMINE and HEPARIN. Unlike basophils, mast cells normally remain in the tissues and do not circulate in the blood. Mast cells, derived from the bone marrow stem cells, are regulated by the STEM CELL FACTOR.
The outer covering of the calvaria. It is composed of several layers: SKIN; subcutaneous connective tissue; the occipitofrontal muscle which includes the tendinous galea aponeurotica; loose connective tissue; and the pericranium (the PERIOSTEUM of the SKULL).
The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.
A mitosporic fungal genus that causes a variety of skin disorders. Malassezia furfur (Pityrosporum orbiculare) causes TINEA VERSICOLOR.
Benign eccrine poromas that present as multiple oval, brown-to-black plaques, located mostly on the chest and back. The age of onset is usually in the fourth or fifth decade.
A chronic inflammatory disease of the skin with unknown etiology. It is characterized by moderate ERYTHEMA, dry, moist, or greasy (SEBACEOUS GLAND) scaling and yellow crusted patches on various areas, especially the scalp, that exfoliate as dandruff. Seborrheic dermatitis is common in children and adolescents with HIV INFECTIONS.
The combination of two or more different factors in the production of cancer.
Imaging the temperatures in a material, or in the body or an organ. Imaging is based on self-emanating infrared radiation (HEAT WAVES), or on changes in properties of the material or tissue that vary with temperature, such as ELASTICITY; MAGNETIC FIELD; or LUMINESCENCE.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
The destruction of germs causing disease.
Proteins obtained from species in the class of AMPHIBIANS.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Immunologically mediated adverse reactions to medicinal substances used legally or illegally.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Diseases affecting the orderly growth and persistence of hair.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.
Part of the arm in humans and primates extending from the ELBOW to the WRIST.
Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.
Benign epidermal proliferations or tumors; some are viral in origin.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
A contagious cutaneous inflammation caused by the bite of the mite SARCOPTES SCABIEI. It is characterized by pruritic papular eruptions and burrows and affects primarily the axillae, elbows, wrists, and genitalia, although it can spread to cover the entire body.
A derivative of PREDNISOLONE with high glucocorticoid activity and low mineralocorticoid activity. Absorbed through the skin faster than FLUOCINONIDE, it is used topically in treatment of PSORIASIS but may cause marked adrenocortical suppression.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.
Any one of five terminal digits of the vertebrate FOOT.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
An ulceration caused by prolonged pressure on the SKIN and TISSUES when one stays in one position for a long period of time, such as lying in bed. The bony areas of the body are the most frequently affected sites which become ischemic (ISCHEMIA) under sustained and constant pressure.
A sharply elevated, irregularly shaped, progressively enlarging scar resulting from formation of excessive amounts of collagen in the dermis during connective tissue repair. It is differentiated from a hypertrophic scar (CICATRIX, HYPERTROPHIC) in that the former does not spread to surrounding tissues.
Skin diseases of the foot, general or unspecified.
A vascular reaction of the skin characterized by erythema and wheal formation due to localized increase of vascular permeability. The causative mechanism may be allergy, infection, or stress.
A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.
A type I keratin that is found associated with the KERATIN-1 in terminally differentiated epidermal cells such as those that form the stratum corneum. Mutations in the genes that encode keratin-10 have been associated with HYPERKERATOSIS, EPIDERMOLYTIC.
Material used for wrapping or binding any part of the body.
The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.
Flat keratinous structures found on the skin surface of birds. Feathers are made partly of a hollow shaft fringed with barbs. They constitute the plumage.
Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.
An iodinated polyvinyl polymer used as topical antiseptic in surgery and for skin and mucous membrane infections, also as aerosol. The iodine may be radiolabeled for research purposes.
A shiny gray element with atomic symbol As, atomic number 33, and atomic weight 75. It occurs throughout the universe, mostly in the form of metallic arsenides. Most forms are toxic. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), arsenic and certain arsenic compounds have been listed as known carcinogens. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Viscous, nauseating oil obtained from the shrub Croton tiglium (Euphorbaceae). It is a vesicant and skin irritant used as pharmacologic standard for skin inflammation and allergy and causes skin cancer. It was formerly used as an emetic and cathartic with frequent mortality.
Each of the upper and lower folds of SKIN which cover the EYE when closed.
Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.
An acute, diffuse, and suppurative inflammation of loose connective tissue, particularly the deep subcutaneous tissues, and sometimes muscle, which is most commonly seen as a result of infection of a wound, ulcer, or other skin lesions.
A vascular connective tissue formed on the surface of a healing wound, ulcer, or inflamed tissue. It consists of new capillaries and an infiltrate containing lymphoid cells, macrophages, and plasma cells.
Filaments 7-11 nm in diameter found in the cytoplasm of all cells. Many specific proteins belong to this group, e.g., desmin, vimentin, prekeratin, decamin, skeletin, neurofilin, neurofilament protein, and glial fibrillary acid protein.
Coverings for the hands, usually with separations for the fingers, made of various materials, for protection against infections, toxic substances, extremes of hot and cold, radiations, water immersion, etc. The gloves may be worn by patients, care givers, housewives, laboratory and industrial workers, police, etc.
The thin, horny plates that cover the dorsal surfaces of the distal phalanges of the fingers and toes of primates.
An isomer of 1-PROPANOL. It is a colorless liquid having disinfectant properties. It is used in the manufacture of acetone and its derivatives and as a solvent. Topically, it is used as an antiseptic.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.
Disorders of increased melanin pigmentation that develop without preceding inflammatory disease.
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.

Glycopeptides from the surgace of human neuroblastoma cells. (1/19537)

Glycopeptides suggesting a complex oligosaccharide composition are present on the surface of cells from human neuroblastoma tumors and several cell lines derived from the tumors. The glycopeptides, labeled with radioactive L-fucose, were removed from the cell surface with trypsin, digested with Pronase, and examined by chromatography on Sephadex G-50. Human skin fibroblasts, brain cells, and a fibroblast line derived from neuroblastoma tumor tissue show less complex glycopeptides. Although some differences exist between the cell lines and the primary tumor cells, the similarities between these human tumors and animal tumors examined previously are striking.  (+info)

Explanations for the clinical and microscopic localization of lesions in pemphigus foliaceus and vulgaris. (2/19537)

Patients with pemphigus foliaceus (PF) have blisters on skin, but not mucous membranes, whereas patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) develop blisters on mucous membranes and/or skin. PF and PV blisters are due to loss of keratinocyte cell-cell adhesion in the superficial and deep epidermis, respectively. PF autoantibodies are directed against desmoglein (Dsg) 1; PV autoantibodies bind Dsg3 or both Dsg3 and Dsg1. In this study, we test the hypothesis that coexpression of Dsg1 and Dsg3 in keratinocytes protects against pathology due to antibody-induced dysfunction of either one alone. Using passive transfer of pemphigus IgG to normal and DSG3(null) neonatal mice, we show that in the areas of epidermis and mucous membrane that coexpress Dsg1 and Dsg3, antibodies against either desmoglein alone do not cause spontaneous blisters, but antibodies against both do. In areas (such as superficial epidermis of normal mice) where Dsg1 without Dsg3 is expressed, anti-Dsg1 antibodies alone can cause blisters. Thus, the anti-desmoglein antibody profiles in pemphigus sera and the normal tissue distributions of Dsg1 and Dsg3 determine the sites of blister formation. These studies suggest that pemphigus autoantibodies inhibit the adhesive function of desmoglein proteins, and demonstrate that either Dsg1 or Dsg3 alone is sufficient to maintain keratinocyte adhesion.  (+info)

Activation of telomerase and its association with G1-phase of the cell cycle during UVB-induced skin tumorigenesis in SKH-1 hairless mouse. (3/19537)

Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that adds hexanucleotide repeats TTAGGG to the ends of chromosomes. Telomerase activation is known to play a crucial role in cell-immortalization and carcinogenesis. Telomerase is shown to have a correlation with cell cycle progression, which is controlled by the regulation of cyclins, cyclin dependent kinases (cdks) and cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors (cdkis). Abnormal expression of these regulatory molecules may cause alterations in cell cycle with uncontrolled cell growth, a universal feature of neoplasia. Skin cancer is the most prevalent form of cancer in humans and the solar UV radiation is its major cause. Here, we investigated modulation in telomerase activity and protein expression of cell cycle regulatory molecules during the development of UVB-induced tumors in SKH-1 hairless mice. The mice were exposed to 180 mjoules/cm2 UVB radiation, thrice weekly for 24 weeks. The animals were sacrificed at 4 week intervals and the studies were performed in epidermis. Telomerase activity was barely detectable in the epidermis of non-irradiated mouse. UVB exposure resulted in a progressive increase in telomerase activity starting from the 4th week of exposure. The increased telomerase activity either persisted or further increased with the increased exposure. In papillomas and carcinomas the enzyme activity was comparable and was 45-fold higher than in the epidermis of control mice. Western blot analysis showed an upregulation in the protein expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E and their regulatory subunits cdk4 and cdk2 during the course of UVB exposure and in papillomas and carcinomas. The protein expression of cdk6 and ckis viz. p16/Ink4A, p21/Waf1 and p27/Kip1 did not show any significant change in UVB exposed skin, but significant upregulation was observed both in papillomas and carcinomas. The results suggest that telomerase activation may be involved in UVB-induced tumorigenesis in mouse skin and that increased telomerase activity may be associated with G1 phase of the cell cycle.  (+info)

Metallothionein-null mice absorb less Zn from an egg-white diet, but a similar amount from solutions, although with altered intertissue Zn distribution. (4/19537)

The influence of metallothionein (MT) on Zn transfer into non-gut tissues was investigated in MT-null (MT-/-) and normal (MT+/+) mice 4 h after oral gavage of aqueous 65ZnSO4solution at doses of 154, 385, 770 and 1540 nmol Zn per mouse. Zn transfer was not significantly different between MT+/+ and MT-/- mice and was directly proportional to the oral dose (slope = 0.127, r = 0.991; 0. 146, r = 0.994, respectively). Blood 65Zn and plasma Zn concentrations increased progressively in MT-/- mice at doses >154 nmol Zn, reaching levels of 2.4% of oral dose and 60 micromol/L, respectively, at the 1540 nmol Zn dose. The corresponding values for MT+/+ mice were approximately half, 1.0% and 29 micromol/L. Intergenotypic differences were found in tissue distribution of 65Zn within the body; MT-/- mice had higher 65Zn levels in muscle, skin, heart and brain, whereas MT+/+ mice retained progressively more Zn in the liver, in conjunction with a linear increase in hepatic MT up to the highest Zn dose. MT induction in the small intestine reached its maximum at an oral dose of 385 nmol Zn and did not differ at higher doses. Absorption of a 770 nmol 65Zn dose from a solid egg-white diet was only one fourth (MT+/+) and one eighth (MT-/-) of the Zn absorption from the same dose of 65Zn in aqueous solution. MT+/+ mice had greater (P < 0.05) Zn absorption from the egg-white diet than did MT-/- mice, indicating that gut MT confers an absorptive advantage, but only when Zn is incorporated into solid food.  (+info)

Accumulation of astaxanthin all-E, 9Z and 13Z geometrical isomers and 3 and 3' RS optical isomers in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is selective. (5/19537)

Concentrations of all-E-, 9Z- and 13Z- geometrical and (3R,3'R), (3R, 3'S) and (3S,3'S) optical isomers of astaxanthin were determined in rainbow trout liver, gut tissues, kidney, skin and blood plasma to evaluate their body distribution. Two cold-pelleted diets containing predominantly all-E-astaxanthin (36.9 mg/kg astaxanthin, 97% all-E-, 0.4% 9Z-, 1.5% 13Z-astaxanthin, and 1.1% other isomers, respectively) or a mixture of all-E- and Z-astaxanthins (35.4 mg/kg astaxanthin, 64% all-E-, 18.7% 9Z-, 12.3% 13Z-astaxanthin, and 2.0% other isomers, respectively), were fed to duplicate groups of trout for 69 d. Individual E/Z isomers were identified by VIS- and 1H-NMR-spectrometry, and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Significantly higher total carotenoid concentration was observed in plasma of trout fed diets with all-E-astaxanthin (P < 0.05). The relative E/Z-isomer concentrations of plasma, skin and kidney were not significantly different among groups, whereas all-E-astaxanthin was higher in intestinal tissues and 13Z-astaxanthin was lower in liver of trout fed all-E-astaxanthin (P < 0.05). The relative amount of hepatic 13Z-astaxanthin (39-49% of total astaxanthin) was higher than in all other samples (P < 0.05). Synthetic, optically inactive astaxanthin was used in all experiments, and the determined dietary ratio between the 3R,3'R:3R, 3'S (meso):3S,3'S optical isomers was 25.3:49.6:25.1. The distribution of R/S-astaxanthin isomers in feces, blood, liver and fillet was similar to that in the diets. The ratio between (3S,3'S)- and (3R,3'R)-astaxanthin in the skin and posterior kidney was ca. 2:1 and 3:1, respectively, regardless of dietary E/Z-astaxanthin composition. The results show that geometrical and optical isomers of astaxanthin are distributed selectively in different tissues of rainbow trout.  (+info)

Interferon-alpha does not improve outcome at one year in patients with diffuse cutaneous scleroderma: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. (6/19537)

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) reduces the severity of skin involvement in early (<3 years) diffuse scleroderma. METHODS: In a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial, 35 patients with early scleroderma received subcutaneous injections of either IFNalpha (13.5 x 10(6) units per week in divided doses) or indistinguishable placebo. Outcomes assessed were the modified Rodnan skin score, as determined by a single observer at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months, as well as data on renal, cardiac, and lung function. Pre- and posttreatment skin biopsy samples were analyzed and blood was obtained for assessment of procollagen peptide levels. RESULTS: There were 11 withdrawals from the IFNalpha group and 3 from the placebo group due to either toxicity, lack of efficacy, or death. In the intent-to-treat analysis, there was a greater improvement in the skin score in the placebo group between 0 and 12 months (mean change IFNalpha -4.7 versus placebo -7.5; P = 0.36). There was also a greater deterioration in lung function in patients receiving active therapy, as assessed by either the forced vital capacity (mean change IFNalpha -8.2 versus placebo +1.3; P = 0.01) or the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (mean change IFNalpha -9.3 versus placebo +4.7; P = 0.002). Skin biopsy showed no significant decrease in collagen synthesis in the IFNalpha group, and no significant differences in the levels of procollagen peptides were seen between the 2 groups. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that IFNalpha is of no value in the treatment of scleroderma, and that it may in fact be deleterious.  (+info)

Hydrophobic interaction of human, mouse, and rabbit interferons with immobilized hydrocarbons. (7/19537)

Interferons of human, mouse, and rabbit origin bind to straight chain hydrocarbons immobilized on agarose. The hydrophobic nature of binding is established by the following observations: (a) a positive correlation between the length of hydrocarbon ligand and the strength of interaction; (b) a stronger interaction with hydrocarbon ligands terminated with apolar rather than polar head groups; (c) a lack of dependence of binding on ionic strength and pH of the solvent; (d) a reversal of binding by ethylene glycol, a hydrophobic solute; (e) an increasing eluting efficacy of tetraalkylammonium ions with the length of their alkyl substituents. The hydrophobic interactions of human interferon underlie the efficiency of two-step chromatographic procedures. For example, human embryo kidney interferon can be purified about 3,600-fold by sequential chromatography on (a) concanavalin A-agarose, (b) octyl-agarose. Another two-step procedure: (a) concanavalin A-agarose, (b) L-tryptophan-agarose, gives about 10,000-fold purification. The overall recovery of interferon in both cases in close to 90%.  (+info)

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated angiogenesis is associated with enhanced endothelial cell survival and induction of Bcl-2 expression. (8/19537)

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell mitogen and permeability factor that is potently angiogenic in vivo. We report here studies that suggest that VEGF potentiates angiogenesis in vivo and prolongs the survival of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) in vitro by inducing expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Growth-factor-enriched and serum-deficient cultures of HDMECs grown on collagen type I gels with VEGF exhibited a 4-fold and a 1.6-fold reduction, respectively, in the proportion of apoptotic cells. Enhanced HDMEC survival was associated with a dose-dependent increase in Bcl-2 expression and a decrease in the expression of the processed forms of the cysteine protease caspase-3. Cultures of HDMECs transduced with and overexpressing Bcl-2 and deprived of growth factors showed enhanced protection from apoptosis and exhibited a twofold increase in cell number and a fourfold increase in the number of capillary-like sprouts. HDMECs overexpressing Bcl-2 when incorporated into polylactic acid sponges and implanted into SCID mice exhibited a sustained fivefold increase in the number of microvessels and a fourfold decrease in the number of apoptotic cells when examined 7 and 14 days later. These results suggest that the angiogenic activity attributed to VEGF may be due in part to its ability to enhance endothelial cell survival by inducing expression of Bcl-2.  (+info)

In medical terms, the skin is the largest organ of the human body. It consists of two main layers: the epidermis (outer layer) and dermis (inner layer), as well as accessory structures like hair follicles, sweat glands, and oil glands. The skin plays a crucial role in protecting us from external factors such as bacteria, viruses, and environmental hazards, while also regulating body temperature and enabling the sense of touch.

Skin aging, also known as cutaneous aging, is a complex and multifactorial process characterized by various visible changes in the skin's appearance and function. It can be divided into two main types: intrinsic (chronological or natural) aging and extrinsic (environmental) aging.

Intrinsic aging is a genetically determined and time-dependent process that results from internal factors such as cellular metabolism, hormonal changes, and genetic predisposition. The primary features of intrinsic aging include gradual thinning of the epidermis and dermis, decreased collagen and elastin production, reduced skin cell turnover, and impaired wound healing. Clinically, these changes present as fine wrinkles, dryness, loss of elasticity, and increased fragility of the skin.

Extrinsic aging, on the other hand, is caused by external factors such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation, pollution, smoking, alcohol consumption, and poor nutrition. Exposure to these environmental elements leads to oxidative stress, inflammation, and DNA damage, which accelerate the aging process. The main features of extrinsic aging are coarse wrinkles, pigmentary changes (e.g., age spots, melasma), irregular texture, skin laxity, and increased risk of developing skin cancers.

It is important to note that intrinsic and extrinsic aging processes often interact and contribute to the overall appearance of aged skin. A comprehensive approach to skincare should address both types of aging to maintain healthy and youthful-looking skin.

Skin diseases, also known as dermatological conditions, refer to any medical condition that affects the skin, which is the largest organ of the human body. These diseases can affect the skin's function, appearance, or overall health. They can be caused by various factors, including genetics, infections, allergies, environmental factors, and aging.

Skin diseases can present in many different forms, such as rashes, blisters, sores, discolorations, growths, or changes in texture. Some common examples of skin diseases include acne, eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis, fungal infections, viral infections, bacterial infections, and skin cancer.

The symptoms and severity of skin diseases can vary widely depending on the specific condition and individual factors. Some skin diseases are mild and can be treated with over-the-counter medications or topical creams, while others may require more intensive treatments such as prescription medications, light therapy, or even surgery.

It is important to seek medical attention if you experience any unusual or persistent changes in your skin, as some skin diseases can be serious or indicative of other underlying health conditions. A dermatologist is a medical doctor who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of skin diseases.

Skin neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the skin that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). They result from uncontrolled multiplication of skin cells, which can form various types of lesions. These growths may appear as lumps, bumps, sores, patches, or discolored areas on the skin.

Benign skin neoplasms include conditions such as moles, warts, and seborrheic keratoses, while malignant skin neoplasms are primarily classified into melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma. These three types of cancerous skin growths are collectively known as non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs). Melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous form of skin cancer, while NMSCs tend to be less invasive but more common.

It's essential to monitor any changes in existing skin lesions or the appearance of new growths and consult a healthcare professional for proper evaluation and treatment if needed.

"Skin physiological phenomena" is not a standard medical term with a specific definition. However, I can provide some information about the general concepts that might be encompassed by this term.

Physiological phenomena refer to the functions and processes that occur in living organisms. When it comes to the skin, there are many different physiological phenomena that take place, including:

1. Barrier function: The skin acts as a barrier to protect the body from external elements such as bacteria, viruses, chemicals, and UV radiation.
2. Temperature regulation: The skin helps regulate body temperature through sweat production and blood flow.
3. Sensation: The skin contains nerve endings that allow us to feel touch, pressure, pain, and temperature.
4. Vitamin D synthesis: The skin can produce vitamin D when exposed to sunlight.
5. Moisture regulation: The skin helps maintain the body's moisture balance by producing sweat and preventing water loss.
6. Immunological function: The skin plays a role in the immune system by providing a physical barrier and containing immune cells that help fight off infections.
7. Excretion: The skin eliminates waste products through sweat.
8. Wound healing: The skin has the ability to repair itself after injury, through a complex process involving inflammation, tissue regeneration, and remodeling.

Therefore, "skin physiological phenomena" could refer to any or all of these functions and processes that take place in the skin.

Skin tests are medical diagnostic procedures that involve the application of a small amount of a substance to the skin, usually through a scratch, prick, or injection, to determine if the body has an allergic reaction to it. The most common type of skin test is the patch test, which involves applying a patch containing a small amount of the suspected allergen to the skin and observing the area for signs of a reaction, such as redness, swelling, or itching, over a period of several days. Another type of skin test is the intradermal test, in which a small amount of the substance is injected just beneath the surface of the skin. Skin tests are used to help diagnose allergies, including those to pollen, mold, pets, and foods, as well as to identify sensitivities to medications, chemicals, and other substances.

Skin absorption, also known as percutaneous absorption, refers to the process by which substances are taken up by the skin and pass into the systemic circulation. This occurs when a substance is applied topically to the skin and penetrates through the various layers of the epidermis and dermis until it reaches the capillaries, where it can be transported to other parts of the body.

The rate and extent of skin absorption depend on several factors, including the physicochemical properties of the substance (such as its molecular weight, lipophilicity, and charge), the concentration and formulation of the product, the site of application, and the integrity and condition of the skin.

Skin absorption is an important route of exposure for many chemicals, drugs, and cosmetic ingredients, and it can have both therapeutic and toxicological consequences. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms and factors that influence skin absorption is crucial for assessing the safety and efficacy of topical products and for developing strategies to enhance or reduce their absorption as needed.

Skin pigmentation is the coloration of the skin that is primarily determined by two types of melanin pigments, eumelanin and pheomelanin. These pigments are produced by melanocytes, which are specialized cells located in the epidermis. Eumelanin is responsible for brown or black coloration, while pheomelanin produces a red or yellow hue.

The amount and distribution of melanin in the skin can vary depending on genetic factors, age, sun exposure, and various other influences. Increased production of melanin in response to UV radiation from the sun helps protect the skin from damage, leading to darkening or tanning of the skin. However, excessive sun exposure can also cause irregular pigmentation, such as sunspots or freckles.

Abnormalities in skin pigmentation can result from various medical conditions, including albinism (lack of melanin production), vitiligo (loss of melanocytes leading to white patches), and melasma (excessive pigmentation often caused by hormonal changes). These conditions may require medical treatment to manage or improve the pigmentation issues.

Artificial Skin is a synthetic substitute or equivalent that is used to replace, support, or enhance the function of damaged or absent skin. It can be made from various materials such as biopolymers, composites, or biosynthetic materials. The main purpose of artificial skin is to provide a temporary or permanent covering for wounds, burns, or ulcers that cannot be healed with conventional treatments. Additionally, it may serve as a platform for the delivery of medications or as a matrix for the growth of cells and tissues during skin grafting procedures. Artificial skin must possess properties such as biocompatibility, durability, flexibility, and permeability to air and water vapor in order to promote optimal healing and minimize scarring.

Bacterial skin diseases are a type of infectious skin condition caused by various species of bacteria. These bacteria can multiply rapidly on the skin's surface when given the right conditions, leading to infection and inflammation. Some common bacterial skin diseases include:

1. Impetigo: A highly contagious superficial skin infection that typically affects exposed areas such as the face, hands, and feet. It is commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria.
2. Cellulitis: A deep-skin infection that can spread rapidly and involves the inner layers of the skin and underlying tissue. It is often caused by Group A Streptococcus or Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.
3. Folliculitis: An inflammation of hair follicles, usually caused by an infection with Staphylococcus aureus or other bacteria.
4. Furuncles (boils) and carbuncles: Deep infections that develop from folliculitis when the infection spreads to surrounding tissue. A furuncle is a single boil, while a carbuncle is a cluster of boils.
5. Erysipelas: A superficial skin infection characterized by redness, swelling, and warmth in the affected area. It is typically caused by Group A Streptococcus bacteria.
6. MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) infections: Skin infections caused by a strain of Staphylococcus aureus that has developed resistance to many antibiotics, making it more difficult to treat.
7. Leptospirosis: A bacterial infection transmitted through contact with contaminated water or soil and characterized by flu-like symptoms and skin rashes.

Treatment for bacterial skin diseases usually involves the use of topical or oral antibiotics, depending on the severity and location of the infection. In some cases, drainage of pus-filled abscesses may be necessary to promote healing. Proper hygiene and wound care can help prevent the spread of these infections.

A skin ulcer is a defined as a loss of continuity or disruption of the skin surface, often accompanied by inflammation and/or infection. These lesions can result from various causes including pressure, venous or arterial insufficiency, diabetes, and chronic dermatological conditions. Skin ulcers are typically characterized by their appearance, depth, location, and underlying cause. Common types of skin ulcers include pressure ulcers (also known as bedsores), venous leg ulcers, arterial ulcers, and diabetic foot ulcers. Proper evaluation, wound care, management of underlying conditions, and prevention strategies are crucial in the treatment of skin ulcers to promote healing and prevent complications.

The epidermis is the outermost layer of the skin, composed mainly of stratified squamous epithelium. It forms a protective barrier that prevents water loss and inhibits the entry of microorganisms. The epidermis contains no blood vessels, and its cells are nourished by diffusion from the underlying dermis. The bottom-most layer of the epidermis, called the stratum basale, is responsible for generating new skin cells that eventually move up to replace dead cells on the surface. This process of cell turnover takes about 28 days in adults.

The most superficial part of the epidermis consists of dead cells called squames, which are constantly shed and replaced. The exact rate at which this happens varies depending on location; for example, it's faster on the palms and soles than elsewhere. Melanocytes, the pigment-producing cells, are also located in the epidermis, specifically within the stratum basale layer.

In summary, the epidermis is a vital part of our integumentary system, providing not only physical protection but also playing a crucial role in immunity and sensory perception through touch receptors called Pacinian corpuscles.

Skin abnormalities refer to any changes in the skin that deviate from its normal structure, function, or color. These can manifest as various conditions such as lesions, growths, discolorations, or textural alterations. Examples include moles, freckles, birthmarks, rashes, hives, acne, eczema, psoriasis, rosacea, skin cancer, and many others. Some skin abnormalities may be harmless and require no treatment, while others might indicate an underlying medical condition that requires further evaluation and management.

Staphylococcal skin infections are a type of skin infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteria, which commonly live on the skin and inside the nose without causing harm. However, if they enter the body through a cut or scratch, they can cause an infection.

There are several types of staphylococcal skin infections, including:

1. Impetigo: A highly contagious superficial skin infection that typically affects children and causes red, fluid-filled blisters that burst and leave a yellowish crust.
2. Folliculitis: An inflammation of the hair follicles that causes red, pus-filled bumps or pimples on the skin.
3. Furunculosis: A deeper infection of the hair follicle that forms a large, painful lump or boil under the skin.
4. Cellulitis: A potentially serious bacterial infection that affects the deeper layers of the skin and can cause redness, swelling, warmth, and pain in the affected area.
5. Abscess: A collection of pus that forms in the skin, often caused by a staphylococcal infection.

Treatment for staphylococcal skin infections typically involves antibiotics, either topical or oral, depending on the severity and location of the infection. In some cases, drainage of pus or other fluids may be necessary to promote healing. Preventing the spread of staphylococcal skin infections involves good hygiene practices, such as washing hands frequently, covering wounds and cuts, and avoiding sharing personal items like towels or razors.

Dermatitis is a general term that describes inflammation of the skin. It is often characterized by redness, swelling, itching, and tenderness. There are many different types of dermatitis, including atopic dermatitis (eczema), contact dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, and nummular dermatitis.

Atopic dermatitis is a chronic skin condition that often affects people with a family history of allergies, such as asthma or hay fever. It typically causes dry, scaly patches on the skin that can be extremely itchy.

Contact dermatitis occurs when the skin comes into contact with an irritant or allergen, such as poison ivy or certain chemicals. This type of dermatitis can cause redness, swelling, and blistering.

Seborrheic dermatitis is a common condition that causes a red, itchy rash, often on the scalp, face, or other areas of the body where oil glands are located. It is thought to be related to an overproduction of oil by the skin's sebaceous glands.

Nummular dermatitis is a type of eczema that causes round, coin-shaped patches of dry, scaly skin. It is more common in older adults and often occurs during the winter months.

Treatment for dermatitis depends on the underlying cause and severity of the condition. In some cases, over-the-counter creams or lotions may be sufficient to relieve symptoms. Prescription medications, such as corticosteroids or immunosuppressants, may be necessary in more severe cases. Avoiding triggers and irritants can also help prevent flare-ups of dermatitis.

Dermatologic surgical procedures refer to various types of surgeries performed by dermatologists, which are aimed at treating and managing conditions related to the skin, hair, nails, and mucous membranes. These procedures can be divided into several categories, including:

1. Excisional surgery: This involves removing a lesion or growth by cutting it out with a scalpel. The resulting wound is then closed with stitches, sutures, or left to heal on its own.
2. Incisional biopsy: This is a type of excisional surgery where only a portion of the lesion is removed for diagnostic purposes.
3. Cryosurgery: This involves using extreme cold (usually liquid nitrogen) to destroy abnormal tissue, such as warts or precancerous growths.
4. Electrosurgical procedures: These use heat generated by an electric current to remove or destroy skin lesions. Examples include electrodessication and curettage (ED&C), which involves scraping away the affected tissue with a sharp instrument and then applying heat to seal the wound.
5. Laser surgery: Dermatologic surgeons use various types of lasers to treat a wide range of conditions, such as removing tattoos, reducing wrinkles, or treating vascular lesions.
6. Mohs micrographic surgery: This is a specialized surgical technique used to treat certain types of skin cancer, particularly basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. It involves removing the tumor in thin layers and examining each layer under a microscope until no cancer cells remain.
7. Scar revision surgery: Dermatologic surgeons can perform procedures to improve the appearance of scars, such as excising the scar and reclosing the wound or using laser therapy to minimize redness and thickness.
8. Hair transplantation: This involves removing hair follicles from one area of the body (usually the back of the head) and transplanting them to another area where hair is thinning or absent, such as the scalp or eyebrows.
9. Flap surgery: In this procedure, a piece of tissue with its own blood supply is moved from one part of the body to another and then reattached. This can be used for reconstructive purposes after skin cancer removal or trauma.
10. Liposuction: Dermatologic surgeons may perform liposuction to remove excess fat from various areas of the body, such as the abdomen, thighs, or chin.

Skin diseases of viral origin are conditions that affect the skin caused by viral infections. These infections can lead to various symptoms such as rashes, blisters, papules, and skin lesions. Some common examples of viral skin diseases include:

1. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) infection: This causes cold sores or genital herpes, which are characterized by small, painful blisters on the skin.
2. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection: This causes chickenpox and shingles, which are characterized by itchy, fluid-filled blisters on the skin.
3. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection: This causes warts, which are small, rough growths on the skin.
4. Molluscum contagiosum: This is a viral infection that causes small, raised, and pearly white bumps on the skin.
5. Measles: This is a highly contagious viral disease characterized by fever, cough, runny nose, and a rash that spreads all over the body.
6. Rubella: Also known as German measles, this viral infection causes a red rash on the face and neck that spreads to the rest of the body.

Viral skin diseases can be spread through direct contact with an infected person or contaminated objects, such as towels or bedding. Some viral skin diseases can be prevented through vaccination, while others can be treated with antiviral medications or other therapies.

A skin cream is not a medical term per se, but it generally refers to a topical emollient preparation intended for application to the skin. It contains a mixture of water, oil, and active ingredients, which are formulated to provide various benefits such as moisturizing, protecting, soothing, or treating specific skin conditions. The exact definition and composition may vary depending on the product's intended use and formulation.

Examples of active ingredients in skin creams include:

1. Moisturizers (e.g., glycerin, hyaluronic acid) - help to retain water in the skin, making it feel softer and smoother.
2. Emollients (e.g., shea butter, coconut oil, petrolatum) - provide a protective barrier that helps prevent moisture loss and soften the skin.
3. Humectants (e.g., urea, lactic acid, alpha-hydroxy acids) - attract water from the environment or deeper layers of the skin to hydrate the surface.
4. Anti-inflammatory agents (e.g., hydrocortisone, aloe vera) - help reduce redness, swelling, and itching associated with various skin conditions.
5. Antioxidants (e.g., vitamin C, vitamin E, green tea extract) - protect the skin from free radical damage and environmental stressors that can lead to premature aging.
6. Sunscreen agents (e.g., zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, chemical filters) - provide broad-spectrum protection against UVA and UVB rays.
7. Skin lighteners (e.g., hydroquinone, kojic acid, arbutin) - help reduce the appearance of hyperpigmentation and even out skin tone.
8. Acne treatments (e.g., benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, retinoids) - target acne-causing bacteria, unclog pores, and regulate cell turnover to prevent breakouts.

It is essential to choose a skin cream based on your specific skin type and concerns, as well as any medical conditions or allergies you may have. Always consult with a dermatologist or healthcare provider before starting a new skincare regimen.

Skin physiological processes refer to the functions and changes that occur in the skin, which are necessary for its maintenance, repair, and regulation of body homeostasis. These processes include:

1. Barrier Function: The skin forms a physical barrier that protects the body from external factors such as microorganisms, chemicals, and UV radiation. It also helps to prevent water loss from the body.
2. Temperature Regulation: The skin plays a crucial role in regulating body temperature through sweat production and blood flow.
3. Immunological Function: The skin contains immune cells that help to protect the body against infection and disease.
4. Vitamin D Synthesis: The skin is able to synthesize vitamin D when exposed to sunlight.
5. Sensory Perception: The skin contains nerve endings that allow for the perception of touch, pressure, temperature, and pain.
6. Wound Healing: When the skin is injured, a complex series of physiological processes are initiated to repair the damage and restore the barrier function.
7. Excretion: The skin helps to eliminate waste products through sweat.
8. Hydration: The skin maintains hydration by regulating water loss and absorbing moisture from the environment.
9. Pigmentation: The production of melanin in the skin provides protection against UV radiation and determines skin color.
10. Growth and Differentiation: The skin constantly renews itself through a process of cell growth and differentiation, where stem cells in the basal layer divide and differentiate into mature skin cells that migrate to the surface and are eventually shed.

"Hairless mice" is a term used to describe strains of laboratory mice that lack a functional fur coat. This condition is also known as "nude mice." The hairlessness in these mice is caused by a genetic mutation that results in the absence or underdevelopment of hair follicles and a weakened immune system.

Hairless mice are often used in scientific research because their impaired immune systems make them more susceptible to certain diseases, allowing researchers to study the progression and treatment of those conditions in a controlled environment. Additionally, their lack of fur makes it easier to observe and monitor skin conditions and wounds. These mice are also used as models for human diseases such as cancer, AIDS, and autoimmune disorders.

Carcinoma, basal cell is a type of skin cancer that arises from the basal cells, which are located in the lower part of the epidermis (the outermost layer of the skin). It is also known as basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and is the most common form of skin cancer.

BCC typically appears as a small, shiny, pearly bump or nodule on the skin, often in sun-exposed areas such as the face, ears, neck, hands, and arms. It may also appear as a scar-like area that is white, yellow, or waxy. BCCs are usually slow growing and rarely spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. However, they can be locally invasive and destroy surrounding tissue if left untreated.

The exact cause of BCC is not known, but it is thought to be related to a combination of genetic and environmental factors, including exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds. People with fair skin, light hair, and blue or green eyes are at increased risk of developing BCC.

Treatment for BCC typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, along with a margin of healthy tissue. Other treatment options may include radiation therapy, topical chemotherapy, or photodynamic therapy. Prevention measures include protecting your skin from UV radiation by wearing protective clothing, using sunscreen, and avoiding tanning beds.

According to the medical definition, ultraviolet (UV) rays are invisible radiations that fall in the range of the electromagnetic spectrum between 100-400 nanometers. UV rays are further divided into three categories: UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (100-280 nm).

UV rays have various sources, including the sun and artificial sources like tanning beds. Prolonged exposure to UV rays can cause damage to the skin, leading to premature aging, eye damage, and an increased risk of skin cancer. UVA rays penetrate deeper into the skin and are associated with skin aging, while UVB rays primarily affect the outer layer of the skin and are linked to sunburns and skin cancer. UVC rays are the most harmful but fortunately, they are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere and do not reach the surface.

Healthcare professionals recommend limiting exposure to UV rays, wearing protective clothing, using broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, and avoiding tanning beds to reduce the risk of UV-related health problems.

The dermis is the layer of skin located beneath the epidermis, which is the outermost layer of the skin. It is composed of connective tissue and provides structure and support to the skin. The dermis contains blood vessels, nerves, hair follicles, sweat glands, and oil glands. It is also responsible for the production of collagen and elastin, which give the skin its strength and flexibility. The dermis can be further divided into two layers: the papillary dermis, which is the upper layer and contains finger-like projections called papillae that extend upwards into the epidermis, and the reticular dermis, which is the lower layer and contains thicker collagen bundles. Together, the epidermis and dermis make up the true skin.

Erythema is a term used in medicine to describe redness of the skin, which occurs as a result of increased blood flow in the superficial capillaries. This redness can be caused by various factors such as inflammation, infection, trauma, or exposure to heat, cold, or ultraviolet radiation. In some cases, erythema may also be accompanied by other symptoms such as swelling, warmth, pain, or itching. It is a common finding in many medical conditions and can vary in severity from mild to severe.

"Cutaneous administration" is a route of administering medication or treatment through the skin. This can be done through various methods such as:

1. Topical application: This involves applying the medication directly to the skin in the form of creams, ointments, gels, lotions, patches, or solutions. The medication is absorbed into the skin and enters the systemic circulation slowly over a period of time. Topical medications are often used for local effects, such as treating eczema, psoriasis, or fungal infections.

2. Iontophoresis: This method uses a mild electrical current to help a medication penetrate deeper into the skin. A positive charge is applied to a medication with a negative charge, or vice versa, causing it to be attracted through the skin. Iontophoresis is often used for local pain management and treating conditions like hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating).

3. Transdermal delivery systems: These are specialized patches that contain medication within them. The patch is applied to the skin, and as time passes, the medication is released through the skin and into the systemic circulation. This method allows for a steady, controlled release of medication over an extended period. Common examples include nicotine patches for smoking cessation and hormone replacement therapy patches.

Cutaneous administration offers several advantages, such as avoiding first-pass metabolism (which can reduce the effectiveness of oral medications), providing localized treatment, and allowing for self-administration in some cases. However, it may not be suitable for all types of medications or conditions, and potential side effects include skin irritation, allergic reactions, and systemic absorption leading to unwanted systemic effects.

Topical administration refers to a route of administering a medication or treatment directly to a specific area of the body, such as the skin, mucous membranes, or eyes. This method allows the drug to be applied directly to the site where it is needed, which can increase its effectiveness and reduce potential side effects compared to systemic administration (taking the medication by mouth or injecting it into a vein or muscle).

Topical medications come in various forms, including creams, ointments, gels, lotions, solutions, sprays, and patches. They may be used to treat localized conditions such as skin infections, rashes, inflammation, or pain, or to deliver medication to the eyes or mucous membranes for local or systemic effects.

When applying topical medications, it is important to follow the instructions carefully to ensure proper absorption and avoid irritation or other adverse reactions. This may include cleaning the area before application, covering the treated area with a dressing, or avoiding exposure to sunlight or water after application, depending on the specific medication and its intended use.

Parasitic skin diseases are conditions caused by parasites living on or in the skin. These parasites can be insects, mites, or fungi that feed off of the host for their own survival. They can cause a variety of symptoms including itching, rashes, blisters, and lesions on the skin. Examples of parasitic skin diseases include scabies, lice infestations, and ringworm. Treatment typically involves the use of topical or oral medications to kill the parasites and alleviate symptoms.

A papilloma is a benign (noncancerous) tumor that grows on a stalk, often appearing as a small cauliflower-like growth. It can develop in various parts of the body, but when it occurs in the mucous membranes lining the respiratory, digestive, or genitourinary tracts, they are called squamous papillomas. The most common type is the skin papilloma, which includes warts. They are usually caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and can be removed through various medical procedures if they become problematic or unsightly.

Keratosis, in general, refers to a skin condition characterized by the abnormal growth or development of keratin, a protein that forms part of the outer layer of the skin (epidermis). There are several types of keratosis, including:

1. Seborrheic Keratosis: benign, often pigmented, rough, and scaly growths that can appear anywhere on the body. They tend to increase in number with age.
2. Actinic Keratosis: rough, scaly patches or spots on the skin that are caused by long-term exposure to sunlight or artificial UV light. These have the potential to develop into squamous cell carcinoma, a type of skin cancer.
3. Solar Keratosis: another term for actinic keratosis, as it is primarily caused by sun damage.
4. Keratosis Pilaris: a common condition where small, rough bumps appear on the skin, often on the arms, thighs, or cheeks. These are caused by excess keratin blocking hair follicles.
5. Follicular Keratosis: a disorder characterized by the formation of horny plugs within the hair follicles, leading to rough, sandpaper-like bumps on the skin.
6. Intraepidermal Keratosis: a term used to describe the abnormal accumulation of keratin in the epidermis, which can lead to various skin conditions.

It's important to consult with a healthcare professional or dermatologist for proper diagnosis and treatment if you suspect having any form of keratosis.

Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process that occurs after tissue injury, aiming to restore the integrity and functionality of the damaged tissue. It involves a series of overlapping phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling.

1. Hemostasis: This initial phase begins immediately after injury and involves the activation of the coagulation cascade to form a clot, which stabilizes the wound and prevents excessive blood loss.
2. Inflammation: Activated inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages, infiltrate the wound site to eliminate pathogens, remove debris, and release growth factors that promote healing. This phase typically lasts for 2-5 days post-injury.
3. Proliferation: In this phase, various cell types, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, proliferate and migrate to the wound site to synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) components, form new blood vessels (angiogenesis), and re-epithelialize the wounded area. This phase can last up to several weeks depending on the size and severity of the wound.
4. Remodeling: The final phase of wound healing involves the maturation and realignment of collagen fibers, leading to the restoration of tensile strength in the healed tissue. This process can continue for months to years after injury, although the tissue may never fully regain its original structure and function.

It is important to note that wound healing can be compromised by several factors, including age, nutrition, comorbidities (e.g., diabetes, vascular disease), and infection, which can result in delayed healing or non-healing chronic wounds.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "sunlight" is not a term with a specific medical definition. However, sunlight does have various implications in the field of medicine. It is the light that comes from the sun, which is a star at the center of our solar system. Sunlight is essential for the production of vitamin D in humans, and it can also have effects on mood and sleep patterns due to its influence on circadian rhythms.

In a medical context, sunlight is often discussed in relation to its potential health benefits and risks. For instance, moderate sun exposure can help increase vitamin D levels, which are important for bone health, immune function, and other bodily processes. However, excessive sun exposure can lead to harmful effects, such as sunburn, premature skin aging, and an increased risk of skin cancer.

It's essential to balance the benefits and risks of sunlight exposure by practicing safe sun habits, such as wearing protective clothing, using a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, seeking shade during peak sunlight hours, and avoiding intentional tanning.

Sunscreening agents, also known as sunscreens or sunblocks, are substances that protect the skin from the harmful effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. They work by absorbing, reflecting, or scattering UV radiation, preventing it from reaching the skin and causing damage such as sunburn, premature aging, and skin cancer.

Sunscreening agents can be chemical or physical. Chemical sunscreens contain organic compounds that absorb UV radiation and convert it into heat, which is then released from the skin. Examples of chemical sunscreens include oxybenzone, avobenzone, octinoxate, and homosalate.

Physical sunscreens, on the other hand, contain inorganic compounds that reflect or scatter UV radiation away from the skin. The most common physical sunscreen agents are zinc oxide and titanium dioxide.

Sunscreening agents are usually formulated into creams, lotions, gels, sprays, or sticks and are applied to the skin before sun exposure. They should be reapplied every two hours or after swimming, sweating, or toweling off to ensure continued protection. It is recommended to use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF (Sun Protection Factor) of at least 30, which blocks both UVA and UVB radiation.

Fibroblasts are specialized cells that play a critical role in the body's immune response and wound healing process. They are responsible for producing and maintaining the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the non-cellular component present within all tissues and organs, providing structural support and biochemical signals for surrounding cells.

Fibroblasts produce various ECM proteins such as collagens, elastin, fibronectin, and laminins, forming a complex network of fibers that give tissues their strength and flexibility. They also help in the regulation of tissue homeostasis by controlling the turnover of ECM components through the process of remodeling.

In response to injury or infection, fibroblasts become activated and start to proliferate rapidly, migrating towards the site of damage. Here, they participate in the inflammatory response, releasing cytokines and chemokines that attract immune cells to the area. Additionally, they deposit new ECM components to help repair the damaged tissue and restore its functionality.

Dysregulation of fibroblast activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including fibrosis (excessive scarring), cancer (where they can contribute to tumor growth and progression), and autoimmune diseases (such as rheumatoid arthritis).

A hair follicle is a part of the human skin from which hair grows. It is a complex organ that consists of several layers, including an outer root sheath, inner root sheath, and matrix. The hair follicle is located in the dermis, the second layer of the skin, and is surrounded by sebaceous glands and erector pili muscles.

The hair growth cycle includes three phases: anagen (growth phase), catagen (transitional phase), and telogen (resting phase). During the anagen phase, cells in the matrix divide rapidly to produce new hair fibers that grow out of the follicle. The hair fiber is made up of a protein called keratin, which also makes up the outer layers of the skin and nails.

Hair follicles are important for various biological functions, including thermoregulation, sensory perception, and social communication. They also play a role in wound healing and can serve as a source of stem cells that can differentiate into other cell types.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Rats, Hairless" is not a recognized medical term or condition. The term "hairless rat" typically refers to a specific breed of domesticated rats, also known as "Smooth-haired Rats" or "Naked Rats," which have a genetic mutation that results in the absence of fur. They are often kept as pets and are used in laboratory research. If you're looking for information on a specific medical condition or term, please provide it, and I would be happy to help.

9,10-Dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA) is a synthetic, aromatic hydrocarbon that is commonly used in research as a carcinogenic compound. It is a potent tumor initiator and has been widely used to study chemical carcinogenesis in laboratory animals.

DMBA is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) with two benzene rings fused together, and two methyl groups attached at the 9 and 10 positions. This structure allows DMBA to intercalate into DNA, causing mutations that can lead to cancer.

Exposure to DMBA has been shown to cause a variety of tumors in different organs, depending on the route of administration and dose. In animal models, DMBA is often applied to the skin or administered orally to induce tumors in the mammary glands, lungs, or digestive tract.

It's important to note that DMBA is not a natural compound found in the environment and is used primarily for research purposes only. It should be handled with care and appropriate safety precautions due to its carcinogenic properties.

Medically, hair is defined as a threadlike structure that grows from the follicles found in the skin of mammals. It is primarily made up of a protein called keratin and consists of three parts: the medulla (the innermost part or core), the cortex (middle layer containing keratin filaments) and the cuticle (outer layer of overlapping scales).

Hair growth occurs in cycles, with each cycle consisting of a growth phase (anagen), a transitional phase (catagen), and a resting phase (telogen). The length of hair is determined by the duration of the anagen phase.

While hair plays a crucial role in protecting the skin from external factors like UV radiation, temperature changes, and physical damage, it also serves as an essential aspect of human aesthetics and identity.

A blister is a small fluid-filled bubble that forms on the skin due to friction, burns, or contact with certain chemicals or irritants. Blisters are typically filled with a clear fluid called serum, which is a component of blood. They can also be filled with blood (known as blood blisters) if the blister is caused by a more severe injury.

Blisters act as a natural protective barrier for the underlying skin and tissues, preventing infection and promoting healing. It's generally recommended to leave blisters intact and avoid breaking them, as doing so can increase the risk of infection and delay healing. If a blister is particularly large or painful, medical attention may be necessary to prevent complications.

Sunburn is a cutaneous condition characterized by redness, pain, and sometimes swelling of the skin caused by overexposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or other sources such as tanning beds. The skin may also blister and peel in severe cases. Sunburn is essentially a burn to the skin that can have both immediate and long-term consequences, including increased aging of the skin and an increased risk of skin cancer. It is important to protect the skin from excessive sun exposure by using sunscreen, wearing protective clothing, and seeking shade during peak sunlight hours.

Sebaceous glands are microscopic, exocrine glands that are found in the dermis of mammalian skin. They are attached to hair follicles and produce an oily substance called sebum, which is composed of triglycerides, wax esters, squalene, and metabolites of fat-producing cells (fatty acids, cholesterol). Sebum is released through a duct onto the surface of the skin, where it forms a protective barrier that helps to prevent water loss, keeps the skin and hair moisturized, and has antibacterial properties.

Sebaceous glands are distributed throughout the body, but they are most numerous on the face, scalp, and upper trunk. They can also be found in other areas of the body such as the eyelids (where they are known as meibomian glands), the external ear canal, and the genital area.

Abnormalities in sebaceous gland function can lead to various skin conditions, including acne, seborrheic dermatitis, and certain types of skin cancer.

Skin manifestations refer to visible changes on the skin that can indicate an underlying medical condition or disease process. These changes can include rashes, lesions, discoloration, eruptions, blisters, hives, and other abnormalities. The appearance, distribution, and pattern of these manifestations can provide important clues for healthcare professionals to diagnose and manage the underlying condition.

Skin manifestations can be caused by a wide range of factors, including infections, inflammatory conditions, allergic reactions, genetic disorders, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. In some cases, skin manifestations may be the primary symptom of a medical condition, while in other cases, they may be a secondary effect of medication or treatment.

It is important to note that while skin manifestations can provide valuable diagnostic information, they should always be evaluated in the context of the patient's overall medical history and presentation. A thorough physical examination and appropriate diagnostic tests are often necessary to confirm a diagnosis and develop an effective treatment plan.

Langerhans cells are specialized dendritic cells that are found in the epithelium, including the skin (where they are named after Paul Langerhans who first described them in 1868) and mucous membranes. They play a crucial role in the immune system as antigen-presenting cells, contributing to the initiation of immune responses.

These cells contain Birbeck granules, unique organelles that are involved in the transportation of antigens from the cell surface to the lysosomes for processing and presentation to T-cells. Langerhans cells also produce cytokines, which help regulate immune responses and attract other immune cells to the site of infection or injury.

It is important to note that although Langerhans cells are a part of the immune system, they can sometimes contribute to the development of certain skin disorders, such as allergic contact dermatitis and some forms of cancer, like Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

Contact dermatitis is a type of inflammation of the skin that occurs when it comes into contact with a substance that the individual has developed an allergic reaction to or that causes irritation. It can be divided into two main types: allergic contact dermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis.

Allergic contact dermatitis is caused by an immune system response to a substance, known as an allergen, which the individual has become sensitized to. When the skin comes into contact with this allergen, it triggers an immune reaction that results in inflammation and characteristic symptoms such as redness, swelling, itching, and blistering. Common allergens include metals (such as nickel), rubber, medications, fragrances, and cosmetics.

Irritant contact dermatitis, on the other hand, is caused by direct damage to the skin from a substance that is inherently irritating or corrosive. This can occur after exposure to strong acids, alkalis, solvents, or even prolonged exposure to milder irritants like water or soap. Symptoms of irritant contact dermatitis include redness, pain, burning, and dryness at the site of contact.

The treatment for contact dermatitis typically involves avoiding further exposure to the allergen or irritant, as well as managing symptoms with topical corticosteroids, antihistamines, or other medications as needed. In some cases, patch testing may be performed to identify specific allergens that are causing the reaction.

Insensible water loss is the unnoticeable or unperceived loss of water from the body through processes such as respiration, evaporation from the skin, and perspiration that is too fine to be seen or felt. It is a normal physiological process and typically accounts for about 400-800 milliliters (ml) of water loss per day in a healthy adult at rest. However, this amount can increase with factors such as environmental temperature, humidity, and altitude, as well as physical activity or illness that increases metabolic rate or alters body temperature regulation.

Insensible water loss is an important factor to consider in maintaining fluid balance in the body, particularly in individuals who are unable to regulate their own fluid intake, such as critically ill patients or those with impaired consciousness. Prolonged or excessive insensible water loss can lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalances, which can have serious consequences on various organ systems and overall health.

Emollients are medical substances or preparations used to soften and soothe the skin, making it more supple and flexible. They work by forming a barrier on the surface of the skin that helps to prevent water loss and protect the skin from irritants and allergens. Emollients can be in the form of creams, lotions, ointments, or gels, and are often used to treat dry, scaly, or itchy skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, and dermatitis. They may contain ingredients such as petroleum jelly, lanolin, mineral oil, or various plant-derived oils and butters. Emollients can also help to reduce inflammation and promote healing of the skin.

Allergic contact dermatitis is a type of inflammatory skin reaction that occurs when the skin comes into contact with a substance (allergen) that the immune system recognizes as foreign and triggers an allergic response. This condition is characterized by redness, itching, swelling, blistering, and cracking of the skin, which usually develops within 24-48 hours after exposure to the allergen. Common allergens include metals (such as nickel), rubber, medications, fragrances, and cosmetics. It is important to note that a person must first be sensitized to the allergen before developing an allergic response upon subsequent exposures.

Dermatologic agents are medications, chemicals, or other substances that are applied to the skin (dermis) for therapeutic or cosmetic purposes. They can be used to treat various skin conditions such as acne, eczema, psoriasis, fungal infections, and wounds. Dermatologic agents include topical corticosteroids, antibiotics, antifungals, retinoids, benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, and many others. They can come in various forms such as creams, ointments, gels, lotions, solutions, and patches. It is important to follow the instructions for use carefully to ensure safety and effectiveness.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Dermatology is a medical specialty that focuses on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases and conditions related to the skin, hair, nails, and mucous membranes. A dermatologist is a medical doctor who has completed specialized training in this field. They are qualified to treat a wide range of skin conditions, including acne, eczema, psoriasis, skin cancer, and many others. Dermatologists may also perform cosmetic procedures to improve the appearance of the skin or to treat signs of aging.

An "injection, intradermal" refers to a type of injection where a small quantity of a substance is introduced into the layer of skin between the epidermis and dermis, using a thin gauge needle. This technique is often used for diagnostic or research purposes, such as conducting allergy tests or administering immunizations in a way that stimulates a strong immune response. The injection site typically produces a small, raised bump (wheal) that disappears within a few hours. It's important to note that intradermal injections should be performed by trained medical professionals to minimize the risk of complications.

A biopsy is a medical procedure in which a small sample of tissue is taken from the body to be examined under a microscope for the presence of disease. This can help doctors diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, such as cancer, infections, or autoimmune disorders. The type of biopsy performed will depend on the location and nature of the suspected condition. Some common types of biopsies include:

1. Incisional biopsy: In this procedure, a surgeon removes a piece of tissue from an abnormal area using a scalpel or other surgical instrument. This type of biopsy is often used when the lesion is too large to be removed entirely during the initial biopsy.

2. Excisional biopsy: An excisional biopsy involves removing the entire abnormal area, along with a margin of healthy tissue surrounding it. This technique is typically employed for smaller lesions or when cancer is suspected.

3. Needle biopsy: A needle biopsy uses a thin, hollow needle to extract cells or fluid from the body. There are two main types of needle biopsies: fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and core needle biopsy. FNA extracts loose cells, while a core needle biopsy removes a small piece of tissue.

4. Punch biopsy: In a punch biopsy, a round, sharp tool is used to remove a small cylindrical sample of skin tissue. This type of biopsy is often used for evaluating rashes or other skin abnormalities.

5. Shave biopsy: During a shave biopsy, a thin slice of tissue is removed from the surface of the skin using a sharp razor-like instrument. This technique is typically used for superficial lesions or growths on the skin.

After the biopsy sample has been collected, it is sent to a laboratory where a pathologist will examine the tissue under a microscope and provide a diagnosis based on their findings. The results of the biopsy can help guide further treatment decisions and determine the best course of action for managing the patient's condition.

Melanocytes are specialized cells that produce, store, and transport melanin, the pigment responsible for coloring of the skin, hair, and eyes. They are located in the bottom layer of the epidermis (the outermost layer of the skin) and can also be found in the inner ear and the eye's retina. Melanocytes contain organelles called melanosomes, which produce and store melanin.

Melanin comes in two types: eumelanin (black or brown) and pheomelanin (red or yellow). The amount and type of melanin produced by melanocytes determine the color of a person's skin, hair, and eyes. Exposure to UV radiation from sunlight increases melanin production as a protective response, leading to skin tanning.

Melanocyte dysfunction or abnormalities can lead to various medical conditions, such as albinism (lack of melanin production), melasma (excessive pigmentation), and melanoma (cancerous growth of melanocytes).

A tuberculin test is a medical procedure used to determine if someone has developed an immune response to the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The test involves injecting a small amount of purified protein derivative (PPD) from the TB bacteria under the skin, usually on the forearm. After 48-72 hours, the area is examined for signs of a reaction, such as swelling, redness, or hardness. A positive result suggests that the person has been infected with TB at some point in the past, although it does not necessarily mean that they have active TB disease. However, individuals who have a positive tuberculin test should be evaluated further to determine if they need treatment for latent TB infection or active TB disease.

Occupational dermatitis is a specific type of contact dermatitis that results from exposure to certain substances or conditions in the workplace. It can be caused by direct contact with chemicals, irritants, or allergens present in the work environment. This condition typically affects the skin on the hands and forearms but can also involve other areas of the body, depending on the nature of the exposure.

There are two main types of occupational dermatitis:

1. Irritant contact dermatitis (ICD): This type occurs when the skin comes into direct contact with an irritating substance, leading to redness, swelling, itching, and sometimes blistering. Common irritants include solvents, detergents, oils, and other industrial chemicals.
2. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD): This type is a result of an allergic reaction to a specific substance. The immune system identifies the allergen as harmful and mounts a response, causing skin inflammation. Common allergens include latex, metals (such as nickel), and certain plants (like poison ivy).

Prevention measures for occupational dermatitis include using appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) like gloves, masks, and aprons, as well as practicing good hygiene, such as washing hands regularly and avoiding touching the face with contaminated hands. If you suspect you have developed occupational dermatitis, consult a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Irritant contact dermatitis is a type of inflammation of the skin (dermatitis) that results from exposure to an external substance that directly damages the skin. It can be caused by both chemical and physical agents, such as solvents, detergents, acids, alkalis, friction, and extreme temperatures. The reaction typically occurs within hours or days of exposure and can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, itching, burning, and pain. Unlike allergic contact dermatitis, which requires sensitization to a specific allergen, irritant contact dermatitis can occur after a single exposure to an irritant in sufficient concentration or after repeated exposures to lower concentrations of the substance.

Cosmetics are defined in the medical field as products that are intended to be applied or introduced to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, and altering the appearance. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), cosmetics include skin creams, lotions, makeup, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail polishes, eye and facial makeup preparations, shampoos, permanent waves, hair colors, toothpastes, and deodorants, as well as any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic product.

It's important to note that the FDA classifies cosmetics and drugs differently. Drugs are defined as products that are intended to diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent disease, and/or affect the structure or function of the body. Some products, such as anti-dandruff shampoos or toothpastes with fluoride, can be considered both a cosmetic and a drug because they have both cleansing and therapeutic properties. These types of products are subject to regulation by both the FDA's Office of Cosmetics and Colors and its Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

Cosmetics must not be adulterated or misbranded, meaning that they must be safe for use under labeled or customary conditions, properly packaged and labeled, and not contain any harmful ingredients. However, the FDA does not have the authority to approve cosmetic products before they go on the market, with the exception of color additives. Manufacturers are responsible for ensuring that their products are safe and properly labeled.

A "drug eruption" is a general term used to describe an adverse skin reaction that occurs as a result of taking a medication. These reactions can vary in severity and appearance, and may include symptoms such as rash, hives, itching, redness, blistering, or peeling of the skin. In some cases, drug eruptions can also cause systemic symptoms such as fever, fatigue, or joint pain.

The exact mechanism by which drugs cause eruptions is not fully understood, but it is thought to involve an abnormal immune response to the medication. There are many different types of drug eruptions, including morphilliform rashes, urticaria (hives), fixed drug eruptions, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), which is a severe and potentially life-threatening reaction.

If you suspect that you are experiencing a drug eruption, it is important to seek medical attention promptly. Your healthcare provider can help determine the cause of the reaction and recommend appropriate treatment. In some cases, it may be necessary to discontinue the medication causing the reaction and switch to an alternative therapy.

A surgical flap is a specialized type of surgical procedure where a section of living tissue (including skin, fat, muscle, and/or blood vessels) is lifted from its original site and moved to another location, while still maintaining a blood supply through its attached pedicle. This technique allows the surgeon to cover and reconstruct defects or wounds that cannot be closed easily with simple suturing or stapling.

Surgical flaps can be classified based on their vascularity, type of tissue involved, or method of transfer. The choice of using a specific type of surgical flap depends on the location and size of the defect, the patient's overall health, and the surgeon's expertise. Some common types of surgical flaps include:

1. Random-pattern flaps: These flaps are based on random blood vessels within the tissue and are typically used for smaller defects in areas with good vascularity, such as the face or scalp.
2. Axial pattern flaps: These flaps are designed based on a known major blood vessel and its branches, allowing them to cover larger defects or reach distant sites. Examples include the radial forearm flap and the anterolateral thigh flap.
3. Local flaps: These flaps involve tissue adjacent to the wound and can be further classified into advancement, rotation, transposition, and interpolation flaps based on their movement and orientation.
4. Distant flaps: These flaps are harvested from a distant site and then transferred to the defect after being tunneled beneath the skin or through a separate incision. Examples include the groin flap and the latissimus dorsi flap.
5. Free flaps: In these flaps, the tissue is completely detached from its original blood supply and then reattached at the new site using microvascular surgical techniques. This allows for greater flexibility in terms of reach and placement but requires specialized expertise and equipment.

Surgical flaps play a crucial role in reconstructive surgery, helping to restore form and function after trauma, tumor removal, or other conditions that result in tissue loss.

Intradermal tests are a type of allergy test that involves the injection of a small amount of allergen extract directly into the skin, usually the forearm or back. This is different from other types of allergy tests such as scratch tests or blood tests, which measure immune system responses to allergens in other ways.

During an intradermal test, a healthcare professional uses a fine needle to inject a small amount of allergen extract just beneath the surface of the skin. This creates a small wheal or bubble, and the area is then observed for signs of a reaction such as redness, swelling, or itching. These reactions indicate that the person has antibodies to the allergen and may be allergic to it.

Intradermal tests are often used when other types of allergy tests have been inconclusive or when a healthcare professional wants to confirm the results of a previous test. They can be used to diagnose a variety of allergies, including those to insect venom, medications, and environmental allergens such as pollen or mold.

It's important to note that intradermal tests carry a higher risk of causing a severe allergic reaction than other types of allergy tests, so they should only be performed by trained healthcare professionals in a medical setting where appropriate treatments are available.

Melanoma is defined as a type of cancer that develops from the pigment-containing cells known as melanocytes. It typically occurs in the skin but can rarely occur in other parts of the body, including the eyes and internal organs. Melanoma is characterized by the uncontrolled growth and multiplication of melanocytes, which can form malignant tumors that invade and destroy surrounding tissue.

Melanoma is often caused by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds, but it can also occur in areas of the body not exposed to the sun. It is more likely to develop in people with fair skin, light hair, and blue or green eyes, but it can affect anyone, regardless of their skin type.

Melanoma can be treated effectively if detected early, but if left untreated, it can spread to other parts of the body and become life-threatening. Treatment options for melanoma include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and targeted therapy, depending on the stage and location of the cancer. Regular skin examinations and self-checks are recommended to detect any changes or abnormalities in moles or other pigmented lesions that may indicate melanoma.

Radiation-induced neoplasms are a type of cancer or tumor that develops as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation is radiation with enough energy to remove tightly bound electrons from atoms or molecules, leading to the formation of ions. This type of radiation can damage DNA and other cellular structures, which can lead to mutations and uncontrolled cell growth, resulting in the development of a neoplasm.

Radiation-induced neoplasms can occur after exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation, such as that received during radiation therapy for cancer treatment or from nuclear accidents. The risk of developing a radiation-induced neoplasm depends on several factors, including the dose and duration of radiation exposure, the type of radiation, and the individual's genetic susceptibility to radiation-induced damage.

Radiation-induced neoplasms can take many years to develop after initial exposure to ionizing radiation, and they often occur at the site of previous radiation therapy. Common types of radiation-induced neoplasms include sarcomas, carcinomas, and thyroid cancer. It is important to note that while ionizing radiation can increase the risk of developing cancer, the overall risk is still relatively low, especially when compared to other well-established cancer risk factors such as smoking and exposure to certain chemicals.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Radiodermatitis is a cutaneous adverse reaction that occurs as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation. It is characterized by inflammation, erythema, dryness, and desquamation of the skin, which can progress to moist desquamation, ulceration, and necrosis in severe cases. Radiodermatitis typically affects areas of the skin that have received high doses of radiation therapy during cancer treatment. The severity and duration of radiodermatitis depend on factors such as the total dose, fraction size, dose rate, and volume of radiation administered, as well as individual patient characteristics.

Dermatomycoses are a group of fungal infections that affect the skin, hair, and nails. These infections are caused by various types of fungi, including dermatophytes, yeasts, and molds. Dermatophyte infections, also known as tinea, are the most common type of dermatomycoses and can affect different areas of the body, such as the scalp (tinea capitis), beard (tinea barbae), body (tinea corporis), feet (tinea pedis or athlete's foot), hands (tinea manuum), and nails (tinea unguium or onychomycosis). Yeast infections, such as those caused by Candida albicans, can lead to conditions like candidal intertrigo, vulvovaginitis, and balanitis. Mold infections are less common but can cause skin disorders like scalded skin syndrome and phaeohyphomycosis. Dermatomycoses are typically treated with topical or oral antifungal medications.

Melanin is a pigment that determines the color of skin, hair, and eyes in humans and animals. It is produced by melanocytes, which are specialized cells found in the epidermis (the outer layer of the skin) and the choroid (the vascular coat of the eye). There are two main types of melanin: eumelanin and pheomelanin. Eumelanin is a black or brown pigment, while pheomelanin is a red or yellow pigment. The amount and type of melanin produced by an individual can affect their skin and hair color, as well as their susceptibility to certain diseases, such as skin cancer.

Hyperpigmentation is a medical term that refers to the darkening of skin areas due to an increase in melanin, the pigment that provides color to our skin. This condition can affect people of all races and ethnicities, but it's more noticeable in those with lighter skin tones.

Hyperpigmentation can be caused by various factors, including excessive sun exposure, hormonal changes (such as during pregnancy), inflammation, certain medications, and underlying medical conditions like Addison's disease or hemochromatosis. It can also result from skin injuries, such as cuts, burns, or acne, which leave dark spots known as post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation.

There are several types of hyperpigmentation, including:

1. Melasma: This is a common form of hyperpigmentation that typically appears as symmetrical, blotchy patches on the face, particularly the forehead, cheeks, and upper lip. It's often triggered by hormonal changes, such as those experienced during pregnancy or while taking birth control pills.
2. Solar lentigos (age spots or liver spots): These are small, darkened areas of skin that appear due to prolonged sun exposure over time. They typically occur on the face, hands, arms, and decolletage.
3. Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation: This type of hyperpigmentation occurs when an injury or inflammation heals, leaving behind a darkened area of skin. It's more common in people with darker skin tones.

Treatment for hyperpigmentation depends on the underlying cause and may include topical creams, chemical peels, laser therapy, or microdermabrasion. Preventing further sun damage is crucial to managing hyperpigmentation, so wearing sunscreen with a high SPF and protective clothing is recommended.

An ointment is a semi-solid preparation, typically composed of a mixture of medicinal substance with a base, which is usually greasy or oily. The purpose of the base is to act as a vehicle for the active ingredient and allow it to be applied smoothly and evenly to the skin or mucous membranes.

Ointments are commonly used in dermatology to treat various skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, rashes, burns, and wounds. They can also be used to deliver medication for localized pain relief, muscle relaxation, and anti-inflammatory or antibiotic effects.

The base of an ointment may consist of various ingredients, including petrolatum, lanolin, mineral oil, beeswax, or a combination of these. The choice of the base depends on the desired properties such as consistency, spreadability, and stability, as well as the intended route of administration and the specific therapeutic goals.

Pigmentation disorders are conditions that affect the production or distribution of melanin, the pigment responsible for the color of skin, hair, and eyes. These disorders can cause changes in the color of the skin, resulting in areas that are darker (hyperpigmentation) or lighter (hypopigmentation) than normal. Examples of pigmentation disorders include melasma, age spots, albinism, and vitiligo. The causes, symptoms, and treatments for these conditions can vary widely, so it is important to consult a healthcare provider for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan.

Actinic keratosis, also known as solar keratosis, is a precancerous skin condition that typically develops in areas exposed to excessive sun damage over the years. It presents as rough, scaly, or crusty patches of skin, often with a pink, red, or brownish tint. These lesions usually appear on the face, ears, scalp, neck, back of the hands, and forearms.

Actinic keratosis is caused by the prolonged exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight or artificial sources like tanning beds. The UV rays damage the skin's DNA, leading to abnormal skin cell growth and the formation of these precancerous lesions.

While most actinic keratoses remain benign, a small percentage can progress into squamous cell carcinoma, a type of skin cancer. Therefore, it is essential to have any suspicious or changing lesions evaluated by a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment. Prevention measures include protecting the skin from excessive sun exposure, wearing protective clothing, using broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, and avoiding tanning beds.

Squamous cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer that begins in the squamous cells, which are flat, thin cells that form the outer layer of the skin (epidermis). It commonly occurs on sun-exposed areas such as the face, ears, lips, and backs of the hands. Squamous cell carcinoma can also develop in other areas of the body including the mouth, lungs, and cervix.

This type of cancer usually develops slowly and may appear as a rough or scaly patch of skin, a red, firm nodule, or a sore or ulcer that doesn't heal. While squamous cell carcinoma is not as aggressive as some other types of cancer, it can metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body if left untreated, making early detection and treatment important.

Risk factors for developing squamous cell carcinoma include prolonged exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning beds, fair skin, a history of sunburns, a weakened immune system, and older age. Prevention measures include protecting your skin from the sun by wearing protective clothing, using a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, avoiding tanning beds, and getting regular skin examinations.

Irritants, in a medical context, refer to substances or factors that cause irritation or inflammation when they come into contact with bodily tissues. These substances can cause a range of reactions depending on the type and duration of exposure, as well as individual sensitivity. Common examples include chemicals found in household products, pollutants, allergens, and environmental factors like extreme temperatures or friction.

When irritants come into contact with the skin, eyes, respiratory system, or mucous membranes, they can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, itching, pain, coughing, sneezing, or difficulty breathing. In some cases, prolonged exposure to irritants can lead to more serious health problems, including chronic inflammation, tissue damage, and disease.

It's important to note that irritants are different from allergens, which trigger an immune response in sensitive individuals. While both can cause similar symptoms, the underlying mechanisms are different: allergens cause a specific immune reaction, while irritants directly affect the affected tissues without involving the immune system.

Soft tissue infections are medical conditions that involve infection of the soft tissues of the body, which include the skin, muscles, fascia (the connective tissue that surrounds muscles), and tendons. These infections can be caused by various types of bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites.

Soft tissue infections can range from mild to severe, depending on the type of organism causing the infection, the extent of tissue involvement, and the patient's overall health status. Some common types of soft tissue infections include:

1. Cellulitis: This is a bacterial infection that affects the skin and underlying tissues. It typically presents as a red, swollen, warm, and painful area on the skin, often accompanied by fever and chills.
2. Abscess: An abscess is a localized collection of pus in the soft tissues, caused by an infection. It can appear as a swollen, tender, and warm lump under the skin, which may be filled with pus.
3. Necrotizing fasciitis: This is a rare but severe soft tissue infection that involves the rapid destruction of fascia and surrounding tissues. It is often caused by a mixture of bacteria and can progress rapidly, leading to shock, organ failure, and even death if not treated promptly.
4. Myositis: This is an inflammation of the muscle tissue, which can be caused by a bacterial or viral infection. Symptoms may include muscle pain, swelling, weakness, and fever.
5. Erysipelas: This is a superficial skin infection that affects the upper layers of the skin and the lymphatic vessels. It typically presents as a raised, red, and painful rash with clear borders.

Treatment for soft tissue infections depends on the type and severity of the infection but may include antibiotics, drainage of pus or abscesses, and surgery in severe cases. Preventive measures such as good hygiene, wound care, and prompt treatment of injuries can help reduce the risk of developing soft tissue infections.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

Papulosquamous skin diseases are a group of chronic inflammatory disorders of the skin characterized by the development of papules (small, solid, often conical bump) and scales. These diseases include psoriasis, lichen planus, and seborrheic dermatitis among others. The skin lesions in these conditions are often red, scaly, and may be pruritic (itchy). They can vary in severity and distribution, and can have a significant impact on a person's quality of life. The exact cause of these diseases is not fully understood, but they are believed to involve an abnormal immune response and genetic factors. Treatment typically involves a combination of topical therapies, phototherapy, and systemic medications.

Keratins are a type of fibrous structural proteins that constitute the main component of the integumentary system, which includes the hair, nails, and skin of vertebrates. They are also found in other tissues such as horns, hooves, feathers, and reptilian scales. Keratins are insoluble proteins that provide strength, rigidity, and protection to these structures.

Keratins are classified into two types: soft keratins (Type I) and hard keratins (Type II). Soft keratins are found in the skin and simple epithelial tissues, while hard keratins are present in structures like hair, nails, horns, and hooves.

Keratin proteins have a complex structure consisting of several domains, including an alpha-helical domain, beta-pleated sheet domain, and a non-repetitive domain. These domains provide keratin with its unique properties, such as resistance to heat, chemicals, and mechanical stress.

In summary, keratins are fibrous structural proteins that play a crucial role in providing strength, rigidity, and protection to various tissues in the body.

Body temperature regulation, also known as thermoregulation, is the process by which the body maintains its core internal temperature within a narrow range, despite varying external temperatures. This is primarily controlled by the hypothalamus in the brain, which acts as a thermostat and receives input from temperature receptors throughout the body. When the body's temperature rises above or falls below the set point, the hypothalamus initiates responses to bring the temperature back into balance. These responses can include shivering to generate heat, sweating to cool down, vasodilation or vasoconstriction of blood vessels to regulate heat loss, and changes in metabolic rate. Effective body temperature regulation is crucial for maintaining optimal physiological function and overall health.

A forehead, in medical terms, refers to the portion of the human skull that lies immediately above the eyes and serves as an attachment site for the frontal bone. It is a common area for the examination of various clinical signs, such as assessing the level of consciousness (by checking if the patient's eyebrows or eyelids twitch in response to a light touch) or looking for signs of increased intracranial pressure (such as bulging fontanelles in infants). Additionally, the forehead is often used as a site for non-invasive procedures like Botox injections.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

Keratoacanthoma is a rapidly growing, dome-shaped, skin tumor that typically arises on sun-exposed areas such as the face, arms, and legs. It is considered a low-grade squamous cell carcinoma (a type of skin cancer) because it shares some characteristics with both benign and malignant tumors.

Keratoacanthomas usually develop over a period of several weeks to months, growing rapidly in size before eventually stabilizing and then gradually regressing on their own within a few months to a year. However, the regression process can take years, and some lesions may not regress completely, leading to cosmetic concerns or even local invasion.

Histologically, keratoacanthomas are characterized by a central keratin-filled crater surrounded by a well-differentiated layer of squamous epithelial cells. The tumor's growth pattern and histological features can make it difficult to distinguish from other types of skin cancer, such as squamous cell carcinoma.

Treatment options for keratoacanthomas include surgical excision, cryosurgery, curettage and electrodesiccation, and topical therapies like imiquimod or 5-fluorouracil. The choice of treatment depends on various factors such as the size, location, and number of lesions, as well as patient preferences and overall health status.

Vascular skin diseases are a group of medical conditions that affect the blood vessels in the skin. These disorders can be caused by problems with the structure or function of the blood vessels, which can lead to various symptoms such as redness, discoloration, pain, itching, and ulcerations. Some examples of vascular skin diseases include:

1. Rosacea: a chronic skin condition that causes redness, flushing, and visible blood vessels in the face.
2. Eczema: a group of inflammatory skin conditions that can cause redness, itching, and dryness. Some types of eczema, such as varicose eczema, are associated with problems with the veins.
3. Psoriasis: an autoimmune condition that causes red, scaly patches on the skin. Some people with psoriasis may also develop psoriatic arthritis, which can affect the blood vessels in the skin and joints.
4. Vasculitis: a group of conditions that cause inflammation of the blood vessels. This can lead to symptoms such as redness, pain, and ulcerations.
5. Livedo reticularis: a condition that causes a net-like pattern of discoloration on the skin, usually on the legs. It is caused by abnormalities in the small blood vessels.
6. Henoch-Schönlein purpura: a rare condition that causes inflammation of the small blood vessels, leading to purple spots on the skin and joint pain.
7. Raynaud's phenomenon: a condition that affects the blood vessels in the fingers and toes, causing them to become narrow and restrict blood flow in response to cold temperatures or stress.

Treatment for vascular skin diseases depends on the specific condition and its severity. It may include medications, lifestyle changes, and in some cases, surgery.

Localized scleroderma, also known as morphea, is a rare autoimmune disorder that affects the skin and connective tissues. It is characterized by thickening and hardening (sclerosis) of the skin in patches or bands, usually on the trunk, limbs, or face. Unlike systemic scleroderma, localized scleroderma does not affect internal organs, although it can cause significant disfigurement and disability in some cases.

There are two main types of localized scleroderma: plaque morphea and generalized morphea. Plaque morphea typically presents as oval or circular patches of thickened, hard skin that are often white or pale in the center and surrounded by a purple or darker border. Generalized morphea, on the other hand, is characterized by larger areas of sclerosis that can cover much of the body surface.

The exact cause of localized scleroderma is not fully understood, but it is thought to involve an overactive immune system response that leads to inflammation and scarring of the skin and underlying tissues. Treatment typically involves a combination of topical therapies (such as corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors), phototherapy, and systemic medications (such as methotrexate or mycophenolate mofetil) in more severe cases.

Laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a non-invasive, investigative technique used to measure microcirculatory blood flow in real time. It is based on the principle of the Doppler effect, which describes the change in frequency or wavelength of light or sound waves as they encounter a moving object or reflect off a moving surface.

In LDF, a low-power laser beam is directed at the skin or other transparent tissue. The light penetrates the tissue and scatters off the moving red blood cells within the microvasculature. As the light scatters, it undergoes a slight frequency shift due to the movement of the red blood cells. This frequency shift is then detected by a photodetector, which converts it into an electrical signal. The magnitude of this signal is directly proportional to the speed and concentration of the moving red blood cells, providing a measure of microcirculatory blood flow.

LDF has various clinical applications, including the assessment of skin perfusion in patients with peripheral arterial disease, burn injuries, and flaps used in reconstructive surgery. It can also be used to study the effects of drugs or other interventions on microcirculation in research settings.

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body, and it is a major component of connective tissues such as tendons, ligaments, skin, and bones. Collagen provides structure and strength to these tissues and helps them to withstand stretching and tension. It is made up of long chains of amino acids, primarily glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline, which are arranged in a triple helix structure. There are at least 16 different types of collagen found in the body, each with slightly different structures and functions. Collagen is important for maintaining the integrity and health of tissues throughout the body, and it has been studied for its potential therapeutic uses in various medical conditions.

Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition characterized by the formation of various types of blemishes on the skin, such as blackheads, whiteheads, papules, pustules, and cysts or nodules. These lesions typically appear on areas of the body that have a high concentration of sebaceous glands, including the face, neck, chest, back, and shoulders.

Acne vulgaris occurs when hair follicles become clogged with dead skin cells and excess oil (sebum) produced by the sebaceous glands. This blockage provides an ideal environment for bacteria, particularly Propionibacterium acnes, to multiply, leading to inflammation and infection. The severity of acne vulgaris can range from mild with only a few scattered comedones (blackheads or whiteheads) to severe cystic acne, which can cause significant scarring and emotional distress.

The exact causes of acne vulgaris are not fully understood, but several factors contribute to its development, including:

1. Hormonal changes during puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, or due to conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
2. Genetic predisposition
3. Use of certain medications, such as corticosteroids and lithium
4. Excessive production of sebum due to overactive sebaceous glands
5. Accumulation of dead skin cells that clog pores
6. Bacterial infection (particularly Propionibacterium acnes)
7. Inflammation caused by the body's immune response to bacterial infection and clogged pores

Treatment for acne vulgaris depends on its severity and can include over-the-counter or prescription topical treatments, oral medications, chemical peels, light therapies, or even hormonal therapies in some cases. It is essential to seek professional medical advice from a dermatologist or healthcare provider to determine the most appropriate treatment plan for individual needs.

Transgenic mice are genetically modified rodents that have incorporated foreign DNA (exogenous DNA) into their own genome. This is typically done through the use of recombinant DNA technology, where a specific gene or genetic sequence of interest is isolated and then introduced into the mouse embryo. The resulting transgenic mice can then express the protein encoded by the foreign gene, allowing researchers to study its function in a living organism.

The process of creating transgenic mice usually involves microinjecting the exogenous DNA into the pronucleus of a fertilized egg, which is then implanted into a surrogate mother. The offspring that result from this procedure are screened for the presence of the foreign DNA, and those that carry the desired genetic modification are used to establish a transgenic mouse line.

Transgenic mice have been widely used in biomedical research to model human diseases, study gene function, and test new therapies. They provide a valuable tool for understanding complex biological processes and developing new treatments for a variety of medical conditions.

SENCAR (skin tumor-prone, cancer-prone) mice are an inbred strain of laboratory mice that were developed through selective breeding for their high susceptibility to developing skin tumors when exposed to certain chemical carcinogens. They are particularly sensitive to two-stage chemical carcinogenesis, making them a valuable tool in cancer research.

The SENCAR mouse strain was developed at the Southern Research Institute (SRI) in Birmingham, Alabama, by crossing various strains of mice and then selectively breeding the offspring for high tumor susceptibility. The resulting SENCAR mice are highly sensitive to both initiation and promotion stages of carcinogenesis, displaying rapid tumor development when exposed to tumor-promoting agents.

These mice have been widely used in dermatology and oncology research to study the mechanisms of chemical carcinogenesis, skin tumor development, and potential chemopreventive agents. They are also used to investigate the genetic factors contributing to cancer susceptibility and the role of the immune system in tumor development.

It is important to note that SENCAR mice are specifically bred for research purposes and should not be confused with wild mice or other strains of laboratory mice.

Delayed hypersensitivity, also known as type IV hypersensitivity, is a type of immune response that takes place several hours to days after exposure to an antigen. It is characterized by the activation of T cells (a type of white blood cell) and the release of various chemical mediators, leading to inflammation and tissue damage. This reaction is typically associated with chronic inflammatory diseases, such as contact dermatitis, granulomatous disorders (e.g. tuberculosis), and certain autoimmune diseases.

The reaction process involves the following steps:

1. Sensitization: The first time an individual is exposed to an antigen, T cells are activated and become sensitized to it. This process can take several days.
2. Memory: Some of the activated T cells differentiate into memory T cells, which remain in the body and are ready to respond quickly if the same antigen is encountered again.
3. Effector phase: Upon subsequent exposure to the antigen, the memory T cells become activated and release cytokines, which recruit other immune cells (e.g. macrophages) to the site of inflammation. These cells cause tissue damage through various mechanisms, such as phagocytosis, degranulation, and the release of reactive oxygen species.
4. Chronic inflammation: The ongoing immune response can lead to chronic inflammation, which may result in tissue destruction and fibrosis (scarring).

Examples of conditions associated with delayed hypersensitivity include:

* Contact dermatitis (e.g. poison ivy, nickel allergy)
* Tuberculosis
* Leprosy
* Sarcoidosis
* Rheumatoid arthritis
* Type 1 diabetes mellitus
* Multiple sclerosis
* Inflammatory bowel disease (e.g. Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis)

Dermoscopy, also known as dermatoscopy or epiluminescence microscopy, is a non-invasive diagnostic technique used in dermatology to evaluate skin lesions, such as moles and pigmented skin tumors. This method involves the use of a handheld device called a dermoscope, which consists of a magnifying lens, a light source, and a transparent plate or immersion fluid that allows for better visualization of the skin's surface structures.

Dermoscopy enables dermatologists to examine the pigmented patterns, vascular structures, and other morphological features hidden beneath the skin's surface that are not visible to the naked eye. By observing these details, dermatologists can improve their ability to differentiate between benign and malignant lesions, leading to more accurate diagnoses and appropriate treatment decisions.

The primary uses of dermoscopy include:

1. Early detection and diagnosis of melanoma and other skin cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.
2. Monitoring the evolution of suspicious moles or lesions over time.
3. Assisting in the identification of various benign skin growths, like seborrheic keratoses, dermatofibromas, and nevi (moles).
4. Improving the diagnostic accuracy for infectious skin conditions, inflammatory processes, and other dermatological disorders.

Overall, dermoscopy is a valuable tool in the field of dermatology that enhances the clinician's ability to diagnose and manage various skin conditions accurately and effectively.

Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is a type of antibody that plays a key role in the immune response to parasitic infections and allergies. It is produced by B cells in response to stimulation by antigens, such as pollen, pet dander, or certain foods. Once produced, IgE binds to receptors on the surface of mast cells and basophils, which are immune cells found in tissues and blood respectively. When an individual with IgE antibodies encounters the allergen again, the cross-linking of IgE molecules bound to the FcεRI receptor triggers the release of mediators such as histamine, leukotrienes, prostaglandins, and various cytokines from these cells. These mediators cause the symptoms of an allergic reaction, such as itching, swelling, and redness. IgE also plays a role in protecting against certain parasitic infections by activating eosinophils, which can kill the parasites.

In summary, Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is a type of antibody that plays a crucial role in the immune response to allergens and parasitic infections, it binds to receptors on the surface of mast cells and basophils, when an individual with IgE antibodies encounters the allergen again, it triggers the release of mediators from these cells causing the symptoms of an allergic reaction.

Exfoliative dermatitis is a severe form of widespread inflammation of the skin (dermatitis), characterized by widespread scaling and redness, leading to the shedding of large sheets of skin. It can be caused by various factors such as drug reactions, underlying medical conditions (like lymphoma or leukemia), or extensive eczema. Treatment typically involves identifying and removing the cause, along with supportive care, such as moisturizers and medications to control inflammation and itching. In severe cases, hospitalization may be necessary for close monitoring and management of fluid and electrolyte balance.

Carcinogens are agents (substances or mixtures of substances) that can cause cancer. They may be naturally occurring or man-made. Carcinogens can increase the risk of cancer by altering cellular DNA, disrupting cellular function, or promoting cell growth. Examples of carcinogens include certain chemicals found in tobacco smoke, asbestos, UV radiation from the sun, and some viruses.

It's important to note that not all exposures to carcinogens will result in cancer, and the risk typically depends on factors such as the level and duration of exposure, individual genetic susceptibility, and lifestyle choices. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies carcinogens into different groups based on the strength of evidence linking them to cancer:

Group 1: Carcinogenic to humans
Group 2A: Probably carcinogenic to humans
Group 2B: Possibly carcinogenic to humans
Group 3: Not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans
Group 4: Probably not carcinogenic to humans

This information is based on medical research and may be subject to change as new studies become available. Always consult a healthcare professional for medical advice.

Edema is the medical term for swelling caused by excess fluid accumulation in the body tissues. It can affect any part of the body, but it's most commonly noticed in the hands, feet, ankles, and legs. Edema can be a symptom of various underlying medical conditions, such as heart failure, kidney disease, liver disease, or venous insufficiency.

The swelling occurs when the capillaries leak fluid into the surrounding tissues, causing them to become swollen and puffy. The excess fluid can also collect in the cavities of the body, leading to conditions such as pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs) or ascites (fluid in the abdominal cavity).

The severity of edema can vary from mild to severe, and it may be accompanied by other symptoms such as skin discoloration, stiffness, and pain. Treatment for edema depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, lifestyle changes, or medical procedures.

Sweat glands are specialized tubular structures in the skin that produce and secrete sweat, also known as perspiration. They are part of the body's thermoregulatory system, helping to maintain optimal body temperature by releasing water and heat through evaporation. There are two main types of sweat glands: eccrine and apocrine.

1. Eccrine sweat glands: These are distributed throughout the body, with a higher concentration on areas like the palms, soles, and forehead. They are responsible for producing a watery, odorless sweat that primarily helps to cool down the body through evaporation.

2. Apocrine sweat glands: These are mainly found in the axillary (armpit) region and around the anogenital area. They become active during puberty and produce a thick, milky fluid that does not have a strong odor on its own but can mix with bacteria on the skin's surface, leading to body odor.

Sweat glands are controlled by the autonomic nervous system, meaning they function involuntarily in response to various stimuli such as emotions, physical activity, or changes in environmental temperature.

Burns are injuries to tissues caused by heat, electricity, chemicals, friction, or radiation. They are classified based on their severity:

1. First-degree burns (superficial burns) affect only the outer layer of skin (epidermis), causing redness, pain, and swelling.
2. Second-degree burns (partial-thickness burns) damage both the epidermis and the underlying layer of skin (dermis). They result in redness, pain, swelling, and blistering.
3. Third-degree burns (full-thickness burns) destroy the entire depth of the skin and can also damage underlying muscles, tendons, and bones. These burns appear white or blackened and charred, and they may be painless due to destroyed nerve endings.

Immediate medical attention is required for second-degree and third-degree burns, as well as for large area first-degree burns, to prevent infection, manage pain, and ensure proper healing. Treatment options include wound care, antibiotics, pain management, and possibly skin grafting or surgery in severe cases.

An exanthem is a skin eruption or rash that often occurs as a symptom of various diseases, such as infectious illnesses. It can appear in different forms, including maculopapular (consisting of both macules and papules), vesicular (small fluid-filled blisters), petechial (small purple or red spots caused by bleeding under the skin), or erythematous (reddened). The rash can be localized to certain areas of the body or generalized, covering large parts or the entire body. Exanthems are usually accompanied by other symptoms related to the underlying disease, such as fever, cough, or muscle aches.

A patch test is a method used in clinical dermatology to identify whether a specific substance causes allergic inflammation of the skin (contact dermatitis). It involves applying small amounts of potential allergens to patches, which are then placed on the skin and left for a set period of time, usually 48 hours. The skin is then examined for signs of an allergic reaction such as redness, swelling or blistering. This helps in identifying the specific substances that an individual may be allergic to, enabling appropriate avoidance measures and treatment.

BALB/c is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The strain was developed at the Institute of Cancer Research in London by Henry Baldwin and his colleagues in the 1920s, and it has since become one of the most commonly used inbred strains in the world.

BALB/c mice are characterized by their black coat color, which is determined by a recessive allele at the tyrosinase locus. They are also known for their docile and friendly temperament, making them easy to handle and work with in the laboratory.

One of the key features of BALB/c mice that makes them useful for research is their susceptibility to certain types of tumors and immune responses. For example, they are highly susceptible to developing mammary tumors, which can be induced by chemical carcinogens or viral infection. They also have a strong Th2-biased immune response, which makes them useful models for studying allergic diseases and asthma.

BALB/c mice are also commonly used in studies of genetics, neuroscience, behavior, and infectious diseases. Because they are an inbred strain, they have a uniform genetic background, which makes it easier to control for genetic factors in experiments. Additionally, because they have been bred in the laboratory for many generations, they are highly standardized and reproducible, making them ideal subjects for scientific research.

Hand dermatoses is a general term used to describe various inflammatory skin conditions that affect the hands. These conditions can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, itching, blistering, scaling, and cracking of the skin on the hands. Common examples of hand dermatoses include:

1. Irritant contact dermatitis: A reaction that occurs when the skin comes into contact with irritants such as chemicals, soaps, or detergents.
2. Allergic contact dermatitis: A reaction that occurs when the skin comes into contact with allergens, such as nickel, rubber, or poison ivy.
3. Atopic dermatitis (eczema): A chronic skin condition characterized by dry, itchy, and inflamed skin.
4. Psoriasis: A chronic skin condition characterized by red, scaly patches that can occur anywhere on the body, including the hands.
5. Dyshidrotic eczema: A type of eczema that causes small blisters to form on the sides of the fingers, palms, and soles of the feet.
6. Lichen planus: An inflammatory skin condition that can cause purple or white patches to form on the hands and other parts of the body.
7. Scabies: A contagious skin condition caused by mites that burrow into the skin and lay eggs, causing intense itching and a rash.

Treatment for hand dermatoses depends on the specific diagnosis and may include topical creams or ointments, oral medications, phototherapy, or avoidance of triggers.

In the context of medicine and physiology, permeability refers to the ability of a tissue or membrane to allow the passage of fluids, solutes, or gases. It is often used to describe the property of the capillary walls, which control the exchange of substances between the blood and the surrounding tissues.

The permeability of a membrane can be influenced by various factors, including its molecular structure, charge, and the size of the molecules attempting to pass through it. A more permeable membrane allows for easier passage of substances, while a less permeable membrane restricts the movement of substances.

In some cases, changes in permeability can have significant consequences for health. For example, increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier (a specialized type of capillary that regulates the passage of substances into the brain) has been implicated in a number of neurological conditions, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and traumatic brain injury.

Sebum is an oily, waxy substance that is produced by the sebaceous glands in the skin of mammals. It is composed mainly of triglycerides, wax esters, squalene, and free fatty acids, as well as smaller amounts of metabolites and other substances. Sebum plays an important role in the maintenance of the skin's barrier function and in the regulation of its moisture levels. It also has antimicrobial properties that help to protect the skin from infection. Excessive sebum production can contribute to the development of acne and other skin conditions.

Skin lightening preparations are topical products or cosmetic treatments that contain ingredients intended to reduce the melanin concentration or inhibit its production in the skin, leading to a lighter skin tone. These products often include active ingredients such as hydroquinone, corticosteroids, retinoic acid, kojic acid, arbutin, or vitamin C. They work by suppressing tyrosinase, an enzyme responsible for melanin production, or causing skin cell turnover to decrease melanin-rich cells' appearance on the surface of the skin. It is essential to use these products under medical supervision and follow recommended guidelines, as improper usage can lead to skin irritation, allergic reactions, or other adverse effects.

The external ear is the visible portion of the ear that resides outside of the head. It consists of two main structures: the pinna or auricle, which is the cartilaginous structure that people commonly refer to as the "ear," and the external auditory canal, which is the tubular passageway that leads to the eardrum (tympanic membrane).

The primary function of the external ear is to collect and direct sound waves into the middle and inner ear, where they can be converted into neural signals and transmitted to the brain for processing. The external ear also helps protect the middle and inner ear from damage by foreign objects and excessive noise.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Hypersensitivity, Immediate: Also known as Type I hypersensitivity, it is an exaggerated and abnormal immune response that occurs within minutes to a few hours after exposure to a second dose of an allergen (a substance that triggers an allergic reaction). This type of hypersensitivity is mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies, which are produced by the immune system in response to the first exposure to the allergen. Upon subsequent exposures, these IgE antibodies bind to mast cells and basophils, leading to their degranulation and the release of mediators such as histamine, leukotrienes, and prostaglandins. These mediators cause a variety of symptoms, including itching, swelling, redness, and pain at the site of exposure, as well as systemic symptoms such as difficulty breathing, wheezing, and hypotension (low blood pressure). Examples of immediate hypersensitivity reactions include allergic asthma, hay fever, anaphylaxis, and some forms of food allergy.

"Anura" is a term used in the field of zoology, particularly in the study of amphibians. It refers to a order that includes frogs and toads. The name "Anura" comes from the Greek language, with "an-" meaning "without," and "oura" meaning "tail." This is a reference to the fact that members of this order lack tails in their adult form.

The Anura order is characterized by several distinct features:

1. They have short, powerful legs that are well adapted for jumping or leaping.
2. Their forelimbs are smaller and less specialized than their hind limbs.
3. Most anurans have a moist, glandular skin, which helps them to breathe and absorb water.
4. Anura includes both aquatic and terrestrial species, with varying degrees of adaptations for each environment.
5. They lay their eggs in water, and their larvae (tadpoles) are aquatic, undergoing a process called metamorphosis to transform into the adult form.

Anura contains approximately 7,000 known species, making it one of the largest orders of vertebrates. They have a cosmopolitan distribution and can be found on every continent except Antarctica. Anurans play essential roles in many ecosystems as both predators and prey, contributing to the regulation of insect populations and serving as indicators of environmental health.

An allergen is a substance that can cause an allergic reaction in some people. These substances are typically harmless to most people, but for those with allergies, the immune system mistakenly identifies them as threats and overreacts, leading to the release of histamines and other chemicals that cause symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, rashes, hives, and difficulty breathing. Common allergens include pollen, dust mites, mold spores, pet dander, insect venom, and certain foods or medications. When a person comes into contact with an allergen, they may experience symptoms that range from mild to severe, depending on the individual's sensitivity to the substance and the amount of exposure.

"Self-examination" is a term used to describe the act of examining one's own body to identify any unusual or changes in bodily functions, appearance, or symptoms that could indicate a potential health issue. It is often recommended as a preventative measure for early detection of certain conditions, such as breast self-examination (BSE) for detecting lumps or abnormalities in the breast tissue that may suggest breast cancer.

However, it's important to note that while self-examinations can be helpful, they are not a substitute for regular medical check-ups and screenings. It is always recommended to consult with a healthcare professional if any concerning symptoms or changes are noticed during a self-examination. They can provide a more thorough evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment plan as needed.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Ichthyosis is a group of skin disorders that are characterized by dry, thickened, scaly skin. The name "ichthyosis" comes from the Greek word "ichthys," which means fish, as the skin can have a fish-like scale appearance. These conditions can be inherited or acquired and vary in severity.

The medical definition of ichthyosis is a heterogeneous group of genetic keratinization disorders that result in dry, thickened, and scaly skin. The condition may affect any part of the body, but it most commonly appears on the extremities, scalp, and trunk. Ichthyosis can also have associated symptoms such as redness, itching, and blistering.

The severity of ichthyosis can range from mild to severe, and some forms of the condition may be life-threatening in infancy. The exact symptoms and their severity depend on the specific type of ichthyosis a person has. Treatment for ichthyosis typically involves moisturizing the skin, avoiding irritants, and using medications to help control scaling and inflammation.

PUVA therapy is a type of treatment that uses both medication and light to treat certain skin conditions, such as psoriasis, eczema, and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The name "PUVA" stands for Psoralen + UVA, which refers to the two main components of the therapy:

1. Psoralen: This is a medication that makes the skin more sensitive to light. It can be taken orally or applied directly to the skin in the form of a cream or bath.
2. UVA: This stands for Ultraviolet A, which is a type of light that is part of the natural sunlight spectrum. In PUVA therapy, the skin is exposed to a controlled dose of UVA light in a special booth or room.

When psoralen is introduced into the body, it absorbs into the skin and makes it more sensitive to UVA light. When the skin is then exposed to UVA light, it triggers a chemical reaction that slows down the growth of affected skin cells. This helps to reduce inflammation, scaling, and other symptoms associated with the skin condition being treated.

It's important to note that PUVA therapy can have side effects, including sunburn, itching, redness, and an increased risk of skin cancer over time. As such, it is typically used as a second-line treatment when other therapies have not been effective, and it is closely monitored by a healthcare professional to ensure its safe and effective use.

The ear is the sensory organ responsible for hearing and maintaining balance. It can be divided into three parts: the outer ear, middle ear, and inner ear. The outer ear consists of the pinna (the visible part of the ear) and the external auditory canal, which directs sound waves toward the eardrum. The middle ear contains three small bones called ossicles that transmit sound vibrations from the eardrum to the inner ear. The inner ear contains the cochlea, a spiral-shaped organ responsible for converting sound vibrations into electrical signals that are sent to the brain, and the vestibular system, which is responsible for maintaining balance.

In the context of medicine, "needles" are thin, sharp, and typically hollow instruments used in various medical procedures to introduce or remove fluids from the body, administer medications, or perform diagnostic tests. They consist of a small-gauge metal tube with a sharp point on one end and a hub on the other, where a syringe is attached.

There are different types of needles, including:

1. Hypodermic needles: These are used for injections, such as intramuscular (IM), subcutaneous (SC), or intravenous (IV) injections, to deliver medications directly into the body. They come in various sizes and lengths depending on the type of injection and the patient's age and weight.
2. Blood collection needles: These are used for drawing blood samples for diagnostic tests. They have a special vacuum-assisted design that allows them to easily penetrate veins and collect the required amount of blood.
3. Surgical needles: These are used in surgeries for suturing (stitching) wounds or tissues together. They are typically curved and made from stainless steel, with a triangular or reverse cutting point to facilitate easy penetration through tissues.
4. Acupuncture needles: These are thin, solid needles used in traditional Chinese medicine for acupuncture therapy. They are inserted into specific points on the body to stimulate energy flow and promote healing.

It is essential to follow proper infection control procedures when handling and disposing of needles to prevent the spread of bloodborne pathogens and infectious diseases.

Clothing is not a medical term, but rather a general term used to describe items worn on the body for various reasons such as protection from the elements, modesty, or fashion. In a medical context, clothing may be referred to in relation to certain conditions or treatments that require special garments, such as compression stockings for deep vein thrombosis or protective gear for athletes. However, there is no specific medical definition for 'clothing'.

A dose-response relationship in radiation refers to the correlation between the amount of radiation exposure (dose) and the biological response or adverse health effects observed in exposed individuals. As the level of radiation dose increases, the severity and frequency of the adverse health effects also tend to increase. This relationship is crucial in understanding the risks associated with various levels of radiation exposure and helps inform radiation protection standards and guidelines.

The effects of ionizing radiation can be categorized into two types: deterministic and stochastic. Deterministic effects have a threshold dose below which no effect is observed, and above this threshold, the severity of the effect increases with higher doses. Examples include radiation-induced cataracts or radiation dermatitis. Stochastic effects, on the other hand, do not have a clear threshold and are based on probability; as the dose increases, so does the likelihood of the adverse health effect occurring, such as an increased risk of cancer.

Understanding the dose-response relationship in radiation exposure is essential for setting limits on occupational and public exposure to ionizing radiation, optimizing radiation protection practices, and developing effective medical countermeasures in case of radiation emergencies.

A "knockout" mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which one or more genes have been deleted or "knocked out" using molecular biology techniques. This allows researchers to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes, as well as potential associations with human diseases. The mice are generated by introducing targeted DNA modifications into embryonic stem cells, which are then used to create a live animal. Knockout mice have been widely used in biomedical research to investigate gene function, disease mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets.

Iontophoresis is a medical technique in which a mild electrical current is used to deliver medications through the skin. This process enhances the absorption of medication into the body, allowing it to reach deeper tissues that may not be accessible through topical applications alone. Iontophoresis is often used for local treatment of conditions such as inflammation, pain, or spasms, and is particularly useful in treating conditions affecting the hands and feet, like hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating). The medications used in iontophoresis are typically anti-inflammatory drugs, anesthetics, or corticosteroids.

Facial dermatoses refer to various skin conditions that affect the face. These can include a wide range of disorders, such as:

1. Acne vulgaris: A common skin condition characterized by the formation of comedones (blackheads and whiteheads) and inflammatory papules, pustules, and nodules. It primarily affects the face, neck, chest, and back.
2. Rosacea: A chronic skin condition that causes redness, flushing, and visible blood vessels on the face, along with bumps or pimples and sometimes eye irritation.
3. Seborrheic dermatitis: A common inflammatory skin disorder that causes a red, itchy, and flaky rash, often on the scalp, face, and eyebrows. It can also affect other oily areas of the body, like the sides of the nose and behind the ears.
4. Atopic dermatitis (eczema): A chronic inflammatory skin condition that causes red, itchy, and scaly patches on the skin. While it can occur anywhere on the body, it frequently affects the face, especially in infants and young children.
5. Psoriasis: An autoimmune disorder that results in thick, scaly, silvery, or red patches on the skin. It can affect any part of the body, including the face.
6. Contact dermatitis: A skin reaction caused by direct contact with an allergen or irritant, resulting in redness, itching, and inflammation. The face can be affected when allergens or irritants come into contact with the skin through cosmetics, skincare products, or other substances.
7. Lupus erythematosus: An autoimmune disorder that can cause a butterfly-shaped rash on the cheeks and nose, along with other symptoms like joint pain, fatigue, and photosensitivity.
8. Perioral dermatitis: A inflammatory skin condition that causes redness, small bumps, and dryness around the mouth, often mistaken for acne. It can also affect the skin around the nose and eyes.
9. Vitiligo: An autoimmune disorder that results in the loss of pigmentation in patches of skin, which can occur on the face and other parts of the body.
10. Tinea faciei: A fungal infection that affects the facial skin, causing red, scaly, or itchy patches. It is also known as ringworm of the face.

These are just a few examples of skin conditions that can affect the face. If you experience any unusual symptoms or changes in your skin, it's essential to consult a dermatologist for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) is defined as a pharmacological agent that is a derivative of the phorbol ester family. It is a potent tumor promoter and activator of protein kinase C (PKC), a group of enzymes that play a role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, proliferation, and differentiation. TPA has been widely used in research to study PKC-mediated signaling pathways and its role in cancer development and progression. It is also used in topical treatments for skin conditions such as psoriasis.

Keratolytic agents are substances that cause the softening and sloughing off of excess keratin, the protein that makes up the outermost layer of the skin (stratum corneum). These agents help to break down and remove dead skin cells, increase moisture retention, and promote the growth of new skin cells. They are commonly used in the treatment of various dermatological conditions such as psoriasis, eczema, warts, calluses, and ichthyosis. Examples of keratolytic agents include salicylic acid, urea, lactic acid, and retinoic acid.

Neoplasms, adnexal and skin appendage refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the sweat glands, hair follicles, or other structures associated with the skin. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), and they can occur anywhere on the body.

Adnexal neoplasms are tumors that arise from the sweat glands or hair follicles, including the sebaceous glands, eccrine glands, and apocrine glands. These tumors can range in size and severity, and they may cause symptoms such as pain, itching, or changes in the appearance of the skin.

Skin appendage neoplasms are similar to adnexal neoplasms, but they specifically refer to tumors that arise from structures such as hair follicles, nails, and sweat glands. Examples of skin appendage neoplasms include pilomatricomas (tumors of the hair follicle), trichilemmomas (tumors of the outer root sheath of the hair follicle), and sebaceous adenomas (tumors of the sebaceous glands).

It is important to note that while many adnexal and skin appendage neoplasms are benign, some can be malignant and may require aggressive treatment. If you notice any unusual growths or changes in your skin, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional for further evaluation and care.

Eczema is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the skin, which leads to symptoms such as redness, itching, scaling, and blistering. It is often used to describe atopic dermatitis, a chronic relapsing form of eczema, although there are several other types of eczema with different causes and characteristics.

Atopic dermatitis is believed to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and it often affects people with a family history of allergic conditions such as asthma or hay fever. The condition typically begins in infancy or childhood and can persist into adulthood, although it may improve over time.

Eczema can affect any part of the body, but it is most commonly found on the hands, feet, behind the knees, inside the elbows, and on the face. The rash of eczema is often accompanied by dry, scaly skin, and people with the condition may experience periods of flare-ups and remissions.

Treatment for eczema typically involves a combination of moisturizers to keep the skin hydrated, topical corticosteroids to reduce inflammation, and antihistamines to relieve itching. In severe cases, systemic immunosuppressive drugs may be necessary. It is also important for people with eczema to avoid triggers that can worsen their symptoms, such as harsh soaps, scratchy fabrics, and stress.

Mechanoreceptors are specialized sensory receptor cells that convert mechanical stimuli such as pressure, tension, or deformation into electrical signals that can be processed and interpreted by the nervous system. They are found in various tissues throughout the body, including the skin, muscles, tendons, joints, and internal organs. Mechanoreceptors can detect different types of mechanical stimuli depending on their specific structure and location. For example, Pacinian corpuscles in the skin respond to vibrations, while Ruffini endings in the joints detect changes in joint angle and pressure. Overall, mechanoreceptors play a crucial role in our ability to perceive and interact with our environment through touch, proprioception (the sense of the position and movement of body parts), and visceral sensation (awareness of internal organ activity).

Hypersensitivity is an exaggerated or inappropriate immune response to a substance that is generally harmless to most people. It's also known as an allergic reaction. This abnormal response can be caused by various types of immunological mechanisms, including antibody-mediated reactions (types I, II, and III) and cell-mediated reactions (type IV). The severity of the hypersensitivity reaction can range from mild discomfort to life-threatening conditions. Common examples of hypersensitivity reactions include allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, food allergies, and anaphylaxis.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "hair color" is not a term that has a medical definition in the same way that a term like "myocardial infarction" (heart attack) does. Hair color can be described in various ways, such as being a natural hair color (like blonde, brunette, red, or black) or describing a change in hair color due to factors like aging (gray or white hairs) or hair dye usage.

However, it's worth noting that changes in hair color can sometimes be associated with certain medical conditions. For example, premature graying of the hair before the age of 30 can be a feature of certain genetic disorders or vitamin B12 deficiency. Similarly, some skin conditions like alopecia areata or vitiligo can cause patchy changes in hair color. But these associations don't provide a medical definition for 'hair color'.

Regional blood flow (RBF) refers to the rate at which blood flows through a specific region or organ in the body, typically expressed in milliliters per minute per 100 grams of tissue (ml/min/100g). It is an essential physiological parameter that reflects the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissues while removing waste products. RBF can be affected by various factors such as metabolic demands, neural regulation, hormonal influences, and changes in blood pressure or vascular resistance. Measuring RBF is crucial for understanding organ function, diagnosing diseases, and evaluating the effectiveness of treatments.

Ultraviolet (UV) therapy, also known as phototherapy, is a medical treatment that uses ultraviolet light to treat various skin conditions. The UV light can be delivered through natural sunlight or artificial sources, such as specialized lamps or lasers.

In medical settings, controlled doses of UV light are used to target specific areas of the skin. The most common type of UV therapy is narrowband UVB (NB-UVB) phototherapy, which uses a specific wavelength of UVB light to treat conditions such as psoriasis, eczema, vitiligo, and dermatitis.

The goal of UV therapy is to reduce inflammation, slow skin cell growth, and improve the overall appearance of the skin. It is important to note that while UV therapy can be effective in treating certain skin conditions, it also carries risks such as skin aging and an increased risk of skin cancer. Therefore, it should only be administered under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional.

Anti-infective agents, local, are medications that are applied directly to a specific area of the body to prevent or treat infections caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, or parasites. These agents include topical antibiotics, antifungals, antivirals, and anti-parasitic drugs. They work by killing or inhibiting the growth of the infectious organisms, thereby preventing their spread and reducing the risk of infection. Local anti-infective agents are often used to treat skin infections, eye infections, and other localized infections, and can be administered as creams, ointments, gels, solutions, or drops.

A nevus, also known as a mole, is a benign growth or mark on the skin that is usually brown or black. It can be raised or flat and can appear anywhere on the body. Nevi are made up of cells called melanocytes, which produce the pigment melanin. Most nevi develop in childhood or adolescence, but they can also appear later in life. Some people have many nevi, while others have few or none.

There are several types of nevi, including:

* Common nevi: These are the most common type of mole and are usually small, round, and brown or black. They can be flat or raised and can appear anywhere on the body.
* Atypical nevi: These moles are larger than common nevi and have irregular borders and color. They may be flat or raised and can appear anywhere on the body, but are most commonly found on the trunk and extremities. Atypical nevi are more likely to develop into melanoma, a type of skin cancer, than common nevi.
* Congenital nevi: These moles are present at birth and can vary in size from small to large. They are more likely to develop into melanoma than moles that develop later in life.
* Spitz nevi: These are rare, benign growths that typically appear in children and adolescents. They are usually pink or red and dome-shaped.

It is important to monitor nevi for changes in size, shape, color, and texture, as these can be signs of melanoma. If you notice any changes in a mole, or if you have a new mole that is unusual or bleeding, it is important to see a healthcare provider for further evaluation.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Protective clothing refers to specialized garments worn by healthcare professionals, first responders, or workers in various industries to protect themselves from potential hazards that could cause harm to their bodies. These hazards may include biological agents (such as viruses or bacteria), chemicals, radiological particles, physical injuries, or extreme temperatures.

Examples of protective clothing include:

1. Medical/isolation gowns: Fluid-resistant garments worn by healthcare workers during medical procedures to protect against the spread of infectious diseases.
2. Lab coats: Protective garments typically worn in laboratories to shield the wearer's skin and clothing from potential chemical or biological exposure.
3. Coveralls: One-piece garments that cover the entire body, often used in industries with high exposure risks, such as chemical manufacturing or construction.
4. Gloves: Protective hand coverings made of materials like latex, nitrile, or vinyl, which prevent direct contact with hazardous substances.
5. Face masks and respirators: Devices worn over the nose and mouth to filter out airborne particles, protecting the wearer from inhaling harmful substances.
6. Helmets and face shields: Protective headgear used in various industries to prevent physical injuries from falling objects or impact.
7. Fire-resistant clothing: Specialized garments worn by firefighters and those working with high temperatures or open flames to protect against burns and heat exposure.

The choice of protective clothing depends on the specific hazards present in the work environment, as well as the nature and duration of potential exposures. Proper use, maintenance, and training are essential for ensuring the effectiveness of protective clothing in minimizing risks and maintaining worker safety.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

A nevus pigmentosus, also known as a pigmented mole or melanocytic nevus, is a benign proliferation of melanocytes, the pigment-producing cells in the skin. These lesions typically appear as well-circumscribed, brown to black macules or papules. They can vary in size and shape and may be flat or raised. Most nevi are harmless and do not require treatment; however, some may undergo malignant transformation into melanoma, a potentially life-threatening skin cancer. Regular self-skin examinations and professional skin checks are recommended to monitor for changes in nevi that may indicate malignancy.

Alopecia is a medical term that refers to the loss of hair or baldness. It can occur in various parts of the body, but it's most commonly used to describe hair loss from the scalp. Alopecia can have several causes, including genetics, hormonal changes, medical conditions, and aging.

There are different types of alopecia, such as:

* Alopecia Areata: It is a condition that causes round patches of hair loss on the scalp or other parts of the body. The immune system attacks the hair follicles, causing the hair to fall out.
* Androgenetic Alopecia: Also known as male pattern baldness or female pattern baldness, it's a genetic condition that causes gradual hair thinning and eventual hair loss, typically following a specific pattern.
* Telogen Effluvium: It is a temporary hair loss condition caused by stress, medication, pregnancy, or other factors that can cause the hair follicles to enter a resting phase, leading to shedding and thinning of the hair.

The treatment for alopecia depends on the underlying cause. In some cases, such as with telogen effluvium, hair growth may resume without any treatment. However, other forms of alopecia may require medical intervention, including topical treatments, oral medications, or even hair transplant surgery in severe cases.

Carcinoma of the skin appendages refers to a type of cancer that originates in the specialized cells of the skin's sweat glands, hair follicles, or sebaceous glands. These cancers are relatively rare and can present as various subtypes, including eccrine carcinoma, apocrine carcinoma, hidradenocarcinoma, and malignant adnexal tumors.

The symptoms of skin appendage carcinomas may include:

1. A firm, painless lump or nodule under the skin that may be skin-colored, red, or blue.
2. Ulceration, crusting, or bleeding from the lesion.
3. Itching, burning, or pain in the affected area.
4. Lymph node enlargement near the tumor site.

Treatment typically involves surgical excision of the tumor, often followed by radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy to ensure complete removal and reduce the risk of recurrence. Regular follow-up appointments with a dermatologist or oncologist are essential for monitoring and early detection of any potential recurrences or new primary cancers.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "touch" is not a term that has a specific medical definition in the context you've provided. In a general sense, touch refers to the ability to perceive things through physically contacting them, which is a function of our nervous system. However, it's not a term used to describe a specific medical condition, diagnosis, treatment, or procedure. If you have any more specific context or question in mind, I'd be happy to try and help further!

Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) is a group of rare inherited skin disorders that are characterized by the development of blisters, erosions, and scarring following minor trauma or friction. The condition results from a genetic defect that affects the structural proteins responsible for anchoring the epidermis (outer layer of the skin) to the dermis (inner layer of the skin).

There are several types of EB, which vary in severity and clinical presentation. These include:

1. Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex (EBS): This is the most common form of EB, and it typically affects the skin's superficial layers. Blistering tends to occur after minor trauma or friction, and healing usually occurs without scarring. There are several subtypes of EBS, which vary in severity.
2. Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa (JEB): This form of EB affects the deeper layers of the skin, and blistering can occur spontaneously or following minor trauma. Healing often results in scarring, and affected individuals may also experience nail loss, dental abnormalities, and fragile mucous membranes.
3. Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (DEB): DEB affects the deeper layers of the skin, and blistering can lead to significant scarring, contractures, and fusion of fingers and toes. There are two main subtypes of DEB: recessive DEB (RDEB), which is more severe and associated with a higher risk of skin cancer, and dominant DEB (DDEB), which tends to be milder.
4. Kindler Syndrome: This is a rare form of EB that affects both the epidermis and dermis. Blistering can occur spontaneously or following minor trauma, and affected individuals may experience photosensitivity, poikiloderma (a mottled skin appearance), and oral and gastrointestinal abnormalities.

Treatment for EB typically focuses on managing symptoms, preventing blister formation and infection, and promoting wound healing. There is currently no cure for EB, but research is ongoing to develop new therapies and treatments.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Soaps" is not a medical term, but rather refers to cleaning agents that are widely used in daily life for personal and household hygiene.

However, if you're referring to "saponification," it is a chemical process that occurs when fats or oils react with an alkali, resulting in the formation of soap and glycerin. This term can be relevant in medical contexts, such as in the production of medicated soaps used for various skin conditions.

If you meant something else by "Soaps," please clarify your question, and I will do my best to provide an accurate answer.

In a medical context, "hot temperature" is not a standard medical term with a specific definition. However, it is often used in relation to fever, which is a common symptom of illness. A fever is typically defined as a body temperature that is higher than normal, usually above 38°C (100.4°F) for adults and above 37.5-38°C (99.5-101.3°F) for children, depending on the source.

Therefore, when a medical professional talks about "hot temperature," they may be referring to a body temperature that is higher than normal due to fever or other causes. It's important to note that a high environmental temperature can also contribute to an elevated body temperature, so it's essential to consider both the body temperature and the environmental temperature when assessing a patient's condition.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

Mustard gas, also known as sulfur mustard or HS, is a chemical warfare agent that has been used in military conflicts. It is a viscous, oily liquid at room temperature with a garlic-like odor. Its chemical formula is (ClCH2CH2)2S.

Mustard gas can cause severe burns and blistering of the skin, eyes, and respiratory tract upon contact or inhalation. It can also damage the immune system and lead to serious, potentially fatal, systemic effects. The onset of symptoms may be delayed for several hours after exposure, making it difficult to recognize and treat the injury promptly.

Mustard gas is classified as a vesicant, which means it causes blistering or tissue damage upon contact with the skin or mucous membranes. It can also have long-term effects, including an increased risk of cancer and other health problems. The use of mustard gas in warfare is banned by international law under the Chemical Weapons Convention.

Inflammation is a complex biological response of tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. It is characterized by the following signs: rubor (redness), tumor (swelling), calor (heat), dolor (pain), and functio laesa (loss of function). The process involves the activation of the immune system, recruitment of white blood cells, and release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to the elimination of the injurious stimuli and initiation of the healing process. However, uncontrolled or chronic inflammation can also lead to tissue damage and diseases.

Pemphigus is a group of rare, autoimmune blistering diseases that affect the skin and mucous membranes. In these conditions, the immune system mistakenly produces antibodies against desmoglein proteins, which are crucial for maintaining cell-to-cell adhesion in the epidermis (outermost layer of the skin). This results in the loss of keratinocyte cohesion and formation of flaccid blisters filled with serous fluid.

There are several types of pemphigus, including:

1. Pemphigus vulgaris - The most common form, primarily affecting middle-aged to older adults, with widespread erosions and flaccid blisters on the skin and mucous membranes (e.g., mouth, nose, genitals).
2. Pemphigus foliaceus - A more superficial form, mainly involving the skin, causing crusted erosions and scaly lesions without mucosal involvement. It is more prevalent in older individuals and in certain geographical regions like the Middle East.
3. Paraneoplastic pemphigus - A rare type associated with underlying neoplasms (cancers), such as lymphomas or carcinomas, characterized by severe widespread blistering of both skin and mucous membranes, along with antibodies against additional antigens besides desmogleins.
4. IgA pemphigus - A less common form characterized by localized or generalized erosions and blisters, with IgA autoantibodies targeting the basement membrane zone.

Treatment for pemphigus typically involves high-dose systemic corticosteroids, often in combination with immunosuppressive agents (e.g., azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, rituximab) to control the disease activity and prevent complications. Regular follow-ups with dermatologists and oral specialists are essential for monitoring treatment response and managing potential side effects.

Diffuse scleroderma is a medical condition that falls under the systemic sclerosis category of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. It is characterized by thickening and hardening (sclerosis) of the skin and involvement of internal organs. In diffuse scleroderma, the process affects extensive areas of the skin and at least one internal organ.

The disease process involves an overproduction of collagen, a protein that makes up connective tissues in the body. This excessive collagen deposition leads to fibrosis (scarring) of the skin and various organs, including the esophagus, gastrointestinal tract, heart, lungs, and kidneys.

Diffuse scleroderma can present with a rapid progression of skin thickening within the first few years after onset. The skin involvement may extend to areas beyond the hands, feet, and face, which are commonly affected in limited scleroderma (another form of systemic sclerosis). Additionally, patients with diffuse scleroderma have a higher risk for severe internal organ complications compared to those with limited scleroderma.

Early diagnosis and appropriate management of diffuse scleroderma are crucial to prevent or slow down the progression of organ damage. Treatment typically involves a multidisciplinary approach, focusing on symptom management, immunosuppressive therapy, and addressing specific organ involvement.

I'm happy to help, but I must clarify that while I can provide information based on the data I have up to 2021, I don't have real-time capabilities. Therefore, I can't provide current medical definitions or the latest research findings.

As for your question, sunbathing is not a medical term per se, but it is a practice related to dermatology and health. Sunbathing generally refers to the act of exposing one's skin to sunlight, usually with the intention of darkening the complexion due to tanning or for perceived benefits from ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure.

However, it is essential to note that excessive sunbathing can lead to various health issues, including premature skin aging, eye damage, and an increased risk of skin cancer due to UV radiation exposure. Therefore, dermatologists generally advise practicing sun safety measures, such as wearing protective clothing, using a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, seeking shade during peak sunlight hours, and avoiding intentional tanning.

Phototoxic dermatitis is a skin reaction that occurs when certain chemicals (known as photosensitizers) in a substance come into contact with the skin and then are exposed to sunlight or artificial UV light. This results in an exaggerated sunburn-like reaction, characterized by redness, swelling, itching, and sometimes blistering of the skin. The reaction usually occurs within a few hours to a couple of days after exposure to the offending agent and light. Common causes include certain medications, essential oils, fragrances, and plants like limes, celery, and parsley. Once the irritant is no longer in contact with the skin and sun exposure is avoided, the symptoms typically resolve within a week or two. Prevention includes avoiding the offending agent and protecting the skin from sunlight through the use of clothing, hats, and broad-spectrum sunscreens.

Physical stimulation, in a medical context, refers to the application of external forces or agents to the body or its tissues to elicit a response. This can include various forms of touch, pressure, temperature, vibration, or electrical currents. The purpose of physical stimulation may be therapeutic, as in the case of massage or physical therapy, or diagnostic, as in the use of reflex tests. It is also used in research settings to study physiological responses and mechanisms.

In a broader sense, physical stimulation can also refer to the body's exposure to physical activity or exercise, which can have numerous health benefits, including improving cardiovascular function, increasing muscle strength and flexibility, and reducing the risk of chronic diseases.

Mast cells are a type of white blood cell that are found in connective tissues throughout the body, including the skin, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. They play an important role in the immune system and help to defend the body against pathogens by releasing chemicals such as histamine, heparin, and leukotrienes, which help to attract other immune cells to the site of infection or injury. Mast cells also play a role in allergic reactions, as they release histamine and other chemicals in response to exposure to an allergen, leading to symptoms such as itching, swelling, and redness. They are derived from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow and mature in the tissues where they reside.

The scalp is the anatomical region located at the upper part of the human head, covering the skull except for the face and the ears. It is made up of several layers: the skin, the connective tissue, the galea aponeurotica (a strong, flat, tendinous sheet), loose areolar tissue, and the periosteum (the highly vascularized innermost layer that attaches directly to the skull bones). The scalp has a rich blood supply and is home to numerous sensory receptors, including those for touch, pain, and temperature. It also contains hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and sweat glands.

Cell movement, also known as cell motility, refers to the ability of cells to move independently and change their location within tissue or inside the body. This process is essential for various biological functions, including embryonic development, wound healing, immune responses, and cancer metastasis.

There are several types of cell movement, including:

1. **Crawling or mesenchymal migration:** Cells move by extending and retracting protrusions called pseudopodia or filopodia, which contain actin filaments. This type of movement is common in fibroblasts, immune cells, and cancer cells during tissue invasion and metastasis.
2. **Amoeboid migration:** Cells move by changing their shape and squeezing through tight spaces without forming protrusions. This type of movement is often observed in white blood cells (leukocytes) as they migrate through the body to fight infections.
3. **Pseudopodial extension:** Cells extend pseudopodia, which are temporary cytoplasmic projections containing actin filaments. These protrusions help the cell explore its environment and move forward.
4. **Bacterial flagellar motion:** Bacteria use a whip-like structure called a flagellum to propel themselves through their environment. The rotation of the flagellum is driven by a molecular motor in the bacterial cell membrane.
5. **Ciliary and ependymal movement:** Ciliated cells, such as those lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tubes, have hair-like structures called cilia that beat in coordinated waves to move fluids or mucus across the cell surface.

Cell movement is regulated by a complex interplay of signaling pathways, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and adhesion molecules, which enable cells to respond to environmental cues and navigate through tissues.

Malassezia is a genus of fungi (specifically, yeasts) that are commonly found on the skin surfaces of humans and other animals. They are part of the normal flora of the skin, but under certain conditions, they can cause various skin disorders such as dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, pityriasis versicolor, and atopic dermatitis.

Malassezia species require lipids for growth, and they are able to break down the lipids present in human sebum into fatty acids, which can cause irritation and inflammation of the skin. Malassezia is also associated with fungal infections in people with weakened immune systems.

The genus Malassezia includes several species, such as M. furfur, M. globosa, M. restricta, M. sympodialis, and others. These species can be identified using various laboratory methods, including microscopy, culture, and molecular techniques.

Seborrheic Keratosis is a common, benign skin condition that typically presents as rough, scaly, tan-to-darkly pigmented growths on the surface of the skin. These lesions can appear anywhere on the body, but they are most commonly found on the face, chest, back, and extremities. Seborrheic Keratoses are caused by an overproduction of keratin, a protein that makes up the outer layer of the skin.

The exact cause of Seborrheic Keratosis is not known, but it is thought to be related to genetic factors and sun exposure. The condition is more common in older adults and is not contagious. While Seborrheic Keratoses are generally harmless, they can be removed for cosmetic reasons or if they become irritated or inflamed. Treatment options include cryotherapy (freezing the lesions with liquid nitrogen), curettage (scraping the lesions off), and laser surgery.

Seborrheic dermatitis is a common, inflammatory skin condition that mainly affects the scalp, face, and upper part of the body. It causes skin irritation, flaking, and redness, often in areas where the skin is oily or greasy. The exact cause of seborrheic dermatitis is not fully understood, but it appears to be related to a combination of genetic, environmental, and microbial factors.

The symptoms of seborrheic dermatitis can vary in severity and may include:

* Greasy or flaky scales on the scalp, eyebrows, eyelashes, ears, or beard
* Redness and inflammation of the skin
* Itching, burning, or stinging sensations
* Yellow or white crusty patches on the scalp or other affected areas
* Hair loss (in severe cases)

Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic condition that tends to flare up and then subside over time. While there is no cure for seborrheic dermatitis, various treatments can help manage the symptoms and prevent complications. These may include medicated shampoos, topical creams or ointments, and lifestyle changes such as stress reduction and avoiding triggers that worsen symptoms.

It is important to note that seborrheic dermatitis should not be confused with other skin conditions, such as psoriasis or eczema, which may have similar symptoms. A healthcare professional can provide a proper diagnosis and recommend appropriate treatment options based on the individual's specific needs.

Cocarcinogenesis is a term used in the field of oncology to describe a process where exposure to certain chemicals or physical agents enhances the tumor-forming ability of a cancer-causing agent (carcinogen). A cocarcinogen does not have the ability to initiate cancer on its own, but it can promote the development and progression of cancer when combined with a carcinogen.

In other words, a cocarcinogen is a substance or factor that acts synergistically with a known carcinogen to increase the likelihood or speed up the development of cancer. This process can occur through various mechanisms, such as suppressing the immune system, promoting inflammation, increasing cell proliferation, or inhibiting apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Examples of cocarcinogens include tobacco smoke, alcohol, certain viruses, and radiation. These agents can interact with carcinogens to increase the risk of cancer in individuals who are exposed to them. It is important to note that while cocarcinogens themselves may not directly cause cancer, they can significantly contribute to its development and progression when combined with other harmful substances or factors.

Thermography, also known as digital infrared thermal imaging (DITI), is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that uses an infrared camera to convert heat emitted from the body into electrical signals that produce images called thermograms. These images visually represent the temperature differences across the surface of the body, which can help identify abnormalities such as inflammation, injury, or disease.

Thermography is not a standalone diagnostic tool but rather an adjunctive one, used in conjunction with other medical tests and clinical evaluations to support diagnosis and treatment planning. It has been used in various medical fields, including breast oncology, rheumatology, neurology, and pain management. However, its effectiveness and accuracy are still a subject of ongoing research and debate within the medical community.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

Antisepsis is the process of preventing or limiting the growth and reproduction of microorganisms (such as bacteria, fungi, and viruses) that can cause infection or disease. This is typically achieved through the use of antiseptic agents, which are substances that inhibit the growth of microorganisms when applied to living tissue or non-living material like surfaces.

Antiseptics work by either killing the microorganisms outright (bactericidal) or preventing them from reproducing and growing (bacteriostatic). They can be applied topically, in the form of creams, ointments, gels, sprays, or washes, to prevent infection in wounds, cuts, burns, or other types of skin damage. Antiseptics are also used in medical devices and equipment to maintain sterility and prevent cross-contamination during procedures.

Examples of antiseptic agents include alcohol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, iodine, and povidone-iodine. The choice of antiseptic depends on the type of microorganism being targeted, the location and severity of the infection, and any potential adverse effects or interactions with other medications or medical conditions.

It's important to note that antisepsis is different from sterilization, which involves the complete destruction of all living organisms, including spores, using methods such as heat, radiation, or chemicals. Sterilization is typically used for surgical instruments and other medical equipment that come into direct contact with sterile tissues or bodily fluids during procedures.

I'm not aware of a specific medical definition for "amphibian proteins." However, I can provide some context that might help you understand what you might be looking for.

Proteins are complex molecules that perform a wide variety of functions within organisms, including catalyzing metabolic reactions, DNA replication, responding to stimuli, and transporting molecules from one location to another. Amphibians are a class of animals that include frogs, toads, salamanders, and newts.

If you're looking for information about proteins that are found in amphibians or are unique to amphibians, then you might be interested in researching the specific proteins that are involved in various biological processes in these animals. For example, some amphibian proteins have been studied for their potential roles in wound healing, immune response, and developmental biology.

One well-known example of an amphibian protein is antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are produced by the skin of many amphibians as a defense against pathogens. These peptides have been studied for their potential therapeutic applications in human medicine, particularly in the context of antibiotic resistance.

If you could provide more context or clarify what you're looking for, I might be able to give you a more specific answer!

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Drug hypersensitivity is an abnormal immune response to a medication or its metabolites. It is a type of adverse drug reaction that occurs in susceptible individuals, characterized by the activation of the immune system leading to inflammation and tissue damage. This reaction can range from mild symptoms such as skin rashes, hives, and itching to more severe reactions like anaphylaxis, which can be life-threatening.

Drug hypersensitivity reactions can be classified into two main types: immediate (or IgE-mediated) and delayed (or non-IgE-mediated). Immediate reactions occur within minutes to a few hours after taking the medication and are mediated by the release of histamine and other inflammatory mediators from mast cells and basophils. Delayed reactions, on the other hand, can take several days to develop and are caused by T-cell activation and subsequent cytokine release.

Common drugs that can cause hypersensitivity reactions include antibiotics (such as penicillins and sulfonamides), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), monoclonal antibodies, and chemotherapeutic agents. It is important to note that previous exposure to a medication does not always guarantee the development of hypersensitivity reactions, as they can also occur after the first administration in some cases.

The diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity involves a thorough medical history, physical examination, and sometimes skin or laboratory tests. Treatment typically includes avoiding the offending medication and managing symptoms with antihistamines, corticosteroids, or other medications as needed. In severe cases, emergency medical care may be required to treat anaphylaxis or other life-threatening reactions.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Hair diseases is a broad term that refers to various medical conditions affecting the hair shaft, follicle, or scalp. These conditions can be categorized into several types, including:

1. Hair shaft abnormalities: These are conditions that affect the structure and growth of the hair shaft. Examples include trichorrhexis nodosa, where the hair becomes weak and breaks easily, and pili torti, where the hair shaft is twisted and appears sparse and fragile.
2. Hair follicle disorders: These are conditions that affect the hair follicles, leading to hair loss or abnormal growth patterns. Examples include alopecia areata, an autoimmune disorder that causes patchy hair loss, and androgenetic alopecia, a genetic condition that leads to pattern baldness in both men and women.
3. Scalp disorders: These are conditions that affect the scalp, leading to symptoms such as itching, redness, scaling, or pain. Examples include seborrheic dermatitis, psoriasis, and tinea capitis (ringworm of the scalp).
4. Hair cycle abnormalities: These are conditions that affect the normal growth cycle of the hair, leading to excessive shedding or thinning. Examples include telogen effluvium, where a large number of hairs enter the resting phase and fall out, and anagen effluvium, which is typically caused by chemotherapy or radiation therapy.
5. Infectious diseases: Hair follicles can become infected with various bacteria, viruses, or fungi, leading to conditions such as folliculitis, furunculosis, and kerion.
6. Genetic disorders: Some genetic disorders can affect the hair, such as Menkes syndrome, which is a rare inherited disorder that affects copper metabolism and leads to kinky, sparse, and brittle hair.

Proper diagnosis and treatment of hair diseases require consultation with a healthcare professional, often a dermatologist or a trichologist who specializes in hair and scalp disorders.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Inbred strains of mice are defined as lines of mice that have been brother-sister mated for at least 20 consecutive generations. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the mice of an inbred strain are genetically identical to one another, with the exception of spontaneous mutations.

Inbred strains of mice are widely used in biomedical research due to their genetic uniformity and stability, which makes them useful for studying the genetic basis of various traits, diseases, and biological processes. They also provide a consistent and reproducible experimental system, as compared to outbred or genetically heterogeneous populations.

Some commonly used inbred strains of mice include C57BL/6J, BALB/cByJ, DBA/2J, and 129SvEv. Each strain has its own unique genetic background and phenotypic characteristics, which can influence the results of experiments. Therefore, it is important to choose the appropriate inbred strain for a given research question.

The forearm is the region of the upper limb between the elbow and the wrist. It consists of two bones, the radius and ulna, which are located side by side and run parallel to each other. The forearm is responsible for movements such as flexion, extension, supination, and pronation of the hand and wrist.

T-lymphocytes, also known as T-cells, are a type of white blood cell that plays a key role in the adaptive immune system's response to infection. They are produced in the bone marrow and mature in the thymus gland. There are several different types of T-cells, including CD4+ helper T-cells, CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells, and regulatory T-cells (Tregs).

CD4+ helper T-cells assist in activating other immune cells, such as B-lymphocytes and macrophages. They also produce cytokines, which are signaling molecules that help coordinate the immune response. CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells directly kill infected cells by releasing toxic substances. Regulatory T-cells help maintain immune tolerance and prevent autoimmune diseases by suppressing the activity of other immune cells.

T-lymphocytes are important in the immune response to viral infections, cancer, and other diseases. Dysfunction or depletion of T-cells can lead to immunodeficiency and increased susceptibility to infections. On the other hand, an overactive T-cell response can contribute to autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammation.

Warts are small, rough growths on the skin or mucous membranes caused by one of several types of human papillomavirus (HPV). They can appear anywhere on the body but most often occur on the hands, fingers, and feet. Warts are benign, non-cancerous growths, but they can be unsightly, uncomfortable, or painful, depending on their location and size.

Warts are caused by HPV infecting the top layer of skin, usually through a small cut or scratch. The virus triggers an overproduction of keratin, a protein in the skin, leading to the formation of a hard, rough growth. Warts can vary in appearance depending on their location and type, but they are generally round or irregularly shaped, with a rough surface that may be flat or slightly raised. They may also contain small black dots, which are actually tiny blood vessels that have clotted.

Warts are contagious and can spread from person to person through direct skin-to-skin contact or by sharing personal items such as towels or razors. They can also be spread by touching a wart and then touching another part of the body. Warts may take several months to develop after exposure to HPV, so it may not always be clear when or how they were contracted.

There are several types of warts, including common warts, plantar warts (which occur on the soles of the feet), flat warts (which are smaller and smoother than other types of warts), and genital warts (which are sexually transmitted). While most warts are harmless and will eventually go away on their own, some may require medical treatment if they are causing discomfort or are unsightly. Treatment options for warts include topical medications, cryotherapy (freezing the wart with liquid nitrogen), and surgical removal.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

Scabies is a contagious skin condition caused by the infestation of the human itch mite (Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis). The female mite burrows into the upper layer of the skin, where it lays its eggs and causes an intensely pruritic (itchy) rash. The rash is often accompanied by small red bumps and blisters, typically found in areas such as the hands, wrists, elbows, armpits, waistline, genitals, and buttocks. Scabies is transmitted through direct skin-to-skin contact with an infected individual or through sharing of contaminated items like bedding or clothing. It can affect people of all ages, races, and socioeconomic backgrounds, but it is particularly common in crowded living conditions, nursing homes, and child care facilities. Treatment usually involves topical medications or oral drugs that kill the mites and their eggs, as well as thorough cleaning and laundering of bedding, clothing, and towels to prevent reinfestation.

Clobetasol is a topical corticosteroid medication that is used to reduce inflammation and relieve itching, redness, and swelling associated with various skin conditions. It works by suppressing the immune system's response to reduce inflammation. Clobetasol is available in several forms, including creams, ointments, emulsions, and foams, and is usually applied to the affected area once or twice a day.

It is important to use clobetasol only as directed by a healthcare provider, as prolonged or excessive use can lead to thinning of the skin, increased susceptibility to infections, and other side effects. Additionally, it should not be used on large areas of the body or for extended periods without medical supervision.

Cell proliferation is the process by which cells increase in number, typically through the process of cell division. In the context of biology and medicine, it refers to the reproduction of cells that makes up living tissue, allowing growth, maintenance, and repair. It involves several stages including the transition from a phase of quiescence (G0 phase) to an active phase (G1 phase), DNA replication in the S phase, and mitosis or M phase, where the cell divides into two daughter cells.

Abnormal or uncontrolled cell proliferation is a characteristic feature of many diseases, including cancer, where deregulated cell cycle control leads to excessive and unregulated growth of cells, forming tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites in the body.

"Cold temperature" is a relative term and its definition can vary depending on the context. In general, it refers to temperatures that are lower than those normally experienced or preferred by humans and other warm-blooded animals. In a medical context, cold temperature is often defined as an environmental temperature that is below 16°C (60.8°F).

Exposure to cold temperatures can have various physiological effects on the human body, such as vasoconstriction of blood vessels near the skin surface, increased heart rate and metabolic rate, and shivering, which helps to generate heat and maintain body temperature. Prolonged exposure to extreme cold temperatures can lead to hypothermia, a potentially life-threatening condition characterized by a drop in core body temperature below 35°C (95°F).

It's worth noting that some people may have different sensitivities to cold temperatures due to factors such as age, health status, and certain medical conditions. For example, older adults, young children, and individuals with circulatory or neurological disorders may be more susceptible to the effects of cold temperatures.

In medical terms, toes are the digits located at the end of the foot. Humans typically have five toes on each foot, consisting of the big toe (hallux), second toe, third toe, fourth toe, and little toe (fifth toe). The bones of the toes are called phalanges, with the exception of the big toe, which has a different bone structure and is composed of a proximal phalanx, distal phalanx, and sometimes a sesamoid bone.

Toes play an essential role in maintaining balance and assisting in locomotion by helping to push off the ground during walking or running. They also contribute to the overall stability and posture of the body. Various medical conditions can affect toes, such as ingrown toenails, bunions, hammertoes, and neuromas, which may require specific treatments or interventions to alleviate pain, restore function, or improve appearance.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

A pressure ulcer, also known as a pressure injury or bedsore, is defined by the National Pressure Injury Advisory Panel (NPIAP) as "localized damage to the skin and/or underlying soft tissue usually over a bony prominence or related to a medical or other device." The damage can be caused by intense and/or prolonged pressure or shear forces, or a combination of both. Pressure ulcers are staged based on their severity, ranging from an initial reddening of the skin (Stage 1) to full-thickness tissue loss that extends down to muscle and bone (Stage 4). Unstageable pressure ulcers are those in which the base of the wound is covered by yellow, tan, green or brown tissue and the extent of tissue damage is not visible. Suspected deep tissue injury (Suspected DTI) describes intact skin or non-blanchable redness of a localized area usually over a bony prominence due to pressure and/or shear. The area may be preceded by tissue that is painful, firm, mushy, boggy, warmer or cooler as compared to adjacent tissue.

A keloid is a type of scar that results from an overgrowth of granulation tissue (collagen) at the site of a healed skin injury. Unlike normal scars, keloids extend beyond the borders of the original wound, invading surrounding tissues and forming smooth, hard, benign growths. They can be pink, red, or purple in color, and may become darker over time. Keloids can occur anywhere on the body, but they are most common on the earlobes, chest, shoulders, and back. They can cause itching, pain, and discomfort, and can sometimes interfere with movement. The exact cause of keloid formation is not fully understood, but it is thought to involve a combination of genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors. Treatment options for keloids include surgery, radiation therapy, corticosteroid injections, and silicone gel sheeting, although they can be difficult to eliminate completely.

Foot dermatoses refer to various skin conditions that affect the feet. These can include inflammatory conditions like eczema and psoriasis, infectious diseases such as athlete's foot (tinea pedis), fungal infections, bacterial infections, viral infections (like plantar warts caused by HPV), and autoimmune blistering disorders. Additionally, contact dermatitis from irritants or allergens can also affect the feet. Proper diagnosis is essential to determine the best course of treatment for each specific condition.

Urticaria, also known as hives, is an allergic reaction that appears on the skin. It is characterized by the rapid appearance of swollen, pale red bumps or plaques (wheals) on the skin, which are often accompanied by itching, stinging, or burning sensations. These wheals can vary in size and shape, and they may change location and appear in different places over a period of hours or days. Urticaria is usually caused by an allergic reaction to food, medication, or other substances, but it can also be triggered by physical factors such as heat, cold, pressure, or exercise. The condition is generally harmless, but severe cases of urticaria may indicate a more serious underlying medical issue and should be evaluated by a healthcare professional.

I must clarify that the term "Guinea Pigs" is not typically used in medical definitions. However, in colloquial or informal language, it may refer to people who are used as the first to try out a new medical treatment or drug. This is known as being a "test subject" or "in a clinical trial."

In the field of scientific research, particularly in studies involving animals, guinea pigs are small rodents that are often used as experimental subjects due to their size, cost-effectiveness, and ease of handling. They are not actually pigs from Guinea, despite their name's origins being unclear. However, they do not exactly fit the description of being used in human medical experiments.

Keratin-10 is a type II keratin protein that is primarily expressed in the differentiated layers of stratified squamous epithelia, including the skin's epidermis. It plays a crucial role in providing structural support and protection to these epithelial tissues. Keratin-10 pairs with keratin-1 to form intermediate filaments, which are essential for maintaining the integrity and stability of epithelial cells. The expression of keratin-10 is often used as a marker for terminal differentiation in epidermal keratinocytes.

A bandage is a medical dressing or covering applied to a wound, injury, or sore with the intention of promoting healing or preventing infection. Bandages can be made of a variety of materials such as gauze, cotton, elastic, or adhesive tape and come in different sizes and shapes to accommodate various body parts. They can also have additional features like fasteners, non-slip surfaces, or transparent windows for monitoring the condition of the wound.

Bandages serve several purposes, including:

1. Absorbing drainage or exudate from the wound
2. Protecting the wound from external contaminants and bacteria
3. Securing other medical devices such as catheters or splints in place
4. Reducing swelling or promoting immobilization of the affected area
5. Providing compression to control bleeding or prevent fluid accumulation
6. Relieving pain by reducing pressure on sensitive nerves or structures.

Proper application and care of bandages are essential for effective wound healing and prevention of complications such as infection or delayed recovery.

In medical terms, a hand is the part of the human body that is attached to the forearm and consists of the carpus (wrist), metacarpus, and phalanges. It is made up of 27 bones, along with muscles, tendons, ligaments, and other soft tissues. The hand is a highly specialized organ that is capable of performing a wide range of complex movements and functions, including grasping, holding, manipulating objects, and communicating through gestures. It is also richly innervated with sensory receptors that provide information about touch, temperature, pain, and proprioception (the sense of the position and movement of body parts).

Feathers are not a medical term, but they are a feature found in birds and some extinct theropod dinosaurs. Feathers are keratinous structures that grow from the skin and are used for various functions such as insulation, flight, waterproofing, and display. They have a complex structure consisting of a central shaft with barbs branching off on either side, which further divide into smaller barbules. The arrangement and modification of these feather structures vary widely among bird species to serve different purposes.

In medical terms, fingers are not specifically defined as they are common anatomical structures. However, I can provide you with a general anatomy definition:

Fingers are the terminal parts of the upper limb in primates, including humans, consisting of four digits (thumb, index, middle, and ring fingers) and one opposable thumb. They contain bones called phalanges, connected by joints that allow for movement and flexibility. Each finger has a nail, nerve endings for sensation, and blood vessels to supply nutrients and oxygen. Fingers are crucial for various activities such as grasping, manipulating objects, and tactile exploration of the environment.

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences. This technique is particularly useful for the detection and quantification of RNA viruses, as well as for the analysis of gene expression.

The process involves two main steps: reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first step, reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to convert RNA into complementary DNA (cDNA) by reading the template provided by the RNA molecule. This cDNA then serves as a template for the PCR amplification step.

In the second step, the PCR reaction uses two primers that flank the target DNA sequence and a thermostable polymerase enzyme to repeatedly copy the targeted cDNA sequence. The reaction mixture is heated and cooled in cycles, allowing the primers to anneal to the template, and the polymerase to extend the new strand. This results in exponential amplification of the target DNA sequence, making it possible to detect even small amounts of RNA or cDNA.

RT-PCR is a sensitive and specific technique that has many applications in medical research and diagnostics, including the detection of viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus, and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). It can also be used to study gene expression, identify genetic mutations, and diagnose genetic disorders.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

A plant extract is a preparation containing chemical constituents that have been extracted from a plant using a solvent. The resulting extract may contain a single compound or a mixture of several compounds, depending on the extraction process and the specific plant material used. These extracts are often used in various industries including pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, cosmetics, and food and beverage, due to their potential therapeutic or beneficial properties. The composition of plant extracts can vary widely, and it is important to ensure their quality, safety, and efficacy before use in any application.

Povidone-Iodine is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent, which is a complex of iodine with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). This complex allows for sustained release of iodine, providing persistent antimicrobial activity. It has been widely used in various clinical settings, including as a surgical scrub, wound disinfection, and skin preparation before invasive procedures. Povidone-Iodine is effective against bacteria, viruses, fungi, and spores. The mechanism of action involves the release of iodine ions, which oxidize cellular components and disrupt microbial membranes, leading to cell death.

Arsenic is a naturally occurring semi-metal element that can be found in the earth's crust. It has the symbol "As" and atomic number 33 on the periodic table. Arsenic can exist in several forms, including inorganic and organic compounds. In its pure form, arsenic is a steel-gray, shiny solid that is brittle and easily pulverized.

Arsenic is well known for its toxicity to living organisms, including humans. Exposure to high levels of arsenic can cause various health problems, such as skin lesions, neurological damage, and an increased risk of cancer. Arsenic can enter the body through contaminated food, water, or air, and it can also be absorbed through the skin.

In medicine, arsenic has been used historically in the treatment of various diseases, including syphilis and parasitic infections. However, its use as a therapeutic agent is limited due to its toxicity. Today, arsenic trioxide is still used as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), a type of blood cancer. The drug works by inducing differentiation and apoptosis (programmed cell death) in APL cells, which contain a specific genetic abnormality. However, its use is closely monitored due to the potential for severe side effects and toxicity.

Croton oil is a highly toxic, irritant, and vesicant liquid that is derived from the seeds of the croton tiglium plant. It is a type of unsaturated fatty acid known as an octadecatrienoic acid, and it contains a mixture of various chemical compounds including crotonic acid, diglycerides, and phorbol esters.

Croton oil is commonly used in laboratory research as a pharmacological tool to study the mechanisms of inflammation, pain, and skin irritation. It can also be used as a veterinary medicine to treat certain types of intestinal parasites in animals. However, due to its high toxicity and potential for causing severe burns and blisters on the skin, it is not used in human medicine.

It's important to note that croton oil should only be handled by trained professionals in a controlled laboratory setting, as improper use or exposure can result in serious injury or death.

Eyelids are the thin folds of skin that cover and protect the front surface (cornea) of the eye when closed. They are composed of several layers, including the skin, muscle, connective tissue, and a mucous membrane called the conjunctiva. The upper and lower eyelids meet at the outer corner of the eye (lateral canthus) and the inner corner of the eye (medial canthus).

The main function of the eyelids is to protect the eye from foreign particles, light, and trauma. They also help to distribute tears evenly over the surface of the eye through blinking, which helps to keep the eye moist and healthy. Additionally, the eyelids play a role in facial expressions and non-verbal communication.

Cytokines are a broad and diverse category of small signaling proteins that are secreted by various cells, including immune cells, in response to different stimuli. They play crucial roles in regulating the immune response, inflammation, hematopoiesis, and cellular communication.

Cytokines mediate their effects by binding to specific receptors on the surface of target cells, which triggers intracellular signaling pathways that ultimately result in changes in gene expression, cell behavior, and function. Some key functions of cytokines include:

1. Regulating the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of immune cells such as T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and macrophages.
2. Coordinating the inflammatory response by recruiting immune cells to sites of infection or tissue damage and modulating their effector functions.
3. Regulating hematopoiesis, the process of blood cell formation in the bone marrow, by controlling the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.
4. Modulating the development and function of the nervous system, including neuroinflammation, neuroprotection, and neuroregeneration.

Cytokines can be classified into several categories based on their structure, function, or cellular origin. Some common types of cytokines include interleukins (ILs), interferons (IFNs), tumor necrosis factors (TNFs), chemokines, colony-stimulating factors (CSFs), and transforming growth factors (TGFs). Dysregulation of cytokine production and signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammation, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Cellulitis is a medical condition characterized by an infection and inflammation of the deeper layers of the skin (dermis and subcutaneous tissue) and surrounding soft tissues. It's typically caused by bacteria, most commonly group A Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus.

The affected area often becomes red, swollen, warm, and painful, and may be accompanied by systemic symptoms such as fever, chills, and fatigue. Cellulitis can spread rapidly and potentially become life-threatening if left untreated, so it's important to seek medical attention promptly if you suspect you have this condition. Treatment typically involves antibiotics, rest, elevation of the affected limb (if applicable), and pain management.

Granulation tissue is the pinkish, bumpy material that forms on the surface of a healing wound. It's composed of tiny blood vessels (capillaries), white blood cells, and fibroblasts - cells that produce collagen, which is a protein that helps to strengthen and support the tissue.

Granulation tissue plays a crucial role in the wound healing process by filling in the wound space, contracting the wound, and providing a foundation for the growth of new skin cells (epithelialization). It's typically formed within 3-5 days after an injury and continues to develop until the wound is fully healed.

It's important to note that while granulation tissue is a normal part of the healing process, excessive or overgrowth of granulation tissue can lead to complications such as delayed healing, infection, or the formation of hypertrophic scars or keloids. In these cases, medical intervention may be necessary to manage the excess tissue and promote proper healing.

Intermediate filament proteins (IFPs) are a type of cytoskeletal protein that form the intermediate filaments (IFs), which are one of the three major components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells, along with microtubules and microfilaments. These proteins have a unique structure, characterized by an alpha-helical rod domain flanked by non-helical head and tail domains.

Intermediate filament proteins are classified into six major types based on their amino acid sequence: Type I (acidic) and Type II (basic) keratins, Type III (desmin, vimentin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and peripherin), Type IV (neurofilaments), Type V (lamins), and Type VI (nestin). Each type of IFP has a distinct pattern of expression in different tissues and cell types.

Intermediate filament proteins play important roles in maintaining the structural integrity and mechanical strength of cells, providing resilience to mechanical stress, and regulating various cellular processes such as cell division, migration, and signal transduction. Mutations in IFP genes have been associated with several human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and genetic skin fragility disorders.

Protective gloves are a type of personal protective equipment (PPE) used to shield the hands from potential harm or contamination. They can be made from various materials such as latex, nitrile rubber, vinyl, or polyethylene and are designed to provide a barrier against chemicals, biological agents, radiation, or mechanical injuries. Protective gloves come in different types, including examination gloves, surgical gloves, chemical-resistant gloves, and heavy-duty work gloves, depending on the intended use and level of protection required.

In the context of medical terminology, "nails" primarily refer to the keratinous plates that are found at the tips of fingers and toes. These specialized structures are part of the outermost layer of the skin (epidermis) and are formed by a type of cells called keratinocytes. The nails serve to protect the delicate underlying tissues from trauma, and they also aid in tasks such as picking up small objects or scratching itches.

The medical term for fingernails and toenails is "unguis," which comes from Latin. Each nail consists of several parts:

1. Nail plate: The visible part of the nail that is hard and flat, made up of keratin.
2. Nail bed: The skin beneath the nail plate to which the nail plate is attached; it supplies blood to the nail.
3. Matrix: The area where new cells are produced for the growth of the nail plate; located under the cuticle and extends slightly onto the finger or toe.
4. Lunula: The crescent-shaped white area at the base of the nail plate, which is the visible portion of the matrix.
5. Cuticle: The thin layer of skin that overlaps the nail plate and protects the underlying tissue from infection.
6. Eponychium: The fold of skin that surrounds and covers the nail plate; also known as the "proximal nail fold."
7. Hyponychium: The area of skin between the free edge of the nail plate and the fingertip or toe tip.
8. Perionychiun: The skin surrounding the nail on all sides.

Understanding the anatomy and medical aspects of nails is essential for healthcare professionals, as various conditions can affect nail health, such as fungal infections, ingrown nails, or tumors.

2-Propanol is a type of alcohol, also known as isopropanol or isopropyl alcohol. It is a colorless, flammable liquid with a characteristic odor. 2-Propanol is miscible with water and most organic solvents.

It is commonly used as a solvent and as an antiseptic or disinfectant, due to its ability to denature proteins and disrupt microbial cell membranes. In medical settings, 2-Propanol is often used as a skin sanitizer or hand rub to reduce the number of microorganisms on the skin.

Ingestion or prolonged exposure to 2-Propanol can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and may lead to central nervous system depression, nausea, vomiting, and other symptoms. It is important to handle 2-Propanol with care and follow appropriate safety precautions when using it.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

Staphylococcus aureus is a type of gram-positive, round (coccal) bacterium that is commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes of warm-blooded animals and humans. It is a facultative anaerobe, which means it can grow in the presence or absence of oxygen.

Staphylococcus aureus is known to cause a wide range of infections, from mild skin infections such as pimples, impetigo, and furuncles (boils) to more severe and potentially life-threatening infections such as pneumonia, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and sepsis. It can also cause food poisoning and toxic shock syndrome.

The bacterium is often resistant to multiple antibiotics, including methicillin, which has led to the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains that are difficult to treat. Proper hand hygiene and infection control practices are critical in preventing the spread of Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA.

Melanosis is a general term that refers to an increased deposit of melanin, the pigment responsible for coloring our skin, in the skin or other organs. It can occur in response to various factors such as sun exposure, aging, or certain medical conditions. There are several types of melanosis, including:

1. Epidermal melanosis: This type of melanosis is characterized by an increase in melanin within the epidermis, the outermost layer of the skin. It can result from sun exposure, hormonal changes, or inflammation.
2. Dermal melanosis: In this type of melanosis, there is an accumulation of melanin within the dermis, the middle layer of the skin. It can be caused by various conditions such as nevus of Ota, nevus of Ito, or melanoma metastasis.
3. Mucosal melanosis: This type of melanosis involves an increase in melanin within the mucous membranes, such as those lining the mouth, nose, and genitals. It can be a sign of systemic disorders like Addison's disease or Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.
4. Lentigo simplex: Also known as simple lentigines, these are small, benign spots that appear on sun-exposed skin. They result from an increase in melanocytes, the cells responsible for producing melanin.
5. Labial melanotic macule: This is a pigmented lesion found on the lips, typically the lower lip. It is more common in darker-skinned individuals and is usually benign but should be monitored for changes that may indicate malignancy.
6. Ocular melanosis: An increase in melanin within the eye can lead to various conditions such as ocular melanocytosis, oculodermal melanocytosis, or choroidal melanoma.

It is important to note that while some forms of melanosis are benign and harmless, others may indicate an underlying medical condition or even malignancy. Therefore, any new or changing pigmented lesions should be evaluated by a healthcare professional.

Cell division is the process by which a single eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) divides into two identical daughter cells. This complex process involves several stages, including replication of DNA, separation of chromosomes, and division of the cytoplasm. There are two main types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of cell division that results in two genetically identical daughter cells. It is a fundamental process for growth, development, and tissue repair in multicellular organisms. The stages of mitosis include prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, followed by cytokinesis, which divides the cytoplasm.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is a type of cell division that occurs in the gonads (ovaries and testes) during the production of gametes (sex cells). Meiosis results in four genetically unique daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. This process is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity. The stages of meiosis include meiosis I and meiosis II, which are further divided into prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

In summary, cell division is the process by which a single cell divides into two daughter cells, either through mitosis or meiosis. This process is critical for growth, development, tissue repair, and sexual reproduction in multicellular organisms.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Hyperplasia is a medical term that refers to an abnormal increase in the number of cells in an organ or tissue, leading to an enlargement of the affected area. It's a response to various stimuli such as hormones, chronic irritation, or inflammation. Hyperplasia can be physiological, like the growth of breast tissue during pregnancy, or pathological, like in the case of benign or malignant tumors. The process is generally reversible if the stimulus is removed. It's important to note that hyperplasia itself is not cancerous, but some forms of hyperplasia can increase the risk of developing cancer over time.

Folliculitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of one or more hair follicles, typically appearing as small red bumps or pimples that surround the affected follicle. It can occur anywhere on the body where hair grows, but it's most common in areas exposed to friction, heat, and tight clothing such as the neck, back, legs, arms, and buttocks.

Folliculitis can be caused by various factors, including bacterial or fungal infections, irritation from shaving or waxing, ingrown hairs, and exposure to chemicals or sweat. The severity of folliculitis ranges from mild cases that resolve on their own within a few days to severe cases that may require medical treatment.

Treatment for folliculitis depends on the underlying cause. For bacterial infections, antibiotics may be prescribed, while antifungal medications are used for fungal infections. In some cases, topical treatments such as creams or gels may be sufficient to treat mild folliculitis, while more severe cases may require oral medication or other medical interventions.

Antimicrobial cationic peptides (ACPs) are a group of small, naturally occurring peptides that possess broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites. They are called "cationic" because they contain positively charged amino acid residues (such as lysine and arginine), which allow them to interact with and disrupt the negatively charged membranes of microbial cells.

ACPs are produced by a wide range of organisms, including humans, animals, and plants, as part of their innate immune response to infection. They play an important role in protecting the host from invading pathogens by directly killing them or inhibiting their growth.

The antimicrobial activity of ACPs is thought to be mediated by their ability to disrupt the membranes of microbial cells, leading to leakage of cellular contents and death. Some ACPs may also have intracellular targets, such as DNA or protein synthesis, that contribute to their antimicrobial activity.

ACPs are being studied for their potential use as therapeutic agents to treat infectious diseases, particularly those caused by drug-resistant bacteria. However, their clinical application is still in the early stages of development due to concerns about their potential toxicity to host cells and the emergence of resistance mechanisms in microbial pathogens.

Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (CLE) is a skin manifestation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease, but it can also occur without systemic involvement. It is characterized by various skin lesions that differ in appearance and distribution. The three main subtypes of CLE are:

1. Acute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (ACLE): This form is typically associated with SLE and is characterized by a classic malar or "butterfly" rash on the face, which is often photosensitive and can be accompanied by discoid lesions. The rash may also appear on other sun-exposed areas of the body.

2. Chronic Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (CCLE): This subtype includes Discoid Lupus Erythematosus (DLE) and other less common forms such as lupus panniculitis and chilblain lupus. DLE is characterized by well-circumscribed, erythematous, scaly plaques that can cause scarring and pigmentation changes, often found on the face, scalp, and ears. Lupus panniculitis presents as deep subcutaneous nodules or indurated plaques, typically located on the trunk and proximal extremities. Chilblain lupus is characterized by violaceous, tender, and swollen lesions on acral areas, often triggered by cold exposure.

3. Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (SCLE): This form of CLE presents as non-scarring, papulosquamous or annular polycyclic rashes, often located on the trunk and proximal extremities. The lesions are typically photosensitive and may appear in patients with SLE or those with isolated cutaneous disease.

The diagnosis of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus is based on clinical presentation, histopathological findings, and sometimes direct immunofluorescence. Treatment depends on the severity and extent of skin involvement and may include topical therapies, antimalarials, corticosteroids, immunomodulatory agents, or photoprotection measures.

A case-control study is an observational research design used to identify risk factors or causes of a disease or health outcome. In this type of study, individuals with the disease or condition (cases) are compared with similar individuals who do not have the disease or condition (controls). The exposure history or other characteristics of interest are then compared between the two groups to determine if there is an association between the exposure and the disease.

Case-control studies are often used when it is not feasible or ethical to conduct a randomized controlled trial, as they can provide valuable insights into potential causes of diseases or health outcomes in a relatively short period of time and at a lower cost than other study designs. However, because case-control studies rely on retrospective data collection, they are subject to biases such as recall bias and selection bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, it is important to carefully design and conduct case-control studies to minimize these potential sources of bias.

Lymph nodes are small, bean-shaped organs that are part of the immune system. They are found throughout the body, especially in the neck, armpits, groin, and abdomen. Lymph nodes filter lymph fluid, which carries waste and unwanted substances such as bacteria, viruses, and cancer cells. They contain white blood cells called lymphocytes that help fight infections and diseases by attacking and destroying the harmful substances found in the lymph fluid. When an infection or disease is present, lymph nodes may swell due to the increased number of immune cells and fluid accumulation as they work to fight off the invaders.

Mycosis fungoides is the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), a rare cancer that affects the skin's immune system. It is characterized by the infiltration of malignant CD4+ T-lymphocytes into the skin, leading to the formation of patches, plaques, and tumors. The disease typically progresses slowly over many years, often starting with scaly, itchy rashes that can be mistaken for eczema or psoriasis. As the disease advances, tumors may form, and the lymphoma may spread to other organs, such as the lymph nodes, lungs, or spleen. Mycosis fungoides is not contagious and cannot be spread from person to person. The exact cause of mycosis fungoides is unknown, but it is thought to result from a combination of genetic, environmental, and immune system factors.

Homologous transplantation is a type of transplant surgery where organs or tissues are transferred between two genetically non-identical individuals of the same species. The term "homologous" refers to the similarity in structure and function of the donated organ or tissue to the recipient's own organ or tissue.

For example, a heart transplant from one human to another is an example of homologous transplantation because both organs are hearts and perform the same function. Similarly, a liver transplant, kidney transplant, lung transplant, and other types of organ transplants between individuals of the same species are also considered homologous transplantations.

Homologous transplantation is in contrast to heterologous or xenogeneic transplantation, where organs or tissues are transferred from one species to another, such as a pig heart transplanted into a human. Homologous transplantation is more commonly performed than heterologous transplantation due to the increased risk of rejection and other complications associated with xenogeneic transplants.

Lumpy Skin Disease Virus (LSDV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus that belongs to the Poxviridae family and Capripoxvirus genus. It is the causative agent of Lumpy Skine Disease (LSD), a severe vector-borne viral disease affecting cattle. The virus is transmitted through blood-sucking insects, such as mosquitoes and ticks, or through direct contact with infected animals.

The clinical signs of LSD include the development of nodules or lumps on the skin, particularly on the head, neck, and limbs, which can vary in size from small papules to large tumors. Other symptoms may include fever, loss of appetite, nasal discharge, excessive salivation, and difficulty breathing. In severe cases, LSD can lead to death due to secondary bacterial infections or complications related to the respiratory system.

LSDV is a significant concern for the global cattle industry, as it can cause significant economic losses due to reduced milk production, weight loss, decreased fertility, and increased mortality rates. It is endemic in many African countries, but has also been reported in several countries in the Middle East, Asia, and Eastern Europe. Vaccination is an effective strategy for controlling LSD, and several vaccines are available for use in affected regions.

Urocanic acid is a substance that is naturally present in the skin and acts as a photo-protectant. It absorbs ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun, which helps to prevent damage to the skin. When the skin is exposed to UV radiation, urocanic acid can undergo chemical changes, which can have both immunosuppressive and tumor-promoting effects in the skin.

Urocanic acid is formed as a byproduct of the breakdown of histidine, an amino acid that is found in proteins. It is present in high concentrations in the outermost layer of the skin (the stratum corneum), where it plays a role in maintaining the skin's barrier function and helping to regulate pH levels.

In addition to its role as a photo-protectant, urocanic acid has also been studied for its potential therapeutic uses. For example, some research suggests that it may have anti-inflammatory effects, which could make it useful in the treatment of skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis. However, more research is needed to confirm these potential benefits and to determine the safety and effectiveness of urocanic acid-based therapies.

Dermabrasion is a medical procedure that involves the mechanical exfoliation, or removal, of the outer layers of the skin using a rapidly rotating abrasive tool. The goal of dermabrasion is to improve the appearance of various skin conditions, such as acne scars, fine lines and wrinkles, age spots, and sun damage.

During the procedure, the doctor uses a high-speed brush or a diamond-coated wheel to remove the top layers of the skin, revealing smoother, more evenly textured skin underneath. The depth of the treatment can be adjusted based on the individual's needs and desired outcome.

After dermabrasion, it is common for the skin to be red, swollen, and sensitive for several days or weeks. It may take several months for the skin to fully heal and for the final results to become apparent.

It is important to note that dermabrasion is not appropriate for everyone, particularly those with certain skin conditions such as active acne, eczema, or psoriasis. Additionally, there are risks associated with the procedure, including infection, scarring, and changes in skin color. It is essential to consult with a qualified medical professional before undergoing dermabrasion to determine if it is the right treatment option for you.

Nociceptors are specialized peripheral sensory neurons that detect and transmit signals indicating potentially harmful stimuli in the form of pain. They are activated by various noxious stimuli such as extreme temperatures, intense pressure, or chemical irritants. Once activated, nociceptors transmit these signals to the central nervous system (spinal cord and brain) where they are interpreted as painful sensations, leading to protective responses like withdrawing from the harmful stimulus or seeking medical attention. Nociceptors play a crucial role in our perception of pain and help protect the body from further harm.

According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the National Organization for Rare Disorders, bullous pemphigoid is an autoimmune blistering disorder characterized by the formation of large, fluid-filled blisters (bullae) on the skin and mucous membranes. This condition primarily affects older adults, with most cases occurring in individuals over 60 years of age.

In bullous pemphigoid, the immune system mistakenly produces antibodies against proteins called BP230 and BP180, which are found in the basement membrane zone – a layer that separates the epidermis (outer skin layer) from the dermis (inner skin layer). This autoimmune response leads to the formation of blisters, causing significant discomfort and potential complications if left untreated.

The symptoms of bullous pemphigoid typically include:

1. Large, fluid-filled blisters on the skin, often appearing on the trunk, arms, or legs. These blisters may be itchy or painful.
2. Blisters that rupture easily, leading to raw, open sores.
3. Mucous membrane involvement, such as blisters in the mouth, nose, eyes, or genital area.
4. Skin redness and irritation.
5. Fluid-filled bumps (papules) or pus-filled bumps (pustules).
6. Scarring and skin discoloration after blisters heal.

Treatment for bullous pemphigoid usually involves a combination of medications to control the immune response, reduce inflammation, and promote healing. These may include corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, or other targeted therapies. In some cases, antibiotics may also be prescribed to help manage secondary infections that can occur due to blister formation.

It is essential to consult with a healthcare professional for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan if you suspect you have bullous pemphigoid or are experiencing related symptoms.

Microcirculation is the circulation of blood in the smallest blood vessels, including arterioles, venules, and capillaries. It's responsible for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and the removal of waste products. The microcirculation plays a crucial role in maintaining tissue homeostasis and is regulated by various physiological mechanisms such as autonomic nervous system activity, local metabolic factors, and hormones.

Impairment of microcirculation can lead to tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and organ dysfunction, which are common features in several diseases, including diabetes, hypertension, sepsis, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of the microcirculation is essential for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a type of cancer that affects T-cells, a specific group of white blood cells called lymphocytes. These cells play a crucial role in the body's immune system and help protect against infection and disease. In CTCL, the T-cells become malignant and accumulate in the skin, leading to various skin symptoms and lesions.

CTCL is a subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), which refers to a group of cancers that originate from lymphocytes. Within NHL, CTCL is categorized as a type of extranodal lymphoma since it primarily involves organs or tissues outside the lymphatic system, in this case, the skin.

The two most common subtypes of CTCL are mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome:

1. Mycosis fungoides (MF): This is the more prevalent form of CTCL, characterized by patches, plaques, or tumors on the skin. The lesions may be scaly, itchy, or change in size, shape, and color over time. MF usually progresses slowly, with early-stage disease often confined to the skin for several years before spreading to lymph nodes or other organs.
2. Sézary syndrome (SS): This is a more aggressive form of CTCL that involves not only the skin but also the blood and lymph nodes. SS is characterized by the presence of malignant T-cells, known as Sézary cells, in the peripheral blood. Patients with SS typically have generalized erythroderma (reddening and scaling of the entire body), pruritus (severe itching), lymphadenopathy (swollen lymph nodes), and alopecia (hair loss).

The diagnosis of CTCL usually involves a combination of clinical examination, skin biopsy, and immunophenotyping to identify the malignant T-cells. Treatment options depend on the stage and subtype of the disease and may include topical therapies, phototherapy, systemic medications, or targeted therapies.

"Beauty culture" is not a medical term, but it generally refers to the practices, customs, and products related to enhancing or maintaining physical appearance and attractiveness. This can include various aspects such as skin care, makeup, hair care, body modification (e.g., piercings, tattoos), fashion, fitness, and wellness.

While "beauty culture" is not a medical term per se, some of its components may fall under the purview of medical professionals, particularly dermatologists, plastic surgeons, and other healthcare providers who specialize in aesthetic medicine or cosmetic procedures. These professionals can provide guidance on safe practices and evidence-based treatments to help individuals achieve their desired appearance goals while minimizing risks and potential harm.

Cutaneous candidiasis is a fungal infection of the skin caused by Candida species, most commonly Candida albicans. The infection can occur anywhere on the skin, but it typically affects warm, moist areas such as the armpits, groin, and fingers. The symptoms of cutaneous candidiasis include redness, itching, burning, and cracking of the skin. In severe cases, pustules or blisters may also be present.

The infection can occur in people of all ages but is more common in those with weakened immune systems, such as individuals with HIV/AIDS, diabetes, or cancer. Other risk factors include obesity, poor hygiene, and the use of certain medications, such as antibiotics and corticosteroids.

Treatment for cutaneous candidiasis typically involves topical antifungal medications, such as clotrimazole or miconazole. In severe cases, oral antifungal medications may be necessary. Keeping the affected area clean and dry is also important to prevent the spread of the infection.

The term "back" is a common word used to describe the large posterior part of the body of a human or an animal, which extends from the neck to the pelvis and contains the spine, spinal cord, ribs, muscles, and other various tissues. In medical terms, the back is also known as the dorsal region. It provides support, protection, and mobility for the body, allowing us to stand upright, bend, twist, and perform various physical activities. The back is susceptible to various injuries, disorders, and conditions, such as back pain, strains, sprains, herniated discs, scoliosis, and arthritis, among others.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

"Swine" is a common term used to refer to even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, including domestic pigs and wild boars. However, in a medical context, "swine" often appears in the phrase "swine flu," which is a strain of influenza virus that typically infects pigs but can also cause illness in humans. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic was caused by a new strain of swine-origin influenza A virus, which was commonly referred to as "swine flu." It's important to note that this virus is not transmitted through eating cooked pork products; it spreads from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

Lichen Planus is a chronic, autoimmune skin condition that can also affect the mucous membranes inside the mouth, genitals, and eyes. It is characterized by the appearance of purplish, flat-topped bumps or lesions on the skin, which may be itchy. The exact cause of Lichen Planus is unknown, but it is believed to occur when the immune system mistakenly attacks cells in the skin or mucous membranes. Certain medications, viral infections, and genetic factors may increase the risk of developing this condition. Treatment typically focuses on managing symptoms and may include topical corticosteroids, oral medications, or light therapy.

Arsenic poisoning is a condition that occurs when a person ingests or comes into contact with a toxic amount of arsenic, a naturally occurring element found in the earth's crust. Arsenic has no smell or taste, making it difficult to detect in food, water, or air.

Acute arsenic poisoning can occur after a single large exposure to arsenic, while chronic arsenic poisoning occurs after repeated or long-term exposure to lower levels of arsenic. The symptoms of acute arsenic poisoning include vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and muscle cramps. In severe cases, it can lead to death due to heart failure or respiratory failure.

Chronic arsenic poisoning can cause a range of health problems, including skin changes such as pigmentation and hard patches on the palms and soles, weakness, peripheral neuropathy, and an increased risk of cancer, particularly skin, lung, bladder, and kidney cancer. It can also affect cognitive development in children.

Arsenic poisoning is treated by removing the source of exposure and providing supportive care to manage symptoms. Chelation therapy may be used to remove arsenic from the body in cases of severe acute poisoning or chronic poisoning with high levels of arsenic. Prevention measures include monitoring and reducing exposure to arsenic in food, water, and air, as well as proper handling and disposal of arsenic-containing products.

A "mutant strain of mice" in a medical context refers to genetically engineered mice that have specific genetic mutations introduced into their DNA. These mutations can be designed to mimic certain human diseases or conditions, allowing researchers to study the underlying biological mechanisms and test potential therapies in a controlled laboratory setting.

Mutant strains of mice are created through various techniques, including embryonic stem cell manipulation, gene editing technologies such as CRISPR-Cas9, and radiation-induced mutagenesis. These methods allow scientists to introduce specific genetic changes into the mouse genome, resulting in mice that exhibit altered physiological or behavioral traits.

These strains of mice are widely used in biomedical research because their short lifespan, small size, and high reproductive rate make them an ideal model organism for studying human diseases. Additionally, the mouse genome has been well-characterized, and many genetic tools and resources are available to researchers working with these animals.

Examples of mutant strains of mice include those that carry mutations in genes associated with cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, metabolic diseases, and immunological conditions. These mice provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of human diseases and help advance our understanding of potential therapeutic interventions.

Plastic surgery is a medical specialty that involves the restoration, reconstruction, or alteration of the human body. It can be divided into two main categories: reconstructive surgery and cosmetic surgery.

Reconstructive surgery is performed to correct functional impairments caused by burns, trauma, birth defects, or disease. The goal is to improve function, but may also involve improving appearance.

Cosmetic (or aesthetic) surgery is performed to reshape normal structures of the body in order to improve the patient's appearance and self-esteem. This includes procedures such as breast augmentation, rhinoplasty, facelifts, and tummy tucks.

Plastic surgeons use a variety of techniques, including skin grafts, tissue expansion, flap surgery, and fat grafting, to achieve their goals. They must have a thorough understanding of anatomy, as well as excellent surgical skills and aesthetic judgment.

A syndrome, in medical terms, is a set of symptoms that collectively indicate or characterize a disease, disorder, or underlying pathological process. It's essentially a collection of signs and/or symptoms that frequently occur together and can suggest a particular cause or condition, even though the exact physiological mechanisms might not be fully understood.

For example, Down syndrome is characterized by specific physical features, cognitive delays, and other developmental issues resulting from an extra copy of chromosome 21. Similarly, metabolic syndromes like diabetes mellitus type 2 involve a group of risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that collectively increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

It's important to note that a syndrome is not a specific diagnosis; rather, it's a pattern of symptoms that can help guide further diagnostic evaluation and management.

A hypertrophic cicatrix is a type of scar that forms when the body overproduces collagen during the healing process. Collagen is a protein that helps to repair and strengthen tissues in the body. However, when too much collagen is produced, it can cause the scar to become thickened, raised, and firm.

Hypertrophic scars are usually red or pink in color and may be itchy or painful. They typically develop within a few weeks of an injury or surgery and can continue to grow for several months before eventually stabilizing. Unlike keloids, which are a more severe type of scar that can grow beyond the boundaries of the original wound, hypertrophic scars do not extend beyond the site of the injury.

While hypertrophic scars can be unsightly and cause discomfort, they are generally not harmful to one's health. Treatment options may include corticosteroid injections, silicone gel sheeting, pressure therapy, or laser surgery to help reduce the size and appearance of the scar. It is important to seek medical advice if you are concerned about a hypertrophic scar or if it is causing significant discomfort or distress.

Pyrimidine dimers are a type of DNA lesion that form when two adjacent pyrimidine bases on the same strand of DNA become covalently linked, usually as a result of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light. The most common type of pyrimidine dimer is the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), which forms when two thymine bases are linked together in a cyclobutane ring structure.

Pyrimidine dimers can distort the DNA helix and interfere with normal replication and transcription processes, leading to mutations and potentially cancer. The formation of pyrimidine dimers is a major mechanism by which UV radiation causes skin damage and increases the risk of skin cancer.

The body has several mechanisms for repairing pyrimidine dimers, including nucleotide excision repair (NER) and base excision repair (BER). However, if these repair mechanisms are impaired or overwhelmed, pyrimidine dimers can persist and contribute to the development of cancer.

Leprosy, also known as Hansen's disease, is a chronic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium leprae. It primarily affects the skin, peripheral nerves, mucosal surfaces of the upper respiratory tract, and the eyes. The disease mainly spreads through droplets from the nose and mouth of infected people.

Leprosy is characterized by granulomatous inflammation, which leads to the formation of distinctive skin lesions and nerve damage. If left untreated, it can cause progressive and permanent damage to the skin, nerves, limbs, and eyes. However, with early diagnosis and multidrug therapy (MDT), the disease can be cured, and disability can be prevented or limited.

The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies leprosy into two types based on the number of skin lesions and bacteriological index: paucibacillary (one to five lesions) and multibacillary (more than five lesions). This classification helps determine the appropriate treatment regimen.

Although leprosy is curable, it remains a public health concern in many developing countries due to its stigmatizing nature and potential for social exclusion of affected individuals.

A melanocortin receptor (MCR) is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds melanocortin peptides. The melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) is one of five known subtypes of MCRs (MC1R-MC5R).

The MC1R is primarily expressed in melanocytes, which are pigment-producing cells located in the skin, hair follicles, and eyes. This receptor plays a crucial role in determining the type of melanin that is produced in response to environmental stimuli such as UV radiation.

Activation of the MC1R by its endogenous ligands, including α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), leads to the activation of adenylate cyclase and an increase in intracellular cAMP levels. This results in the activation of protein kinase A and the phosphorylation of key transcription factors, which ultimately promote the expression of genes involved in melanin synthesis.

Mutations in the MC1R gene have been associated with various pigmentation disorders, including red hair color, fair skin, and an increased risk of developing skin cancer. Additionally, polymorphisms in the MC1R gene have been linked to an increased risk of developing other diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Neoplastic cell transformation is a process in which a normal cell undergoes genetic alterations that cause it to become cancerous or malignant. This process involves changes in the cell's DNA that result in uncontrolled cell growth and division, loss of contact inhibition, and the ability to invade surrounding tissues and metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body.

Neoplastic transformation can occur as a result of various factors, including genetic mutations, exposure to carcinogens, viral infections, chronic inflammation, and aging. These changes can lead to the activation of oncogenes or the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, which regulate cell growth and division.

The transformation of normal cells into cancerous cells is a complex and multi-step process that involves multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations. It is characterized by several hallmarks, including sustained proliferative signaling, evasion of growth suppressors, resistance to cell death, enabling replicative immortality, induction of angiogenesis, activation of invasion and metastasis, reprogramming of energy metabolism, and evading immune destruction.

Neoplastic cell transformation is a fundamental concept in cancer biology and is critical for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer development and progression. It also has important implications for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, as identifying the specific genetic alterations that underlie neoplastic transformation can help guide targeted therapies and personalized medicine approaches.

Tinea is a common fungal infection of the skin, also known as ringworm. It's called ringworm because of its characteristic red, circular, and often scaly rash with raised edges that can resemble a worm's shape. However, it has nothing to do with any kind of actual worm.

The fungi responsible for tinea infections belong to the genus Trichophyton, Microsporum, or Epidermophyton. These fungi thrive in warm, damp environments and can be contracted from infected people, animals, or contaminated soil. Common types of tinea infections include athlete's foot (tinea pedis), jock itch (tinea cruris), and ringworm of the scalp (tinea capitis).

Treatment for tinea typically involves antifungal medications, either topical or oral, depending on the location and severity of the infection. Proper hygiene and avoiding sharing personal items can help prevent the spread of this contagious condition.

Organ culture techniques refer to the methods used to maintain or grow intact organs or pieces of organs under controlled conditions in vitro, while preserving their structural and functional characteristics. These techniques are widely used in biomedical research to study organ physiology, pathophysiology, drug development, and toxicity testing.

Organ culture can be performed using a variety of methods, including:

1. Static organ culture: In this method, the organs or tissue pieces are placed on a porous support in a culture dish and maintained in a nutrient-rich medium. The medium is replaced periodically to ensure adequate nutrition and removal of waste products.
2. Perfusion organ culture: This method involves perfusing the organ with nutrient-rich media, allowing for better distribution of nutrients and oxygen throughout the tissue. This technique is particularly useful for studying larger organs such as the liver or kidney.
3. Microfluidic organ culture: In this approach, microfluidic devices are used to create a controlled microenvironment for organ cultures. These devices allow for precise control over the flow of nutrients and waste products, as well as the application of mechanical forces.

Organ culture techniques can be used to study various aspects of organ function, including metabolism, secretion, and response to drugs or toxins. Additionally, these methods can be used to generate three-dimensional tissue models that better recapitulate the structure and function of intact organs compared to traditional two-dimensional cell cultures.

Sensitivity and specificity are statistical measures used to describe the performance of a diagnostic test or screening tool in identifying true positive and true negative results.

* Sensitivity refers to the proportion of people who have a particular condition (true positives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true positive rate" or "recall." A highly sensitive test will identify most or all of the people with the condition, but may also produce more false positives.
* Specificity refers to the proportion of people who do not have a particular condition (true negatives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true negative rate." A highly specific test will identify most or all of the people without the condition, but may also produce more false negatives.

In medical testing, both sensitivity and specificity are important considerations when evaluating a diagnostic test. High sensitivity is desirable for screening tests that aim to identify as many cases of a condition as possible, while high specificity is desirable for confirmatory tests that aim to rule out the condition in people who do not have it.

It's worth noting that sensitivity and specificity are often influenced by factors such as the prevalence of the condition in the population being tested, the threshold used to define a positive result, and the reliability and validity of the test itself. Therefore, it's important to consider these factors when interpreting the results of a diagnostic test.

Occupational exposure refers to the contact of an individual with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents as a result of their job or occupation. This can include exposure to hazardous substances such as chemicals, heavy metals, or dusts; physical agents such as noise, radiation, or ergonomic stressors; and biological agents such as viruses, bacteria, or fungi.

Occupational exposure can occur through various routes, including inhalation, skin contact, ingestion, or injection. Prolonged or repeated exposure to these hazards can increase the risk of developing acute or chronic health conditions, such as respiratory diseases, skin disorders, neurological damage, or cancer.

Employers have a legal and ethical responsibility to minimize occupational exposures through the implementation of appropriate control measures, including engineering controls, administrative controls, personal protective equipment, and training programs. Regular monitoring and surveillance of workers' health can also help identify and prevent potential health hazards in the workplace.

Mites are tiny arthropods belonging to the class Arachnida, which also includes spiders and ticks. They are characterized by their small size, usually measuring less than 1 mm in length, and their lack of obvious segmentation on their bodies. Many mites are parasitic, feeding on the skin cells, blood, or fluids of plants and animals, including humans. Some common mite infestations in humans include scabies, caused by the itch mite (Sarcoptes scabiei), and dust mites (e.g., Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae), which are commonly found in household dust and can cause allergic reactions in some people. It's worth noting that the majority of mites are not harmful to humans and play important roles in ecosystems as decomposers and predators.

"Pharmaceutical vehicles" is not a standard term in medical or pharmaceutical sciences. However, I can provide some context based on the phrase's possible meaning. If by "pharmaceutical vehicles," you mean the carriers or delivery systems for drugs or medications, then the definition would be:

Pharmaceutical vehicles refer to various formulations, preparations, or technologies that facilitate and control the administration of a drug or therapeutic agent to its target site in the body. These can include different types of drug delivery systems such as tablets, capsules, liposomes, nanoparticles, transdermal patches, inhalers, injectables, and other innovative drug carrier technologies.

These pharmaceutical vehicles ensure that the active ingredients are safely and effectively transported to their intended site of action within the body, enhancing therapeutic efficacy while minimizing potential side effects.

Infrared rays are not typically considered in the context of medical definitions. They are a type of electromagnetic radiation with longer wavelengths than those of visible light, ranging from 700 nanometers to 1 millimeter. In the field of medicine, infrared radiation is sometimes used in therapeutic settings for its heat properties, such as in infrared saunas or infrared therapy devices. However, infrared rays themselves are not a medical condition or diagnosis.

Rejuvenation, in the context of medicine and aesthetics, refers to the process or procedures aimed at restoring a youthful appearance or vitality. This can be achieved through various treatments such as hormone replacement therapy, cosmetic surgery, skin treatments, and lifestyle changes. However, it is important to note that while these procedures can help improve one's appearance or vitality, they do not halt the aging process entirely.

Kaposi varicelliform eruption (KVE) is a cutaneous disorder that results from the dissemination of the Herpesviridae family of viruses, most commonly herpes simplex virus (HSV), in individuals with underlying dermatologic conditions. The term "Kaposi" refers to the dermatologist who first described this condition, and "varicelliform" indicates the appearance of the rash, which resembles that seen in varicella or chickenpox.

In KVE, the affected individual's pre-existing skin disorder, such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, or Darier disease, facilitates the entry and spread of the virus, leading to a widespread, severe skin eruption. The lesions typically appear as vesicles, pustules, and crusted papules, covering large areas of the body. They can be painful, pruritic (itchy), or associated with constitutional symptoms like fever and malaise.

KVE is a serious condition that requires prompt medical attention to prevent complications such as secondary bacterial infections, scarring, and systemic spread of the virus. Treatment usually involves antiviral medications, often given systemically, along with supportive care for the skin lesions.

A wound infection is defined as the invasion and multiplication of microorganisms in a part of the body tissue, which has been damaged by a cut, blow, or other trauma, leading to inflammation, purulent discharge, and sometimes systemic toxicity. The symptoms may include redness, swelling, pain, warmth, and fever. Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics and proper wound care. It's important to note that not all wounds will become infected, but those that are contaminated with bacteria, dirt, or other foreign substances, or those in which the skin's natural barrier has been significantly compromised, are at a higher risk for infection.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Cosmetic techniques refer to medical or surgical procedures that are performed with the primary goal of improving the appearance or aesthetics of an individual. These techniques can be non-invasive, minimally invasive, or surgical in nature and may involve various treatments such as:

1. Botulinum toxin (Botox) injections: used to reduce wrinkles and fine lines by temporarily paralyzing the underlying muscles.
2. Dermal fillers: injected beneath the skin to add volume, smooth out wrinkles, and enhance facial features.
3. Chemical peels: a chemical solution is applied to the skin to remove damaged outer layers, revealing smoother, more even-toned skin.
4. Microdermabrasion: a minimally abrasive procedure that uses fine crystals or diamond tips to exfoliate and remove dead skin cells, resulting in a refreshed appearance.
5. Laser resurfacing: using laser technology to improve the texture, tone, and overall appearance of the skin by removing damaged layers and stimulating collagen production.
6. Micro-needling: a minimally invasive treatment that involves puncturing the skin with fine needles to promote collagen production and skin rejuvenation.
7. Facelift surgery (rhytidectomy): a surgical procedure that tightens loose or sagging skin on the face and neck, restoring a more youthful appearance.
8. Blepharoplasty: cosmetic eyelid surgery that removes excess fat, muscle, and skin from the upper and/or lower eyelids to improve the appearance of tired or aging eyes.
9. Rhinoplasty: nose reshaping surgery that can correct various aesthetic concerns such as a bulbous tip, crooked bridge, or wide nostrils.
10. Breast augmentation: surgical enhancement of the breasts using implants or fat transfer to increase size, improve symmetry, or restore volume lost due to aging, pregnancy, or weight loss.
11. Liposuction: a surgical procedure that removes excess fat from various areas of the body, such as the abdomen, hips, thighs, and arms, to contour and shape the body.

These cosmetic techniques aim to enhance an individual's appearance, boost self-confidence, and help them feel more comfortable in their own skin.

Sweat, also known as perspiration, is the fluid secreted by the sweat glands in human skin. It's primarily composed of water, with small amounts of sodium chloride, potassium, and other electrolytes. Sweat helps regulate body temperature through the process of evaporation, where it absorbs heat from the skin as it turns from a liquid to a gas.

There are two types of sweat glands: eccrine and apocrine. Eccrine glands are found all over the body and produce a watery, odorless sweat in response to heat, physical activity, or emotional stress. Apocrine glands, on the other hand, are mainly located in the armpits and groin area and become active during puberty. They produce a thicker, milky fluid that can mix with bacteria on the skin's surface, leading to body odor.

It is important to note that while sweating is essential for maintaining normal body temperature and overall health, excessive sweating or hyperhidrosis can be a medical condition requiring treatment.

Occlusive dressings are specialized bandages or coverings that form a barrier over the skin, preventing air and moisture from passing through. They are designed to create a moist environment that promotes healing by increasing local blood flow, reducing wound desiccation, and encouraging the growth of new tissue. Occlusive dressings can also help to minimize pain, scarring, and the risk of infection in wounds. These dressings are often used for dry, necrotic, or hard-to-heal wounds, such as pressure ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, and burns. It is important to monitor the wound closely while using occlusive dressings, as they can sometimes lead to skin irritation or maceration if left in place for too long.

Epithelium is the tissue that covers the outer surface of the body, lines the internal cavities and organs, and forms various glands. It is composed of one or more layers of tightly packed cells that have a uniform shape and size, and rest on a basement membrane. Epithelial tissues are avascular, meaning they do not contain blood vessels, and are supplied with nutrients by diffusion from the underlying connective tissue.

Epithelial cells perform a variety of functions, including protection, secretion, absorption, excretion, and sensation. They can be classified based on their shape and the number of cell layers they contain. The main types of epithelium are:

1. Squamous epithelium: composed of flat, scalelike cells that fit together like tiles on a roof. It forms the lining of blood vessels, air sacs in the lungs, and the outermost layer of the skin.
2. Cuboidal epithelium: composed of cube-shaped cells with equal height and width. It is found in glands, tubules, and ducts.
3. Columnar epithelium: composed of tall, rectangular cells that are taller than they are wide. It lines the respiratory, digestive, and reproductive tracts.
4. Pseudostratified epithelium: appears stratified or layered but is actually made up of a single layer of cells that vary in height. The nuclei of these cells appear at different levels, giving the tissue a stratified appearance. It lines the respiratory and reproductive tracts.
5. Transitional epithelium: composed of several layers of cells that can stretch and change shape to accommodate changes in volume. It is found in the urinary bladder and ureters.

Epithelial tissue provides a barrier between the internal and external environments, protecting the body from physical, chemical, and biological damage. It also plays a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis by regulating the exchange of substances between the body and its environment.

Hexachlorophene is a synthetic antimicrobial compound, historically used for its broad-spectrum bacteriostatic properties. Its medical definition is as a white crystalline powder with a slight characteristic odor, soluble in alcohol, chloroform, and ether, and sparingly soluble in water. It has been used as a topical antiseptic and surgical scrub for its effectiveness against gram-positive bacteria, some fungi, and viruses. However, due to concerns about neurotoxicity, particularly in infants, its use is now largely restricted to medical applications that require extensive sterilization, such as certain types of wound care.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Facial neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the tissues of the face. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Facial neoplasms can occur in any of the facial structures, including the skin, muscles, bones, nerves, and glands.

Benign facial neoplasms are typically slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body. Examples include papillomas, hemangiomas, and neurofibromas. While these tumors are usually harmless, they can cause cosmetic concerns or interfere with normal facial function.

Malignant facial neoplasms, on the other hand, can be aggressive and invasive. They can spread to other parts of the face, as well as to distant sites in the body. Common types of malignant facial neoplasms include basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma.

Treatment for facial neoplasms depends on several factors, including the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches. It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you notice any unusual growths or changes in the skin or tissues of your face.

Petrolatum is a semi-solid mixture of hydrocarbons obtained from petroleum. In the medical field, it's often used as an ointment base or protective dressing because of its impermeability to water and bacteria. It's also known as petroleum jelly or soft paraffin.

There is no medical definition for "dog diseases" as it is too broad a term. However, dogs can suffer from various health conditions and illnesses that are specific to their species or similar to those found in humans. Some common categories of dog diseases include:

1. Infectious Diseases: These are caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites. Examples include distemper, parvovirus, kennel cough, Lyme disease, and heartworms.
2. Hereditary/Genetic Disorders: Some dogs may inherit certain genetic disorders from their parents. Examples include hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), and degenerative myelopathy.
3. Age-Related Diseases: As dogs age, they become more susceptible to various health issues. Common age-related diseases in dogs include arthritis, dental disease, cancer, and cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS).
4. Nutritional Disorders: Malnutrition or improper feeding can lead to various health problems in dogs. Examples include obesity, malnutrition, and vitamin deficiencies.
5. Environmental Diseases: These are caused by exposure to environmental factors such as toxins, allergens, or extreme temperatures. Examples include heatstroke, frostbite, and toxicities from ingesting harmful substances.
6. Neurological Disorders: Dogs can suffer from various neurological conditions that affect their nervous system. Examples include epilepsy, intervertebral disc disease (IVDD), and vestibular disease.
7. Behavioral Disorders: Some dogs may develop behavioral issues due to various factors such as anxiety, fear, or aggression. Examples include separation anxiety, noise phobias, and resource guarding.

It's important to note that regular veterinary care, proper nutrition, exercise, and preventative measures can help reduce the risk of many dog diseases.

The scrotum is a part of the external male genitalia. It's a sac-like structure made up of several layers of skin and smooth muscle, which hangs down behind and beneath the penis. The primary function of the scrotum is to maintain the testicles at a temperature slightly lower than the core body temperature, which is optimal for sperm production.

The scrotum contains two compartments, each one housing a testicle. It's located in the pubic region and is usually visible externally. The skin of the scrotum is thin and wrinkled, which allows it to expand and contract depending on the temperature, accommodating the shrinking or swelling of the testicles.

Please note that while I strive to provide accurate information, this definition is intended to be a general overview and should not replace professional medical advice.

ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) is a strain of albino Swiss mice that are widely used in scientific research. They are an outbred strain, which means that they have been bred to maintain maximum genetic heterogeneity. However, it is also possible to find inbred strains of ICR mice, which are genetically identical individuals produced by many generations of brother-sister mating.

Inbred ICR mice are a specific type of ICR mouse that has been inbred for at least 20 generations. This means that they have a high degree of genetic uniformity and are essentially genetically identical to one another. Inbred strains of mice are often used in research because their genetic consistency makes them more reliable models for studying biological phenomena and testing new therapies or treatments.

It is important to note that while inbred ICR mice may be useful for certain types of research, they do not necessarily represent the genetic diversity found in human populations. Therefore, it is important to consider the limitations of using any animal model when interpreting research findings and applying them to human health.

Chlorhexidine is an antimicrobial agent used for its broad-spectrum germicidal properties. It is effective against bacteria, viruses, and fungi. It is commonly used as a surgical scrub, hand sanitizer, and healthcare disinfectant. Chlorhexidine is available in various forms, including solutions, gels, and sprays. It works by disrupting the microbial cell membrane, leading to the death of the organism. It is also used in mouthwashes and skin cleansers for its antimicrobial effects.

Tissue distribution, in the context of pharmacology and toxicology, refers to the way that a drug or xenobiotic (a chemical substance found within an organism that is not naturally produced by or expected to be present within that organism) is distributed throughout the body's tissues after administration. It describes how much of the drug or xenobiotic can be found in various tissues and organs, and is influenced by factors such as blood flow, lipid solubility, protein binding, and the permeability of cell membranes. Understanding tissue distribution is important for predicting the potential effects of a drug or toxin on different parts of the body, and for designing drugs with improved safety and efficacy profiles.

Food hypersensitivity is an umbrella term that encompasses both immunologic and non-immunologic adverse reactions to food. It is also known as "food allergy" or "food intolerance." Food hypersensitivity occurs when the body's immune system or digestive system reacts negatively to a particular food or food component.

Immunologic food hypersensitivity, commonly referred to as a food allergy, involves an immune response mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies. Upon ingestion of the offending food, IgE antibodies bind to the food antigens and trigger the release of histamine and other chemical mediators from mast cells and basophils, leading to symptoms such as hives, swelling, itching, difficulty breathing, or anaphylaxis.

Non-immunologic food hypersensitivity, on the other hand, does not involve the immune system. Instead, it is caused by various mechanisms, including enzyme deficiencies, pharmacological reactions, and metabolic disorders. Examples of non-immunologic food hypersensitivities include lactose intolerance, gluten sensitivity, and histamine intolerance.

It's important to note that the term "food hypersensitivity" is often used interchangeably with "food allergy," but it has a broader definition that includes both immunologic and non-immunologic reactions.

Tyrosinase, also known as monophenol monooxygenase, is an enzyme (EC 1.14.18.1) that catalyzes the ortho-hydroxylation of monophenols (like tyrosine) to o-diphenols (like L-DOPA) and the oxidation of o-diphenols to o-quinones. This enzyme plays a crucial role in melanin synthesis, which is responsible for the color of skin, hair, and eyes in humans and animals. Tyrosinase is found in various organisms, including plants, fungi, and animals. In humans, tyrosinase is primarily located in melanocytes, the cells that produce melanin. The enzyme's activity is regulated by several factors, such as pH, temperature, and metal ions like copper, which are essential for its catalytic function.

'C3H' is the name of an inbred strain of laboratory mice that was developed at the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine. The mice are characterized by their uniform genetic background and have been widely used in biomedical research for many decades.

The C3H strain is particularly notable for its susceptibility to certain types of cancer, including mammary tumors and lymphomas. It also has a high incidence of age-related macular degeneration and other eye diseases. The strain is often used in studies of immunology, genetics, and carcinogenesis.

Like all inbred strains, the C3H mice are the result of many generations of brother-sister matings, which leads to a high degree of genetic uniformity within the strain. This makes them useful for studying the effects of specific genes or environmental factors on disease susceptibility and other traits. However, it also means that they may not always be representative of the genetic diversity found in outbred populations, including humans.

The word skin originally only referred to dressed and tanned animal hide and the usual word for human skin was hide. Skin is a ... The density of skin flora depends on region of the skin. The disinfected skin surface gets recolonized from bacteria residing ... The adjective cutaneous means "of the skin" (from Latin cutis 'skin'). In mammals, the skin is an organ of the integumentary ... The skin on the palms and the soles of the feet is the thickest skin on the body at 4 mm thick. The speed and quality of wound ...
"Glass Skin" (stylized GLASS SKIN) is a single by Dir En Grey, released on September 10, 2008 in Japan in a regular and limited ... "Glass Skin" is one of the two singles to be featured on the album Uroboros, along with its predecessor "Dozing Green". Like its ... The music video for "Glass Skin" was premiered on MTV in Japan. It is largely computer generated, but features images of the ... The artwork on the cover, booklet, and accompanying promotional materials of "Glass Skin", as well as some artwork used on the ...
... s may be male or female. Skin-walker stories told among Navajo children may be complete life and death struggles ... Traditional Navajo people are reluctant to reveal skin-walker lore to non-Navajos, or to discuss it at all among those they do ... In Navajo culture, a skin-walker (Navajo: yee naaldlooshii) is a type of harmful witch who has the ability to turn into, ... But people who choose to become witches are seen as corrupt.[pages needed] The legend of the skin-walkers is not well ...
U/LES) Since coming to law enforcement attention in late 2004, the term ghost skins has gained currency among white ... In white supremacist circles, a ghost skin (short for 'ghost skinhead') is a white supremacist who refrains from openly ... At least one white supremacist group has reportedly encouraged ghost skins to seek positions in law enforcement for the ... According to the Oregon National Socialist Movement website, explicitly cited by the 2006 FBI report, "Ghost Skins don't shave ...
... skin vasodilation has permitted blood flow rates of skin to reach volumes of six to eight litres per minute. Skin contains an ... Normal human skin temperature on the trunk of the body varies between 33.5 and 36.9 °C (92.3 and 98.4 °F), though the skin's ... Regulation of skin blood flow is crucial to homeothermy. Sympathetic control of blood flow to the skin involves the system of ... In the skin, external lesions and skin cancers are treated by means of liquid nitrogen, which is applied directly to cancerous ...
... opted to lock skin trading when they saw their skins being used in skin gambling. Valve has had to take other steps to limit ... The addition of skins made the game attractive to expert players, as the skins could be taken as a kind of trophy, showing off ... In video games, skin gambling is the use of virtual goods, often cosmetic in-game items such as "skins", as virtual currency to ... Further, the newer skin gambling sites have kept low profiles, making skin gambling more of an underground economy that is more ...
... may refer to: The Skin Trade or Dark Visions, a 1989 horror fiction anthology, or the included story "The Skin Trade ... "Skin Trade" (Beavis and Butt-head), an episode of Beavis and Butt-head Skin Trade, a 2004 short film featuring Jack J. Yang ... Skin Trade (film), a 2014 film directed by Ekachai Uekrongtham, and starring Dolph Lundgren and Tony Jaa "Skin Trade" (song), a ... " by George R. R. Martin Skin Trade, novel by Reggie Nadelson Skin Trade (novel), a 2009 Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter novel by ...
... may refer to: "Perfect Skin" (Lloyd Cole and the Commotions song) "Perfect Skin" (The 69 Eyes song) This ... disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Perfect Skin. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to ...
Thick Skinned, a 1989 French film "Thick Skin", a song by Leona Lewis from I Am Thick Skin, a 2018 album by Tia Gostelow ... Thick skin can refer to: The ability to withstand criticism. Literally thick skin covering the body of an animal, such as an ... Callus, an area of thickened skin Callus (disambiguation), similar uses of Callus such as a lack of empathy (callousness). ... Look up thick skin in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... page lists articles associated with the title Thick skin. If an ...
"Clean Skin" at Showtime "Clean Skin" at IMDb (Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, ... "Clean Skin" is the third episode of the first season of the political thriller TV series Homeland. It originally aired on ... Dan Forcella of TV Fanatic rated "Clean Skin" a 4.5/5, calling it "another gem of an episode". Scott Collura of IGN gave the ... Collura, Scott (October 18, 2011). "Homeland: "Clean Skin" Review". IGN TV. Retrieved January 7, 2012. Carp, Jesse (October 17 ...
The skin gap is the difference in the amount of skin that men and women are expected to show in the same social setting. The ... "The Skin Gap". Glossy. May 31, 2016. "The Skin Gap: Nachum Interviews Allison Josephs About Her Latest Project". Nachum Segal. ... This study argues that this modesty and lack of skin showing is what defies the societal norm created by the skin gap. There ... There is a long history behind why specific groups of women choose to be more modest in comparison to the amount of skin that ...
For this reason, doctors specializing in skin diseases are invaluable in the diagnosis of skin cancers and difficult skin ... or part of the affected skin plus part of the normal skin (to show the interface between normal and abnormal skin). Incisional ... Skin biopsy is a biopsy technique in which a skin lesion is removed to be sent to a pathologist to render a microscopic ... It is a method used to diagnose tumor deep in the skin or lymph nodes under the skin. The cellular aspirate is mounted on a ...
... is a cutaneous condition observed in roughly 50% of diabetic patients with longstanding disease.: 540 Diabetic ... 2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. ISBN 978-0-7216-2921-6. v t e (Articles with ... short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Skin conditions resulting from errors in metabolism, All stub articles, ... dermadromes Limited joint mobility Skin lesion James, William D.; Berger, Timothy G.; et al. ( ...
EPs Totem Skin (2012) These Ghosts Are Haunting Our Halls (2013) Splits Totem Skin / Heart on My Sleeve (2014) Totem Skin on ... Totem Skin on Bandcamp Totem Skin on Facebook (Facebook ID not in Wikidata, Articles with short description, Short description ... Totem Skin on Bandcamp. Retrieved 16 January 2017. Kamiński, Karol (18 October 2013). "Totem Skin: From the Gloomy Forests of ... Totem Skin disbanded in January 2017; what was to be their third album has been reworked into the self-titled debut album of ...
... is a jazz vocal album by Michael Franks, released in 1985 with Warner Bros. Records. It was Franks' ninth studio ... Michael Franks - Your Secret's Safe With Me , Billboard Skin Dive (Vinyl back cover). Michael Franks. United States: Warner ...
... can also be seen as a skin transplant. This is based upon the principle of mobilizing a full segment of skin from ... Skin grafting, a type of graft surgery, involves the transplantation of skin. The transplanted tissue is called a skin graft. ... There are alternatives to skin grafting including skin substitutes using cells from patients, skin from other animals, such as ... A full-thickness skin graft involves pinching and cutting skin away from the donor section. A full-thickness skin graft is more ...
"Hit Series "Skin Wars," Hosted By Trish Romijn, Returns for Its Third Season on Wednesday, April 20 At 10PM ET/PT" (Press ... A spinoff called Skin Wars: Fresh Paint hosted by RuPaul aired as a special on August 26, 2015. It featured six highly ... Skin Wars is a body painting reality competition hosted by Rebecca Romijn that premiered on the American pay-television channel ... On September 30, 2014, GSN announced plans to air a ten-episode second season of Skin Wars with Romijn and all three judges ...
Skin. In 2020, Jim McBride produced and appeared in Skin: A History of Nudity in the Movies, a documentary on the history of ... Skin's Skincyclopedia: The A to Z Guide to Finding Your Favorite Actresses Naked in 2005. Mr. Skin's Skintastic Video Guide: ... Skin: A History of Nudity in the Movies (2020) - IMDb, retrieved 2022-05-17 Gray, Lila (2013-10-11). "Mr. Skin Launches Male ... Skin Partner for New NSFW Column, "Flesh and Blood"!". Retrieved 2013-11-23. "Being Mr. Skin". May 21, 2019 - via www. ...
... s are anatomical features which include: Langer's lines Blaschko's lines Kraissl's lines This disambiguation page ... lists articles associated with the title Skin line. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point ...
... were a British pop/rock band of the late 1980s and early 1990s. Critically acclaimed as artists, they never gained ... ", "Where the Wild Things Are" and "Tirade". Skin Games were: Wendy Page (vocals) Jim Marr (bass guitar) Jonny Willett (lead ...
Chilling - Before skinning the carcass is left in a cold room bleed. This often takes place overnight. Skinning - Skin is ... Crocodile skin either refers to the skin of a live crocodile or a leather made from dead crocodile hide. It has multiple ... Any uncertificated skins are confiscated by customs and sale of an inherited (pre-CITES) or illegally imported skin is a ... The grade is measured on a scale of damage to the skin and value is deducted by 25% at each level. Therefore, skin value can ...
... is commonly sold as dried leaves or sheets. Yuba served as a main course in Kyoto Tofu skin roll in dim sum cuisine ... Tofu skin, Yuba, beancurd skin, beancurd sheet, or beancurd robes is a food made from soybeans. During the boiling of soy milk ... The films are collected and dried into yellowish sheets known as tofu skin. Since tofu skin is not produced using a coagulant, ... tofu bamboo'). By layering or bunching fresh tofu skin or rehydrated tofu skin, then tying it tightly in cloth and stewing it, ...
"Skin Deep" (Grimm) "Skin Deep" (House) "Skin Deep" (Law & Order) "Skin Deep" (Once Upon a Time) "Skin Deep" (The Outer Limits) ... Skin Deep may refer to: Skin Deep (1922 film), a film by Lambert Hillyer Skin Deep (1929 film), a film by Ray Enright Skin Deep ... "Skin Deep" (Cher song) "Skin Deep" (The Stranglers song) "Skin Deep", a song by Area-7 from Bitter & Twisted "Skin Deep", a ... Skin Deep (Louis Bellson album) (1955) "Skin Deep", a composition by Louie Bellson Skin Deep (Buddy Guy album) (2008) Skin Deep ...
... is an English punk group from Gipsy Hill, London who play in the early UK Oi! style. Hard Skin is an oi band founded ... "Hard Skin - Same Meat Different Gravy". Punknews.org. "Hard Skin - On The Balls/Why Do Birds Suddenly Appear". Thelineofbestfit ... "Hard Skin: Oi! meets girl..." Louderthanwar.com. 24 January 2013. Hard Skin discography at Discogs 2013 interview (Articles ... "HARD SKIN - Damaged Goods". Damagedgoods.com. "Hard Skin: A Sly Eulogy to Oi!". Consequence.net. Retrieved 8 September 2020. " ...
Hyperkeratosis, a skin condition Cutaneous condition, any of various skin conditions Mole (skin marking), a benign tumor on ... Skin marking may refer to: Scarifying, scratching, etching, burning / branding, or cutting designs, pictures, or words into the ... human skin, usually with darker pigment Tattoo Body art This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Skin ...
... which trap moisture against the skin. Wrinkles are the first sign that the skin is over-hydrated. In addition, macerated skin ... Although most maceration clears up quickly once the skin is exposed to fresh air and allowed to dry, sometimes skin that ... However, this white skin should not be confused with the pale, whitish appearance of the new epithelial tissue in a healing ... Maceration is caused by excessive amounts of fluid remaining in contact with the skin or the surface of a wound for extended ...
... , a gothic rock band Second Skin by John Course & mrTimothy Second Skin by The Mayfield Four Second Skin, a 1982 ... Second skin may refer to: Second Skin, a 1994 Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode Second Skin, a 1999 Spanish romantic drama ... a 1988 song by Hugo Largo on their debut album Drum Second Skin, a 1991 song by The Gits 2econd Skin, a 1998 song by Moonspell ... on the album Sin/Pecado Second Skin, a 2003 song by VNV Nation Second Skin, a 1964 novel by John Hawkes Second Skin, a 2008 ...
... s are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin, since they are so often found in skin creases and folds. Studies ... A skin tag, or acrochordon (pl. acrochorda), is a small benign tumor that forms primarily in areas where the skin forms creases ... The surface of an acrochordon may be smooth or irregular in appearance and is often raised from the surface of the skin on a ... June 1989). "Skin tags are not a risk factor for colorectal polyps". Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. 11 (3): 299-302. doi ...
... can refer to: The skin of a chicken Keratosis pilaris, a condition commonly known as 'chicken skin' Goose bumps ... an anthology of ghost stories by Glen Grant This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Chicken skin. If ...
... is a process that involves the application of a disinfectant to reduce levels of microorganisms on the skin. ... Disinfecting the skin of the patient and the hands of the healthcare providers are an important part of surgery. Skin ... There is strong evidence that chlorhexidine and denatured alcohol use to clean skin prior to surgery is better than any other ... Maibach, H. I.; Aly, Raza (2012). Skin Microbiology: Relevance to Clinical Infection. Springer Science & Business Media. p. ...
Some skin infections, like cellulitis, need antibiotic treatment, but others will get better on their own without antibiotics. ... What are skin infections?. Skin infections occur when bacteria infect the skin and sometimes the deep tissue beneath the skin. ... Another type of skin infection is skin abscess, which is a collection of pus under the skin. ... Cellulitis is a common type of skin infection that causes redness, swelling, and pain in the infected area of the skin. ...
In the land between bare skin and makeup makeup exists the imperceptible wash of color that is Perfecting Skin Tint ... More skin, less makeup.. An undetectable wash of color that evens out skins appearance but wont hide your freckles, cake your ... Our shade guide helps you see and compare how the shades apply on different skin tones. Find a skin tone that looks closest to ... Perfecting Skin Tint ingredients Close Water/Aqua/Eau, Cyclopentasiloxane, Cyclohexasiloxane, Dimer Dilinoleyl Dimer ...
... By Kyle Smith Social Links for Kyle Smith * View Author Archive ... After rigorous beauty testing, we believe these are the 15 best skincare brands - CeraVe, Tatcha, Fenty Skin and more ... "A brown-skinned man . . . is now the alleged enemy. If you wanted the crudest but most effective weapon against the ...
... but Cat-skin did. Then let Cat-skin come up, said the king: and when she came he said to her, Who are you? I am a poor ... put on the fur-skin cloak, and was Cat-skin again. When she went into the kitchen to her work, and began to rake the ashes, the ... who was again forced to tell him that Cat-skin had cooked it. Cat-skin was brought again before the king, but she still told ... Thus Cat-skin lived for a long time very sorrowfully. Ah! pretty princess! thought she, what will now become of thee? But ...
"SKIN-online.net. Archived from the original on July 2, 2007.. *^ "Asian Imports: Attempting to Break Into the U.S. Music ... "Beneath The Skin", which Sugizo composed for the Skin, was covered and played by X Japan in 2014.[20] ... Skin (stylized as S.K.I.N.) is a United States-based Japanese visual kei rock supergroup founded by Japanese musicians Yoshiki ... During the intermediate of the performance of "Beneath The Skin", Gackt and Yoshiki both played piano, Sugizo was on violin and ...
Skin infections can be caused by bacteria, virus, fungus, or parasites. Impetigo is a type among kids. Shingles is a ... Some skin infections cover a small area on the top of your skin. Other infections can go deep into your skin or spread to a ... Skin Biopsy (National Library of Medicine) Also in Spanish * Skin Rashes and Other Problems (American Academy of Family ... Fungal Skin Infections (Merck & Co., Inc.) Also in Spanish * Skin Rashes and Other Problems (American Academy of Family ...
Other, rarer types of nonmelanoma skin cancer include dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, Merkel cell carcinoma, and Kaposis ... Nonmelanoma skin cancer primarily comprises basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. ...
... layers: In all vertebrates the skin has two major layers. The outer, relatively thin epidermis is composed of closely ... In human eye: The skin. The outermost layer of the lid is the skin, with features not greatly different from skin on the rest ... In mammal: Skin and hair. The skin of mammals is constructed of two layers, a superficial nonvascular epidermis and an inner ... In integument: Skin layers. In all vertebrates the skin has two major layers. The outer, relatively thin epidermis is composed ...
Source for information on skin beetle: A Dictionary of Zoology dictionary. ... Skin Conditions , Definition A skin lesion is a superficial growth or patch of the skin that does not resemble the area ... Skin , Skin The skin is of interest to psychoanalysis because it is anaclitically related to narcissism, because it is an ... Nu Skin Enterprises Inc , Nu Skin Enterprises, Inc. 75 West Center Street Provo, Utah 84601 U.S.A. (801) 345-6100 Fax: (801) ...
In Europe, people make fun of me, but whatever!" (Her skin is very, very smooth). Brown always splurges on a separate sunscreen ... Before we even get to skin products, Brown stresses that she never, ever tans. "People looking for sun on their face are out-of ... for the beach and Avon Skin So Soft Lotion SPF 15 ($10.99) for evenings (it doubles as bug repellent). Before bed, she uses ...
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Sensitive skin may react to environmental changes or skin care products. It is sometimes a symptom of a condition. Learn about ... Dry skin. A person with dry skin may also have sensitive skin. The skin tends to become more sensitive as it loses the ... Sensitive skin is a common issue but not a medical diagnosis by itself. People with sensitive skin may be more likely to ... Usually, having sensitive skin is not a sign of a serious skin condition. Some people are simply more sensitive to products ...
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But with our evidence-based, comprehensive guides, youll be a skin care self-care expert in no time. ... The Ultimate Skin Care Routine for Dry Skin. Dry, flaky skin will be a thing of the past with these expert tips. Plus, we ... 10 Common Causes of Red Spots on the Skin. Red spots on the skin can be caused by a number of skin conditions, including… ... Your Skin Is a Superhero: How to Support Your Bodys Biggest Organ. Learn all about your superhero skin and how to give it what ...
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Learn about this and other tests that have been studied to detect or screen for skin cancer in this expert reviewed summary. ... Having a skin exam to screen for skin cancer has not been shown to decrease your chance of dying from skin cancer. ... Skin cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the skin.. The skin is the bodys largest ... Regular skin checks by a doctor are important for people who have already had skin cancer. If you are checking your skin and ...
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  • Shaving for men - if dry skin reactions occurs on your face, skip a couple of days (over a weekend? (chemocare.com)
  • Research from Circana reveals skin care sales through August of 2023 are up 12%, the highest gains in the beauty segment. (drugstorenews.com)
  • Broad-spectrum sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or higher can help protect sensitive skin from ultraviolet (UV) rays. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • If you're going to be outside, finish with a sunscreen to shield your skin from the damaging effects of the sun. (walgreens.com)
  • Most people are conditioned to apply sunscreen in the summer, particularly at the beach and at other outdoor activities, but we find, regretfully, that less people are applying the sunscreen needed to protect their skin in the winter months. (prweb.com)
  • According to The Skin Cancer Foundation, men's increased risk for skin cancer is due to their shorter hairstyles combined with improper sunscreen application. (prweb.com)
  • I cannot underestimate the importance of sunscreen application to every bit of exposed skin even during the winter months," advises Dr. Fox. (prweb.com)
  • These included educational pamphlets, SPF15 sunscreen, instant photographs that revealed skin injury, sun sensitivity assessments, on-the-spot feedback, and follow-up reports in the mail. (brown.edu)
  • Keep your shirt on, wear a wide-brimmed hat, protect as much of your skin as possible with clothing, and use sunscreen - SPF 15 or greater. (brown.edu)
  • The ears are the third most common location on the body for basal cell carcinomas, a nonmelanoma skin cancer," says Dr. Silver. (prweb.com)
  • An estimated 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime and 1.3 million new cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer will be diagnosed this year, according to the American Cancer Society. (prweb.com)
  • Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, also called nonmelanoma skin cancer or keratinocyte carcinoma, are the most common forms of skin cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • In the United States, about 3 million cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer or keratinocyte carcinoma are diagnosed each year, and rates have likely been increasing for decades but have recently stabilized. (cancer.gov)
  • Skin tightening treatments can help lift and tone the neck, chin, eyebrows, and chest by stimulating your collagen production. (massgeneral.org)
  • We offer the following FDA approved treatments for tightening the skin. (massgeneral.org)
  • Since skin tightening treatments stimulate collagen to rejuvenate your skin, the results are seen over following months. (massgeneral.org)
  • We offer a wide range of non-invasive solutions - including medical grade treatments and skin care products - to improve your skin after damage from aging, sun exposure, skin-related disorders and more. (ohsu.edu)
  • Over-the-counter products may be helpful treatments for many skin rashes. (medicinenet.com)
  • Below, we'll explore the common causes of why your skin may feel hot to the touch, some potential treatments, and when you should seek help. (healthline.com)
  • Cancer that forms in squamous cells is called squamous cell carcinoma of the skin . (cancer.gov)
  • Love love, it completely cleared up my sensitive oily acne prone skin . (sephora.com)
  • It can be used in the form of oil you rub on your skin, soap to clean and cool irritated skin, or powder that can be applied as a paste to weepy, oily or oozy skin inflammations. (selfgrowth.com)
  • My skin is also dry, with an oily T-zone, so I have experienced less creasing under my eyes when I use this product compared to some other cream concealers , such as Maybelline Cover stick, NYX Professional concealer wand or Annabelle Colour-correcting concealer . (sephora.com)
  • Moisturizers prevent water loss by layering an oily substance over the skin to keep water in or by attracting water to the outer skin layer from the inner skin layer. (chemocare.com)
  • Improvement in most wrinkles, skin texture, redness and brown spots. (bcm.edu)
  • They're great for hiding blemishes, redness, and other skin imperfections. (sephora.com)
  • A long-wear, buildable cream concealer that's formulated with skin-loving botanicals to smooth skin's texture and visibly reduce redness. (sephora.com)
  • Sweet Berry: Reduces the appearance of redness and soothes skin. (sephora.com)
  • In this case, hot skin may also be accompanied by redness or swelling . (healthline.com)
  • To provide skin with the hydration it needs to remain soft and supple, follow up with a moisturizer . (walgreens.com)
  • The brand's new Marine Moisture collection features formulas that work to help boost hydration and support the moisture barrier for sea-to-skin health, the brand noted. (drugstorenews.com)
  • A 2021 review concludes that hydrolyzed collagen supplements for 90 days can reduce wrinkles and improve skin elasticity and hydration. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This allows your cosmetic dermatologist (a skin doctor who helps improve a patient's physical appearance) to develop the best possible treatment plan for you. (massgeneral.org)
  • A patient's skin cells, genetically modified and grown in a test tube, could provide the next generation of artificial skin. (technologyreview.com)
  • Surgeons can then transplant small pieces of the patient's epidermis, the top layer of skin, which grows and spreads over the newly grown dermis. (technologyreview.com)
  • In an experimental method developed by Steven Boyce of the University of Cincinnati, a patient's own skin cells are biopsied and then grown in culture. (technologyreview.com)
  • One key distinctive symptom of the disease is that it can lead to hyperpigmentation or darkening of the patient's skin. (news-medical.net)
  • Clinical studies from the Integrative Dermatology Symposium showcase how ingredients from nature support the lip and skin microbiome, in addition to improving the appearance of age spots and hyperpigmentation. (drugstorenews.com)
  • The epidermis is composed of the outermost layers of the skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Skin care products like lotions, serums, and creams can improve your skin, but diet plays a role too. (healthline.com)
  • Creams and lotions are effective ways of restoring moisture following dry skin reactions. (chemocare.com)
  • Many skin care companies add vitamin C to their protective creams. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • But the body's biggest organ is the skin, and recent studies show "that we're big sponges for these chemicals," says John Kissel of the University of Washington in Seattle. (sciencenews.org)
  • The skin is the body's largest organ . (cancer.gov)
  • The body then resorts to using the skin as an organ of elimination of the toxins. (selfgrowth.com)
  • In mammals, the skin is an organ of the integumentary system made up of multiple layers of ectodermal tissue and guards the underlying muscles, bones, ligaments, and internal organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • For instance, people with very dry skin may respond well to ingredients such as urea or lactic acid. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The formulas for natural skin care products use plant- and mineral-derived ingredients like aloe vera, bakuchiol and Centella asiatica in place of synthetics whenever possible. (walgreens.com)
  • Solutions-oriented skin care products typically feature additional ingredients, allowing them to perform beyond their primary function. (walgreens.com)
  • Bubble Skincare's new Morning Rays Brightening Eye Cream is formulated with ingredients that can help brighten dark circles and reduce inflamed and puffy skin under the eyes, the brand said. (drugstorenews.com)
  • Glycerin: Supports the moisture barrier for softer-feeling skin. (sephora.com)
  • what's the skin barrier? (dermalogica.com)
  • Story highlights The skin barrier helps protect the skin, keeping water in and pollutants out. (dermalogica.com)
  • A damaged skin barrier can lead to sensitive skin. (dermalogica.com)
  • Ointments are designed to be a barrier and stay on the surface of the skin for protection against harsh elements. (chemocare.com)
  • Amphibian skin is not a strong barrier, especially regarding the passage of chemicals via skin, and is often subject to osmosis and diffusive forces. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mammalian skin is composed of two primary layers: The epidermis, which provides waterproofing and serves as a barrier to infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research shows that applying colloidal oatmeal to the skin may help with symptoms such as rashes, dry skin, and eczema. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • With temperatures rising, more exposed skin and more plants in full bloom, people are more prone to experiencing rashes, acne outbreaks and other skin inflammations. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Common skin rashes include COVID-19 rash, eczema , poison ivy , hives , and athlete's foot . (medicinenet.com)
  • Skin rashes are now associated with coronavirus COVID-19 infections. (medicinenet.com)
  • People with generally sensitive skin have local reactions to chemicals, dyes, and fragrances present in products that come into contact with their skin. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A non-specific, inflammatory skin response happens in reaction to the chemicals in these products. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • MORE THAN SKIN DEEP Some chemicals in products ranging from cosmetics to plastics used in neonatal intensive care units can seep into a person's body as readily through the skin as via breathing, new studies show. (sciencenews.org)
  • The proliferation of skin cells is triggered by inflammatory chemicals produced by specialized white blood cells called T-cells. (medicinenet.com)
  • Mice with natural immunity against MmuPV1 after colonization and acquired immunity through the transfer of T cells from immune mice or by MmuPV1 vaccination were protected against skin carcinogenesis induced by chemicals or by ultraviolet radiation in a manner dependent on CD8 + T cells. (nature.com)
  • Dermal fillers, which aim to reduce lines in the skin, often contain hyaluronic acid. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Research from 2020 found that a combination of hyaluronic acid and a purified polynucleotide helped boost the amount and quality of collagen in the skin and enhance skin elasticity. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Hypoallergenic moisturizers and lotions may reduce dryness without irritating sensitive skin. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • More skin cancers are found on the left side of patients' faces (which is the side exposed to the most sunlight while driving). (prweb.com)
  • Most basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers can be cured . (cancer.gov)
  • Greater public awareness has led to higher rates of screening exams, self-exams, and detection of these skin cancers. (cancer.gov)
  • Skin cancer incidence equals that of all other cancers combined - about 1 million new U.S. cases per year. (brown.edu)
  • Our goal is to prevent skin cancers by helping people adopt sun-smart habits outdoors, particularly in environments like the beach where they are exposed to high intensity ultraviolet radiation," said Weinstock. (brown.edu)
  • Retinol is a type of retinoids used to help reduce fine lines and wrinkles and improve the appearance of skin. (healthline.com)
  • It can be used for deep wrinkles, jowl improvement, neck tightening, crepey skin and cellulite. (bcm.edu)
  • Peptides: Help reduce the appearance of wrinkles and support natural collagen for the look of smoother, firmer skin. (sephora.com)
  • One result of this is lines and wrinkles in the skin . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This could be why people develop wrinkles and other features associated with aging skin. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Many people are looking into ways of boosting collagen in the skin to stop wrinkles and other signs of skin aging. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In humans, for example, the skin located under the eyes and around the eyelids is the thinnest skin on the body at 0.5 mm thick and is one of the first areas to show signs of aging such as "crows feet" and wrinkles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over the past decade, artificial-skin products-made from scaffolds of collagen, the molecule that gives skin its structure and elasticity-have drastically improved burn victims' chances of survival. (technologyreview.com)
  • Collagen: Supports skin elasticity for a youthful, smooth appearance. (sephora.com)
  • As age and other factors reduce collagen levels, the skin loses its elasticity, and lines can form. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Lubiderm Lotion Daily Moisture Normal To Dry Skin Fragrance Free - 16 Fl. (safeway.com)
  • Additionally, a person with sensitive skin may be more prone to reactions to skincare products, makeup, or certain types of clothing. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • We rarely use sunscreens during those activities, or at least not as much and as regular as we should and are commonly prone to acute and chronic sun damage of the skin. (researchgate.net)
  • More than 90 percent of skin cancer is caused by exposure to UV radiation. (prweb.com)
  • The primary cause of skin cancer is chronic unprotected exposure to the sun and intense irregular exposures such as those that occur at the beach. (brown.edu)
  • Research suggests topical applications may help protect the skin from sun exposure and changes in pigmentation. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • When skin feels hot to the touch, it often means that the body's temperature is hotter than normal. (healthline.com)
  • Found in the lower part of the epidermis, these cells make melanin , the pigment that gives skin its natural color. (cancer.gov)
  • The only protection of our skin is endogenous (synthesis of melanin and enzymatic antioxidants) and exogenous (antioxidants, which we consume from the food, like vitamins A, C, E, etc. (researchgate.net)
  • The greater production of MSH leads to the over-stimulation of melanocytes which are the melanin-producing cells that provide color (melanin) to the skin. (news-medical.net)
  • But this is the one I find works the best with my super dark circles and crepey under eye skin . (sephora.com)
  • Sensitive skin is a common issue but not a medical diagnosis by itself. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • People with sensitive skin may be more likely to experience skin inflammation, irritation, and discoloration. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Sensitive skin may also be a symptom of an underlying condition. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Finding ways to avoid potential triggers and soothe irritated skin may help people with sensitive skin find relief and improve their quality of life. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Depending on the cause of sensitive skin and the accompanying symptoms, doctors may prescribe a few different medications. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Some home remedies may also help treat or prevent sensitive skin symptoms. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Oats may be especially helpful for people with sensitive skin. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Applying a colloidal oatmeal paste to sensitive skin may help manage symptoms. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • If a person has sensitive skin with no underlying health condition, their skin may become irritated more easily. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Because they are less likely to contain artificial fragrances, preservatives and dyes, natural options are often desirable for those with sensitive skin. (walgreens.com)
  • Dove Body Wash Sensitive Skin - 34 Fl. (safeway.com)
  • If you have sensitive skin, you know that the right cleanser can make a world of difference. (sephora.com)
  • This is a great cleanser for sensitive skin . (sephora.com)
  • Having sensitive skin I find this cleanser perfect for my needs. (sephora.com)
  • This makes my face feel very soft, and does not irritate my sensitive skin at all. (sephora.com)
  • I love that considering I have sensitive skin . (sephora.com)
  • He has sensitive skin and the product he had been using before discovering this was harsh on him. (sephora.com)
  • His beard is softer, it smells good, and he says it's good for his sensitive skin . (sephora.com)
  • Super gentle on my sensitive skin while cleaning off all my makeup. (sephora.com)
  • The gentle heat generated by the Fractora pins in the sub-dermal tissue promotes collagen restructuring for skin rejuvenation and an improved appearance in the skin. (massgeneral.org)
  • Your complexion requires daily care to feel and look its best, and that means using products that are suitable for your skin type and formulated with your specific concerns in mind. (walgreens.com)
  • At Walgreens, we have a diverse assortment of skin care products available for you to buy online and in stores, making it easy to create the right regimen to meet the unique needs of your complexion. (walgreens.com)
  • Although everyone's complexion is different, there are some universal guidelines for healthy skin. (walgreens.com)
  • Performed by our licensed aesthetician, the non-traumatic peels we offer stimulate healthy change in the skin to create a beautiful, renewed complexion with minimal downtime. (ohsu.edu)
  • This crease-resistant, light-reflecting liquid concealer blends seamlessly into skin and diffuses the look of pores and fine lines. (sephora.com)
  • For example, a frog sitting in an anesthetic solution would be sedated quickly as the chemical diffuses through its skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Skin also helps control body temperature and stores water, fat, and vitamin D . The skin has several layers, but the two main layers are the epidermis (top or outer layer) and the dermis (lower or inner layer). (cancer.gov)
  • We'll talk with you about a skin care regimen and homeopathic and vitamin therapies. (ohsu.edu)
  • Learn more about vitamin C for skin care here. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • View all Acne Acne + breakouts Adult acne Aging skin More. (dermalogica.com)
  • A revolutionary one-step skincare solution to cleanse and hydrate while leaving skin feeling soft and refreshed. (sephora.com)
  • This breakthrough skincare solution gently cleanses and moisturizes, leaving your skin feeling soft, refreshed, and perfectly balanced. (sephora.com)
  • Our selection of skincare for combination skin features clinically tested products from well-known brands. (marksandspencer.com)
  • When a moisturizer is used on the surface of the skin, the product penetrates and restores moisture to the skin cells. (chemocare.com)
  • Substances that attract water to the skin include glycerin, propylene glycol, proteins and some vitamins. (chemocare.com)
  • Are You a Skin Care Pro? (healthline.com)
  • These expert tips have your skin care covered. (healthline.com)
  • Beauty brand Selfmade is elevating what it means to care for your skin. (healthline.com)
  • Doing a regular at-home skin care self-exam can be a relatively easy way to reduce your risk for serious skin conditions. (healthline.com)
  • Our in-store consultants are specially trained in skin care. (walgreens.com)
  • With so many skin care products available on the market today, it can be difficult to narrow down the best choices for your skin. (walgreens.com)
  • As you put together your daily regimen, keep your skin care concerns in mind and look for products formulated to meet your specific needs. (walgreens.com)
  • This icon signifies that the Mary Kay Independent Beauty Consultant has advanced knowledge of skin care, color, and Clinical Solutions™ products. (marykay.com)
  • You'll enjoy personalized advice for creating a customized skin care regimen that's right for you. (marykay.com)
  • Rejuvenates skin in all skin types with relatively easy skin care and little downtime. (bcm.edu)
  • In a paper published in the current issue of the Journal of Burn Care and Research , Supp showed that these skin cells, when grown in a test tube, could kill more of a specific kind of bacteria than standard skin cells. (technologyreview.com)
  • The doctors and skin care specialists at OHSU Casey Eye Institute's Aesthetic Facial Surgery Center are experts at making your skin look its very best. (ohsu.edu)
  • She performs customized facials and peels and helps you learn how to care for your specific skin type. (ohsu.edu)
  • Board-certified and fellowship trained surgeons with special training and experience in facial surgery and skin care, including specialists in oculoplastic and facial plastic surgery. (ohsu.edu)
  • We offer topical skin care products that are hypoallergenic, organic and antioxidant rich. (ohsu.edu)
  • It's a relaxing and educational treatment which identifies your personal skin care issues and the best treatment options. (ohsu.edu)
  • Story Highlights Why cleansers and make-up removers are an essential step in your skin care routine The best cleansers remove daily buildup without stripping your skin Oil to Foam Total. (dermalogica.com)
  • The developer and distributor of Nu Skin and Pharmanex personal care products reported second-quarter results Thursday night, surprising analysts on both the top and bottom lines. (foxbusiness.com)
  • Guttate psoriasis symptoms and signs include bumps or small plaques of red itchy, scaling skin that may appear explosively, affecting large parts of the skin surface, after a sore throat. (medicinenet.com)
  • Plaque psoriasis signs and symptoms appear as red or pink small scaly bumps that merge into plaques of raised skin. (medicinenet.com)
  • The treatment for the skin symptoms of Addison's disease is generally the same as treatment utilized for other symptoms of the disease. (news-medical.net)
  • People often use aloe vera gel to treat the skin after sunburn or ease a rash . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Radiant, youthful skin doesn't happen on its own. (walgreens.com)
  • This rash tends to be weepy and oozy and affects the parts of the skin which have come in direct contact with the offending substance. (medicinenet.com)
  • This is a weepy, oozy dermatitis that tends to occur as coin-shaped plaques in the wintertime and is associated with very dry skin . (medicinenet.com)
  • The dry flakes of silvery-white skin scales result from the excessively rapid proliferation of skin cells. (medicinenet.com)
  • The skin condition produces silvery flakes of skin that scale and fall off. (medicinenet.com)
  • UV-induced photoaging of the skin becomes clinically evident with age, when endogenous antioxidative mechanisms and repair processes are not effective any more and actinic damage to the skin prevails. (researchgate.net)
  • Psoriasis commonly affects the skin of the elbows, knees, and scalp . (medicinenet.com)
  • With dry skin reactions, the skin cells at the lower layer of the epidermis (top layer of skin) are dry and flat, with no moisture. (chemocare.com)
  • Before we even get to skin products, Brown stresses that she never, ever tans. (nymag.com)
  • Using the product type menu at the left will allow you to find the right products for every step of your personalized skin-healthy regimenu. (walgreens.com)
  • It's packed with educated insights that align with our products and our mission - healthy skin for all. (dermalogica.com)
  • The Foreground skin focuses on putting your content in the foreground. (mediawiki.org)
  • Ultimately, they hope to produce a type of artificial skin that can sweat, tan, and fight off infection. (technologyreview.com)
  • Which skin type is it good for? (sephora.com)
  • This will usually manifest as some type of skin inflammation. (selfgrowth.com)
  • To investigate the effects of papillomavirus on carcinogen-driven skin cancer, we colonized several strains of immunocompetent mice with mouse papillomavirus type 1 (MmuPV1) 5 . (nature.com)
  • Learn the tips and tricks for choosing the best exfoliant for your skin type and skin concerns. (dermalogica.com)
  • Collagen is the most abundant type of protein in the body and a key component of the skin. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This is a common type of irritant contact dermatitis that occurs in most infants and some adults who wear diapers when feces and urine are in contact with the skin for too long. (medicinenet.com)
  • The health of your skin is crucial immediately before and after cosmetic surgery. (ohsu.edu)
  • For information about risk and protective factors for skin cancer, see Skin Cancer Prevention . (cancer.gov)
  • A new study shows that beachgoers increased their sun-protective behaviors about 5 percent over two months after they were visited at the beach by skin-cancer prevention specialists. (brown.edu)
  • Reptiles and most fish have hard protective scales on their skin for protection, and birds have hard feathers, all made of tough beta-keratins. (wikipedia.org)
  • When skin is exposed to the sun, melanocytes make more pigment and cause the skin to tan, or darken. (cancer.gov)
  • Rossi said that the study allows the researchers to refine a skin-cancer prevention program based on a questionnaire and computer-generated follow-up report. (brown.edu)
  • Plaque psoriasis classically affects skin over the elbows, knees, and scalp and is often itchy . (medicinenet.com)
  • The most distinctive and important feature of amphibians in general and salamanders in particular is their smooth, moist skin. (britannica.com)
  • Toads of the genus Bufo are familiar as "warty" amphibians, the skin being highly glandular and covered with tubercles (small, round nodules). (britannica.com)
  • Skin of a different nature exists in amphibians, reptiles, and birds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lafene Health Center is offering a free skin cancer screening clinic for faculty and staff this summer. (k-state.edu)
  • A gentle formula that cleans and conditions ‭facial hair by removing dirt and oil while moisturizing skin underneath plus it was a 2018 Men's Health Grooming Award winner for Best Beard Wash. (sephora.com)
  • PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- Health educators don't get sand kicked in their faces when they discuss skin cancer with sun worshipers. (brown.edu)
  • People take collagen supplements for their joint and skin health. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A cleanser that gently cleans, refreshes, and uses micellar technology to powerfully dissolve makeup without drying out skin. (sephora.com)
  • I'm Greek Italian which means I have pale skin with dark circles under my eyes, concealers are my most basic makeup need and I have gone through and tried a lot in 30 yrs. (sephora.com)
  • The outermost layer of the lid is the skin, with features not greatly different from skin on the rest of the body, with the possible exception of large pigment cells, which, although found elsewhere, are much more numerous in the skin of the lids. (britannica.com)
  • For some toxic air pollutants, more can get into the body through the skin than via breathing, new human data indicate. (sciencenews.org)
  • The spectrum of this disease ranges from mild with limited involvement of small areas of skin to severe psoriasis with large, thick plaques to red inflamed skin affecting the entire body surface. (medicinenet.com)
  • For skin flare-ups, Ayurvedic remedies incorporate the use of herbs to cool and restore balance in the body, dietary recommendations, and quick yoga and breathing techniques. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Bath oils such as baby oil, mineral oil, Herbal Bath Oil, Lubriderm Bath Oil, or Neutrogena Body Oil can be applied to your wet skin after you emerge from the bath or shower. (chemocare.com)
  • Skin is the layer of usually soft, flexible outer tissue covering the body of a vertebrate animal, with three main functions: protection, regulation, and sensation. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, the skin plays a key role in protecting the body against pathogens and excessive water loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • The skin on the palms and the soles of the feet is the thickest skin on the body at 4 mm thick. (wikipedia.org)
  • Proteins found in your skin called collagen and elastin start to break down causing your skin to become loose and sag. (massgeneral.org)
  • During that process, keratinocytes will become highly organized, forming cellular junctions (desmosomes) between each other and secreting keratin proteins and lipids which contribute to the formation of an extracellular matrix and provide mechanical strength to the skin. (wikipedia.org)