Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Expressed Emotion: Frequency and quality of negative emotions, e.g., anger or hostility, expressed by family members or significant others, that often lead to a high relapse rate, especially in schizophrenic patients. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 7th ed)Facial Expression: Observable changes of expression in the face in response to emotional stimuli.Emotional Intelligence: The ability to understand and manage emotions and to use emotional knowledge to enhance thought and deal effectively with tasks. Components of emotional intelligence include empathy, self-motivation, self-awareness, self-regulation, and social skill. Emotional intelligence is a measurement of one's ability to socialize or relate to others.Happiness: Highly pleasant emotion characterized by outward manifestations of gratification; joy.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Anger: A strong emotional feeling of displeasure aroused by being interfered with, injured or threatened.Empathy: An individual's objective and insightful awareness of the feelings and behavior of another person. It should be distinguished from sympathy, which is usually nonobjective and noncritical. It includes caring, which is the demonstration of an awareness of and a concern for the good of others. (From Bioethics Thesaurus, 1992)Affective Symptoms: Mood or emotional responses dissonant with or inappropriate to the behavior and/or stimulus.Recognition (Psychology): The knowledge or perception that someone or something present has been previously encountered.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Arousal: Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.Social Control, Informal: Those forms of control which are exerted in less concrete and tangible ways, as through folkways, mores, conventions, and public sentiment.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Kinesics: Systematic study of the body and the use of its static and dynamic position as a means of communication.Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Repression, Psychology: The active mental process of keeping out and ejecting, banishing from consciousness, ideas or impulses that are unacceptable to it.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Galvanic Skin Response: A change in electrical resistance of the skin, occurring in emotion and in certain other conditions.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Pattern Recognition, Visual: Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Voice: The sounds produced by humans by the passage of air through the LARYNX and over the VOCAL CORDS, and then modified by the resonance organs, the NASOPHARYNX, and the MOUTH.Individuality: Those psychological characteristics which differentiate individuals from one another.Personal Construct Theory: A psychological theory based on dimensions or categories used by a given person in describing or explaining the personality and behavior of others or of himself. The basic idea is that different people will use consistently different categories. The theory was formulated in the fifties by George Kelly. Two tests devised by him are the role construct repertory test and the repertory grid test. (From Stuart Sutherland, The International Dictionary of Psychology, 1989)Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Schizophrenic Psychology: Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Prefrontal Cortex: The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the MEDIODORSAL NUCLEUS OF THE THALAMUS. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the DIENCEPHALON; MESENCEPHALON; and LIMBIC SYSTEM as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.Socialization: The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.Shame: An emotional attitude excited by realization of a shortcoming or impropriety.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Awareness: The act of "taking account" of an object or state of affairs. It does not imply assessment of, nor attention to the qualities or nature of the object.Music: Sound that expresses emotion through rhythm, melody, and harmony.Frustration: The motivational and/or affective state resulting from being blocked, thwarted, disappointed or defeated.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Defense Mechanisms: Unconscious process used by an individual or a group of individuals in order to cope with impulses, feelings or ideas which are not acceptable at their conscious level; various types include reaction formation, projection and self reversal.Psychophysiology: The study of the physiological basis of human and animal behavior.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Nonverbal Communication: Transmission of emotions, ideas, and attitudes between individuals in ways other than the spoken language.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Functional Neuroimaging: Methods for visualizing REGIONAL BLOOD FLOW, metabolic, electrical, or other physiological activities in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM using various imaging modalities.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Guilt: Subjective feeling of having committed an error, offense or sin; unpleasant feeling of self-criticism. These result from acts, impulses, or thoughts contrary to one's personal conscience.Rejection (Psychology): Non-acceptance, negative attitudes, hostility or excessive criticism of the individual which may precipitate feelings of rejection.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Gyrus Cinguli: One of the convolutions on the medial surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES. It surrounds the rostral part of the brain and CORPUS CALLOSUM and forms part of the LIMBIC SYSTEM.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Theory of Mind: The ability to attribute mental states (e.g., beliefs, desires, feelings, intentions, thoughts, etc.) to self and to others, allowing an individual to understand and infer behavior on the basis of the mental states. Difference or deficit in theory of mind is associated with ASPERGER SYNDROME; AUTISTIC DISORDER; and SCHIZOPHRENIA, etc.Tape Recording: Recording of information on magnetic or punched paper tape.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Love: Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Negativism: State of mind or behavior characterized by extreme skepticism and persistent opposition or resistance to outside suggestions or advice. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Irritable Mood: Abnormal or excessive excitability with easily triggered anger, annoyance, or impatience.Psychological Theory: Principles applied to the analysis and explanation of psychological or behavioral phenomena.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Unconscious (Psychology): Those forces and content of the mind which are not ordinarily available to conscious awareness or to immediate recall.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Inhibition (Psychology): The interference with or prevention of a behavioral or verbal response even though the stimulus for that response is present; in psychoanalysis the unconscious restraining of an instinctual process.Limbic System: A set of forebrain structures common to all mammals that is defined functionally and anatomically. It is implicated in the higher integration of visceral, olfactory, and somatic information as well as homeostatic responses including fundamental survival behaviors (feeding, mating, emotion). For most authors, it includes the AMYGDALA; EPITHALAMUS; GYRUS CINGULI; hippocampal formation (see HIPPOCAMPUS); HYPOTHALAMUS; PARAHIPPOCAMPAL GYRUS; SEPTAL NUCLEI; anterior nuclear group of thalamus, and portions of the basal ganglia. (Parent, Carpenter's Human Neuroanatomy, 9th ed, p744; NeuroNames, http://rprcsgi.rprc.washington.edu/neuronames/index.html (September 2, 1998)).Resilience, Psychological: The human ability to adapt in the face of tragedy, trauma, adversity, hardship, and ongoing significant life stressors.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Evoked Potentials: Electrical responses recorded from nerve, muscle, SENSORY RECEPTOR, or area of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM following stimulation. They range from less than a microvolt to several microvolts. The evoked potential can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), or motor (EVOKED POTENTIALS, MOTOR), or other modalities that have been reported.Laughter: An involuntary expression of merriment and pleasure; it includes the patterned motor responses as well as the inarticulate vocalization.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Mental Processes: Conceptual functions or thinking in all its forms.Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Motion Pictures as Topic: The art, technique, or business of producing motion pictures for entertainment, propaganda, or instruction.Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Personality Development: Growth of habitual patterns of behavior in childhood and adolescence.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Nerve Net: A meshlike structure composed of interconnecting nerve cells that are separated at the synaptic junction or joined to one another by cytoplasmic processes. In invertebrates, for example, the nerve net allows nerve impulses to spread over a wide area of the net because synapses can pass information in any direction.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Dominance, Cerebral: Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.Personality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.Phobic Disorders: Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Temperament: Predisposition to react to one's environment in a certain way; usually refers to mood changes.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Concept Formation: A cognitive process involving the formation of ideas generalized from the knowledge of qualities, aspects, and relations of objects.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.
  • An interview with Dr. Will Howat at SfN 2018, discussing the possibilities and challenges of immunohistochemistry (IHC) beyond a single color! (news-medical.net)
  • In fact, in his popular childrearing guide of 1928, Psychological Care of the Infant and Child, he urged parents to strictly control their displays of affection toward their children and to engage in behaviors designed to ensure that children would dampen or suppress their emotions. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Instead, anatomical, neurophysiological, functional neuroimaging, and neuropsychological evidence is described that anterior limbic and related structures including the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala are involved in emotion, reward valuation, and reward-related decision- making (but not memory), with the value representations transmitted to the anterior cingulate cortex for action e outcome learning. (neojungiantypology.com)
  • The most well-known "emotion" region of the brain is the amygdala, a group of nuclei found deep within the temporal lobes. (nytimes.com)
  • Brain regions like the amygdala are certainly important to emotion, but they are neither necessary nor sufficient for it. (nytimes.com)
  • Instead, a single brain area like the amygdala participates in many different mental events, and many different brain areas are capable of producing the same outcome. (nytimes.com)
  • The amygdala is one of the main brain areas associated with emotion and brain's the reward system. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Also featured on the album are "Emotions", a song originally recorded by Brenda Lee that peaked at number 7 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1961, and "'Til You Cry", which later became a hit for country singer Eddy Raven, peaking at number 4 on the Hot Country Songs chart in 1989. (wikipedia.org)
  • Current research on emotion in learning context point out the necessity to better understand which emotions are most important for different kinds of learning activities. (unige.ch)
  • In the TEL (Technology Enhanced Learning) context, there is also a need to build tools and technologies that can help learners become more aware of their emotions and how they impact their learning experiences. (unige.ch)
  • At a given moment, they might incorporate varying shades of multiple emotions or be heavily influenced by context. (psychologytoday.com)
  • It was written and produced by Carey, David Cole and Robert Clivillés of C+C Music Factory, and released as the album's first single on August 13, 1991. (wikipedia.org)
  • It remained in the top 40 for 20 weeks and was one of four singles from Carey on the Hot 100's 1991 year-end charts, ranking 22. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carey performed "Emotions" live for the first time at the 1991 MTV Video Music Awards, backed by several male and female back up vocalists. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following the award show appearance, she sang "Emotions" on The Arsenio Hall Show, airing on September 23, 1991. (wikipedia.org)
  • The global emotion analytics market size to grow from USD 2.2 billion in 2019 to USD 4.6 billion by 2024, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 15.8% during 2019-2024. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • 7130257-EX $ 49.95 7130257-W $ 149.95 STRATACE-EX Acoustic Emotions These acoustic guitar-centered melodies take the audience traveling on a roller coaster of emotion and sensibility. (smartsound.com)
  • His works introduced the idea that there were certain basic emotions and that emotions served adaptive functions - that is, that they were essential to survival rather than something that interfered with it. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This provides a strong path for the brain to follow, and is likely to trigger high levels of memory encoding, as our brains usually find it easier to follow a single narrative than a sequence of vignettes. (fastcompany.com)
  • Able to sequence exchanges and show sensitivity to others' emotions and views. (prezi.com)
  • If emotions are not distinct neural entities, perhaps they have a distinct bodily pattern - heart rate, respiration, perspiration, temperature and so on? (nytimes.com)
  • Empirically, there's no biological imprint or even neural circuit for a category of emotion like ' anger ,'" Barrett says. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Outside the U.S., it was Carey's most successful single since "Vision of Love" (1990), the lead single from her debut album. (wikipedia.org)
  • Emotions" became Carey's fifth consecutive number-one hit on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, giving her the distinction of being the first (and, to date, only) act to have their first five singles make number 1 on the Hot 100. (wikipedia.org)
  • This study analyzes the relationships between cognitive appraisals, classroom and test emotions, and math achievement in a sample of 1219 Portuguese students from the 6th and 8th grades. (springer.com)
  • It's one that we've been told we have to engage with, because emotions must be kept in check, and must be tightly held down. (medium.com)
  • We invite PhD students and researchers from different disciplines (education, psychology, language sciences, and computer science) to participate in a two-days workshop on emotion and emotion awareness in computer-mediated collaboration and learning. (unige.ch)
  • Fortunately, during the last two decades of the twentieth century, the field of psychology began to accumulate a great deal that is of importance to understanding emotion and the aging process. (encyclopedia.com)
  • When we label an emotion, it might make it more manageable," says Seth J. Gillihan, a clinical assistant professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. (psychologytoday.com)
  • There are several different definitions, each aligned with a particular theoretical view," says Lisa Feldman Barrett, a psychology professor at Northeastern University and the author of the forthcoming book How Emotions Are Made . (psychologytoday.com)
  • Emotions" received positive reviews from critics. (wikipedia.org)
  • The research showed that parents improved their abilities to handle their own emotions and to see themselves in a more positive light," said Weiss, adding, "It helped them to become more aware of their parenting and all of the good they do as parents. (hindustantimes.com)
  • Hopelessness appears to play a particular role in the interplay between cognitive appraisals, emotions, and academic achievement as it is the only emotion that relates to math achievement both in test and classroom situations. (springer.com)
  • The single's music video, directed by Jeff Preiss, features Carey and friends with exotic animals experiencing emotions while partying and having fun around town in New York City. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rolling Stone writer Rob Tannenbaum also said, "they (producers) back Carey with pumping house keyboards and shamelessly recycle the chords of Cheryl Lynn's 'Got to Be Real' and the Emotions' 'Best of My Love' to construct the bubbly new-disco 'Emotions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carey opened every show with Emotions during her Music Box Tour in 1993, Daydream World Tour in 1996, Butterfly World Tour in 1998, and Rainbow World Tour in 2000. (wikipedia.org)
  • Il video prodotto per Emotions , diretto da Jeff Preiss , vede la Carey in compagnia di alcuni amici e di alcuni animali esotici, mentre si muovono per le strade di una città, mentre la fotografia del video cambia continuamente colore. (wikipedia.org)
  • We discuss how the findings help illustrate which conclusions can, and cannot, be drawn from single-neuron research. (ssrn.com)
  • The company has a strong research team for developing cloud-based emotions analytics that extracts a set of emotions and individual character traits based on raw vocal intonations. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • At this time, the theoretical contributions of Silvan Tomkins, Carroll Izard, Paul Ekman, and Robert Plutchik sparked a new wave of research on the emotions. (encyclopedia.com)