Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Spectrin: A high molecular weight (220-250 kDa) water-soluble protein which can be extracted from erythrocyte ghosts in low ionic strength buffers. The protein contains no lipids or carbohydrates, is the predominant species of peripheral erythrocyte membrane proteins, and exists as a fibrous coating on the inner, cytoplasmic surface of the membrane.Life: The state that distinguishes organisms from inorganic matter, manifested by growth, metabolism, reproduction, and adaptation. It includes the course of existence, the sum of experiences, the mode of existing, or the fact of being. Over the centuries inquiries into the nature of life have crossed the boundaries from philosophy to biology, forensic medicine, anthropology, etc., in creative as well as scientific literature. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Bone Development: The growth and development of bones from fetus to adult. It includes two principal mechanisms of bone growth: growth in length of long bones at the epiphyseal cartilages and growth in thickness by depositing new bone (OSTEOGENESIS) with the actions of OSTEOBLASTS and OSTEOCLASTS.Facial Bones: The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)Erythrocyte Membrane: The semi-permeable outer structure of a red blood cell. It is known as a red cell 'ghost' after HEMOLYSIS.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Sex Determination by Skeleton: Validation of the sex of an individual by means of the bones of the SKELETON. It is most commonly based on the appearance of the PELVIS; SKULL; STERNUM; and/or long bones.Paleopathology: The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.Dinosaurs: General name for two extinct orders of reptiles from the Mesozoic era: Saurischia and Ornithischia.Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.Osteogenesis: The process of bone formation. Histogenesis of bone including ossification.Ribs: A set of twelve curved bones which connect to the vertebral column posteriorly, and terminate anteriorly as costal cartilage. Together, they form a protective cage around the internal thoracic organs.Life Cycle Stages: The continuous sequence of changes undergone by living organisms during the post-embryonic developmental process, such as metamorphosis in insects and amphibians. This includes the developmental stages of apicomplexans such as the malarial parasite, PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.Ankyrins: A family of membrane-associated proteins responsible for the attachment of the cytoskeleton. Erythrocyte-related isoforms of ankyrin attach the SPECTRIN cytoskeleton to a transmembrane protein (ANION EXCHANGE PROTEIN 1, ERYTHROCYTE) in the erythrocyte plasma membrane. Brain-related isoforms of ankyrin also exist.Cartilage: A non-vascular form of connective tissue composed of CHONDROCYTES embedded in a matrix that includes CHONDROITIN SULFATE and various types of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are three major types: HYALINE CARTILAGE; FIBROCARTILAGE; and ELASTIC CARTILAGE.Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Paleontology: The study of early forms of life through fossil remains.Life Tables: Summarizing techniques used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in populations. These methods can be applied to the study not only of death, but also of any defined endpoint such as the onset of disease or the occurrence of disease complications.Anthropology, Physical: The comparative science dealing with the physical characteristics of humans as related to their origin, evolution, and development in the total environment.Calcification, Physiologic: Process by which organic tissue becomes hardened by the physiologic deposit of calcium salts.Cytoskeleton: The network of filaments, tubules, and interconnecting filamentous bridges which give shape, structure, and organization to the cytoplasm.Life Support Care: Care provided patients requiring extraordinary therapeutic measures in order to sustain and prolong life.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Cyclization: Changing an open-chain hydrocarbon to a closed ring. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Anthozoa: A class in the phylum CNIDARIA, comprised mostly of corals and anemones. All members occur only as polyps; the medusa stage is completely absent.Spherocytosis, Hereditary: A group of familial congenital hemolytic anemias characterized by numerous abnormally shaped erythrocytes which are generally spheroidal. The erythrocytes have increased osmotic fragility and are abnormally permeable to sodium ions.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Calcium Carbonate: Carbonic acid calcium salt (CaCO3). An odorless, tasteless powder or crystal that occurs in nature. It is used therapeutically as a phosphate buffer in hemodialysis patients and as a calcium supplement.Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Jaw: Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Osteoblasts: Bone-forming cells which secrete an EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. HYDROXYAPATITE crystals are then deposited into the matrix to form bone.Anion Exchange Protein 1, Erythrocyte: A major integral transmembrane protein of the ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANE. It is the anion exchanger responsible for electroneutral transporting in CHLORIDE IONS in exchange of BICARBONATE IONS allowing CO2 uptake and transport from tissues to lungs by the red blood cells. Genetic mutations that result in a loss of the protein function have been associated with type 4 HEREDITARY SPHEROCYTOSIS.Erythrocyte Deformability: Ability of ERYTHROCYTES to change shape as they pass through narrow spaces, such as the microvasculature.Body Patterning: The processes occurring in early development that direct morphogenesis. They specify the body plan ensuring that cells will proceed to differentiate, grow, and diversify in size and shape at the correct relative positions. Included are axial patterning, segmentation, compartment specification, limb position, organ boundary patterning, blood vessel patterning, etc.Tropomodulin: An actin capping protein that binds to the pointed-end of ACTIN. It functions in the presence of TROPOMYOSIN to inhibit microfilament elongation.Branchial Region: A region, of SOMITE development period, that contains a number of paired arches, each with a mesodermal core lined by ectoderm and endoderm on the two sides. In lower aquatic vertebrates, branchial arches develop into GILLS. In higher vertebrates, the arches forms outpouchings and develop into structures of the head and neck. Separating the arches are the branchial clefts or grooves.History, Ancient: The period of history before 500 of the common era.Burial: The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.Elliptocytosis, Hereditary: An intrinsic defect of erythrocytes inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The erythrocytes assume an oval or elliptical shape.Cytoskeletal Proteins: Major constituent of the cytoskeleton found in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They form a flexible framework for the cell, provide attachment points for organelles and formed bodies, and make communication between parts of the cell possible.Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.History, Medieval: The period of history from the year 500 through 1450 of the common era.Craniofacial Abnormalities: Congenital structural deformities, malformations, or other abnormalities of the cranium and facial bones.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Neural Crest: The two longitudinal ridges along the PRIMITIVE STREAK appearing near the end of GASTRULATION during development of nervous system (NEURULATION). The ridges are formed by folding of NEURAL PLATE. Between the ridges is a neural groove which deepens as the fold become elevated. When the folds meet at midline, the groove becomes a closed tube, the NEURAL TUBE.Ulna: The inner and longer bone of the FOREARM.Morphogenesis: The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Musculoskeletal Development: The morphologic and physiological changes of the MUSCLES, bones (BONE AND BONES), and CARTILAGE of the body, i.e., MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, during the prenatal and postnatal stages of development.Integumentary System: The outer covering of the body composed of the SKIN and the skin appendages, which are the HAIR, the NAILS; and the SEBACEOUS GLANDS and the SWEAT GLANDS and their ducts.Hominidae: Family of the suborder HAPLORHINI (Anthropoidea) comprising bipedal primate MAMMALS. It includes modern man (HOMO SAPIENS) and the great apes: gorillas (GORILLA GORILLA), chimpanzees (PAN PANISCUS and PAN TROGLODYTES), and orangutans (PONGO PYGMAEUS).Extremities: The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.Osteoporosis: Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Porifera: The phylum of sponges which are sessile, suspension-feeding, multicellular animals that utilize flagellated cells called choanocytes to circulate water. Most are hermaphroditic. They are probably an early evolutionary side branch that gave rise to no other group of animals. Except for about 150 freshwater species, sponges are marine animals. They are a source of ALKALOIDS; STEROLS; and other complex molecules useful in medicine and biological research.Dentition: The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Bones of Upper Extremity: The bones of the upper and lower ARM. They include the CLAVICLE and SCAPULA.Life Style: Typical way of life or manner of living characteristic of an individual or group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Musculoskeletal Abnormalities: Congenital structural abnormalities and deformities of the musculoskeletal system.Maxillofacial Development: The process of growth and differentiation of the jaws and face.Elasmobranchii: A subclass of cartilaginous fish comprising the SHARKS; rays; skates (SKATES (FISH);), and sawfish. Elasmobranchs are typically predaceous, relying more on smell (the olfactory capsules are relatively large) than sight (the eyes are relatively small) for obtaining their food.Cnidaria: A phylum of radially symmetrical invertebrates characterized by possession of stinging cells called nematocysts. It includes the classes ANTHOZOA; CUBOZOA; HYDROZOA, and SCYPHOZOA. Members carry CNIDARIAN VENOMS.Cemeteries: Areas set apart as burial grounds.Longevity: The normal length of time of an organism's life.Diterpenes: Twenty-carbon compounds derived from MEVALONIC ACID or deoxyxylulose phosphate.Bone Resorption: Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.Mesoderm: The middle germ layer of an embryo derived from three paired mesenchymal aggregates along the neural tube.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Bone Diseases, MetabolicMembrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Anatomy, Comparative: The comparative study of animal structure with regard to homologous organs or parts. (Stedman, 25th ed)Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Bone Diseases: Diseases of BONES.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Zebrafish: An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.Scapula: Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.Stereoisomerism: The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Nocardia: A genus of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria whose species are widely distributed and are abundant in soil. Some strains are pathogenic opportunists for humans and animals.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Osteocytes: Mature osteoblasts that have become embedded in the BONE MATRIX. They occupy a small cavity, called lacuna, in the matrix and are connected to adjacent osteocytes via protoplasmic projections called canaliculi.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Radius: The outer shorter of the two bones of the FOREARM, lying parallel to the ULNA and partially revolving around it.Somites: Paired, segmented masses of MESENCHYME located on either side of the developing spinal cord (neural tube). Somites derive from PARAXIAL MESODERM and continue to increase in number during ORGANOGENESIS. Somites give rise to SKELETON (sclerotome); MUSCLES (myotome); and DERMIS (dermatome).Archaeology: The scientific study of past societies through artifacts, fossils, etc.Sickness Impact Profile: A quality-of-life scale developed in the United States in 1972 as a measure of health status or dysfunction generated by a disease. It is a behaviorally based questionnaire for patients and addresses activities such as sleep and rest, mobility, recreation, home management, emotional behavior, social interaction, and the like. It measures the patient's perceived health status and is sensitive enough to detect changes or differences in health status occurring over time or between groups. (From Medical Care, vol.xix, no.8, August 1981, p.787-805)X-Ray Microtomography: X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Forelimb: A front limb of a quadruped. (The Random House College Dictionary, 1980)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Insurance, Life: Insurance providing for payment of a stipulated sum to a designated beneficiary upon death of the insured.Vertebrates: Animals having a vertebral column, members of the phylum Chordata, subphylum Craniata comprising mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fishes.Anthropology: The science devoted to the comparative study of man.Genes, Homeobox: Genes that encode highly conserved TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS that control positional identity of cells (BODY PATTERNING) and MORPHOGENESIS throughout development. Their sequences contain a 180 nucleotide sequence designated the homeobox, so called because mutations of these genes often results in homeotic transformations, in which one body structure replaces another. The proteins encoded by homeobox genes are called HOMEODOMAIN PROTEINS.Zebrafish Proteins: Proteins obtained from the ZEBRAFISH. Many of the proteins in this species have been the subject of studies involving basic embryological development (EMBRYOLOGY).Bone Diseases, DevelopmentalTreatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Chondrogenesis: The formation of cartilage. This process is directed by CHONDROCYTES which continually divide and lay down matrix during development. It is sometimes a precursor to OSTEOGENESIS.Erythrocytes, Abnormal: Oxygen-carrying RED BLOOD CELLS in mammalian blood that are abnormal in structure or function.Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Diaphyses: The shaft of long bones.Metacarpal Bones: The five cylindrical bones of the METACARPUS, articulating with the CARPAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF FINGERS distally.Homeodomain Proteins: Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).Minerals: Native, inorganic or fossilized organic substances having a definite chemical composition and formed by inorganic reactions. They may occur as individual crystals or may be disseminated in some other mineral or rock. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Microfilament Proteins: Monomeric subunits of primarily globular ACTIN and found in the cytoplasmic matrix of almost all cells. They are often associated with microtubules and may play a role in cytoskeletal function and/or mediate movement of the cell or the organelles within the cell.Sternum: A long, narrow, and flat bone commonly known as BREASTBONE occurring in the midsection of the anterior thoracic segment or chest region, which stabilizes the rib cage and serves as the point of origin for several muscles that move the arms, head, and neck.Technetium Tc 99m Medronate: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used primarily in skeletal scintigraphy. Because of its absorption by a variety of tumors, it is useful for the detection of neoplasms.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Growth Plate: The area between the EPIPHYSIS and the DIAPHYSIS within which bone growth occurs.Hydrozoa: A class in the phylum CNIDARIA which alternates between polyp and medusa forms during their life cycle. There are over 2700 species in five orders.Embryo, Nonmammalian: The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Chondrocytes: Polymorphic cells that form cartilage.Bone Morphogenetic Proteins: Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. They are synthesized as large precursor molecules which are cleaved by proteolytic enzymes. The active form can consist of a dimer of two identical proteins or a heterodimer of two related bone morphogenetic proteins.Hyoid Bone: A mobile U-shaped bone that lies in the anterior part of the neck at the level of the third CERVICAL VERTEBRAE. The hyoid bone is suspended from the processes of the TEMPORAL BONES by ligaments, and is firmly bound to the THYROID CARTILAGE by muscles.Chemistry, Organic: The study of the structure, preparation, properties, and reactions of carbon compounds. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Ossification, Heterotopic: The development of bony substance in normally soft structures.Mortuary Practice: Activities associated with the disposition of the dead. It excludes cultural practices such as funeral rites.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Chick Embryo: The developmental entity of a fertilized chicken egg (ZYGOTE). The developmental process begins about 24 h before the egg is laid at the BLASTODISC, a small whitish spot on the surface of the EGG YOLK. After 21 days of incubation, the embryo is fully developed before hatching.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Neuropeptides: Peptides released by NEURONS as intercellular messengers. Many neuropeptides are also hormones released by non-neuronal cells.Glycophorin: The major sialoglycoprotein of the human erythrocyte membrane. It consists of at least two sialoglycopeptides and is composed of 60% carbohydrate including sialic acid and 40% protein. It is involved in a number of different biological activities including the binding of MN blood groups, influenza viruses, kidney bean phytohemagglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Mice, Mutant Strains: Mice bearing mutant genes which are phenotypically expressed in the animals.Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Forensic Anthropology: Scientific study of human skeletal remains with the express purpose of identification. This includes establishing individual identity, trauma analysis, facial reconstruction, photographic superimposition, determination of time interval since death, and crime-scene recovery. Forensic anthropologists do not certify cause of death but provide data to assist in determination of probable cause. This is a branch of the field of physical anthropology and qualified individuals are certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1992 Jun;13(2):146)Bones of Lower Extremity: The bones of the upper and lower LEG. They include the PELVIC BONES.Osteocalcin: Vitamin K-dependent calcium-binding protein synthesized by OSTEOBLASTS and found primarily in BONES. Serum osteocalcin measurements provide a noninvasive specific marker of bone metabolism. The protein contains three residues of the amino acid gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla), which, in the presence of CALCIUM, promotes binding to HYDROXYAPATITE and subsequent accumulation in BONE MATRIX.Zygoma: Either of a pair of bones that form the prominent part of the CHEEK and contribute to the ORBIT on each side of the SKULL.Personal Satisfaction: The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Osteoclasts: A large multinuclear cell associated with the BONE RESORPTION. An odontoclast, also called cementoclast, is cytomorphologically the same as an osteoclast and is involved in CEMENTUM resorption.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Echinodermata: A phylum of the most familiar marine invertebrates. Its class Stelleroidea contains two subclasses, the Asteroidea (the STARFISH or sea stars) and the Ophiuroidea (the brittle stars, also called basket stars and serpent stars). There are 1500 described species of STARFISH found throughout the world. The second class, Echinoidea, contains about 950 species of SEA URCHINS, heart urchins, and sand dollars. A third class, Holothuroidea, comprises about 900 echinoderms known as SEA CUCUMBERS. Echinoderms are used extensively in biological research. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, pp773-826)Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Limb Buds: Distinct regions of mesenchymal outgrowth at both flanks of an embryo during the SOMITE period. Limb buds, covered by ECTODERM, give rise to forelimb, hindlimb, and eventual functional limb structures. Limb bud cultures are used to study CELL DIFFERENTIATION; ORGANOGENESIS; and MORPHOGENESIS.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Famous PersonsBlood Proteins: Proteins that are present in blood serum, including SERUM ALBUMIN; BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS; and many other types of proteins.Joints: Also known as articulations, these are points of connection between the ends of certain separate bones, or where the borders of other bones are juxtaposed.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Growth Differentiation Factor 5: A growth differentiation factor that plays a role in early CHONDROGENESIS and joint formation.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Biogenesis: The origin of life. It includes studies of the potential basis for life in organic compounds but excludes studies of the development of altered forms of life through mutation and natural selection, which is BIOLOGICAL EVOLUTION.Skates (Fish): The common name for all members of the Rajidae family. Skates and rays are members of the same order (Rajiformes). Skates have weak electric organs.Octoxynol: Nonionic surfactant mixtures varying in the number of repeating ethoxy (oxy-1,2-ethanediyl) groups. They are used as detergents, emulsifiers, wetting agents, defoaming agents, etc. Octoxynol-9, the compound with 9 repeating ethoxy groups, is a spermatocide.Mice, Inbred C57BLAge Determination by Skeleton: Establishment of the age of an individual by examination of their skeletal structure.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Notochord: A cartilaginous rod of mesodermal cells at the dorsal midline of all CHORDATE embryos. In lower vertebrates, notochord is the backbone of support. In the higher vertebrates, notochord is a transient structure, and segments of the vertebral column will develop around it. Notochord is also a source of midline signals that pattern surrounding tissues including the NEURAL TUBE development.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Animal Fins: Membranous appendage of fish and other aquatic organisms used for locomotion or balance.Leg Bones: The bones of the free part of the lower extremity in humans and of any of the four extremities in animals. It includes the FEMUR; PATELLA; TIBIA; and FIBULA.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.SOX9 Transcription Factor: A SOXE transcription factor that plays a critical role in regulating CHONDROGENESIS; OSTEOGENESIS; and male sex determination. Loss of function of the SOX9 transcription factor due to genetic mutations is a cause of CAMPOMELIC DYSPLASIA.PAX9 Transcription Factor: A paired box transcription factor that is involved in ODONTOGENESIS.Periosteum: Thin outer membrane that surrounds a bone. It contains CONNECTIVE TISSUE, CAPILLARIES, nerves, and a number of cell types.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Sea Urchins: Somewhat flattened, globular echinoderms, having thin, brittle shells of calcareous plates. They are useful models for studying FERTILIZATION and EMBRYO DEVELOPMENT.Cephalometry: The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.Ilium: The largest of three bones that make up each half of the pelvic girdle.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.TriterpenesAbsorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Hedgehog Proteins: A family of intercellular signaling proteins that play and important role in regulating the development of many TISSUES and organs. Their name derives from the observation of a hedgehog-like appearance in DROSOPHILA embryos with genetic mutations that block their action.Osmotic Fragility: RED BLOOD CELL sensitivity to change in OSMOTIC PRESSURE. When exposed to a hypotonic concentration of sodium in a solution, red cells take in more water, swell until the capacity of the cell membrane is exceeded, and burst.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Alkaloids: Organic nitrogenous bases. Many alkaloids of medical importance occur in the animal and vegetable kingdoms, and some have been synthesized. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Embryo, Mammalian: The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Hyperostosis: Increase in the mass of bone per unit volume.Models, Anatomic: Three-dimensional representation to show anatomic structures. Models may be used in place of intact animals or organisms for teaching, practice, and study.History, 17th Century: Time period from 1601 through 1700 of the common era.Sesterterpenes: Terpenes of five units of HEMITERPENES, formed from geranylfarnesyl pyrophosphate.
Life by the Numbers: New York: William Morrow, 1971. "Ursule Molinaro; Wrote Novels and Plays", New York Times obituary, July ... In her novel Fat Skeletons, a translator wary of serving unappreciative publishers attempts to pass her own novel off as a ... In the latter part of her life, she developed a method for teaching creative writing that relied wholly upon the oral and ... She was deeply interested in astrology and numerology and wrote two books (The Zodiac Lovers; Life by the Numbers) on these ...
Skeleton[edit]. Outdated life restoration depicting Yarasuchus as a "raisuchian" with osteoderms. ... The relatively complete skeleton of Yarasuchus allowed Nesbitt and colleagues to confidently refer a number of isolated bones ... The material was found disarticulated, however it represents the majority of the skeleton, missing only the distal caudal ... and differs in only a few minor anatomical features of the skeleton, such as having a less of a rear facing glenoid (the bony ...
"Skeleton Canyon". Ghost Towns of Arizona. Retrieved 2011-02-07. Barra, Allen (2008). Inventing Wyatt Earp: His Life and Many ... ISBN 0-471-18967-7. Roberts, Gary L. (2007). Doc Holliday: The Life and Legend. New York, NY: Wiley, J. p. 544. ISBN 978-0-470- ... Some researchers[who?] theorize that Mexican Rurales, led by Captain Alfredo Carrillo, who had survived the Skeleton Canyon ... ISBN 0-9631772-7-3. "The Life and Times of "Old Man" Clanton 1816 - 1881". Retrieved 3 May 2011. ...
Reconstructed skeleton. Retrieved 2007-AUG-23. Reconstruction in life. Color is based on reasonable assumption of ... doi:10.1111/j.1475-4983.2005.00507.x. Mounted skeleton. Lobed feet less likely, but plausible. Retrieved 2007-AUG-23. ...
Life. Flood Editions. 2014. ISBN 9780983889380. Skeleton Coast. Flood Editions. 2017. ISBN 9780990340799. http://www.english. ...
He returned to the United States in 1878 and spent the remaining years of his life in Louisiana and Canada. On November 28, ... "The Skeleton Crew". Fleshing Out Skull and Bones: Investigations into America's Most Powerful Secret Society. Walterville, OR: ...
These skeletons are composed of opaline silica. In some it takes the form of relatively simple spicules, but in others it forms ... Data related to Polycystinea at Wikispecies Systematics of the Radiolaria Radiolaria.org Tree of Life: Polycystine Radiolarians ... They include the vast majority of the fossil radiolaria, as their skeletons are abundant in marine sediments, making them one ...
Living Skeleton'". New York Times. January 7, 1887. Retrieved 2015-03-28. Isaac Sprague, the "living skeleton," died here ... They had three sons who lived healthy, normal lives. Sprague made attempts to stay away from the sideshow, but he could not ... In a result of forced promotion and work pressure, it was not uncommon for the Living Skeleton act to marry the Fat Lady act. ... Human Skeletons I. W. Sprague: Steven Bolin's Vintage Sideshow Photographs J Tithonus Pednaud, "Isaac W. Sprague - The Original ...
"Pompeii Skeletons Reveal Secrets of Roman Family Life." BBC. n.p. 13 December 2010. Web. 5 October 2010. http://www.bbc.co.uk/ ... Influenza, colds, and other ailments were just as apparent, if not more, in Imperial Rome as in today's life. However, they had ... Periostitis was also found in many samples, with a frequency indicating overcrowding and overall poor quality of life. Rome had ...
... there is no eternal life and the second is to remind the viewer to enjoy their life now. The skeletons she uses to embody this ... It teaches one to love life, to celebrate it and respect its fragility. It makes one treasure loved ones and to appreciate the ... Rodman, Edmon J. (16 July 2012). "For Crypto-Jews of New Mexico, Art is a Window into Secret Life". JTA. Retrieved 15 April ... She also traces the uses of skeletons as an art motif further back to pre-Columbian times. Rodriguez is influenced by ...
Though the post cranial skeleton is very similar to the early large bodied reptiles like pelycosaurs and pareiasaurs, the ... http://www.palaeocritti.com/by-group/diadectomorpha/limnoscelis Bringing Fossils To Life: An Introduction To Paleobiology by ... Limnoscelis skeleton. Limnoscelis skeleton in the Milan Natural History Museum. ...
Judith Oakley (2006). "Japanese skeleton shrimp - Caprella macho". Marine Life Information Network: Biology and Sensitivity Key ... Caprella mutica, commonly known as the Japanese skeleton shrimp, is a species of skeleton shrimp. They are relatively large ... "Japanese Skeleton Shrimp". Cape Breton University, ACAP Cape Breton, and the Government of Canada. Retrieved February 4, 2012 ... However, their larger sizes and very aggressive behavior also make them a serious threat to native species of skeleton shrimp. ...
The Mystery of the Dancing Skeleton. New York: Sterling Publishing Company, 1962. Guthrie, A. B. The Blue Hen's Chick. New York ... Guthrie, A. B (1965). The blue hen's chick: A life in context. McGraw-Hill. Retrieved 9 July 2015. Hathaway & Heppe, Lulu & ... access-date= requires ,url= (help) Atkins, Ken (June 1, 1979). "Scenes of Life by Joe Papin". The Denton-Record Chronicle. , ... Govan & West, Christine Noble & Emily Govan (1962). Mystery of the dancing skeleton. New York: Sterling Pub. Co. Retrieved 9 ...
Parkman's Skeleton." Engraving by Taylor & Adams, 1850. Published in: Trial of Professor John W. Webster, for the Murder of Dr ... Ned Nevins: the news boy, or, Street life in Boston. Boston: Lee & Shepard, 1867. Mass. Historical Society. "Restoration of Dr ...
Article - Skeleton Shrimp Eugene N. Kozloff (1983). "Sessile Jellyfish". Seashore Life of the Northern Pacific Coast. ... Judith Oakley (2006). "Japanese skeleton shrimp - Caprella macho". Marine Life Information Network: Biology and Sensitivity Key ... Caprellidae is a family of amphipods commonly known as skeleton shrimps. Their common name denotes the threadlike slender body ... "Caprella laeviuscula: the smooth skeleton shrimp". Intertidal Marine Invertebrates of the South Puget Sound. Archived from the ...
Judith Oakley (2006). "Japanese skeleton shrimp - Caprella macho". Marine Life Information Network: Biology and Sensitivity Key ... For example, skeleton shrimp have short legs and a slender tail like a scorpion tail, fairy shrimp swim upside down with ... doi:10.1007/s10750-007-9024-2. ISBN 978-1-4020-8258-0. Snyderman, Marty and Wiseman, Clay (1996) Guide to Marine Life: ... Marin J "Shrimps and Krill" Fisheries and Aquaculture - Volume 2, Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems, UNESCO. Volker Siegel ( ...
U.S. Bobsled and Skeleton Federation (January 18, 2014). "2014 U.S. Olympic Skeleton Team Announced". TeamUSA.org. Retrieved ... Tress lives and trains in Lake Placid, New York at the United States Olympic Training Center.[needs update] "Kyle TRESS". ... A member of the three-man U.S. skeleton team, he will compete in the Winter Olympics in Solchi, Russia, next month." Official ... Kyle Tress (born May 29, 1981) is an American Olympic skeleton racer who competed from 2002 until 2017. He placed 25th in the ...
The life expectancy at birth was 59 years for females and 54 for males. Among children younger than 15, 3% had lost a mother, 5 ... Skeleton Coast "President announces governors". The Namibian. 10 April 2015. "Namibia's Population by Region". Election Watch. ...
The average life-expectancy in the Viking Age was 39 years for men and 42 years for women. Most of those buried at Hesselbjerg ... One skeleton in particular was selected to be extensively scientifically analyzed and facially reconstructed for an exhibit at ... She showed signs of hard work and disease, which was not uncommon either in the Viking Age or in the skeletons excavated at ... In a few instances, traces of decayed coffins were found outlining the skeletons in the graves. The burial site is now ...
On the skeletons of Puffinus nativitatus and Pagodroma nivea. Tori 13: 50-67. Kuroda, N. 1983. Some osteological notes on ... His works included Birds of the Island of Java (2 Volumes, 1933-36) and Parrots of the World in Life Colours (1975). He ...
The skeleton extinguishes a candle which represents life, and above the taper is written the Latin motto. A volume of Rubens' ... presents death as a skeleton standing over symbols of wealth and power and extinguishing a candle that symbolizes life. ... The skeleton in one canvas - In Ictu Oculi - is the sole actor amid ... Myers, Shirley D.; Myers, Bernard Samuel, eds. (1979). ... ISBN 978-0-131-45577-1. Valdes Leal's canvases are still-lives but on such a large scale - more than 7 feet (2.1 meters) high ...
Ousterhout, Douglas K., editor (1991). Aesthetic Contouring of the Craniofacial Skeleton. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. ISBN ... The Life and Ruins of a Billionaire Genius. Scribner, a Division of Simon & Schuster, Inc. pp. 171-175. Van Marie, Karin (1006 ...
She began racing skeleton in 2014. Wesenberg was named, along with Katie Uhlaender, to represent the U.S. in women's skeleton ... Wesenberg attended the University of Colorado, where she studied business administration, and lives in Modesto, California. ... "2018 U.S. Olympic Skeleton Team Announced" (Press release). United States Bobsled and Skeleton Federation. January 15, 2018. ... "Standings (2014/2015) (Women's skeleton) (Europe Cup)". International Bobsleigh and Skeleton Federation. Retrieved 2018-01-05. ...
There's a life-size plaster statue of the Virgin just behind the altar. She has a machete slash across her breast and someone ... The Skeleton Priest, from Emergency Sex. If blue helmeted UN peacekeepers show up in your town or village and offer to protect ... Your lives are worth so much less than theirs. [1] New Yorker [2] Transcript of Andrew Thomson's appearance on Australian talk ... Thomson has dedicated his life to humanitarian aid. He has worked as a medical officer in the UN in New York, Cambodia and ...
Shank, David; Silberman, Steve (1994). Skeleton Key: A Dictionary for Deadheads. Broadway Books, New York, NY. ISBN 978-0-385- ... Chapter 4. ISBN 978-1-250-03380-2. Jackson, Blair (1999). Garcia: An American Life. Penguin Books. pg. 125. ...
Life Span 180-210 days 1-7 Does: 7-8 months 10-12 years ... The skeleton of a Water deer at the Royal Veterinary College.. ...
... explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives. ... 3,300-Year-Old Egyptian Skeletons Reveal Lower Classes Hard Lives. More than three quarters of the adults showed signs of ... To see what these everyday Egyptians daily lives were like, Stevens and her colleagues analyzed 159 skeletons that were found ... Hard life. About 10 years ago, a surveyor investigating a region in the desert near Amarna discovered an ancient cemetery. The ...
Bringing the Skeletons of Coco to Life. Just in time for Halloween and Dia de los Muertos, we are excited to share a look ...
A human adult skeleton contains 206 bones in the body to make up the skeletal system. ... The main function of the human skeleton is to provide support to the body, protect the internal organs and provide movement to ... Macaroni Skeleton. Observe a life-size human skeleton and create your own skeleton using macaroni for your science project. Get ... Construct the macaroni skeleton and label all of the major bones.. *Observe a life-size human skeleton and create your own ...
How Whopping Whale Skeletons Come to Life at Bonehenge. "Every one of these animals has a story." by Megan Dohm December 5, ... Life on the Ice May Never Be the Same For the Iñupiat of northern Alaska, warming oceans and rising seas weaken the very ground ... Three skeletons of beaked whales visible at Bonehenge. Megan Dohm. Finally, in 2012, Echo-who was looking like a whale again- ... At right, Keith Rittmaster works on the skeleton of a baby pygmy sperm whale, using a mixture resins and bone dust. Both calf ...
Halloween decorations are simple with this fully posable skeleton thats perfect for ... ... Scare up some fun with a skeleton at your haunted house this year. ... Life Size Posable Skeleton Halloween Decoration #13703399. Life Size Posable Skeleton Halloween Decoration is rated 4.2 out of ... Magazine with skeleton and skeleton dog on front page. Page 2 has price for Posable skeleton 13703399 $45.00 Online is showing ...
Back in 2005, artist Shanell Papp finished work on a life-size, anatomically correct crochet skeleton, complete with remov ... Back in 2005, artist Shanell Papp finished work on a life-size, anatomically correct crochet skeleton, complete with removable ... "I made the skeleton, in order to explore my body while I was an art student at the University of Lethbridge," Papp told Design ... The skeleton was created for an open research project on textiles, anatomy, and art, called BAWDY. ...
Written by one of the most consulted authorities on the subject, Atlas of Developmental Field Anomalies of the Human Skeleton ... Atlas of Developmental Field Anomalies of the Human Skeleton: A Paleopathology Perspective. ... Atlas of Developmental Field Anomalies of the Human Skeleton: A Paleopathology Perspective. Ethne Barnes ... is the pre-eminent resource for developmental defects of the skeleton. This guide focuses on localized bone structures ...
True-to-Life Human X-Rays™ - Set of 18, SB40317 at Nasco. You will find a unique blend of products for Arts & Crafts, Education ... Hold these life-sized human X-rays up to the light or use them on a light table and see every authentic detail of a real ... Arrange the 18 pieces together to reproduce the entire skeleton that is 5 ft. tall. The teacher guide includes reproducible ...
This model is life size. The model is designed as a visual aid for teaching anatomy, physiology and podiatry courses. Helps ... Life Size Foot Ankle Joint Anatomical Model Skeleton - Human Medical Anatomy SN! Email to friends Share on Facebook - opens in ... Details about Life Size Foot Ankle Joint Anatomical Model Skeleton - Human Medical Anatomy SN!. ... "Life Size Foot Ankle Joint Anatomical Model Skeleton -..." Return to top ...
Full size model skeletons available now to buy online ... Buy Life Size Model Skeletons now from Healthandcare.co.uk with ... Deluxe Life Size Model Skeleton The Deluxe Life Size Model Skeleton is based on the same design as the Anatomical Model Full ... Life Size Model Skeletons. Sunday, 27 April 2014 , Paul. We have sold Life-size Model Skeletons to a range of people over the ... Anatomical Model Full Size Skeleton. The Anatomical Model Full Size Skeleton is another of our best-selling skeletons. This ...
... ... Four of them to make the skeleton and another four to create the internal organs. "I was curious about the human body and I ... the artist borrowed a human skeleton from a university and collected anatomical textbooks. ...
This economical, life-size articulated adult plastic model is our most popular school-level skeleton. Its ideal for teaching ... Full Human Skeleton - Budget Bucky - Life Size 66 SKU: AA-CH-10 ...
... to the default T-posed SL skeleton? Im using blender. ... Rigging a non-T-posed character to the T posed bone skeleton? ... Rigging a non-T-posed character to the T posed bone skeleton? ... Rigging a non-T-posed character to the T posed bone skeleton? ... to the default T-posed SL skeleton? Im using blender. ...
Original Life Size Human Anatomical Anatomy Resin Head Skeleton Lifesize Skull Medical Teaching Model ... For just US$31.99 , buy Life Size Human Anatomical Anatomy Resin Head Skeleton Lifesize Skull Medical Teaching Model from the ...
Our prices on Skeleton Models are guaranteed to be the lowest and our Skeleton Models are of the high quality. ... we have a wide range of anatomy Skeleton Models available. ... Life-Size Skeleton Models Muscled Skeleton Models Mini Skeleton ... Mini Human Skeleton Model on Metal Base Petite Plus Human Skeleton Model on Plastic Base Life Size Human Skeleton Model Life ... Petite Plus Human Skeleton Model on Plastic Base - 17.25" (45cm). Life Size Human Skeleton Model Life Size Human Skeleton Model ...
Not complete skeletons, but some interesting and very old bones, conserved by the National Trust on Gower and Cardiff ... Album Review: Tim and Sam Band - Life Stream Tuesday 6 April 2010, 15:41. ... Not complete skeletons, but some interesting and very old bones, conserved by the National Trust on Gower and Cardiff ...
Help your child make a skeleton out of recycled milk jugs and wire for a fun and educational craft. You will need a supply of ... How to Make a Life-Size Skeleton 2 How to Make a Human Skeleton Model From Empty Plastic Milk Bottles ... Press the jug into the bottom of the torso section of the skeleton and hold for at least 1 minute to allow the glue to set. ... Help your child make a skeleton out of recycled milk jugs and wire for a fun and educational craft. You will need a supply of ...
Though different life styles have meant that they have evolved different variations on the central theme. ... and these muscles need to be solidly attached to the birds skeleton. They also to generate tremendous stresses in the skeleton ... The basic bird skeleton was inherited from their reptilian ancestors. The constraints of flight however have meant that birds ... Bird Anatomy: Complete Guide - Including Feet, Skeleton & Wings. The Anatomy of a Bird - Bone, Blood & Guts. The anatomy of ...
Skeleton shrimp are tiny, gangly amphipods with transparent, stick-like bodies. They live attached to hydroids, sponges and ... Reproduction and Life Cycle. Skeleton shrimp reproduce sexually. Females carry large, transparent egg pouches on their abdomen ... Skeleton shrimp have long, gangly, stick-like bodies. Their bodies are usually transparent, but may vary in color from tan to ... Skeleton shrimp live on hydroids, sponges and vegetation, which they grasp with their hooked rear legs. (marlin harms/Flickr) ...
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More articles from Life Sciences:. Molecular doorstop could be key to new tuberculosis drugs 20.03.2018 , Rockefeller ... They have discovered that the rigidity of the cytoskeleton, or cell skeleton, in the vicinity of the cell s organelles, appears ... All articles from Life Sciences ,,,. The most recent press releases about innovation ,,,. ... With optical tweezers, researchers pinpoint the rhythmic rigidity of cell skeletons. 04.12.2003 ...
More articles from Life Sciences:. Single-stranded DNA and RNA origami go live 15.12.2017 , Wyss Institute for Biologically ... Zebrafish fins consist of a skin that is stabilized by a skeleton of bony fin rays; similar to an umbrella that is supported by ... How is the exact shape of the fin skeleton regenerated? In order to form new fin rays, newly formed osteoblasts have to align ... All articles from Life Sciences ,,,. The most recent press releases about innovation ,,,. ...
Laboratory studies suggest changing ocean chemistry will 1) harm life forms that rely on carbonate-based shells and skeletons, ... Building Shells and Skeletons: Calcifying Organisms. Many ocean plants and animals build shells and skeletons out of two ... They spend their early lives as larvae. larvaeA distinct, immature life stage of animals prior to metamorphosis into the adult ... Effects of Ocean and Coastal Acidification on Marine Life. B. The minerals that animals build their shells out of are calcium ...
  • A field archaeologist uses a brush on a skeleton in an open coffin during the excavation of a late 18th to mid 19th century cemetery under St James Gardens near Euston train station in London on Nov 1, 2018 as part of the HS2 high-speed rail project. (businesstimes.com.sg)
  • Assistant professor of biology Nick Gidmark says the 55-foot skeleton will be suspended from the ceiling of the atrium by homecoming 2019, the first weekend of November. (wqad.com)
  • At right, Keith Rittmaster works on the skeleton of a baby pygmy sperm whale, using a mixture resins and bone dust. (atlasobscura.com)
  • Rigging a non-T-posed character to the T posed bone skeleton? (secondlife.com)
  • Researchers from Bayreuth University (Germany) uncover mechanisms that allow bone-forming cells to regenerate a correctly shaped new fin skeleton. (innovations-report.com)
  • A careful look at the ancient hominin's skeleton suggests one bone may actually belong to a baboon. (newscientist.com)
  • Students from high school to medical school can solidify their understanding of this dynamic tissue with a primer sponsored by the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research in Washington, D.C. The tutorial covers topics from basic bone structure to the impact of hormones like testosterone and cortisol on the skeleton. (sciencemag.org)
  • A fun feature on exercise illustrates why volleyball is better for the skeleton than hockey is-it triggers a bigger spike in bone density. (sciencemag.org)
  • In this natural and cultural history of bone, he explains where our skeletons came from, what they do inside us, and what others can learn about us when these wondrous assemblies of mineral and protein are all we've left behind. (audible.com)
  • Assorted skeleton parts set includes: life-size skull, humerus, articulated hand (on wire), hip bone and sacrum (tail bone). (horror-hall.com)
  • Up to now only little was known about how changes in the differentiation status of osteoblasts are brought about, and it was unknown how zebrafish manage to regenerate the exact shape of the lost fin skeleton. (innovations-report.com)
  • This is an elegant mechanism that ensures a gradient of cells experiencing high and low levels of retinoic acid", Begemann explains, "This allows two processes to run in parallel during regeneration: Proliferation for the production of all cells that replace the lost structure and redifferentiation of osteoblasts where the skeleton re-emerges. (innovations-report.com)
  • KEPALA BATAS: The latest discovery of human skeleton, aged probably between 5,000 and 6,000 years, at the construction site of an archaeology gallery in Guar Kepah here on Monday proved the existence of prehistoric people in Peninsular Malaysia during Neolithic period. (yahoo.com)
  • It's going to get prehistoric in your neighborhood when you decorate your yard with the Life-Size Tyrannosaurus Skeleton. (geekalerts.com)
  • In a limited number of animals, the hard skeleton transmits vibrations that are sensed by the hearing mechanism. (britannica.com)
  • This week, you'll learn more about the Cambrian Explosion, which led to the development of external hard skeleton components at 542 million years before present. (coursera.org)
  • So, an organism with a cartilaginous vertebra or vertebral column may not be as well or as accurately represented in the rock record as a really robust hard skeleton would be represented. (coursera.org)
  • These results provide a previously undescribed mechanism for actomyosin force generation at the plasma membrane, and may apply to spectrin-F-actin-based membrane skeleton networks in other cell types, such as neurons and polarized epithelial cells. (pnas.org)
  • The biconcave disk shape and deformability of mammalian RBCs rely on the membrane skeleton, a viscoelastic network of short, membrane-associated actin filaments (F-actin) cross-linked by long, flexible spectrin tetramers. (pnas.org)
  • Other themes include: -Reconnaissance of ancient primordial life before the first cell evolved -The entire ~4-billion-year development of single- and multi-celled life through the lens of the Tree of Life -The influence of Earth system processes (meteor impacts, volcanoes, ice sheets) on shaping and structuring the Tree of Life This synthesis emphasizes the universality of the emergence of life as a prelude for the search for extraterrestrial life. (coursera.org)
  • The reviewer that posted the picture in 2016 shows a white skeleton, so I am assuming this item has changed since that time and the picture/information has not been updated. (orientaltrading.com)
  • Laboratory studies suggest changing ocean chemistry will 1) harm life forms that rely on carbonate-based shells and skeletons, 2) harm organisms sensitive to acidity and 3) harm organisms higher up the food chain that feed on these sensitive organisms. (epa.gov)
  • They look a lot like an ancient group of creatures called rangeomorphs , which existed in a time before skeletons, shells, legs, mouths, guts, and nervous systems. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • Tonight, Dr. Paul Koudounaris--author of Empire of Death, the definitive book on ossuaries--will present a heavily illustrated talk based on his new book Heavenly Bodies: Cult Treasures and Spectacular Saints from the Catacombs, the story of skeletons discovered in the Roman Catacombs in the late sixteenth century. (feedreader.com)
  • Largely forgotten in the annals of religious history, Dr. Koudounaris gained unprecedented access to religious institutions where the surviving decorated skeletons are held. (feedreader.com)
  • Studying the human skeleton through various science projects helps students understand how the human body supports itself and moves. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Students can conduct different types of projects with a skeleton depending on the grade level and requirement for the science class. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Conduct a science experiment using a life-size plastic human skeleton to measure different objects. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Observe a life-size human skeleton and create your own skeleton using macaroni for your science project. (ehow.co.uk)
  • A human skeleton is like a biography of that person," says lead investigator Ashleigh Haruda from the Central Natural Science Collections at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU). (bigthink.com)
  • Carolina Science Online®, our new eLearning platform, brings your classroom to life with resources for all ages. (carolina.com)
  • Carolina covers the world of life science with everything from slides and kits to Agricultural and Vet Science. (carolina.com)
  • This is the incredible true story of the race to find a cure, a dispatch from the life-changing world of modern oncological science, and a brave new chapter in medical history. (audible.com)
  • Looking for a new spin on life science lessons? (bioedonline.org)
  • BioEd Online brings the excitement of space life science to your classroom through a series of curricular units focused on engaging topics such as the effects of microgravity on our body systems, maintaining fitness and health during long-duration space missions, the impact of space travel on sleep patterns. (bioedonline.org)
  • These efforts resulted in a series of four educational modules that teach space life science concepts and promote STEM careers. (bioedonline.org)
  • The links below provide access to complete teacher guides or individual activities (PDF), PowerPoint slides, video presentations, and other content to enhance your instruction related to space life sciences, including science articles from the journal, Nature. (bioedonline.org)
  • They've spent months piecing together the skeleton of a whale in a contribution to a major renovation of the Umbeck Science-Mathematics Center. (wqad.com)
  • In the case of the cat, there were enough remains - its entire skull including its lower jaw, along with parts of its upper body, legs and four vertebrae - to understand quite a bit about its life. (bigthink.com)
  • In this proof of concept study, we attempted to infer the skeleton components using comparative genomic analysis and to uncover the genetic regulatory network (GRN) ab initio using a Variational Bayesian expectation maximization (VBEM) approach. (springer.com)
  • The site contained hundreds of skeletons and skeletal fragments from lower-class Egyptians. (scientificamerican.com)
  • In November 1974, palaeoanthropologists Donald Johanson and Tom Gray made the discovery of a lifetime near the village of Hadar in Ethiopia: dozens of fossil fragments belonging to a single hominin skeleton dating back 3.2 million years. (newscientist.com)
  • Once the fragments had been pieced together, the skeleton was declared to be of the species Australopithecus afarensis . (newscientist.com)
  • He stresses, though, that the analysis, which he will present at a meeting of the Paleoanthropology Society in San Francisco next week , also confirms that the other 88 fossil fragments belonging to Lucy's skeleton are correctly identified. (newscientist.com)
  • Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) Global Archaeological Research Centre director Professor Datuk Dr Mokhtar Saidin said he also believed that the discovery was the only human skeleton from the period ever found buried underneath a shell mound in Peninsular Malaysia. (yahoo.com)
  • A 4,000-YEAR-OLD Bronze Age skeleton found buried near Emsworth could have been one of our early rulers who died in combat, scientists have found. (portsmouth.co.uk)
  • Isotope analysis revealed a high-protein diet, and according to Haruda, "It must have been fed by humans since the animal had lost almost all its teeth towards the end of its life. (bigthink.com)
  • Based on the teeth, the skeleton is believed to be of a woman but we need to conduct (more) studies to ascertain the gender, age, cause of death and genetics," Mokhtar told reporters at the excavation site here today. (yahoo.com)