Blalock-Taussig Procedure: A cardiovascular procedure performed to create a blood supply to the PULMONARY CIRCULATION. It involves making a connection between the subclavian, or carotid branch of the AORTA, or the AORTIC ARCH to the PULMONARY ARTERY.Fontan Procedure: A procedure in which total right atrial or total caval blood flow is channeled directly into the pulmonary artery or into a small right ventricle that serves only as a conduit. The principal congenital malformations for which this operation is useful are TRICUSPID ATRESIA and single ventricle with pulmonary stenosis.Norwood Procedures: A set of surgical procedures performed to establish sufficient outflow to the systemic circulation in individuals with univentricular congenital heart malformations, such as HYPOPLASTIC LEFT HEART SYNDROME, and MITRAL VALVE atresia, associated with systemic outflow obstruction. Follow-on surgeries may be performed and consist of a HEMI-FONTAN PROCEDURE as the stage 2 Norwood procedure and a FONTAN PROCEDURE as the stage 3 Norwood procedure.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Heart Bypass, Right: Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance to the right atrium directly to the pulmonary arteries, avoiding the right atrium and right ventricle (Dorland, 28th ed). This a permanent procedure often performed to bypass a congenitally deformed right atrium or right ventricle.Heterotaxy Syndrome: Abnormal thoracoabdominal VISCERA arrangement (visceral heterotaxy) or malformation that involves additional CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS (e.g., heart isomerism; DEXTROCARDIA) and/or abnormal SPLEEN (e.g., asplenia and polysplenia). Irregularities with the central nervous system, the skeleton and urinary tract are often associated with the syndrome.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Tricuspid Atresia: Absence of the orifice between the RIGHT ATRIUM and RIGHT VENTRICLE, with the presence of an atrial defect through which all the systemic venous return reaches the left heart. As a result, there is left ventricular hypertrophy (HYPERTROPHY, LEFT VENTRICULAR) because the right ventricle is absent or not functional.Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome: A condition caused by underdevelopment of the whole left half of the heart. It is characterized by hypoplasia of the left cardiac chambers (HEART ATRIUM; HEART VENTRICLE), the AORTA, the AORTIC VALVE, and the MITRAL VALVE. Severe symptoms appear in early infancy when DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS closes.Ventricular Function: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART VENTRICLES.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Pulmonary Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.Cerebral Ventricles: Four CSF-filled (see CEREBROSPINAL FLUID) cavities within the cerebral hemispheres (LATERAL VENTRICLES), in the midline (THIRD VENTRICLE) and within the PONS and MEDULLA OBLONGATA (FOURTH VENTRICLE).Abnormalities, MultipleCardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Vena Cava, Superior: The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest.Third Ventricle: A narrow cleft inferior to the CORPUS CALLOSUM, within the DIENCEPHALON, between the paired thalami. Its floor is formed by the HYPOTHALAMUS, its anterior wall by the lamina terminalis, and its roof by EPENDYMA. It communicates with the FOURTH VENTRICLE by the CEREBRAL AQUEDUCT, and with the LATERAL VENTRICLES by the interventricular foramina.Fourth Ventricle: An irregularly shaped cavity in the RHOMBENCEPHALON, located between the MEDULLA OBLONGATA; the PONS; and the isthmus in front, and the CEREBELLUM behind. It is continuous with the central canal of the cord below and with the CEREBRAL AQUEDUCT above, and through its lateral and median apertures it communicates with the SUBARACHNOID SPACE.North AmericaHemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Lateral Ventricles: Cavity in each of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES derived from the cavity of the embryonic NEURAL TUBE. They are separated from each other by the SEPTUM PELLUCIDUM, and each communicates with the THIRD VENTRICLE by the foramen of Monro, through which also the choroid plexuses (CHOROID PLEXUS) of the lateral ventricles become continuous with that of the third ventricle.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Cerebral Ventricle Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the brain ventricles, including the two lateral, the third, and the fourth ventricle. Ventricular tumors may be primary (e.g., CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS and GLIOMA, SUBEPENDYMAL), metastasize from distant organs, or occur as extensions of locally invasive tumors from adjacent brain structures.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Myocardium: The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Myocardial Contraction: Contractile activity of the MYOCARDIUM.Ventricular Function, Right: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the right HEART VENTRICLE.Double Outlet Right Ventricle: Incomplete transposition of the great vessels in which both the AORTA and the PULMONARY ARTERY arise from the RIGHT VENTRICLE. The only outlet of the LEFT VENTRICLE is a large ventricular septal defect (VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECTS or VSD). The various subtypes are classified by the location of the septal defect, such as subaortic, subpulmonary, or noncommitted.Hydrocephalus: Excessive accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid within the cranium which may be associated with dilation of cerebral ventricles, INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; HEADACHE; lethargy; URINARY INCONTINENCE; and ATAXIA.Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Cerebral Ventriculography: Radiography of the ventricular system of the brain after injection of air or other contrast medium directly into the cerebral ventricles. It is used also for x-ray computed tomography of the cerebral ventricles.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Ventricular Function, Left: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.Endocardium: The innermost layer of the heart, comprised of endothelial cells.Injections, Intraventricular: Injections into the cerebral ventricles.Ventricular Dysfunction, Right: A condition in which the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION, and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the right ventricular wall.Ependyma: A thin membrane that lines the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES and the central canal of the SPINAL CORD.Pericardium: A conical fibro-serous sac surrounding the HEART and the roots of the great vessels (AORTA; VENAE CAVAE; PULMONARY ARTERY). Pericardium consists of two sacs: the outer fibrous pericardium and the inner serous pericardium. The latter consists of an outer parietal layer facing the fibrous pericardium, and an inner visceral layer (epicardium) resting next to the heart, and a pericardial cavity between these two layers.Transposition of Great Vessels: A congenital cardiovascular malformation in which the AORTA arises entirely from the RIGHT VENTRICLE, and the PULMONARY ARTERY arises from the LEFT VENTRICLE. Consequently, the pulmonary and the systemic circulations are parallel and not sequential, so that the venous return from the peripheral circulation is re-circulated by the right ventricle via aorta to the systemic circulation without being oxygenated in the lungs. This is a potentially lethal form of heart disease in newborns and infants.Heart Septum: This structure includes the thin muscular atrial septum between the two HEART ATRIA, and the thick muscular ventricular septum between the two HEART VENTRICLES.Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular: Enlargement of the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is often attributed to PULMONARY HYPERTENSION and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Heart Septal Defects, Ventricular: Developmental abnormalities in any portion of the VENTRICULAR SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communications between the two lower chambers of the heart. Classification of ventricular septal defects is based on location of the communication, such as perimembranous, inlet, outlet (infundibular), central muscular, marginal muscular, or apical muscular defect.Cardiomegaly: Enlargement of the HEART, usually indicated by a cardiothoracic ratio above 0.50. Heart enlargement may involve the right, the left, or both HEART VENTRICLES or HEART ATRIA. Cardiomegaly is a nonspecific symptom seen in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HEART FAILURE) or several forms of CARDIOMYOPATHIES.Fetal Heart: The heart of the fetus of any viviparous animal. It refers to the heart in the postembryonic period and is differentiated from the embryonic heart (HEART/embryology) only on the basis of time.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Ventricular Dysfunction, Left: A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.Diastole: Post-systolic relaxation of the HEART, especially the HEART VENTRICLES.Ventricular Remodeling: The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Angiocardiography: Radiography of the heart and great vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Systole: Period of contraction of the HEART, especially of the HEART VENTRICLES.Cardiac Volume: The volume of the HEART, usually relating to the volume of BLOOD contained within it at various periods of the cardiac cycle. The amount of blood ejected from a ventricle at each beat is STROKE VOLUME.Ventricular Pressure: The pressure within a CARDIAC VENTRICLE. Ventricular pressure waveforms can be measured in the beating heart by catheterization or estimated using imaging techniques (e.g., DOPPLER ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY). The information is useful in evaluating the function of the MYOCARDIUM; CARDIAC VALVES; and PERICARDIUM, particularly with simultaneous measurement of other (e.g., aortic or atrial) pressures.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Cardiomyopathies: A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular: Enlargement of the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is attributed to sustained abnormal pressure or volume loads and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Ventriculostomy: Surgical creation of an opening in a cerebral ventricle.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Cardiomyopathy, Dilated: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.Choroid Plexus: A villous structure of tangled masses of BLOOD VESSELS contained within the third, lateral, and fourth ventricles of the BRAIN. It regulates part of the production and composition of CEREBROSPINAL FLUID.Papillary Muscles: Conical muscular projections from the walls of the cardiac ventricles, attached to the cusps of the atrioventricular valves by the chordae tendineae.Myocytes, Cardiac: Striated muscle cells found in the heart. They are derived from cardiac myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, CARDIAC).Heart Aneurysm: A localized bulging or dilatation in the muscle wall of a heart (MYOCARDIUM), usually in the LEFT VENTRICLE. Blood-filled aneurysms are dangerous because they may burst. Fibrous aneurysms interfere with the heart function through the loss of contractility. True aneurysm is bound by the vessel wall or cardiac wall. False aneurysms are HEMATOMA caused by myocardial rupture.Fistula: Abnormal communication most commonly seen between two internal organs, or between an internal organ and the surface of the body.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Atrial Function: The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the HEART ATRIA.Tricuspid Valve: The valve consisting of three cusps situated between the right atrium and right ventricle of the heart.Coronary Circulation: The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.Echocardiography, Doppler: Measurement of intracardiac blood flow using an M-mode and/or two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiogram while simultaneously recording the spectrum of the audible Doppler signal (e.g., velocity, direction, amplitude, intensity, timing) reflected from the moving column of red blood cells.Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt: Surgical creation of a communication between a cerebral ventricle and the peritoneum by means of a plastic tube to permit drainage of cerebrospinal fluid for relief of hydrocephalus. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Ventricular Septum: The muscular structure separating the right and the left lower chambers (HEART VENTRICLES) of the heart. The ventricular septum consists of a very small membranous portion just beneath the AORTIC VALVE, and a large thick muscular portion consisting of three sections including the inlet septum, the trabecular septum, and the outlet septum.Cerebral Aqueduct: Narrow channel in the MESENCEPHALON that connects the third and fourth CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Tetralogy of Fallot: A combination of congenital heart defects consisting of four key features including VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECTS; PULMONARY STENOSIS; RIGHT VENTRICULAR HYPERTROPHY; and a dextro-positioned AORTA. In this condition, blood from both ventricles (oxygen-rich and oxygen-poor) is pumped into the body often causing CYANOSIS.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Cerebrospinal Fluid: A watery fluid that is continuously produced in the CHOROID PLEXUS and circulates around the surface of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and in the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Ventricular Fibrillation: A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in HEART VENTRICLES. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (SYNCOPE). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with CARDIAC ARREST.Heart Neoplasms: Tumors in any part of the heart. They include primary cardiac tumors and metastatic tumors to the heart. Their interference with normal cardiac functions can cause a wide variety of symptoms including HEART FAILURE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; or EMBOLISM.Ventricular Dysfunction: A condition in which HEART VENTRICLES exhibit impaired function.Pulmonary Valve Stenosis: The pathologic narrowing of the orifice of the PULMONARY VALVE. This lesion restricts blood outflow from the RIGHT VENTRICLE to the PULMONARY ARTERY. When the trileaflet valve is fused into an imperforate membrane, the blockage is complete.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Mitral Valve: The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.Cisterna Magna: One of three principal openings in the SUBARACHNOID SPACE. They are also known as cerebellomedullary cistern, and collectively as cisterns.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Hypertension, Pulmonary: Increased VASCULAR RESISTANCE in the PULMONARY CIRCULATION, usually secondary to HEART DISEASES or LUNG DISEASES.Echocardiography, Doppler, Color: Echocardiography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image.
This is what defines HLHS as a "single ventricle" defect. There is no known cause in the majority of HLHS cases. Some cases may ... Overall, it is estimated to make up 2-3% of all cases of congenital heart disease, and is the most common single-ventricle ... In this procedure, the right ventricle is used to pump blood into the systemic circulation. Since the right ventricle is no ... This should eliminate any mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood in the right ventricle. The right ventricle performs the ...
The ventricle is 0.42 mm in juvenile animal length of 2.0 mm. The ventricle grows to the size 6 mm in adults. There is a single ... The digestive tract is short and consist of a single loop. The rectum does not penetrate the heart. The radula consist of 1.4% ... The respiratory system consist of single left bipectinate ctenidium (gill). The circulatory system is hypertrophied: heart is ...
The single ventricle is doing nearly twice the expected amount of work because it has to pump blood for the body and lungs. ... The Fontan procedure is used in pediatric patients who possess only a single functional ventricle, either due to lack of a ... Jack Rychik, head of the Single Ventricle Survivorship Program at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia summarized the long-term ... ISBN 0-7216-9556-6. Overview of single ventricle lesions from Cincinnati Children's Heart Center The Pediatric Heart Network ...
They have a heart that consists of a single ventricle and two atria. When the ventricle starts contracting, deoxygenated blood ... This vibrates and sound is transmitted through a single bone, the stapes, to the inner ear. Only high-frequency sounds like ... The third suborder, Sirenoidea, contains the four species of sirens, which are in a single family, Sirenidae. Members of this ... and is spread around the body and back to the heart in a single loop. In the adult stage, amphibians (especially frogs) lose ...
"Arginine vasopressin to manage hypoxemic infants after stage I palliation of single ventricle lesions". Pediatric Critical Care ...
This is known as single cycle circulation. The heart of fish is therefore only a single pump (consisting of two chambers). Fish ... The atrium serves as a one-way antechamber, sends blood to the third part, ventricle. The ventricle is another thick-walled, ... The heart pumps the blood in a single loop throughout the body. In most fish, the heart consists of four parts, including two ... This short length is achieved by the spiral valve with multiple turns within a single short section instead of a long tube-like ...
The atrium serves as a one-way antechamber, sends blood to the third part, ventricle. The ventricle is another thick-walled, ... A single, undescribed species of Phreatobius, has been called a true "land fish" as this worm-like catfish strictly lives among ... Thus a pond that contained a single species might be said to contain 120 fish. But if the pond contained a total of 120 fish ... The heart pumps the blood in a single loop throughout the body. In most fish, the heart consists of four parts, including two ...
... from the apex of the heart to the outflow of the ventricles), and so the ventricles fail to pump blood around the body - ... They were both able to show that, if a ring of excitable tissue was stimulated at a single point, the subsequent waves of ... The ventricles are then being stimulated by more than one pacemaker. Scar and dying tissue is inexcitable, but around these ... Garrey cut out a similar ring from the turtle ventricle. ... the ventricles become dilated with blood as the rapid quivering ...
Single-ventricle palliation for high-risk neonates: the emergence of an alternative hybrid stage I strategy. The Journal of ... such as double-outlet right ventricle, or transposition of the great arteries, acute turns or kinks in the pulmonary arteries ... so that combining interventions and surgery into a single therapeutic procedure potentially leads to reduction of complexity, ...
... at the ventricle's midpoint), and h = thickness of the ventricle. This calculation is based on the Law of Laplace which states ... However, the relationship is not simple because of the restriction of the term preload to single myocytes. Preload can still be ... In cardiac physiology, preload is the end diastolic volume that stretches the right or left ventricle of the heart to its ... Estimation may be inaccurate, for example in a chronically dilated ventricle new sarcomeres may have formed in the heart muscle ...
The Fontan procedure routes blood through the patient's single ventricle, to the lungs, and into systemic circulation. This ... Abnormal looping of the ventricles contributes to arrhythmia and heart block in fetuses. Isomerism of the bronchial tree is not ... Deranged abdominal organ asymmetry: The stomach and spleen are prone to isolated reversal The stomach, liver, and a single ... Rarely, left atrial isomeric patients have a single, normal, functional spleen. Patients lacking a functional spleen are in ...
With a Sano shunt, a hole is made in the wall of the single ventricle, and a Gore-Tex conduit is used to connect the ventricle ... In this case, blood comes from the single ventricle, through the pulmonary valve, the reconstructed aorta, the subclavian ... After this first step (switching the right ventricle in functional position of the absent left ventricle) children generally ... or other conditions that result in single ventricle circulation. In these conditions, the most urgent problem is that the heart ...
... thickness of ventricle Stroke volume (SV) is the volume of blood ejected by the right/left ventricle in a single contraction. ... there is no single Frank-Starling curve on which the ventricle operates but rather a family of curves, each of which defined by ... To generate a PV loop for the left ventricle, the LV pressure is plotted against LV volume at multiple time points during a ... Ventricular stroke work (SW) is defined as the work performed by the left or right ventricle to eject the stroke volume into ...
Just like pacemakers, ICDs can have a single wire or lead in the heart (in the right ventricle, single chamber ICD), two leads ... one in the right ventricle and one on the outer wall of the left ventricle). The difference between pacemakers and ICDs is that ... Recent developments include the subcutaneous ICD (S-ICD), and the ability to pace the left ventricle from multiple sites near- ... The lead usually lodges in the apex or septum of the right ventricle. ...
The members of the order Hexanchiformes have only a single dorsal fin. The anal fin is absent in the orders Squaliformes, ... The flow of the heart in order is: sinus venosus, atrium, ventricle and conus arteriosus. Like other fishes, sharks extract ... Unlike other vertebrates, sharks have a single-circuit circulatory system, blood flows from the heart, to the gills where it is ...
The ventricles arise as a single cavity that is divided by the developing interventricular septum. Before the septum closes ... In human embryology, the primary interventricular foramen is a temporary opening between the developing ventricles of the heart ... completely, the remaining opening between the two ventricles is termed the interventricular foramen. In some individuals, the ...
... the bulbus cordis will develop into the right ventricle; the primitive ventricle will form the left ventricle; the primitive ... Initially, a single pulmonary vein develops in the form of a bulge in the back wall of the left atrium. This vein will connect ... Because of this, blood can access both the left primitive ventricle and the right primitive ventricle. As the anterior and ... The tube is divided into cardiac regions along its craniocaudal axis: the primitive ventricle, called primitive left ventricle ...
CSF is also produced by the single layer of column-shaped ependymal cells which line the ventricles; by the lining surrounding ... The ventricles are a series of cavities filled with CSF. The majority of CSF is produced from within the two lateral ventricles ... CSF moves in a single outward direction from the ventricles, but multidirectionally in the subarachnoid space. Fluid movement ... As the forebrain develops, the neural cord within it becomes a ventricle, ultimately forming the lateral ventricles. Along the ...
Some features may be seen in the ventricle wall separating the right and left lower chambers or the ventricle muscle. This ... Cardiac fibromas are mostly single and well-circumscribed and the average size of the tumor is circular and is 5 cm. Sometimes ... The mass dimensions were 38 X 28 mm in the apical area of the left ventricle. A surgical procedure was recommended due to the ... These tumors usually occur within the anterior wall of the left ventricle or the interventricular septum and rarely involves ...
It has four chambers: two "upper" chambers, the atria (single:atrium), and two "lower" chambers (the ventricles). Anatomically ... Blood is transferred into the ventricles in 2 steps: in the first step, as the ventricle relaxes from the previous systolic ... the atria contract to overfill the ventricles, causing the ventricle walls to "stretch", which allows for a stronger ... The E/A ratio is a marker of the function of the left ventricle of the heart. It represents the ratio of peak velocity flow in ...
The adult SVZ is a paired brain structure situated throughout the lateral walls of the lateral ventricles. It is composed of ... The innermost layer (Layer I) contains a single layer (monolayer) of ependymal cells lining the ventricular cavity; these cells ... 2016). "Influence of glioblastoma contact with the lateral ventricle on survival: a meta-analysis". Journal of Neurooncology. ... the third type is typically found in the lateral ventricles just above the hippocampus and is similar in size to the second ...
The lateral ventricles are formed as large cavities of the telencephalic vesicle. The size of the ventricles are decreased in ... There is no known definitive single mechanism that causes colpocephaly. However, researchers believe there are many possible ... The sign is seen on transverse sonograms of the fetal cranium obtained at the level of the ventricles. A special case is found ... He suggested the term 'hydrocephalus ex vauco' to be used for enlargement of the occipital horns of the lateral ventricles as a ...
Unifocal PVCs are triggered from a single site in the ventricle, causing the peaks on the ECG to look the same. Multifocal PVCs ... In a PVC, the ventricles contract first and before the atria have optimally filled the ventricles with blood, which means that ... Normally, impulses pass through both ventricles almost at the same time and the depolarization waves of the two ventricles ... Single PVC are common in healthy persons. The prevalence of PVCs has been estimated to be about 1% to 4% for the general ...
The Kawashima procedure is used for congenital heart disease with a single effective ventricle and an interrupted inferior vena ...
... this is VDD mode and can be achieved with a single pacing lead with electrodes in the right atrium (to sense) and ventricle (to ... which can pace both the septal and lateral walls of the left ventricle. By pacing both sides of the left ventricle, the ... In this type, only one pacing lead is placed into a chamber of the heart, either the atrium or the ventricle. Dual-chamber ... When the pacemaker does not detect a heartbeat within a normal beat-to-beat time period, it will stimulate the ventricle of the ...
The systemic heart has muscular contractile walls and consists of a single ventricle and two atria, one for each side of the ... Octopuses are gonochoric and have a single, posteriorly-located gonad which is associated with the coelom. The testis in males ...
Children with double outlet right ventricle receive compassionate, comprehensive care through our Single Ventricle Program. We ... In double outlet right ventricle, there is almost always a hole in the septum, or wall, between the right and left ventricles, ... In many patients, double outlet right ventricle allows oxygen-poor (blue) blood to leave the right ventricle through the aorta ... What is double outlet right ventricle?. Double outlet right ventricle is a rare birth defect of the heart. ...
An Expectant Parents Guide to Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome and Other Single Ventricle Defects. ... Some of this blood enters the right ventricle through a valve called the tricuspid valve, and some of it passes across a hole ... In the most extreme cases, the connection between the left ventricle and the aorta is closed off completely, a condition known ... These structures include the mitral valve, the left ventricle, the aortic valve and the aorta. HLHS is a congenital heart ...
With this syndrome, structures on the left side of the heart, such as the aorta, aortic valve, left ventricle, and mitral valve ... www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/CongenitalHeartDefects/AboutCongenitalHeartDefects/Single-Ventricle-Defects%5FUCM%5F307037% ... With this syndrome, structures on the left side of the heart, such as the aorta, aortic valve, left ventricle, and mitral valve ... Single ventricle defects. American Heart Association website. Available at: http:// ...
A single ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was necessary. The third patient needed a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt after ventricular ... In the second patient an isolated fourth ventricle could be treated by ventricular irrigation and aqueductal stenting. Third ...
... www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/CongenitalHeartDefects/AboutCongenitalHeartDefects/Single-Ventricle-Defects%5FUCM%5F307037% ... The blood returns to the left atrium and goes into the left ventricle. The blood then moves out to the rest of the body. ... It then goes into the right ventricle. Next, the blood travels to the lungs through the pulmonary valve. Here, it picks up ... With this syndrome, structures on the left side of the heart, which includes the aorta, aortic valve, left ventricle, and ...
Double outlet right ventricle surgery is a procedure that fixes a type of heart malformation called double outlet right ... These surgeries will result in a functioning heart that uses only a single ventricle. ... Double Outlet Right Ventricle Surgery for Children. What is double outlet right ventricle surgery for children?. Double outlet ... In a normal heart, the left ventricle is connected to the aorta and the right ventricle is connected to the pulmonary artery. ...
Having a single ventricle means that only one of the two ventricles works well enough to pump blood. ... a heart has two working ventricles (pumping chambers). ... How Is a Single Ventricle Defect Diagnosed?. Single ventricle ... What Is a Single Ventricle Defect?. Usually, a heart has two working ventricles (pumping chambers). Having a single ventricle ... How Is a Single Ventricle Defect Treated?. Single ventricle defects are treated by two or three surgeries. The first surgery ...
Single-ventricle physiology results from underdevelopment of the left or right ventricle during fetal life. Although single- ... Prespecified subgroup analyses were performed according to single left ventricle versus single nonleft ventricle; Norwood ... Enalapril in Infants With Single Ventricle. Daphne T. Hsu, Victor Zak, Lynn Mahony, Lynn A. Sleeper, Andrew M. Atz, Jami C. ... Enalapril in Infants With Single Ventricle. Daphne T. Hsu, Victor Zak, Lynn Mahony, Lynn A. Sleeper, Andrew M. Atz, Jami C. ...
We treat single ventricle defect at Childrens cardiovascular program, and we consistently achieve patient outcomes among the ... What causes a single ventricle defect?. A single ventricle defect occurs during the first eight weeks of fetal development, ... Single left ventricle: This defect occurs when one ventricle of the heart (usually the right ventricle) is underdeveloped and ... Single ventricle defect. Single ventricle defect is a general term used to describe several distinct congenital heart defects. ...
... the ejection fraction of a single ventricle was significantly lower than that of a normal left or right ventricle. Ventricular ... Characteristics of ventricular function in single ventricle.. S Kitamura, Y Kawashima, Y Shimazaki, T Mori, S Nakano, S Beppu, ... Characteristics of ventricular function in single ventricle.. S Kitamura, Y Kawashima, Y Shimazaki, T Mori, S Nakano, S Beppu ... Characteristics of ventricular function in single ventricle.. S Kitamura, Y Kawashima, Y Shimazaki, T Mori, S Nakano, S Beppu ...
The term single ventricle refers to any congenital cardiac anomaly in which one ventricle is hypoplastic or absent, such as ... The term single ventricle refers to any congenital cardiac anomaly in which one ventricle is hypoplastic or absent, such as ... or of the apical portion of either ventricle generally necessitates a single ventricle approach. Early diagnosis and management ...
... with morphologic right ventricles have a worse prognosis than those with morphologic left ventricles. The aim of this study was ... BACKGROUND: In postnatal life, patients with single ventricle (SV) with morphologic right ventricles have a worse prognosis ... When all four categories were compared (normal left ventricle, normal right ventricle, SV left ventricle, and SV right ... Both the right and left ventricles were analyzed in fetuses with normal cardiac anatomy for comparison. RESULTS: Fifty-four ...
A child with a single ventricle defect is born with a heart that has only one ventricle that is large enough or strong enough ... What is a single ventricle heart defect?. A child with a single ventricle defect is born with a heart that has only one ... Treatments for single ventricle heart defects. The various types of single ventricle heart defects are very different. For ... Single ventricle heart defects life expectancy. Forty years ago children with single ventricle heart defects didnt survive ...
NIRS Monitoring in the Ambulatory Single Ventricle Patient. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... Patients with single ventricle anatomy undergoing routine, elective cardiac catheterization prior to second stage palliation. ... The study will be a prospective evaluation of all single ventricle patients as they undergo their routine cardiac ... Evaluation of Near-infrared Spectroscopy for Non-invasive Monitoring of the Ambulatory Single Ventricle Patient. ...
Objective Patients with unoperated single ventricle (SV) rarely survive into adulthood with good functional status and may ... Long-term survival with an unrepaired single ventricle: what is your dangerous idea? ...
... neonate was diagnosed as having concordant atrioventricular connection and single cardiac outlet and aorta from right ventricle ...
Centers caring for critically ill infants, particularly those with single-ventricle anatomy or hypoxia, should review their ... Centers caring for critically ill infants, particularly those with single-ventricle anatomy or hypoxia, should review their ...
... where there is a single left ventricle. However, the most common single ventricle malformation is hypoplastic left heart ... Anxiety and ADHD in Patients With Single-Ventricle Congenital Heart Disease *Debating the Potential Impact of Single-Payer ... that the loading conditions on the ventricle are minimized to preserve function of the single ventricle and that the pulmonary ... As with all single ventricle patients, the ideal physiology at this stage results in a balance where pulmonary blood flow and ...
We offer complete care for hypoplastic left heart syndrome and single ventricle defects from fetal diagnosis through delivery ... This is why HLHS is called a single ventricle defect: one ventricle has to do the work of two. ... With our Single Ventricle and High-Risk Home Monitoring Program, patients and their families are never too far from a medical ... HLHS and Single Ventricle Defects. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a congenital heart defect that requires a series ...
Mount Sinai pediatric cardiology specialists are prepared to make an accurate diagnosis and to treat your child with single ... About Single Ventricle Defects. In a single ventricle defect, the heart has only one functioning ventricle (pumping chamber) ... With single ventricle heart defects, we usually perform surgeries such as the bi-directional Glenn shunt (at about four to six ... Hearing your child has a single ventricle defect can be a shock. At the Childrens Heart Center, we are here for you. We have a ...
... N Engl J Med. 2010 May 27;362(21):1980-92. doi ... Background: The Norwood procedure with a modified Blalock-Taussig (MBT) shunt, the first palliative stage for single-ventricle ... The right ventricle-pulmonary artery (RVPA) shunt may improve coronary flow but requires a ventriculotomy. We compared the two ...
The pediatric heart experts at the Nemours Cardiac Center diagnose and treat single ventricle physiology and palliation at ...
The effect of intraoperative hypotension on the outcomes of initial hybrid palliation for single ventricle congenital heart ... The "hybrid procedure" is an alternative surgical palliation strategy for single ventricle congenital heart disease. The ...
... Ann Thorac Surg. 2012 Feb;93(2):614-8; discussion ... Background: Single ventricle hearts can be surgically palliated by a series of operations culminating in the Fontan procedure, ... Methods: From 1998 to 2010, 557 patients with single ventricle heart disease underwent second-stage surgical palliation. This ... No early or late deaths occurred in patients with tricuspid atresia and double inlet left ventricle. Multivariate analysis ...
... The Single Ventricle Monitoring Program in The Congenital Heart Collaborative at UH ... Double inlet left ventricle. If you or a family member has any questions regarding our Single Ventricle Monitoring Program, ... Childrens Hospital provides specialized care for high-risk infants born with a single ventricle heart defect. A single ... The Single Ventricle Monitoring Program provides care for these children beginning after the newborn operation until they ...
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