Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Sheep Diseases: Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Sheep, Domestic: A species of sheep, Ovis aries, descended from Near Eastern wild forms, especially mouflon.Hybrid Vigor: The adaptive superiority of the heterozygous GENOTYPE with respect to one or more characters in comparison with the corresponding HOMOZYGOTE.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Weaning: Permanent deprivation of breast milk and commencement of nourishment with other food. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Wool: The hair of SHEEP or other animals that is used for weaving.Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Goats: Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.Least-Squares Analysis: A principle of estimation in which the estimates of a set of parameters in a statistical model are those quantities minimizing the sum of squared differences between the observed values of a dependent variable and the values predicted by the model.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Sheep, Bighorn: A species of sheep, Ovis canadensis, characterized by massive brown horns. There are at least four subspecies and they are all endangered or threatened.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Litter Size: The number of offspring produced at one birth by a viviparous animal.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Animals, Inbred Strains: Animals produced by the mating of progeny over multiple generations. The resultant strain of animals is virtually identical genotypically. Highly inbred animal lines allow the study of certain traits in a relatively pure form. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Scrapie: A fatal disease of the nervous system in sheep and goats, characterized by pruritus, debility, and locomotor incoordination. It is caused by proteinaceous infectious particles called PRIONS.Weight Gain: Increase in BODY WEIGHT over existing weight.Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus: A BETARETROVIRUS that causes pulmonary adenomatosis in sheep (PULMONARY ADENOMATOSIS, OVINE).Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Inbreeding: The mating of plants or non-human animals which are closely related genetically.Sus scrofa: A species of SWINE, in the family Suidae, comprising a number of subspecies including the domestic pig Sus scrofa domestica.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Equidae: A family of hoofed MAMMALS consisting of HORSES, donkeys, and zebras. Members of this family are strict herbivores and can be classified as either browsers or grazers depending on how they feed.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Fertility: The capacity to conceive or to induce conception. It may refer to either the male or female.Goat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.PortugalQuantitative Trait, Heritable: A characteristic showing quantitative inheritance such as SKIN PIGMENTATION in humans. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Dystocia: Slow or difficult OBSTETRIC LABOR or CHILDBIRTH.Lactation: The processes of milk secretion by the maternal MAMMARY GLANDS after PARTURITION. The proliferation of the mammary glandular tissue, milk synthesis, and milk expulsion or let down are regulated by the interactions of several hormones including ESTRADIOL; PROGESTERONE; PROLACTIN; and OXYTOCIN.Haplotypes: The genetic constitution of individuals with respect to one member of a pair of allelic genes, or sets of genes that are closely linked and tend to be inherited together such as those of the MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Gene Frequency: The proportion of one particular in the total of all ALLELES for one genetic locus in a breeding POPULATION.Animal Identification Systems: Procedures for recognizing individual animals and certain identifiable characteristics pertaining to them; includes computerized methods, ear tags, etc.Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Chromosomes, Mammalian: Complex nucleoprotein structures which contain the genomic DNA and are part of the CELL NUCLEUS of MAMMALS.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Pregnancy, Animal: The process of bearing developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero in non-human mammals, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Hybridization, Genetic: The genetic process of crossbreeding between genetically dissimilar parents to produce a hybrid.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Sexual Maturation: Achievement of full sexual capacity in animals and in humans.Fetus: The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Heterozygote: An individual having different alleles at one or more loci regarding a specific character.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Genome: The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Scrotum: A cutaneous pouch of skin containing the testicles and spermatic cords.Pulmonary Adenomatosis, Ovine: A contagious, neoplastic, pulmonary disease of sheep characterized by hyperplasia and hypertrophy of pneumocytes and epithelial cells of the lung. It is caused by JAAGSIEKTE SHEEP RETROVIRUS.Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of animals.Ovulation: The discharge of an OVUM from a rupturing follicle in the OVARY.Hair Color: Color of hair or fur.Rumen: The first stomach of ruminants. It lies on the left side of the body, occupying the whole of the left side of the abdomen and even stretching across the median plane of the body to the right side. It is capacious, divided into an upper and a lower sac, each of which has a blind sac at its posterior extremity. The rumen is lined by mucous membrane containing no digestive glands, but mucus-secreting glands are present in large numbers. Coarse, partially chewed food is stored and churned in the rumen until the animal finds circumstances convenient for rumination. When this occurs, little balls of food are regurgitated through the esophagus into the mouth, and are subjected to a second more thorough mastication, swallowed, and passed on into other parts of the compound stomach. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Prions: Small proteinaceous infectious particles which resist inactivation by procedures that modify NUCLEIC ACIDS and contain an abnormal isoform of a cellular protein which is a major and necessary component. The abnormal (scrapie) isoform is PrPSc (PRPSC PROTEINS) and the cellular isoform PrPC (PRPC PROTEINS). The primary amino acid sequence of the two isoforms is identical. Human diseases caused by prions include CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB SYNDROME; GERSTMANN-STRAUSSLER SYNDROME; and INSOMNIA, FATAL FAMILIAL.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Eating: The consumption of edible substances.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Adipose Tissue: Specialized connective tissue composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It is the site of stored FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. In mammals, there are two types of adipose tissue, the WHITE FAT and the BROWN FAT. Their relative distributions vary in different species with most adipose tissue being white.HornsBody Size: The physical measurements of a body.DNA, Mitochondrial: Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Parasitic Diseases, Animal: Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.DairyingNematode Infections: Infections by nematodes, general or unspecified.Abomasum: The fourth stomach of ruminating animals. It is also called the "true" stomach. It is an elongated pear-shaped sac lying on the floor of the abdomen, on the right-hand side, and roughly between the seventh and twelfth ribs. It leads to the beginning of the small intestine. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Estrus: The period in the ESTROUS CYCLE associated with maximum sexual receptivity and fertility in non-primate female mammals.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Sex Characteristics: Those characteristics that distinguish one SEX from the other. The primary sex characteristics are the OVARIES and TESTES and their related hormones. Secondary sex characteristics are those which are masculine or feminine but not directly related to reproduction.Buffaloes: Ruminants of the family Bovidae consisting of Bubalus arnee and Syncerus caffer. This concept is differentiated from BISON, which refers to Bison bison and Bison bonasus.Horse Diseases: Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.Food Technology: The application of knowledge to the food industry.Wolves: Any of several large carnivorous mammals of the family CANIDAE that usually hunt in packs.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Hair: A filament-like structure consisting of a shaft which projects to the surface of the SKIN from a root which is softer than the shaft and lodges in the cavity of a HAIR FOLLICLE. It is found on most surfaces of the body.Animals, Suckling: Young, unweaned mammals. Refers to nursing animals whether nourished by their biological mother, foster mother, or bottle fed.Linkage Disequilibrium: Nonrandom association of linked genes. This is the tendency of the alleles of two separate but already linked loci to be found together more frequently than would be expected by chance alone.Lymph: The interstitial fluid that is in the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.PrPSc Proteins: Abnormal isoform of prion proteins (PRIONS) resulting from a posttranslational modification of the cellular prion protein (PRPC PROTEINS). PrPSc are disease-specific proteins seen in certain human and animal neurodegenerative diseases (PRION DISEASES).Zeranol: A non-steroidal estrogen analog.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Food Quality: Ratings of the characteristics of food including flavor, appearance, nutritional content, and the amount of microbial and chemical contamination.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.SicilyHip Dysplasia, Canine: A hereditary disease of the hip joints in dogs. Signs of the disease may be evident any time after 4 weeks of age.Ruminants: A suborder of the order ARTIODACTYLA whose members have the distinguishing feature of a four-chambered stomach, including the capacious RUMEN. Horns or antlers are usually present, at least in males.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Plant Poisoning: Poisoning by the ingestion of plants or its leaves, berries, roots or stalks. The manifestations in both humans and animals vary in severity from mild to life threatening. In animals, especially domestic animals, it is usually the result of ingesting moldy or fermented forage.Omasum: The third stomach of ruminants, situated on the right side of the abdomen at a higher level than the fourth stomach and between this latter and the second stomach, with both of which it communicates. From its inner surface project large numbers of leaves or folia, each of which possesses roughened surfaces. In the center of each folium is a band of muscle fibers which produces a rasping movement of the leaf when it contracts. One leaf rubs against those on either side of it, and large particles of food material are ground down between the rough surfaces, preparatory to further digestion in the succeeding parts of the alimentary canal. (Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Encephalopathy, Bovine Spongiform: A transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle associated with abnormal prion proteins in the brain. Affected animals develop excitability and salivation followed by ATAXIA. This disorder has been associated with consumption of SCRAPIE infected ruminant derived protein. This condition may be transmitted to humans, where it is referred to as variant or new variant CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB SYNDROME. (Vet Rec 1998 Jul 25;143(41):101-5)History, Modern 1601-: The period of history from 1601 of the common era to the present.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Stomach, RuminantFoot Rot: A disease of the horny parts and of the adjacent soft structures of the feet of cattle, swine, and sheep. It is usually caused by Corynebacterium pyogenes or Bacteroides nodosus (see DICHELOBACTER NODOSUS). It is also known as interdigital necrobacillosis. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 18th ed)Myostatin: A growth differentiation factor that is a potent inhibitor of SKELETAL MUSCLE growth. It may play a role in the regulation of MYOGENESIS and in muscle maintenance during adulthood.Bluetongue: A reovirus infection, chiefly of sheep, characterized by a swollen blue tongue, catarrhal inflammation of upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, and often by inflammation of sensitive laminae of the feet and coronet.
  • Breeders ultimately want a healthy and capable set of sheep to breed. (pioneerthinking.com)
  • You can find Shetland Sheep Dog puppies priced from $400 USD to $2500 USD with one of our credible breeders. (puppyfind.com)
  • Take advantage of our PuppySearch or leisurely browse our directory of hundreds of dog breeds, Shetland Sheep Dog dog breeders, Shetland Sheep Dog dogs for adoption, and Shetland Sheep Dog puppy for sale listings with photos and detailed descriptions. (puppyfind.com)
  • Many Shetland Sheep Dog dog breeders with puppies for sale also offer a health guarantee. (puppyfind.com)
  • With thousands of Shetland Sheep Dog puppies for sale and hundreds of Shetland Sheep Dog dog breeders, you're sure to find the perfect Shetland Sheep Dog puppy. (puppyfind.com)
  • The breeders in the area used the local horned black-faced sheep and crossed them with a few breeds of white-faced sheep ( Southdown , Cotswold , and Leicester ). (wikipedia.org)
  • The popularity of the Shropshire breed grew rapidly in England, and in 1882 Shropshire breeders founded the Shropshire Sheep Breeders' Association and Flock Book Society, the world's first such society for sheep. (wikipedia.org)
  • The same year the Society published the first Flock Book, a record of sheep bred and their breeders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Breeders in Texas crossed the Barbados Blackbelly (a polled breed) and Rambouilette to start with but the resulting hybrids had poor quality horns which often interfered with the animal's ability to feed and/or see. (infobarrel.com)
  • Like the Caliornia Red, American Blackbellys are aseasonal breeders which means they can breed all year round. (infobarrel.com)
  • These sheep went mainly to breeders in Ontario and Quebec. (infobarrel.com)
  • Breeders will explain in their presentations the characteristics of the breed, advantages and disadvantages of the breed, and other pertinent information. (sheepandwool.org)
  • This move signifies that the Tunis registry has outgrown its physical offices, previously based in the homes of Tunis breeders, but is also the fastest-growing sheep breed. (farmanddairy.com)
  • Expert forecasts predict that this number will continue to climb in future years and exhibits the dedication of Tunis breeders to the longevity of the breed. (farmanddairy.com)
  • However, due to the diligence and dedication of Tunis breeders, the Tunis sheep breed has moved up on the conservation priority list to "watch" status. (farmanddairy.com)
  • According to Don Schrider, communication director of American Livestock Breeds Conservancy, "This move reflects the excellent job Tunis breeders are doing to promote this American treasure. (farmanddairy.com)
  • Since moving its National Tunis Sale from the northeast to Wooster, Ohio, in 2003, the registry has seen growth in the number of Tunis breeders selling and buying Tunis sheep from Ohio westward. (farmanddairy.com)
  • To help young sheep breeders interested in purchasing Tunis sheep, there will be a free drawing for more than $300 in sale credits for a youth and new breeders that go toward purchases at the Tunis sale. (farmanddairy.com)
  • The August show will not only be for established Tunis breeders from across the country, but the Indiana State Fair will offer a 4-H Tunis market lamb class and a breed class for Indiana 4-H members. (farmanddairy.com)
  • Though their ancestors hailed from the former emirate of Bokhara, a land located in present-day Turkmenistan and Afghanistan, early breeders tweaked the sheep breed's genetics, making today's American Karakul unique among the world's fat-tailed sheep breeds. (hobbyfarms.com)
  • Importations by other breeders in the U.S. and in Canada continued through 1929, but the number of sheep imported was relatively few. (hobbyfarms.com)
  • Breeders and judges should at all times be careful to avoid obvious conditions or exaggerations which would be detrimental in any way to the health, welfare or soundness of this breed. (thekennelclub.org.uk)
  • From time to time certain conditions or exaggerations may be considered to have the potential to affect dogs in some breeds adversely, and judges and breeders are requested to refer to the Breed Watch section of the Kennel Club website here http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/services/public/breed/watch for details of any such current issues. (thekennelclub.org.uk)
  • I. INTRODUCTION Various breeding plans are available to animal breeders, and the choice of a plan is influenced by many factors, including the type of animal and the particular aspect of its performance in which the breeder is interested. (livestocklibrary.com.au)
  • The experiment was carried out by collaboration of Center for Integrative Genetics (CIGENE), Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences (IHA), University of Life Sciences (UMB) and The Norwegian Association of Sheep and Goat Breeders (NSG). (bibsys.no)
  • This breed is well-known for its ability to herd sheep and control livestock with its intense gaze (also known as "eye") and stalking-like movements. (thriftyfun.com)
  • Breeds of Livestock. (wikipedia.org)
  • The breed is listed as "threatened" on the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy's conservation priority list, having fewer than 1,000 annual registrations and an estimated global population less than 5,000. (hobbyfarms.com)
  • In the May issue, we covered the factors involved in nurturing sheep and keeping the livestock in excellent condition. (farmingmagazine.com)
  • Dot Perkins of the University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension, a Field Specialist in Livestock and lifelong resident and small farmer in the region, talks about the basics of breeding and birthing sheep. (farmingmagazine.com)
  • It was concluded that native sheep had a possible for the versatile role to generate income for livestock keepers. (springer.com)
  • Generally, the current state of knowledge on the characterization of farm animal generic resources in Ethiopia shows that there is still lack of information about the production characters of local breeds managed in their native production system [ 4 ] although the country is widely known to possess a large population of livestock with enormous diversity. (springer.com)
  • Sheep can be frequently transported throughout their lives and are often sold via livestock markets. (rspca.org.uk)
  • While Andrew Jackson would not have had this particular breed, he did have livestock on The Hermitage. (hmdb.org)
  • Part of having a good livestock produce is by keeping your sheep healthy and well fed. (pioneerthinking.com)
  • It requires extensive, hands-on experience and high attention to detail, as well as, superior lamb caring ethics to learn exactly how to appraise a ewe or ram for breeding. (pioneerthinking.com)
  • To expand the sheep breed and produce lamb pelts for the trade, imported Karakuls were crossed with sheep of other breeds. (hobbyfarms.com)
  • Sheep that breed out of season are best if you want to sell lamb for the Easter market. (grit.com)
  • Even the song, "Mary had a little lamb" shows how a baby sheep can connect with humans. (interestinganimals.net)
  • Romney Salt Marsh Lamb is produced by traditional grazing of the Romney breed on the salt marshes of Romney in Kent. (slowfood.org.uk)
  • She now sells the larger modern southdowns to prime lamb producers, while breeding the babydolls more for the pet market. (abc.net.au)
  • According to the Eblex/NFU report Vision for British Lamb Production , sheep producers can boost productivity and deliver greater economic, environmental and social benefits. (fwi.co.uk)
  • Average litter size is one. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later chapters consider the control of postpartum ovarian activity, seasonal breeding, multiple births and litter size, pregnancy testing, parturition, and the onset of puberty. (pighealth.com)
  • However, at present there are conflicting data regarding seasonality in oestrus (and litter size) in domestic dogs. (bmj.com)
  • The primary objective of this study was to investigate seasonal variations in oestrus and litter size in a large assistance dog breeding colony in the UK in order to optimise colony management. (bmj.com)
  • The authors also evaluated the relationship between month and litter size for 1609 litters observed during the same period. (bmj.com)
  • There was no evidence of regular seasonal variations in oestrus or litter size by meteorological season or month. (bmj.com)
  • The authors' findings suggest that special consideration of the annual distribution of oestrus and litter size is unnecessary for the management of assistance dog breeding colonies similar to those in the UK. (bmj.com)
  • Knowledge of seasonality in oestrus and litter size of bitches in assistance dog breeding colonies may support colony management through the efficient allocation throughout the year of resources required for the breeding programme. (bmj.com)
  • This breed is mainly kept for the meat production, and litter size is therefore a trait of large economic value. (bibsys.no)
  • Handling of c.1111A allele in NWS will significantly influence the future litter size in this population. (bibsys.no)
  • WOOSTER, Ohio - In Wooster, a producer of Katahdin sheep is working with producers from two other states on the heritability of parasite resistance. (farmanddairy.com)
  • The Bieleks, along with a group of 10 Katahdin producers, submitted a proposal to the North Central Region Sustainable Research and Education Program's Farmer Rancher Grant Program in 2005 and were awarded $17,950 for their project, Selecting Sheep for Parasite Resistance. (farmanddairy.com)
  • In their current project, David Coplen of Birch Cove Farm in Missouri, Donna Stoneback of Wade Jean Farm in Pennsylvania, and the Bieleks are raising registered Katahdin hair sheep. (farmanddairy.com)
  • Data collected on 10 farms as part of the initial Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education grant was submitted to David Notter, professor of animal science at Virginia Tech and head of the National Sheep Improvement Program, for analysis and for use in his work on developing a fecal egg count measure of expected progeny differences in Katahdin sheep. (farmanddairy.com)
  • Notter reported a fairly high heritability for resistance to parasites in the Katahdin breed. (farmanddairy.com)
  • If you don't want fleece and the associated work and cost of shearing, consider a hair sheep such as Dorper, Katahdin or Barbados Blackbelly. (grit.com)
  • The hair-type breeds of Katahdin, Dorper, Barbados Blackbelly, and St. Croix are used in some systems. (georgiaencyclopedia.org)
  • The sheep herding dogs featured in the children's movie, "Babe," were Border Collies. (thriftyfun.com)
  • The breed became known in the West when Commodore Matthew Perry returned from Japan in 1853 with several dogs that had been presented to him. (britannica.com)
  • While black and tan is the most common colour, at the end of the 19th century there were also grey and totally black, and even wholly tan Beauce Sheep Dogs. (royalcanin.com)
  • Beauce Sheep Dogs are big, solidly built, powerful and muscular, but not at all lardy. (royalcanin.com)
  • As part of the group of herding dogs, German Shepherds are work dogs originally developed for guarding sheep and herding. (hubpages.com)
  • At one point, this breed was almost exclusively selected to be utilized as guiding dogs for people impaired visually. (hubpages.com)
  • For this reason, this is the perfect breed for search and rescue dogs, guard dogs and police dos as it takes them less time to interpret instructions and learn many different tasks compared to almost every other large breed. (hubpages.com)
  • Some breeds tend to flock and can be herded easily by dogs, whereas others (often the best foragers) disperse over the land. (grit.com)
  • Basing on conducted analysis it was determined that in hair coat of collie breed dogs fluff hair were predominant (about 75%) that influenced its high spinning properties. (ebscohost.com)
  • Most of Eddie's clients are dogs, which come in more or less standard sizes because of AKC breeding specifications. (telegram.com)
  • Neighborhood and wild dogs as well as coyotes are the most prevalent predators of sheep in Georgia. (georgiaencyclopedia.org)
  • This breed has a tendency to be oblivious of its small size, and they will not hesitate to attack strange dogs that are much larger than they are. (greatdogsite.com)
  • Some dogs of this breed gets like a whistler when they breathe. (greatdogsite.com)
  • Evidence of seasonality in oestrus in bitches within specialist breeding programmes, such as those for assistance dogs, may support colony management through tailoring the distribution of resources required for breeding throughout the year. (bmj.com)
  • The lack of seasonality in oestrus may be a function of dogs in the UK, particularly valuable breeding bitches, being exposed to fairly constant environmental conditions throughout the year as a consequence of artificial light and heating during the winter months. (bmj.com)
  • 2-5 This may reflect the diversity of the study populations, which include free-roaming, predominately mixed breed dogs in less developed communities, and purebreed or first crossbreed pet and laboratory dogs in developed communities. (bmj.com)
  • Guard dog breed are special dogs that are used to protect people and belongings from dangers. (amazonaws.com)
  • Cataracts describes the transparency of the lens in the eye.While cataracts are a common finding in older dogs, many breeds, including Cavaliers, have a genetic predisposition to juvenile cataracts, i.e., occurring in young animals. (gopetplan.com)
  • Morey considers pedomorphosis in dogs a byproduct of natural selection for earlier sexual maturity and smaller body size, features that, according to evolutionary theory, ought to increase the fitness of animals engaged in colonizing a new ecological niche. (freerepublic.com)
  • Although dogs strongly resembling Bearded Collies are depicted in art dating from the eighteenth century, hard evidence of the breed cannot be found until the early nineteenth century, when the first breed description was published. (petfinder.com)
  • In a process generally thought to span at least 14,000 years, humans have domesticated the dog, produced innumerable breeds, and bred and trained them to perform a great variety of useful services and sometimes dubious actions, including as guard dogs trained to instill fear in people and as sports dogs taught to fight other dogs to the death. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • After nearly 46 years of raising and caring for as many as 300 sheep on 80 acres with just the help of her dogs for most of those years, Lea is selling her last remaining flock. (goodfoodworld.com)
  • A "sound" sheep is one in good, overall physical condition and mostly free of physical or genetic defects. (pioneerthinking.com)
  • Alleles of the DRB1 exon 2 locus of the major histocompatibility complex have recently been associated with genetic resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep. (teagasc.ie)
  • Although existing genetic studies have already identified numerous sheep fecundity genes, the underlying genetic mechanism(s) remain largely undefined. (frontiersin.org)
  • By cross-breeding, cross-fostering newborns, and even transferring embryos between foxes of different behavior, they determined that about 35 percent of the foxes' defense response was attributable to genetic factors. (creation.com)
  • Study - breeds of genetic interest that lack definition, genetic or historical documentation. (grit.com)
  • Breeding and genetic technology research workers will also find the book to be full of very helpful advice, information and key research literature references. (pighealth.com)
  • Genetic distances between breed pairs were evaluated using Nei's genetic distance. (frontiersin.org)
  • Breeding Plans for Sheep - Past and Possible Progress By HELEN NEWTON TURNER* SUMMARY THIS paper outlines the general structure of the Merino industry in Australia, and reviews its influence on plans for genetic improvement. (livestocklibrary.com.au)
  • The size of a flock has a direct bearing on the type of breeding plan which might be considered, and on the amount of genetic progress which might be made. (livestocklibrary.com.au)
  • However, recent genetic studies question the validity of some of these subspecies and suggest a need to re-evaluate overall bighorn sheep taxonomy. (fws.gov)
  • By 1920, when Professor Charles S. Plumb updated his classic textbook, Types and Breeds of Farm Animals , flocks were well-established in Canada (Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Alberta for a total of about 600 head) as well as Texas, New Mexico, Kansas, Colorado, Maryland and New York. (hobbyfarms.com)
  • People have been keeping flocks of sheep for as long as history has been written down - longer actually. (grit.com)
  • But Ms Nolan wanted something closer to the ground to run in her olive groves as part of an integrated farming system, and after a lengthy search she found a few remnant flocks of the original-sized southdowns, which are now known as babydolls. (abc.net.au)
  • The breed's adaptability to most environments and their dual-purpose nature led to them quickly becoming a popular breed. (wikipedia.org)
  • It should include origin of the breed, the breed's primary purpose, and other information of interest to the general public. (sheepandwool.org)
  • The National Tunis Sheep Registry, Inc. sponsors shows and sales across the United States that help maintain the integrity of Tunis sheep bloodlines, furthering the breed's longevity. (farmanddairy.com)
  • While the Pomeranian has since been bred down in size, the breed's ancestors weighed up to thirty pounds. (greatdogsite.com)
  • Sheep that are alert, bright, and social exhibit healthy behavior. (pioneerthinking.com)
  • In this breeding experiment silver foxes ( Vulpes vulpes ) 1 were selected solely on their behavior towards humans. (creation.com)
  • Through continued selective breeding, this behavior has become characteristic of the entire domesticated fox population. (creation.com)
  • In a wide range of mammals - herbivores and predators, large and small - domestication seems to have brought with it strikingly similar changes in appearance and behavior: changes in size, changes in coat color, even changes in the animals' reproductive cycles. (freerepublic.com)
  • Six DRB1 exon 2 alleles were identified by sequence-based typing in Suffolk (n = 31) and eight in Texel (n = 60) sheep. (teagasc.ie)
  • However, the Genescan™ method of allele identification cannot be used for Suffolk × Texel crossbred progeny or in other breeds where the relationship between STR size and DRB1 exon 2 allele is not known. (teagasc.ie)
  • The foxes were evaluated based on their responses and only the tamest were bred to develop a population of domesticated foxes. (creation.com)
  • In addition to the population of foxes bred for tameness, they maintained a separate population bred for aggressiveness. (creation.com)
  • In the tenth generation comparisons began of blood cortisol levels between domesticated foxes and their farm-bred counterparts. (creation.com)
  • In generation 45 both the basal and stress-induced blood cortisol levels were three to five-fold lower in the domesticated foxes than in farm-bred foxes. (creation.com)
  • Foxes bred for tameability in a 40-year experiment exhibit remarkable transformations that suggest an interplay between behavioral genetics and development. (freerepublic.com)
  • Sheep with opposite features are less likely to be good producers. (pioneerthinking.com)
  • In 2007, they applied for another grant to continue their work with three producers from three states, and were awarded a subsequent grant from the Farmer Rancher Grant Program for $14,215 for their project, Building on Parasite Resistance Selection in Sheep. (farmanddairy.com)
  • There have been such large requests from the western United States for Tunis breeding sheep that Eastern producers are having trouble filling the orders. (farmanddairy.com)
  • Sheep producers have tremendous scope to improve productivity and profitability, says Adas sheep consultant Kate Phillips. (fwi.co.uk)
  • But rather than buy breeding stock at market, producers should see the chain as an extension of their farm, and build a relationship with suppliers and customers. (fwi.co.uk)
  • Coat colors for this breed include black and tan, brindle, parti-color, and a number of other shades. (greatdogsite.com)
  • Two strains, the Border strain, which was brown and white with a slightly wavy coat, and the Highland strain, which had a gray and white coat, have since been interbred and merged into one breed. (petfinder.com)
  • They are hairy sheep, as a woolly coat would be a disadvantage in the African climate. (banhamzoo.co.uk)
  • The Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep, with its iconic curling horns that adorn many a sportsman's rec-room, is starting to show the effects of generations of trophy hunting, a new study finds. (cbc.ca)
  • The Afrikaner is one of the oldest breeds with a medium-frame, yellow to red colored with lateral horns with a typical twist. (frontiersin.org)
  • Social rank depends on the presence and size of horns, body mass, and height at the withers and hocks. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • This bulletin gives concise information regarding the breeds of light horses and will be of particular usefulness to the farmer in those sections where light horses are preeminently fitted for his work, such as mountainous and hilly sections and where there are markets for horses for saddle and driving purposes. (unt.edu)
  • Same for domesticated ducks, domesticated geese, domesticated horses - when you get bred for gentleness, for human uses, apparently you get stupider. (nhpr.org)
  • Shetland Sheep Dog Puppies for Sale - Shipped Worldwide! (puppyfind.com)
  • Finding the right Shetland Sheep Dog puppy can be dog gone hard work. (puppyfind.com)
  • PuppyFind® provides a convenient and efficient means of selecting and purchasing the perfect Shetland Sheep Dog puppy (or Shetland Sheep Dog puppies) from the comfort of your home, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. (puppyfind.com)
  • Some Shetland Sheep Dog puppies for sale may be shipped Worldwide and include crate and veterinarian checkup. (puppyfind.com)
  • Take a gander at Sycamore Farms' flock of Shetland sheep during year-round tours. (mountainx.com)
  • Shetland sheep graze in the shadow of the Blue Ridge Mountains at Sycamore Farms. (mountainx.com)
  • It is of the North European Short Tailed type, related to such breeds as the Finnsheep, Romanov, Shetland, Spelsau sheep and the Swedish Landrace, all of which are descendants of this type of sheep which was predominate in Scandinavia and the British Isles during 8th and 9th century. (nat.is)
  • While sequence-based typing is the standard method for allele discrimination, a rapid, high throughput method for DRB1 exon 2 genotyping is required if such information is to be incorporated into national breeding programmes. (teagasc.ie)
  • Today, this hardy breed makes up a good chunk of Britain's sheep population, although it remains a minor breed in the United States. (hobbyfarms.com)
  • The hardy environment conditions cause the sheep to produce extra fat which marbles the meat, adding to the flavour and making it moist. (slowfood.org.uk)
  • A hardy breed, they are naturally polled (hornless) and are distinguished by their thick heavy coats and white belt banding their middle. (hmdb.org)