A form of pneumoconiosis resulting from inhalation of dust containing crystalline form of SILICON DIOXIDE, usually in the form of quartz. Amorphous silica is relatively nontoxic.
Transparent, tasteless crystals found in nature as agate, amethyst, chalcedony, cristobalite, flint, sand, QUARTZ, and tridymite. The compound is insoluble in water or acids except hydrofluoric acid.
Pulmonary or extrapulmonary infection caused by MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS or nontuberculous mycobacteria in a patient with silicosis.
Quartz (SiO2). A glassy or crystalline form of silicon dioxide. Many colored varieties are semiprecious stones. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.
A yellow metallic element with the atomic symbol Au, atomic number 79, and atomic weight 197. It is used in jewelry, goldplating of other metals, as currency, and in dental restoration. Many of its clinical applications, such as ANTIRHEUMATIC AGENTS, are in the form of its salts.
Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.
The maximum exposure to a biologically active physical or chemical agent that is allowed during an 8-hour period (a workday) in a population of workers, or during a 24-hour period in the general population, which does not appear to cause appreciable harm, whether immediate or delayed for any period, in the target population. (From Lewis Dictionary of Toxicology, 1st ed)
A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by inhalation of dust and by tissue reaction to their presence. These inorganic, organic, particulate, or vaporized matters usually are inhaled by workers in their occupational environment, leading to the various forms (ASBESTOSIS; BYSSINOSIS; and others). Similar air pollution can also have deleterious effects on the general population.
An office in the Department of Labor responsible for developing and establishing occupational safety and health standards.
Uranium. A radioactive element of the actinide series of metals. It has an atomic symbol U, atomic number 92, and atomic weight 238.03. U-235 is used as the fissionable fuel in nuclear weapons and as fuel in nuclear power reactors.
A trace element that is required in bone formation. It has the atomic symbol Sn, atomic number 50, and atomic weight 118.71.
The industry concerned with the removal of raw materials from the Earth's crust and with their conversion into refined products.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
A diverse group of lung diseases that affect the lung parenchyma. They are characterized by an initial inflammation of PULMONARY ALVEOLI that extends to the interstitium and beyond leading to diffuse PULMONARY FIBROSIS. Interstitial lung diseases are classified by their etiology (known or unknown causes), and radiological-pathological features.
NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.
A form of pneumoconiosis caused by inhalation of asbestos fibers which elicit potent inflammatory responses in the parenchyma of the lung. The disease is characterized by interstitial fibrosis of the lung, varying from scattered sites to extensive scarring of the alveolar interstitium.
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
A process in which normal lung tissues are progressively replaced by FIBROBLASTS and COLLAGEN causing an irreversible loss of the ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream via PULMONARY ALVEOLI. Patients show progressive DYSPNEA finally resulting in death.
Management, removal, and elimination of biologic, infectious, pathologic, and dental waste. The concept includes blood, mucus, tissue removed at surgery or autopsy, soiled surgical dressings, and other materials requiring special control and handling. Disposal may take place where the waste is generated or elsewhere.
Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.
Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.
Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.

Crystalline silica exposure, radiological silicosis, and lung cancer mortality in diatomaceous earth industry workers. (1/330)

BACKGROUND: The role of silicosis as either a necessary or incidental condition in silica associated lung cancer remains unresolved. To address this issue a cohort analysis of dose-response relations for crystalline silica and lung cancer mortality was conducted among diatomaceous earth workers classified according to the presence or absence of radiological silicosis. METHODS: Radiological silicosis was determined by median 1980 International Labour Organisation system readings of a panel of three "B" readers for 1809 of 2342 white male workers in a diatomaceous earth facility in California. Standardised mortality ratios (SMR) for lung cancer, based on United States rates for 1942-94, were calculated separately for workers with and without radiological silicosis according to cumulative exposures to respirable crystalline silica (milligrams per cubic meter x years; mg/m3-years) lagged 15 years. RESULTS: Eighty one cases of silicosis were identified, including 77 with small opacities of > or = 1/0 and four with large opacities. A slightly larger excess of lung cancer was found among the subjects with silicosis (SMR 1.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.43 to 4.03) than in workers without silicosis (SMR 1.19, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.57). An association between silica exposure and lung cancer risk was detected among those without silicosis; a statistically significant (p = 0.02) increasing trend of lung cancer risk was seen with cumulative exposure, with SMR reaching 2.40 (95% CI 1.24 to 4.20) at the highest exposure level (> or = 5.0 mg/m3-years). A similar statistically significant (p = 0.02) dose-response gradient was observed among non-silicotic subjects when follow up was truncated at 15 years after the final negative radiograph (SMR 2.96, 95% CI 1.19 to 6.08 at > or = 5.0 mg/m3-years), indicating that the association among non-silicotic subjects was unlikely to be accounted for by undetected radiological silicosis. CONCLUSIONS: The dose-response relation observed between cumulative exposure to respirable crystalline silica and lung cancer mortality among workers without radiological silicosis suggests that silicosis is not a necessary co-condition for silica related lung carcinogenesis. However, the relatively small number of silicosis cases in the cohort and the absence of radiographic data after employment limit interpretations.  (+info)

End stage renal disease among ceramic workers exposed to silica. (2/330)

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether ceramic workers exposed to silica experience an excess of end stage renal disease. METHODS: On the basis of a health surveillance programme, a cohort of 2980 male ceramic workers has been enrolled during the period 1974-91 in Civitacastellana, Lazio, Italy. For each worker, employment history, smoking data, and x ray film readings were available. The vital status was ascertained for all cohort members. All 2820 people still alive and resident in the Lazio region as in June 1994 were searched for a match in the regional end stage renal diseases registry, which records (since June, 1994) all patients undergoing dialysis treatment in public and private facilities of the region. Expected numbers of prevalent cases from the cohort were computed by applying the rate of patients on dialysis treatment by the age distribution of the cohort. RESULTS: A total of six cases was detected when 1.87 were expected (observed/expected (O/E) = 3.21; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.17 to 6.98). The excess risk was present among non-smokers (O = 2; O/E = 4.34) and smokers (O = 4; O/E = 2.83), as well as among workers without silicosis (O = 4; O/E = 2.78) and workers with silicosis (O = 2; O/E = 4.54). The risk was higher among subjects with < 20 years since first employment (O = 4; O/E = 4.65) than among those employed > 20 years. CONCLUSION: These results provide further evidence that exposure to silica dust among ceramic workers is associated with nephrotoxic effects.  (+info)

Left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy associated with silicosis. (3/330)

Left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy usually results from invasion or compression of the nerve caused by diseases localized within the aortopulmonary window. This study reports the case of a 76-yr-old male with vocal cord paralysis due to lymph node involvement by silicosis. This rare entity was identified by video-mediastinoscopy, which revealed a granulomatous and fibrosed recurrent lymph node encasing the nerve. The nerve was dissected and released from scar tissues. Progressive clinical improvement was observed followed by total and durable recovery of the voice after 15 weeks follow-up.  (+info)

Serum levels of soluble Fas ligand in patients with silicosis. (4/330)

Certain patients with silicosis have been reported to exhibit immunological abnormalities such as the appearance of antinuclear antibodies and the occurrence of autoimmune diseases. Fas ligand (FasL) is a type II membrane protein which induces apoptosis by binding to its membrane receptor, Fas. FasL is converted to a soluble form by a metalloproteinase-like enzyme. We have already found serum soluble Fas (sFas) levels in silicosis patients as well as in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) to be significantly higher than those in healthy volunteers. To examine further the role of the Fas/FasL system in silica-induced immunological abnormalities, we investigated serum soluble FasL (sFasL) levels in silicosis patients with no clinical symptoms of autoimmune diseases, using ELISA for sFasL. Although the serum sFasL levels in patients with SLE were significantly higher than those in healthy volunteers and showed a slight positive correlation with serum sFas levels, those in silicosis patients exhibited no significant difference from those in healthy volunteers, and there was no correlation with serum sFas levels. However, sFasL levels were elevated in silicosis patients with slight dyspnoea or normal PCO2 among various clinical parameters of silicosis. It may be speculated that the immunological disturbances presented by the abnormalities of apoptosis-related molecules in silicosis patients do not occur with a similar degree of respiratory involvement. Further studies are required to clarify which kinds of factors are involved in silicosis patients who exhibit immunological abnormalities.  (+info)

Over-expression of the decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) gene in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) derived from silicosis patients. (5/330)

Dysregulation of apoptosis, particularly in the Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) pathway, is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Recently, a soluble decoy receptor, termed decoy receptor 3 (DcR3), that binds FasL and inhibits FasL-induced apoptosis, has been identified. Silicosis is clinically characterized not only by respiratory disorders but by immunological abnormalities. We have found that serum soluble Fas (sFas) levels are elevated in silicosis patients and that sFas message is dominantly expressed in PBMC derived from these patients. This study examined DcR3 gene expression in PBMC derived from patients with silicosis, SLE, or progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), and compared it with that in healthy volunteers (HV). The relative expression level of the DcR3 gene was examined in PBMC derived from 37 patients with silicosis without clinical symptoms of autoimmune disease, nine patients with SLE, 12 patients with PSS, and 28 HV using the semiquantitative multiplex-reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (MP-RT-PCR). The correlation between the relative expression level of the DcR3 gene and multiple clinical parameters for respiratory disorders and immunological abnormalities in individuals with silicosis was analysed. The DcR3 gene was significantly over-expressed in cases of silicosis or SLE when compared with HV. In addition, the DcR3 relative expression level was positively correlated with the serum sFas level in silicosis patients. It is unclear, however, whether over-expression of the DcR3 gene in silicosis is caused by chronic silica exposure, merely accompanies the alteration in Fas-related molecules, or precedes the clinical onset of autoimmune abnormalities. It will be necessary to study these patients further, establish an in vitro model of human T cells exposed recurrently to silica compounds, and resolve whether the increase in DcR3 mRNA expression is a cause or consequence of disease.  (+info)

Occupational lung cancer risk for men in Germany: results from a pooled case-control study. (6/330)

Occupational exposures such as crystalline silica, diesel engine exhaust, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and man-made mineral fibers are strongly suspected to increase lung cancer risk. Two case-control studies in Germany conducted between 1988 and 1996 were pooled for a joint analysis. A total of 3,498 male cases and 3,541 male population controls, frequency matched for age and region, were included in the study. The lifelong history of all jobs and industries was coded and occupational exposures were evaluated by expert rating. Odds ratios, crude and adjusted for smoking and asbestos exposure, were calculated by conditional logistic regression. Job-related evaluation showed a statistically significant increased odds ratio adjusted for smoking among farmers; forestry workers, fishermen, and livestock workers; miners and quarrymen; chemical processors; cabinet makers and related wood workers; metal producers and processors; bricklayers and carpenters; road construction workers, pipelayers and well diggers; plasterers, insulators, and upholsterers; painters and lacquerers; stationary engine and heavy equipment operators; transport workers and freight handlers; and service workers. With regard to specific occupational exposures, elevated odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals (CI)) for lung cancer risk adjusted for smoking and asbestos exposure were observed for man-made mineral fibers (OR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.17, 1.88); crystalline silica (OR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.22, 1.62); diesel engine exhaust (OR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.23, 1.67); and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OR = 1.53, 95% CI 1.14, 2.04). The risk of asbestos exposure, adjusted for smoking was also increased (OR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.24, 1.60).  (+info)

Risk factors for pulmonary disease due to culture-positive M. tuberculosis or nontuberculous mycobacteria in South African gold miners. (7/330)

The aim of this study was to determine risk factors for disease due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) compared to those due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in South African gold miners with pulmonary mycobacterial disease. A case/control study comparing tuberculosis and NTM cases amongst all patients with a positive sputum mycobacterial culture in 1995 was carried out. The 51 cases of disease due to NTM and 425 tuberculosis cases were similar with regard to age, education, home region, smoking habits and percentage of CD4 cells. After adjustment for confounders, those with NTM were more likely to have had previous tuberculosis treatment (odds ratio (OR) 3.61; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.9-6.9), have worked longer underground (p-value for trend=0.05) or have evidence of silicosis (OR 12.6; 95% CI 2.2-71) and were less likely to drink regularly (OR 0.12; 95% CI 0.02-0.93) than patients with tuberculosis. In patients with disease due to NTM, 35.3% were human immunodeficiency virus-positive compared with 48.8% of tuberculosis patients (p=0.2) and an estimated 21% overall in the mines at the time of the study. Previous tuberculosis treatment, silicosis and duration of underground work are even more strongly associated with disease due to nontuberculous mycobacteria than with tuberculosis. Attempts to reduce the incidence of all pulmonary mycobacterial disease in this community should address recognized risk factors and ensure that those with tuberculosis are diagnosed, treated and cured.  (+info)

Low serum alpha-1-antitrypsin level as a contributory factor of combined emphysema in silicosis. (8/330)

In order to evaluate low serum alpha-1-antitrypsin level as a contributory factor of combined emphysema in silicotic patients, serum alpha-1-antitrypsin analysis was carried out in 80 patients with silicosis. Low serum alpha-1-antitrypsin level was found in 5 patients. Large opacities were observed roentgenologically in only 1 out of these 5 cases in contrast to 31 of the other 75 cases. Also the suggestive findings for the emphysema were showed in 4 of these 5 cases while such findings were found on their chest X-ray films in only 43 of the other 75 cases. FEV 1.0% below 50 were calculated in 3 of the 5 cases, on the contrary in 22 of the 75 cases. RV above 50% predicted value was showed by all the 5 low antitrypsin patients, in contrast to only 25 of other 74 cases. The silicotic patients with low serum alpha-1-antitrypsin concentration are most likely to have an association with a high incidence of complicated emphysema.  (+info)

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the following questions. (1) Is silica dust on its own, without the presence of silicosis, associated with an increased risk of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in workers exposed to silica dust? (2) In the absence of silicosis is the excess risk dose related? (3) What is the predominant chronological sequence between the development of PTB and the development of silicosis after the end of exposure to dust? METHODS: A cohort of 2255 white South African gold miners has been followed up from 1968 to 1971, when they were 45-55 years of age, to 31 December 1995 for the incidence of PTB. During the follow up 1592 (71%) men died. Of these, 1296 (81%) had a necropsy done at the National Centre for Occupational Health (NCOH) to determine the presence of silicosis and PTB. The incidence of PTB in the cohort was studied relative to cumulative exposure to dust and the onset of silicosis. For the miners with necropsy, the incidence for PTB was studied relative to the severity of ...
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Silicosis is the chronic fibrosing disease of the lungs produced by the prolonged and extensive exposure to free crystalline silica dust. When workers inhale crystalline silica (dust), the lung tissue reacts by developing fibrotic nodules and scarring around the trapped silica particles. This fibrotic condition of the lung is called silicosis. If the nodules grow too large, breathing becomes difficult and death may result. Silicosis victims are also at high risk of developing active tuberculosis. More than one million U.S. workers are exposed to crystalline silica, and each year hundreds of these workers die from silicosis. Silicosis treatment is very limited as there is no cure for the disease, but it is 100 percent preventable if employers, workers, and health professionals work together to reduce exposures.. Pneumoconiosis is the general term for lung disease caused by inhalation of mineral dust. Silicosis is a fibrosing lung disease caused by inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica ...
The incidence of silicosis is less common these days, since introduction of various occupational safety measures, in all industries, including industries handling silica dust. However, silicosis is still the most common occupational disease affecting humans. The incidence is especially seen in many developing countries, because of lax laws and lax implementing of occupational safety measures in industries, dealing with silica. China has reported approximately 24,000 deaths annually from 1991 to 1995. Silicosis is less common in developed nations. For example, in the United States approximately one to two million workers are exposed to silica dust in their occupation and it is estimated that approximately 60,000 of them will develop silicosis in their later life. In the year 1999, CDC has reported only 197 deaths due to silicosis or silicosis as a contributing factor in death.. There was rapid decline in incidences of silicosis and other occupational diseases, after implementation of safety ...
This letter was accepted by the court as a PIL since the occupational disease affects thousands of mine workers in the sandstone industry of the Jodhp..
Results There were 19 silicosis subjects in the exposed group which was categorised into the silicosis group. The process in stone mortar and pestle production industry produced high level of silica dust in the air ranging between 3.97-21.12 mg/m3. The level of HO-1 increased as the level of silica exposure increased even after adjusted for smoking and employment duration. The level of serum HO-1 level was, however, not significantly different between silicosis, exposed, and non-exposed groups, nor was the relationship between HO-1 and pulmonary function.. ...
OBJECTIVES: We describe an emerging public health concern regarding silicosis in the fast-growing highway repair industry. METHODS: We examined highway construction trends, silicosis surveillance case data, and environmental exposure data to evaluate the risk of silicosis among highway repair workers. We reviewed silicosis case data from the construction industry in 3 states that have silicosis re
Silicosis, a massive fibrosis of the lungs, results from the inhalation of excessive amounts of silica dust. This severe, irreversible, disabling, and often fatal occupational disease can be prevented by dust control. Only free silica causes the disease, which can develop rapidly but is generally chronic and progresses slowly. (Today a relation to cancer is suspected, based on epidemiological and experimental data concerning the relationship between silica exposure and the development of lung cancer.) Silicosis, one of the oldest known occupational diseases, [End Page 132] still occurs. This fact highlights the dichotomy, now as it did in earlier years, between possession of sufficient technological knowledge to prevent the disease and failure to eradicate it. This gap between the hazard of silicosis and effective action to eliminate it is a recurrent feature of the history of silicosis.. In a well-written and carefully researched account of this extraordinary disease, Elaine Katz has brought to ...
Phoenix residents who are exposed to respirable silica dust may develop irreversible or fatal silicosis, lung disease or TB - read comprehensive information for persons or family members who have suffered from silicosis, have a history of workplace silica dust exposure, and are considering a silicosis lawsuit in Phoenix
Maryland residents who are exposed to respirable silica dust may develop irreversible or fatal silicosis, lung disease or TB - read comprehensive information for persons or family members who have suffered from silicosis, have a history of workplace silica dust exposure, and are considering a silicosis lawsuit in Maryland
Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of renal disease among workers with silicosis.´. Methods A population of 1328 workers with definite silicosis and adequate work history information, drawn from three states with silicosis surveillance systems, was followed. Renal disease was ascertained via linkage of the cohort with a United States register (which has existed since 1977) of end-stage renal disease.. Results In the first analysis, it was assumed that the risk of end-stage renal disease began upon exposure to silica. In this analysis 12 cases of end-stage renal disease were found versus 15.6 expected, for a rate ratio of 0.77. Four cases of glomerular end-stage renal disease were found (standardized incidence ratio 2.65, 95% confidence interval 0.56-5.25). It is possible that some persons with end-stage renal disease died before being entered into the silicosis registers. In a second analysis, person-time at risk was assumed to begin at the date of entry into ...
Aim: To determine the prevalence of kidney disease in a cohort of individuals with silicosis. Methods: Review of medical records and questionnaires from patients reported to a state surveillance system for silicosis. Reporting of individuals with silicosis is required by state law. All individuals with silicosis reported as required by law to the State of Michigan. Individuals included in this art
The mortality of a cohort of 1487 male patients with silicosis in a population-based register followed up from 1980 to 1986 was evaluated with reference to the mortality rates of the general male population. A striking excess of deaths from all causes (observed 368, standardized mortality ratio, SMR 3.00) was noted. Seventy-four percent of the deaths were due to respiratory conditions and complications directly or indirectly related to silicosis. The risk of death was especially higher than expected in younger patients under 45 years of age. Patients with simple silicosis of profusion category 1 did not appear to be at any increased risk of death relative to the general population, but increasing excesses of death were associated with greater extent of simple and conglomerate disease. These increased mortality risks were observed in tuberculosis-free patients as well as in those who never smoked. For the same extent of silicotic disease, the risk of death was higher if tuberculosis occurred. ...
Plain text: Introduction Artificial stone is an increasingly popular material used to fabricate kitchen and bathroom benchtops. Cutting and grinding artificial stone is associated with generation of very high levels of respirable crystalline silica, and the frequency of cases of severe silicosis associated with this exposure is rapidly increasing. Aim To report the characteristics of a clinical series of Australian workers with artificial stone-associated silicosis. Methods Respiratory physicians voluntarily reported cases of artificial stone-associated silicosis identified in their clinical practices. Physicians provided information including occupational histories, respiratory function tests, chest radiology and histopathology reports, when available. results Seven male patients were identified with a median age of 44 years (range 26-61). All were employed in small kitchen and bathroom benchtop fabrication businesses with an average of eight employees (range 2-20). All workplaces primarily ...
To investigate the effect of chronic lung inflammation on the incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis in mice. Chronic lung inflammation in the form of silicosis was induced via intranasal application of silica particles. Immunization with collagen Type II commenced one week later and mice were sacrificed six weeks after booster immunization. Thereafter, silicosis was confirmed via flow cytometry and arthritis was evaluated performing knee and paw histology. Pronounced lung inflammation in the silica-treated compared to PBS-treated control mice was demonstrated by significantly elevated broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) cell count, attributable to increased numbers of macrophages and granulocytes. Inflammation in the lungs was not associated with elevated PAD2 and PAD4 expression, yet silica treated animals had significantly higher aCCP serum titers. However, lung inflammation did not lead to an increase in the incidence of arthritis, nor did it exacerbate the macroscopic or histologic joint
To investigate the effect of chronic lung inflammation on the incidence and severity of collagen-induced arthritis in mice. Chronic lung inflammation in the form of silicosis was induced via intranasal application of silica particles. Immunization with collagen Type II commenced one week later and mice were sacrificed six weeks after booster immunization. Thereafter, silicosis was confirmed via flow cytometry and arthritis was evaluated performing knee and paw histology. Pronounced lung inflammation in the silica-treated compared to PBS-treated control mice was demonstrated by significantly elevated broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) cell count, attributable to increased numbers of macrophages and granulocytes. Inflammation in the lungs was not associated with elevated PAD2 and PAD4 expression, yet silica treated animals had significantly higher aCCP serum titers. However, lung inflammation did not lead to an increase in the incidence of arthritis, nor did it exacerbate the macroscopic or histologic joint
By Mazurek, JM Wood, JM Occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica occurs in construction, mining, manufacturing, and other industries and can result in silicosis and other lung diseases. Classic (chronic) silicosis results from exposure to relatively low concentrations of respirable crystalline silica for ,/=10 years. Exposure to higher concentrations of silica for 5-10 years can cause accelerated silicosis, and symptoms of acute silicosis can sometimes develop within weeks of initial exposure to extreme concentrations of silica (I). Deaths in young adults from acute or accelerated silicosis generally reflect more recent and intense exposures (2). Silicosis is incurable, but preventable through effective control and elimination of exposure to respirable crystalline silica (1). To characterize recent trends in premature mortality attributed to silicosis in the United States, CDC analyzed annual mortality data from 1968-2005, the most recent years for which complete data were ...
According to a 2009 study by the University of Witwatersrand and University College, London, there are approximately 288,000 cases of compensable silicosis in South Africa involving former gold miners who have contracted silicosis as a direct result of their work.. Additional research has shown that approximately 20 to 30 percent of former and current gold miners contracted silicosis because of their exposure to harmful quantities of dust underground. These and other similar studies show the same pattern-staggering numbers of miners, families and communities injured over decades and decades because of the mining industrys neglect.. The overwhelming majority of former gold miners are from areas historically known for supplying migratory labour to locations, including the Eastern Cape, Lesotho, Mozambique and Botswana. These areas are characterized by poverty and under-development. The Nelson Mandela Centre of Memorys website quotes Padraig OMalleys The Hope of Hope - South Africas Transition ...
GPs are at the forefront in combatting a new epidemic - but its not an infectious disease that has public health experts concerned. An epidemic of silicosis has emerged among workers in the engineered stone industry, bringing into focus the continued risk of lung diseases facing Australian workers across many occupations. As with coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP), which shocked physicians when it re-emerged among Queensland coal miners a few years ago, it was thought that safe work practices had relegated silicosis to history. The silicosis epidemic among stonemasons in Queensland is a stark reminder of workplace dangers, writes Megan Howe.
There is no specific treatment for silicosis. Removing the source of silica exposure is important to prevent the disease from getting worse. Supportive treatment includes cough medicine, bronchodilators, and oxygen if needed. Antibiotics are prescribed for respiratory infections as needed.. Treatment also includes limiting exposure to irritants and quitting smoking.. People with silicosis are at high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB). Silica is believed to interfere with the bodys immune response to the bacteria that cause TB. Skin tests to check for exposure to TB should be done regularly. Those with a positive skin test should be treated with anti-TB drugs. Any change in the appearance of the chest x-ray may be a sign of TB.. People with severe silicosis may need to have a lung transplant.. ...
In the present study, a rat silicosis model was established using HOPE MED8050 exposure control apparatus. This system is a non-invasive instrument that allows animal inhalation of silica particles and may be set to a certain dust concentration. Compared with intratracheal administration of silica dust (20,21), using the dynamic pollution control system facilitated the establishment of an ideal silicosis model. Histopathological observations demonstrated that, following inhalation of SiO2 for 4 weeks, silicotic nodules containing macrophages developed in the lung tissues of rats. Furthermore, the number of silicotic nodules increased after 8 and 12 weeks of inhalation. Fibrous and cellular silicotic nodules with diffuse interstitial fibrosis were observed in rats at 16 weeks. Myofibroblasts are α-SMA-expressing cells that originate from epithelial-mesenchymal transition (22), endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (23), pericyte transdifferentiation (24) and pleural mesothelial cells (25) or ...
Silicosis Definition Silicosis is a progressive disease that belongs to a group of lung disorders called pneumoconioses. Silicosis is marked by the formation of lumps (nodules) and fibrous scar tissue in the lungs.
The SILICOSIS project seeks to re-evaluate the epidemiological importance of silicosis by combining history, social science and public health. Indeed, its medical definition was literally, and minimally, bargained in the 1930s by employers and unions and States under the aegis of International Labour Organization. This truncated basis has continued to have its effects and led to a massive underreporting of the cases of silicosis, many of which were declared as tuberculosis. In this view, SILICOSIS will aim, first, at a rereading of the 20th century epidemiology of silicosis and tuberculosis from a transnational perspective by comparing European and Southern African mining fields, two regions particularly hit. It will also aim at analysing the real magnitude of silicosis today, mainly in the non mining sector, by questioning contemporary medical classifications ...
First payments in South African silicosis settlement expected in second quarter 5 February 2020. The first payments to miners who contracted the fatal lung diseases silicosis and tuberculosis from a R5-billion class action settlement by gold producers are expected in the second quarter of 2020, a lawyer for the companies said on Wednesday. The companies involved are Harmony Gold, Gold Fields, African Rainbow Minerals, Sibanye-Stillwater, AngloGold Ashanti and Anglo American South Africa. The latter no longer has gold assets but at one time was a bullion producer.. …The exact number of eligible claimants is unknown but is expected to be less than 100 000, attorney Michael Murray told a mining industry conference, the Mining Indaba, in Cape Town. The class action suit was launched in 2012 on behalf of miners suffering from silicosis, an incurable disease caused by inhaling silica dust from gold-bearing rocks, and a settlement was agreed by mining firms in 2018. It causes shortness of breath, a ...
TB is linked with a deadly silicosis epidemic, hidden for decades in rural South Africa. Gold mining firms must make amends. - Jaine Roberts, The Hidden Epidemic Amongst Former Miners: Silicosis, Tuberculosis and the Occupational Diseases in Mines and Works Act in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. A 2007 health and safety audit found that the tuberculosis rates in mines continued to be the highest in the world, and the audit was blunt as to why: … there is a pervasive culture of non-compliance to legislative requirements. Inquiry after inquiry makes findings to the effect that risk assessments are not conducted, training is not done, early-morning examinations are not done, equipment is not maintained and the list goes on and on.. Jaine Roberts, the director of research at Rhodes University in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, and the author of The Hidden Epidemic Amongst Former Miners: Silicosis, Tuberculosis and the Occupational Diseases in Mines and Works Act in the Eastern Cape, South ...
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ILO: International Labour Organization - The International Labour Organization is the UN specialized agency which seeks the promotion of social justice and internationally recognized human and labour rights
ILO: International Labour Organization - The International Labour Organization is the UN specialized agency which seeks the promotion of social justice and internationally recognized human and labour rights
INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMME ON CHEMICAL SAFETY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH CRITERIA 72 PRINCIPLES OF STUDIES ON DISEASES OF SUSPECTED CHEMICAL ETIOLOGY AND THEIR PREVENTION This report contains the collective views of an international group of experts and does not necessarily represent the decisions or the stated policy of the United Nations Environment Programme, the International Labour Organisation, or the World Health Organization. Published under the joint sponsorship of the United Nations Environment Programme, the International Labour Organisation, and the World Health Organization World Health Orgnization Geneva, 1987 The International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) is a joint venture of the United Nations Environment Programme, the International Labour Organisation, and the World Health Organization. The main objective of the IPCS is to carry out and disseminate evaluations of the effects of chemicals on human health and the quality of the environment. Supporting activities include the ...
INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMME ON CHEMICAL SAFETY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH CRITERIA 104 PRINCIPLES FOR THE TOXICOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF PESTICIDE RESIDUES IN FOOD This report contains the collective views of an international group of experts and does not necessarily represent the decisions or the stated policy of the United Nations Environment Programme, the International Labour Organisation, or the World Health Organization. Published under the joint sponsorship of the United Nations Environment Programme, the International Labour Organisation, and the World Health Organization World Health Organization Geneva, 1990 The International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) is a joint venture of the United Nations Environment Programme, the International Labour Organisation, and the World Health Organization. The main objective of the IPCS is to carry out and disseminate evaluations of the effects of chemicals on human health and the quality of the environment. Supporting activities include the development of ...
By Our Representative. Gujarats powerful health officialdom has created yet another hurdle in the payment of compensation to the victims of the deadly disease, silicosis. It has questioned the diagnosis of the disease by a privately-run reputed hospital operating in Anand district. This came to light in a strongly-worded representation made by the Peoples Training and Research Centres (PTRCs) Jagdish Patel to state health minister Nitin Patel.. The representation wonders whether the hospital in question, which tested these patients, is recognized by the state officialdom at all, and if yes, then why is its expert doctors diagnosis being questioned.. According to the representation, an outpatient department (OPD) of the Karamsad-based Pramukh Swami Medical College-cum-Shri Krishna Hospital has been in existence at the PTRCs office of Shakarpur area in Khambhat taluka ever since 2007. Khambhat, and especially Shakrpur, is notorious for large number of silicosis cases, caused by polishing ...
Silica exposure remains a serious threat to nearly 2 million U.S. workers, including more than 100,000 workers in high risk jobs such as abrasive blasting, foundry work, stonecutting, rock drilling, quarry work and tunneling. The seriousness of the health hazards associated with silica exposure is demonstrated by the fatalities and disabling illnesses that continue to occur in sandblasters and rockdrillers. Crystalline silica has been classified as a human lung carcinogen. Additionally, breathing crystalline silica dust can cause silicosis, which in severe cases can be disabling, or even fatal. The respirable silica dust enters the lungs and causes the formation of scar tissue, thus reducing the lungs ability to take in oxygen. There is no cure for silicosis. Since silicosis affects lung function, it makes one more susceptible to lung infections like tuberculosis. In addition, smoking causes lung damage and adds to the damage caused by breathing silica dust ...
A day-long conference organized by the National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) on silicosis for endemic States ended on Friday. The conference made several suggestions to ameliorate the cause of millions of workers, who due to exposure to silica dust fall victim to silicosis, which is an incurable disease of lungs and often confused with tuberculosis.
What is silicosis? Learn more about this disease often contracted due to inhaling hazardous dust. Discover how to prevent and spot silicosis. Click here.
The federal government responded and in the Secretary of Labor, Francis Perkins, held a National Silicosis Conference and initiated a campaign to
If you have been diagnosed with acute silicosis, you may wish to go over the following five questions with your physician: 1. What will be the line of treatment you will take? Acute silicosis is g
Objectives Whether nonpneumoconiotic silica-exposed coal miners develop radiologically recognizable pleural changes was studied.. Methods In a retrospective follow-up study, the oldest and the most recent chest X-rays of 765 workers with a profusion category lower than 1/0 according to the International Labour Office were read.. Results Altogether 720 (94.1%) workers had no abnormalities, and 45 (5.9%) showed some pleural alteration in the first X-ray. In 43 (6%) of the 720 with no initial abnormalities, some pleural change was detected in the last X-ray. There was a statistical difference (P=0.022) according to silica exposure category [low: 5 (2.4%); medium: 8 (6%); high: 30 (8%)]. The relative risk for any pleural alteration was significantly increased in relation to the silica-exposed group [medium: odds ratio (OR) 5.72, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.4-23.5, P=0.016; high: OR 7.62, 95% CI 2.1-27.2, P=0.002] and to rib alterations (OR 3.74, 95% CI 1.4-9.7, P=0.007). In 19 (2.6%) workers ...
Since the original establishment of the ILO List of Occupational Diseases in 1925 (C18) with 3 occupational diseases [13], the list has played a key role in harmonizing the development of policies on occupational diseases and in promoting their prevention at the international level. The ILO List of Occupational Diseases has been updated continually, reflecting changes in the structure of modern industry and the scientific advancement of occupational medicine. In addition, as an agreement of the tripartite meetings and approved results of the International Labour Conference, the ILO list of occupational disease should have been in the common territory of workers, employers, and governments. Until C121 was revised in 1980, the ILO List of Occupational Diseases had been an appended schedule for a workers compensation scheme, in which the included items were limited. Since R194, the ILO List has changed to a focus on prevention, recording, and reporting of occupational diseases by expanding its ...
As a stonemason, Karl had no idea silica dust from the engineered stone he worked with could leave him with silicosis, a deadly lung disease.
Silica, or silicon dioxide (SiO2), is a group IV metal oxide, which naturally occurs in both crystalline and amorphous forms. The most abundant form of silica is α-quartz, and the term quartz is often used in place of the general term crystalline silica. Crystalline silica has been classified as a definite carcinogen (Group 1) causing lung cancer by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) [1]. In some studies, kidney, stomach, and esophageal cancers have also been reported to be associated with crystalline silica [2, 3]. In Korea, mining, stone cutting, construction, and refining are known to be hazardous industries with respect to crystalline silica exposure, and many silicosis cases have occurred among these industries [4]. There has been no systematic survey on the number of workers exposed to crystalline silica in Korea, but in one survey in 2005, the number of workers handling crystalline silica was estimated to be about 48,000, while the number of crystalline silica ...
Institute of Experimental Cardiology, All-Union Cardiologic Scientific Center, Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR, Moscow. Institute of Work Hygiene and Occupational Diseases, Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR, Moscow. (Presented by Academician of the Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR V. N. Smirnov.) Translated from Byulleten Éksperimentalnoi Biologii i Meditsiny, Vol. 112, No. 9, pp. 265-267, September, 1991. ...
OBJECTIVE: To determine early signs of renal injury due to occupational silica exposure. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analytical research. SETTINGS: Kenyatta National Hospital for the referent population and Clayworks ceramics, bricks and tiles factory for the assessment of occupational silica exposure. SUBJECTS: Thirty three non-smoking silica-exposed male industrial workers and 38 non-smoking male referents participated in this study. RESULTS: Silica-exposed males excreted significantly increased levels of U.TP, U.Malb, U.ALP, U.y-GT and U.LDH compared to referent males. Among the silica-exposed males, U.Si negatively correlated significantly with age, U.TP correlated significantly to each of U.ALP and U.LDH. However, no correlation was observed between work duration and U.Si. CONCLUSION: The present study shows that there is associated glomerular and proximal tubular damage among silica exposed workers which is not duration related and is seemingly subclinical and nonprogressive and urinary silica ...
The agencies have previously identified exposure to silica as a health hazard to stone countertop workers. Their alert follows reports of 70-plus cases in Spain and Israel where plant and site workers handling raw materials and finished slabs developed silicosis, an incurable, progressively disabling and sometimes fatal lung disease. The OSHA/NIOSH document offers protection measures for countertop fabrication and installation worksites: monitoring the air to determine silica exposure levels; using engineering controls and safe work practices to control dust exposure; and, providing workers with respiratory protection when needed, plus training and information on silica hazards.. Crystalline silica is found in granite, sandstone, quartzite, various other rocks and sand. Workers who inhale very small crystalline silica particles are at risk for silicosis, symptoms of which can include shortness of breath, cough and fatigue. Airborne crystalline silica exposure also increase risk of developing ...
Better Work Jordan was established in Jordan in 2008 and started operations in 2009 at the request of the Jordanian government. Better Work Jordan is a comprehensive programme bringing together all levels of the garment industry to improve working conditions and respect of labour rights for workers, and boost the competitiveness of apparent business. A key objective and strategy of Better Work is to leverage the influence and financing of buyers to improve working conditions in factories. A second goal of BW has been to promote transparency and public reporting as a tool to create further incentives for factories to improve their labour standards. As BWJ enters the third phase of its program, it seeks to build on its successes, as well as to address the challenges that are before both the program and the garment industry in Jordan. The main outcomes that BWJ seeks to accomplish in this phase are threefold: to expand and optimize the programs offering of core services, to strengthen the capacity ...
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Theres not a lot of natural gas drilling in Kentucky, but nearby West Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania have become hotbeds as the Marcellus Shale is tapped. Now, in response to a study, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health are warning natural gas workers that they could be exposed to unhealthy levels of silica dust.. Silicosis is a lung disease caused by silica dust, and has long been associated with mining. But when natural gas workers fracture-or frack-the shale rock, they use large amounts of silica sand. As Elizabeth Grossman reports for public health blog The Pump Handle, that can cause major health problems too.. ...
Symptoms of silicosis can appear from a few weeks to many years after exposure to silica dust. Symptoms typically worsen over time as scarring in the lungs occurs.
The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) published its proposed rule for occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica in the Federal Register yesterday. The proposed rule includes two standards, one for general industry and maritime and the other specifically for construction. The construction standard would reduce the current permissible exposure limit (PEL) of respirable crystalline silica which was established in 1971 from 250 micrograms per cubic meter averaged over an 8-hour day down to 50 micrograms per cubic meter. OSHA claims the proposed rule would save the lives of 560 construction workers and prevent 1,080 cases of silicosis a year. Its estimated that approximately 1.85 million construction workers are exposed to respirable crystalline silica at their workplace.. Silica, also known as silicon dioxide, is a chemical compound that occurs in nature as a basic component of sand and quartz. Silica is found in a number of building materials including shingles, ...
Lester Brickman, Disparities Between Asbestosis and Silicosis Claims Generated by Litigation Screenings and Clinical Studies, 29 Cardozo Law Review 513 (2007 ...
Nol-Tec Systems offers complete dust mitigation solutions to help you meet OSHAs respirable crystalline silica standards. Contact us to learn more.
OBJECTIVES: To investigate risk factors for severe acute pneumonia in South African gold miners. DESIGN AND METHODS: An inclusive case-control study drawn from a predefined cohort of 4762 miners of known HIV status. Cases were defined by hospital admission meeting the clinical and radiological case definitions for pneumonia during 1998. Controls were randomly selected from the starting cohort. Considered risk factors were: HIV infection, smoking, age, occupation, previous tuberculosis, and chronic premorbid chest disease caused by post-tuberculous lung disease or silicosis (International Labour Office grades 1/0 and above) defined from routine screening radiographs taken before the start of the study. RESULTS: There were 109 cases and 400 controls. HIV infection [odds ratio (OR) 31.6], previous tuberculosis (OR 2.4), and an abnormal premorbid radiograph (OR 2.8) were each significantly more prevalent in cases than controls, whereas other variables were not. On multivariate analysis, HIV ...
In 1935, the U.S. Congress held hearings into the Hawks Nest disaster, a major public scandal involving the deaths of up to 2,000 workers during construction of a Union Carbide hydroelectric plant.[1] In the mid-1930s, silicosis was regarded as the king of occupational diseases, as well known and notorious as asbestosis would become in the 1990s. The Hawks Nest disaster even became the theme of the blues song, Silicosis is killin me by Pinewood Tom] (Josh White).[2]. Less than a week after the Hawks Nest hearings adjourned in Congress, a group of industrialists met privately at the Mellon Institute, a foundation that had been established by financiers Andrew and Richard Mellon in 1913 to benefit American manufacturers through the practical cooperation of science and industry. The meeting led to the formation of a new organization, headquartered at Mellon, called the Air Hygiene Foundation (AHF). Because of recent misleading publicity about silicosis and the appointment of a ...
Objective: Due to a outbreak of silica-related autoimmune disease in synthetic stone construction, we found an opportunity to characterize the rheumatologic complications in silicosis within these highly exposed patients.. Methods: We reviewed data from all cases of silicosis due to synthetic stone dust referred for lung transplant assessment. In addition to silicosis-specific data, we extracted data relevant to the manifestations of autoimmune diseases in these patients.. Results: Of 40 patients in our silicosis cohort, we identified nine (22.5%) with findings consistent with various autoimmune disease. Among these nine, three also had findings suggestive of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Based on an expected autoimmune disease prevalence of 3% ( European international data), the proportion of disease in our group represents a more than seven-fold excess (prevalence ratio [PR] 7.5; 99% CI 2.6 to 16.7). ...
Looking for Pneumoconioses? Find out information about Pneumoconioses. a group of lung diseases, classified as occupational diseases, caused by prolonged inhalation of industrial dust and characterized by the development of... Explanation of Pneumoconioses
The findings in this report are subject to at least five limitations. First, no information on silica exposure intensity or duration is listed on death certificates. Silicosis-associated deaths in young adults should be considered sentinel cases, potentially resulting from high exposures that cause short latency to disease onset and rapid disease progression. Second, lifetime occupational histories of decedents were not collected, and the usual industry and occupation listed on death certificates might not accurately represent the industry or occupation where the hazardous silica exposure occurred. However, there is a generally good agreement of industry and occupation information on death certificates compared with that from other sources (9). Third, industry and occupation information was only available for 40 (83%) and 42 (88%) decedents, respectively, who were included in reports during 1999-2013. Fourth, pneumoconiosis as a cause of death might have been misclassified or under- or ...
The University of Turin, Italy, in partnership with the International Training Centre of the International Labour Organization (ITCILO), the International Labour Office (ILO) and the International Commission of Occupational Health (ICOH) is offering a Master course in Occupational Safety and Health. This one-year programme, conducted in English, includes an internet-based distance learning phase and a face-to-face residential phase at the ITCILO campus in Turin, followed by another distance phase for the preparation of the dissertation. The proposed programme combines the advantages of both sound academic input and the international training experience of the organizing partners. An international approach has been applied to the contents, methodology development and composition of the training team. This programme involves participants from both developing and developed countries, who will have opportunity to share their different experiences. It also comprises a range of learning situations in ...
click video to pause - News Release. US LABOR DEPARTMENT ANNOUNCES FINAL RULE TO IMPROVE U.S. WORKERS PROTECTION FROM THE DANGERS OF RESPIRABLE SILICA DUST. Updated rule amends silica exposure regulations for first time since 1971. WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Labors Occupational Safety and Health Administration today announced a final rule to improve protections for workers exposed to respirable silica dust. The rule will curb lung cancer, silicosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and kidney disease in Americas workers by limiting their exposure to respirable crystalline silica.. More than 80 years ago, Labor Secretary Frances Perkins identified silica dust as a deadly hazard and called on employers to fully protect workers, said U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez. This rule will save lives. It will enable workers to earn a living without sacrificing their health. It builds upon decades of research and a lengthy stakeholder engagement process - including the ...
View Delamar Images. Delamar is located 16 miles west of Caliente. Farmers discovered gold in Pahranagat Valley in 1890, leading to the development of the Ferguson District, or Gold City, in 1891. In 1893 Captain John De Lamar of Montana bought the principal claim for $150,000. In 1894 the Delamar Mines principal components were the Hog Pen, the Glory Hole of the Mine, and the April Fool vein. By 1895 the Delamar mill was producing 260 tons of ore daily. In the following five years, production soared and Delamars output accounted for over half of the states total production. However, improper ventilation in several of the local mines led to the fatal disease silicosis. The dust from these mines, referred to as Delamar Dust, became known as The Maker of Widows. Despite the high number of silicosis cases, the mines had a constant labor force because miners were paid an average of $3 a day. By 1897 the population was over 3,000 citizens, but a fire destroyed half the city in 1900. In 1902 ...
OSHA does not provide specifics for exactly what data is acceptable under this option. The rule says OSHA intends for the performance option to give employers flexibility to accurately characterize exposures using whatever processes or data are most appropriate for their circumstances. The Agency concludes it would be inconsistent to include specifications or criteria in the definition of objective data and thus has not done so here.. In choosing this option, you are essentially making the case that you can present OSHA with information that will show you have good evidence that you know as much about your employees exposure to silica dust as you would under the scheduled monitoring option. OSHA says you can use this option whenever you have any combination of air monitoring data or objective data sufficient to accurately characterize employee exposures to respirable crystalline silica. Your sources can be previous air monitoring, or simply other information about silica exposure in your ...
Downloadable! The subject of this paper is decision-making on the adoption, ratification and implementation of conventions and recommendations of the International Labour Organisation (lLO). The first part of the paper provides-a brief introduction to the ILO as an international organisation, its treaty base and its most important bodies. In the second part of the paper, we focus on international labour standards. We first explain the decision-making procedure within the ILO which leads to the adoption of conventions and recommendations. We then deal with the ratification of conventions at the national stage and discuss the compliance with the obligations arising from ratification. The focus of the paper is not so much on the formal rules and procedures but on the question of how the rules are applied. Descriptive statistics give evidence on the degree of consensus at the decision-making stage, the voting behaviour of the delegates to the International Labour Conference, the ratification behaviour of
Occupational exposure is an important, global cause of respiratory disease. Unlike many other non-communicable lung diseases, the proximal causes of many occupational lung diseases are well understood and they should be amenable to control with use of established and effective approaches. Therefore, the risks arising from exposure to silica and asbestos are well known, as are the means of their prevention. Although the incidence of occupational lung disease has decreased in many countries, in parts of the world undergoing rapid economic transition and population growth-often with large informal and unregulated workforces-occupational exposures continue to impose a heavy burden of disease. The incidence of interstitial and malignant lung diseases remains unacceptably high because control measures are not implemented or exposures arise in novel ways. With the advent of innovative technologies, new threats are continually introduced to the workplace (eg, indium compounds and vicinal diketones). In ...
Miners were examined during 2005-2013 as part of the Enhanced Coal Workers Health Surveillance Program. Work histories were obtained, and chest radiographs and spirometry were administered. For those with multiple Program encounters, the most recent visit was used. Lung parenchymal abnormalities consistent with CWP were classified according to International Labour Organization guidelines, and reference values for FEV1 and FVC were calculated using reference equations derived from the 3rd National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Differences in lung function were evaluated by opacity profusion, and regression models were fit to characterize associations between profusion and lung function ...
Asbestos Convention, 1986 is an International Labour Organization Convention, adopted at the 72nd session of the International Labour Conference. It was established in 1986, with the preamble stating: Having decided upon the adoption of certain proposals with regard to safety in the use of asbestos,... As of 2017[update], the convention has been ratified by 35 states from all continents. Convention C162 - Asbestos Convention, 1986 (No. 162). NORMLEX. ILO. Retrieved 2017-09-20. Ratifications of C162 - Asbestos Convention, 1986 (No. 162). NORMLEX. ILO. Retrieved 2017-09-20. Full text at ...
A work accident, workplace accident, occupational accident, or accident at work is a discrete occurrence in the course of work leading to physical or mental occupational injury. According to the International Labor Organization (ILO), more than 337 million accidents happen on the job each year, resulting, together with occupational diseases, in more than 2.3 million deaths annually.. The phrase in the course of work can include work-related accidents happening off the companys premises, and can include accidents caused by third parties. The definition of work accident includes accidents occurring while engaged in an economic activity, or at work, or carrying on the business of the employer according to the ILO.. The phrase physical or mental harm means any injury, disease, or death. Occupational accidents differ from occupational diseases as accidents are unexpected and unplanned occurrences (e.g., mine collapse), while occupational diseases are contracted as a result of an exposure ...
A work accident, workplace accident, occupational accident, or accident at work is a discrete occurrence in the course of work leading to physical or mental occupational injury.[1] According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), more than 337 million accidents happen on the job each year, resulting, together with occupational diseases, in more than 2.3 million deaths annually.[2] The phrase in the course of work can include work-related accidents happening off the companys premises, and can include accidents caused by third parties, according to Eurostat. The definition of work accident includes accidents occurring while engaged in an economic activity, or at work, or carrying on the business of the employer according to the ILO. The phrase physical or mental harm means any injury, disease, or death. Occupational accidents differ from occupational diseases as accidents are unexpected and unplanned occurrences (e.g., mine collapse), while occupational diseases are contracted ...
Silica is one of the most abundant and complex naturally occurring minerals and the main component of sand. Quartz is the stable crystal form of silica, while tridymite and cristobalite are less stable crystalline forms. Crystalline silica becomes the biggest threat when it is pulverized or changed into very small particles that can become airborne and inhaled. While respirable crystalline silica is an exposure risk for the general population, it is the biggest threat to workers that are exposed to it in their occupational and industrial settings. An estimated 2.3 million workers in the United States are exposed to silica with the greatest exposure being in the construction field.. Throughout history, occupational silica exposures have been mainly linked to with the quarrying of stone, making of stone products, stone cutting as well as masonry. Today, exposures can also occur in the manufacturing of asphalt, glass, pottery, brick, tile, concrete, mortar, plaster and many other construction ...
Amber Selman Lynn wanted to help plan a womens march in Mobile, Ala., this month to mark the first anniversary of last years huge protests across the country. With no experience in political activism, she had helped organize a bus full of women to go from Mobile to NY. After they came back from the euphoric trip, they formed a group called Mobile Marchers that met monthly. They spoke up for the Affordable Care Act at town-hall-style meetings, and knocked on doors for the Alabama Senate candidate Doug Jones, the Democrat who beat Roy S. Moore in a stunning victory last month.. In Texas, emails collected by the organizers of the Womens March in Austin are being repur posed to promote candidates who support abortion rights. In Arkansas, Gwen Combs, the elementary schoolteacher who organized the Little Rock march, is now running for Congress. Thousands of women in October attended a convention in Detroit training them on every thing from lobbying elected officials to white supremacy.. [bs-quote ...
The length of employment in the tunnel rarely lasted more than a year. The dangerous working conditions and silica dust rendered many of the men unable to work. Excavation of the Hawks Nest Tunnel lead to the greatest death toll ever from silicosis in the United States. Of the approximately 5,000 men that worked on the project, an estimated 2,900 worked inside the tunnel. Of these men, silicosis claimed the lives of at least 764 workers. A majority of the dead were African Americans. In the years after the project was completed, many more would die due to their exposure to silica dust while working in the tunnel ...
Silicosis is an often-fatal lung disease caused by the exposure to respirable silica dust. Silicosis often leads to more severe ... When the study concluded, over one third of the sandblasters had lab-confirmed silicosis and two workers had died during the ... Silicosis. Occupational Safety & Health Administration. Retrieved 29 October 2016 New Jersey Department of Health and Senior ... silicosis, and pulmonary edema. Ingestion of potassium permanganate causes severe nausea and diarrhea and lastly, some rare ...
Leung, CC; Yu, IT; Chen, W (May 2012). "Silicosis". The British Journal of Radiology. 379 (9830): 2008-2018. doi:10.1016/S0140- ... Malignancy Lymphoma Carcinoma Mediastinal tumors Inorganic dust disease Silicosis Berylliosis Extrinsic allergic alveolitis ...
Given that silicosis greatly increases the risk of tuberculosis, more research about the effect of various indoor or outdoor ... "NIOSH - Silicosis: Learn the Facts!". cdc.gov. Retrieved 13 April 2010. Mutlu G, Mutlu E, Bellmeyer A, Rubinstein I (2006). " ... Smoking more than 20 cigarettes a day increases the risk of TB by two to four times while silicosis increases the risk about 30 ... People with silicosis have an approximately 30-fold greater risk for developing TB. Silica particles irritate the respiratory ...
"Silicosis". Medical Encyclopedia. MedlinePlus. Retrieved 2013-10-17. Darr; et al. "School IPM". University of Florida. ...
"Silikozis / Silicosis". AIFF. Archived from the original on 2012-03-18. Retrieved 2010-02-24. "Demsala Dawî: Şewaxan / The Last ... directed by Rüya Arzu Köksal Silicosis (Turkish: Silikozis) directed by Ethem Özgüven, Petra Holzer and Selçuk Erzurumlu The ...
... silicosis was widely known as knappers' rot. It has been claimed silicosis was responsible for the early death of three- ... Historically, flint knappers commonly suffered from silicosis, due to the inhalation of flint dust. This has been called "the ... Batty Shaw, A (1981). "Knapper's Rot, Silicosis in East Anglian Flint Knappers". Medical History. 25 (2): 151-168. doi:10.1017/ ... http://www.flintknapping.co.uk/arch.html Kalin, Jeffery (2010). "Flintknapping and Silicosis". Pudget Sound Knappers. Retrieved ...
Gye WE; Kettle EH (1922). "Silicosis and miners' phthisis". British Journal of Experimental Pathology. 3 (5): 241-251. PMC ... where he worked with Edgar Hartley Kettle on silicosis. In June 1919, William Bullock's wife retook her maiden name, and ...
PMID 19318947.(subscription required) Pollard KM (11 March 2016). "Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity". Frontiers in ...
upper (e.g., sarcoid, tuberculosis, silicosis/pneumoconiosis, ankylosing spondylitis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis) ...
The prevailing view was that silicosis was very serious but it was solely caused by silica and not coal dust. The miners' union ... A high proportion of the X-rays suggested that these miners had developed silicosis. NIOSH, with support from the Mine Safety ... Vanhée D, Gosset P, Boitelle A, Wallaert B, Tonnel AB (May 1995). "Cytokines and cytokine network in silicosis and coal workers ... It is similar to both silicosis from inhaling silica dust and asbestosis from inhaling asbestos dust. Inhaled coal dust ...
"Of Severed Fingers, Silicosis, and Stethoscopes". Jcrows.com. Retrieved May 24, 2012. "The UVM Connection > Distinguished ...
Patients with silicosis are at risk. It also appears in patients with hairy cell leukemia, but not in other lymphoproliferative ...
Tidy, H. (4 June 1949). "Ayerza's Disease, Silicosis, and Pulmonary Bilharziasis". Br Med J. 1 (4613): 977-978. doi:10.1136/bmj ...
Silicosis was shown to be very common among former denim sandblasters in Turkey in 2007. A 2015 study confirmed that silicosis ... Silicosis is still a risk when the operator is not completely isolated from the sandblasting apparatus. Sandblasting also may ... Sandblasting has the risk of causing silicosis to the workers, and in Turkey, more than 5,000 workers in the textile industry ... The silica dust produced in the sandblasting process would cause silicosis after sustained inhalation of the dust. In 1918, the ...
... miners are liable to develop silicosis. Based on a study done between 1977 and 1987, cardiovascular disease among potash ...
Cowan suffered from silicosis in later life. He died at the Wooroloo Sanatorium on 7 May 1955, and was buried in Karrakatta ...
... it is the same as silicosis. The word was deliberately coined to be the longest word in English, and has since been used[ ...
She had contracted silicosis from firing metallic glazes, which release toxic fumes, without the use of a protective mask in ... She occasionally used the pen name "Sylvia Silicosis." Her comics combined exaggerated fantasy and ribald humor with ...
He contracted the disease silicosis through this work. He was secretary of the Federated Miners' Union before his election to ...
... and silicosis. She was awarded the Liesegang Preis for her research on silicosis in 1940/41. A prize of a competition for ... She is known for her research on silicosis. After finishing her school at the Privatlyzeum Kirstein, Berlin-Charlottenburg, and ...
Over several years, 476 workers died from silicosis. July 2, 1937 The Holditch (also known as Brymbo) Colliery disaster was a ...
Kettle gained an international reputation by his studies on silicosis, tuberculosis, and gas gangrene. In 1918 Kettle married ... with William E. Gye: "Silicosis and miners' phthisis". British Journal of Experimental Pathology. 3 (5): 241-251. 1922. PMC ...
Silicosis can be associated with systemic autoimmune processes. "In the UK, all oil and gas operators must minimise the release ...
Christine helps her husband with his silicosis research. Eager to improve the lives of his patients, mainly coal miners, Manson ...
However flint knappers suffered from silicosis, known as Knappers Rot due to the inhalation of flint dust. It has been claimed ... ISBN 1-4463-5399-0. Batty Shaw, A (1981). "Knapper's Rot, Silicosis in East Anglian Flint Knappers". Medical History. 25: 151- ...
For services to the Refractories Industries (Silicosis) Scheme. John Holmes, Chief Milk Production Advisory Officer, Ministry ...
Dhar, Aarti (5 April 2015). "Amend Mines Act to contain silicosis: Rajasthan HRC" - via www.thehindu.com. "Fair compensation ... Dhar, Aarti (8 April 2015). "Debilitating effect of silicosis" - via www.thehindu.com. ... 1952 to contain the alarming spread of occupational diseases like silicosis and effectively deal with violators. Fair ...
Over several years, 476 workers died from silicosis. 1932-1968: The Minamata disaster was caused by the dumping of mercury ...
Lewis, Pete (23 October 2015). "Silicosis case: mines are being obstructive, say miners' lawyers". GroundUp News. Retrieved 17 ... "South Africa miners reach $400 million silicosis settlement with mining companies". Reuters. 3 May 2018. Retrieved 17 April ... mineworkers in a class action to claim damages from mining companies for damages due to the widespread contraction of silicosis ...
... of particles biopsied from pulmonary nodules indicates silicosis. Dermatologists use dermatoscopes to view skin ...
... : Primary industries associated with silica exposure of silicosis cases-California, 2000-2002 2008-446 June 2008 ... Silicosis: Primary occupations associated with silica exposure of silicosis cases-California, 2000-2002 2008-450 June 2008 ... Silicosis: Primary industries (2002 NAICS) associated with silica exposure of silicosis cases-Michigan, New Jersey, 1993-2011 ... Silicosis: Primary occupations (2000 COC) associated with silica exposure of silicosis cases-Michigan, New Jersey, 1993-2011 ...
Silicosis is marked by the formation of lumps (nodules) and fibrous scar tissue in the lungs. ... Silicosis Definition Silicosis is a progressive disease that belongs to a group of lung disorders called pneumoconioses. ... Silicosis Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine, 3rd ed. COPYRIGHT 2006 Thomson Gale. Silicosis. Definition. Silicosis is a progressive ... Silicosis is currently incurable. The prognosis for patients with chronic silicosis is generally good. Acute silicosis, however ...
Acute silicosis is a rare complication of short-term exposure to very large amounts of silica. This condition is life- ... Workers with silicosis are at an increased risk of tuberculosis, kidney disease and arthritis. Exposure to RCS may also cause ... He has developed silicosis - a serious respiratory condition that will almost certainly shorten his life after breathing in RCS ... Silicosis can develop in workers exposed to RCS in a number of industries including construction, stone working, quarrying, ...
Prolonged inhalation of silica-containing dusts puts workers at risk for the disease silicosis-a nodular fibrosis of the lungs ... Prolonged inhalation of silica-containing dusts puts these workers at risk for the disease silicosis-a nodular fibrosis of the ...
Silicosis is a lung disease caused by breathing in (inhaling) silica dust. ... Acute silicosis; Chronic silicosis; Accelerated silicosis; Progressive massive fibrosis; Conglomerate silicosis; ... Three types of silicosis occur:. *Chronic silicosis, which results from long-term exposure (more than 20 years) to low amounts ... This is the most common form of silicosis.. *Accelerated silicosis, which occurs after exposure to larger amounts of silica ...
More than one million American workers are currently at risk of developing silicosis, a debilitating, irreversible, sometimes ... The cause of silicosis has been known for centuries, yet Americans continue to die each and every year of this completely ... Silicosis is caused by breathing in particles of crystalline silica-the primary component of sand. Since 1974. The National ... "I had never heard of silicosis," said the worker speaking of his diagnosis. "There was one other man there who had died, but ...
Science News was founded in 1921 as an independent, nonprofit source of accurate information on the latest news of science, medicine and technology. Today, our mission remains the same: to empower people to evaluate the news and the world around them. It is published by the Society for Science, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) membership organization dedicated to public engagement in scientific research and education.. ...
Definition of employee with chronic silicosis *In a claim for chronic silicosis under Part B, claimant must establish that the ... Below are the head notes for the FAB decisions and orders relating to the topic heading, Chronic Silicosis. The head notes are ... A claim based on chronic silicosis under Part B must include a written diagnosis of that condition, signed by a physician, and ... consistent with silicosis. EEOICPA Fin. Dec. No. 55834-2004 (Dept of Labor, September 21, 2004). ...
... scarring lung disease such as silicosis (silica-related lung disease). ...
There is no cure for silicosis. This means that prevention of exposure is the most effective defense against silica-related ...
Breathing in particles (asbestosis, silicosis) causes some types. ... Learn about Silicosis (American Lung Association) * Pneumonitis (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Also in ... Silicosis: Learn the Facts! (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) - PDF Also in Spanish ... Silicosis, from inhaling silica dust. Other causes include autoimmune diseases or occupational exposures to molds, gases, or ...
Most people get silicosis from a workplace where they inhale large amounts of silica dust. Learn more about the causes, risk ... Can Silicosis Be Prevented? Silicosis is a lung disease. It usually happens in jobs where you breathe in dust that contains ... How Is Silicosis Diagnosed?. Other tests to help diagnose silicosis include:. * Chest X-ray or CT scan: This test checks your ... Who Gets Silicosis?. Most people get silicosis because theyre exposed to silica dust at work. Jobs in these fields may put you ...
Silicosis is a fibronodular lung disease caused by inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica (alpha-quartz or silicon ... encoded search term (Silicosis) and Silicosis What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and Diseases. * Silicosis ... and almost all the survivors developed silicosis. [9] More recently, in 1996, silicosis was reported in 60 of 1072 workers in ... www.lung.org/lung-health-and-diseases/lung-disease-lookup/silicosis/learn-about-silicosis.html. Updated: March 13, 2018; ...
珪肺または硅肺(けいはい、Silicosis、Potters rot)は、結晶シリカ(ケイ酸)粉塵を吸入することで生じる職業性肺疾患の一種で、結節をともなう肺上葉の炎症と瘢痕を特徴とする。塵肺の一種に分類される。珪肺症、硅肺症、珪粉症、硅粉症などともい ... About: Silicosis Goto Sponge NotDistinct Permalink An Entity of Type : dbo:Disease, within Data Space : dbpedia.org associated ... El término silicosis fue acuñado por el
This report describes 18 recent cases of silicosis, including the first two fatalities reported in the United States, among ... Patient died from silicosis.. § Abnormal pulmonary function test defined as FEV1,80% predicted, FVC,80% predicted, FEV1/FVC,70 ... Recently, silicosis outbreaks have been reported in several countries among workers who cut and finish stone slabs for ... Eighteen cases of silicosis, including two fatalities, are reported among stone fabrication workers in four states. Several ...
Silica flour has been associated with all types of silicosis, including acute silicosis. Silicosis is due to deposition of fine ... Chest X-ray showing uncomplicated silicosis Complicated silicosis Silicosis ILO Classification 2-2 R-R Fibrothorax and pleural ... Silicosis resulted in at least 43,000 deaths globally in 2013, down from at least 50,000 deaths in 1990. The name silicosis ( ... This is the most common type of silicosis. Patients with this type of silicosis, especially early on, may not have obvious ...
Silicosis is a lung disease caused by the inhalation of crystalline silica dust. Silica exposure is common in mines and in a ... Silicosis Silicosis is a lung disease caused by the inhalation of crystalline silica dust. Silica is a common mineral found ... Our Approach to Silicosis. UCSF provides comprehensive evaluations and care for work-related lung diseases, such as silicosis. ... Although silicosis currently has no cure, treatments can relieve symptoms and prevent complications. Lung transplantation may ...
... have undertaken extensive work to build a foundation of knowledge on Accelerated Silicosis. ... Accelerated Silicosis. Accelerated Silicosis. The Australasian Faculty of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (AFOEM) and ... Accelerated Silicosis overview. Accelerated silicosis is caused by the inhalation of large amounts of respirable crystalline ... Accelerated Silicosis FAQs. Read key information about queries and concerns relating to this condition. ...
Panel formed to tackle silicosis in Coimbatore district The Hindu The State Government has formed a district-level committee ... comprising health and industry officials in Coimbatore on Wednesday to exclusively tackle silicosis, a disease that causes ... JAIPUR: The Silicosis-afflicted patients recounted their plight on the third day of the ongoing dharna on Wednesday.. ... Men working in mines in Rajasthan state are dying early due to silicosis caused by dust, raising safety concerns.. ...
Exposure to respirable crystalline silica dust during construction activities can cause silicosis. This report addresses the ... potential health effects and symptoms of exposure and suggests ways to reduce or prevent silicosis. ... Silicosis in Construction Where Silicosis Comes From and Why Its a Construction Jobsite Concern. Crystalline silica is the ... Types of Silicosis. Workers may develop any of three types of silicosis, depending on the concentration of airborne silica:. ...
Eighty-two new cases of silicosis have been identified in Panna in a recent survey conducted by Environics Trust (Occupation ... 82 new cases of silicosis found in MP Eighty-two new cases of silicosis have been identified in Panna in a recent survey ... He had silicosis with a permanent disability of 50% as per the clinical examination, occupational history and radiology. Prior ... Eighty-two new cases of silicosis have been identified in Panna in a recent survey conducted by Environics Trust (Occupation ...
... against a court ruling allowing class action suits seeking damages for up to half a million miners who contracted silicosis and ... READ: Silicosis: Landmark judgment for mineworkers. A High Court decision last month set the stage for protracted proceedings ... Silicosis is an incurable disease caused by inhaling silica dust from gold-bearing rocks. It causes shortness of breath, a ... allowing class action suits seeking damages for up to half a million miners who contracted the fatal lung diseases silicosis ...
Thus, the primary symptoms of silicosis are breathing difficulty, coughing, chest pain, and general weakness. Silicosis also ... These fibrous masses, which are characteristic of silicosis, hinder lung expansion and gas exchange. ... Thus, the primary symptoms of silicosis are breathing difficulty, coughing, chest pain, and general weakness. Silicosis also ... Silicosis at 20x Magnification. When silica dust is inhaled into the lungs, the tiny particles are engulfed by macrophages, ...
Texas and Washington report 18 cases of severe silicosis, and two fatalities, among young, mostly Hispanic men, who worked at ... Comparable rates of silicosis in the U.S. would mean that 11,500 workers in the industry could have silicosis. Small stone ... The National Jewish Health Center of Excellence for Silicosis and Its Prevention offers diagnosis and treatment of silicosis as ... Severe silicosis found among fabricators of engineered quartz stone Eighteen cases discovered in four states suggest much wider ...
The ToxicDocs collection includes all of the archives notable materials on asbestosis and silicosis, including key reports ...
... silicosis and tuberculosis. In May the High Court ruled that mineworkers could launch a silicosis class action suit against ... READ: Silicosis ruling not on merit - mine companies. "The Working Group will continue with its efforts - which have been ... READ: Silicosis: Landmark judgment for mineworkers. "The companies are conscious of concerns that the appeal processes will ... The Working Group pointed out at the time that it is important to note that the court finding enabling a silicosis class action ...
Silicosis. Silicosis is a lung disease caused by inhalation of crystalline free silica dust. It is characterised by nodular ... Silicosis is a respiratory disorder caused by inhalation of crystalline silica dust and causes inflammation and nodular lesions ... Although everyone knows that the workers have been infected with silicosis, on record it is hardly recognised by the government ... Mining and cutting of stones produces silica dust and prolonged exposure causes silicosis among workers. It is an occupational ...
Acute silicosis develops even faster, sometimes in as little as a few weeks of heavy contact with silica dust. There is no real ... Accelerated silicosis usually occurs over as few as five to ten years, the hastened development stemming from exposure to ... Acute silicosis is often treated with steroids, but the prognosis is usually poor because once respiratory failure begins it ... The nature of acute silicosis, however, makes it a particularly dire condition that can equally affect the young and the old. ...
... nine other drill crew members who worked for the same company had chest radiographic findings compatible with simple silicosis ...
  • Workers with silicosis are at an increased risk of tuberculosis, kidney disease and arthritis. (hse.gov.uk)
  • People with silicosis are at high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB). (medlineplus.gov)
  • In advanced cases, the following may also occur: Cyanosis, pallor along upper parts of body (blue skin) Cor pulmonale (right ventricle heart disease) Respiratory insufficiency Patients with silicosis are particularly susceptible to tuberculosis (TB) infection-known as silicotuberculosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cape Town - Gold mining firms will appeal against a South African court ruling allowing class action suits seeking damages for up to half a million miners who contracted the fatal lung diseases silicosis and tuberculosis, a lawyer for the miners said on Friday. (news24.com)
  • Silicosis patients are at higher risk for autoimmune diseases and lung infections, especially tuberculosis. (eurekalert.org)
  • The High Court, in its judgment, certified the establishment of two separate classes for silicosis and tuberculosis and also changed the common law in respect of general damages claims. (news24.com)
  • On Friday the members of the Working Group filed petitions to the Supreme Court of Appeal for leave to appeal against the certification of the two separate classes for silicosis and tuberculosis. (news24.com)
  • The mining firms were appealing against a High Court ruling allowing a class action suit seeking damages for up to half a million miners who contracted the fatal lung diseases, silicosis and tuberculosis. (news24.com)
  • JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - South African gold producers agreed a 5 billion rand (294.39 million pounds) class action settlement on Thursday with law firms representing thousands of miners who contracted the fatal lung diseases silicosis and tuberculosis, officials said on Thursday. (reuters.com)
  • Having silicosis increases the risk of other problems, such as tuberculosis, lung cancer, and chronic bronchitis. (lung.org)
  • The proposed class included mineworkers who had silicosis or tuberculosis, or their dependants. (lexology.com)
  • dagger] Deaths with the ICD-10 underlying cause of death coded as J65 (pneumoconiosis associated with tuberculosis) were included if code J62 (silicosis) was listed on the entity axis. (redorbit.com)
  • JOHANNESBURG - The out of court settlement for the tuberculosis and silicosis class action brought against six gold mining companies on the Witwatersrand could be signed in the next six months, Graham Briggs, the convener of the Occupational Lung Diseases Working Group, said yesterday. (iol.co.za)
  • It has been reported that nearly half-a-million miners who contracted silicosis and tuberculosis are from neighbouring countries that supplied labour to South African mines. (iol.co.za)
  • This provides important evidence for large scale efforts underway on the subcontinent to combat tuberculosis and silicosis (two diseases closely associated). (internationalsos.com)
  • Those with silicosis are also more likely to develop tuberculosis (TB). (genderjustice.org.za)
  • Many people have lost loved ones due to awful diseases such as silicosis and tuberculosis. (ngopulse.org)
  • People often confuse silicosis with tuberculosis (TB). (ngopulse.org)
  • They want to be able to claim up to half a million rand each from gold mining companies if they contracted silicosis and tuberculosis underground. (ngopulse.org)
  • The silicosis and tuberculosis case was brought in 2004 and it and has still not been resolved. (ngopulse.org)
  • The class action would include two classes, one being the gold miners who have contracted pulmonary tuberculosis and their dependents, and the other being the gold miners who have contracted silicosis and their dependents. (ngopulse.org)
  • Claims can be made for those who have died of silicosis and tuberculosis. (ngopulse.org)
  • Also known by older names including rock tuberculosis, potter's rot, grinder's rot, dust consumption, and stonemason's disease, silicosis belongs to a group of lung disorders called pneumoconiosis. (carlsonattorneys.com)
  • According to the Health and Safety Executive , people who have silicosis and/or have been exposed to RCS also carry a higher risk of developing other medical conditions such as lung cancer, tuberculosis, kidney disease and arthritis. (carestream.com)
  • Tuberculosis- La silicosis hace a un individuo más susceptible a TB. (ncdcr.gov)
  • Silicosis can also become complicated with other lung disease, such as tuberculosis, fungal infections, lung cancer and other autoimmune diseases. (findapersonalinjuryattorney.com)
  • Silicosis is a primary pneumoconiosis involving fibronodular lung disease caused by inhalation of silica dust. (medscape.com)
  • Coal miners are at risk of mixed silicosis and coal workers' pneumoconiosis . (merckmanuals.com)
  • The findings of innumerable small nodules with predominant upper lobes affection, associated with the provided history of occupational exposures make silicosis (classic and simple) the most probable diagnosis, though coal workers' pneumoconiosis and talcosis could give very similar radiological findings. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Silicosis is a lethal pneumoconiosis disease characterized by chronic lung inflammation and fibrosis. (portlandpress.com)
  • Silicosis is considered as one of the serious types of pneumoconiosis and a potentially fatal occupational fibrotic lung disease [ 1 ], which is highly prevalent in developing countries, especially in China, South Africa, and Brazil [ 2 ]. (portlandpress.com)
  • In China, there were 11,471 cases of silicosis reported in 2014, accounting for 42.69% of 26,873 new pneumoconiosis cases (Ministry of Health of the People's Republic of China, 2015). (frontiersin.org)
  • Silicosis is a type of pneumoconiosis - lung diseases that are caused by inhalation of mineral dusts. (healthhype.com)
  • The signs and symptoms of silicosis is similar to the other common types of pneumoconiosis - asbestosis and coal worker's pneumoconiosis. (healthhype.com)
  • Silicosis is a kind of disease known as pneumoconiosis, which means a disease resulting from breathing in dust - dust like silica or asbestos. (tenlaw.com)
  • Chronic silicosis may take 15 or more years of exposure to develop. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Chronic silicosis may progress to more advanced forms. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Chronic silicosis, which results from long-term exposure (more than 20 years) to low amounts of silica dust. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Below are the head notes for the FAB decisions and orders relating to the topic heading, Chronic Silicosis. (dol.gov)
  • The head notes are grouped under the following subheadings: Definition of employee with chronic silicosis, and Medical evidence. (dol.gov)
  • In a claim for chronic silicosis under Part B, claimant must establish that the employee was a DOE employee or a DOE contractor employee who was present for a number of workdays aggregating at least 250 workdays during the mining of tunnels at a DOE facility located in Nevada or Alaska for tests or experiments related to an atomic weapon. (dol.gov)
  • A claim based on chronic silicosis under Part B must include a written diagnosis of that condition, signed by a physician, and must be accompanied by either a chest x-ray interpreted by a B reader, or the result of a CAT scan or other imaging technique, or a lung biopsy, consistent with silicosis. (dol.gov)
  • If you have chronic silicosis, you're at higher risk for TB, flu , and pneumonia. (webmd.com)
  • [ 1 , 2 ] Acute (weeks to years of exposure) and chronic/classic forms (10-30 years after exposure), as well as accelerated silicosis (≤10 years of high-level exposure), have been recognized based on the duration of exposure to silica and on the latency of the symptoms. (medscape.com)
  • [ 8 ] The incidence of silicosis (50%-60%) and mortality (10%-100%) for these occupations far outnumber the mortality (6 per 1000 workers) for chronic silicosis within the silica mining industry. (medscape.com)
  • Because chronic silicosis is slow to develop, signs and symptoms may not appear until years after exposure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pulmonary complications of silicosis also include chronic bronchitis and airflow limitation (indistinguishable from that caused by smoking), non-tuberculous Mycobacterium infection, fungal lung infection, compensatory emphysema, and pneumothorax. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although most commonly silicosis is a chronic disease that develops over decades from exposure to low concentrations of silica dust, accelerated and acute forms are also known. (microscopyu.com)
  • There are three types of silicosis: acute, chronic, and accelerated. (lung.org)
  • Chronic silicosis, which appears 10 to 30 years after exposure and can affect upper lungs and sometimes cause extensive scarring. (lung.org)
  • You may also have shortness of breath over time, especially with chronic silicosis. (lung.org)
  • In chronic silicosis, the silica dust causes areas of swelling in the lungs and chest lymph nodes, which makes breathing more difficult. (lung.org)
  • In accelerated silicosis, swelling in the lungs and symptoms occur faster than in chronic silicosis. (lung.org)
  • Silicosis is a potentially fatal and typically chronic fibrotic lung disease caused by occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica dust (1). (cdc.gov)
  • Chronic silicosis initially causes no symptoms or only mild dyspnea but over years can advance to involve most of the lung and cause dyspnea, hypoxemia, pulmonary hypertension, and respiratory impairment. (merckmanuals.com)
  • In low-intensity or short-term exposures, these nodules remain discrete and do not compromise lung function (simple chronic silicosis). (merckmanuals.com)
  • But with higher-intensity or more prolonged exposures (complicated chronic silicosis), these nodules coalesce and cause progressive fibrosis and reduction of lung volumes (total lung capacity, vital capacity) on pulmonary function tests, or they coalesce, sometimes forming large conglomerate masses (called progressive massive fibrosis). (merckmanuals.com)
  • Chronic silicosis is the most common form of the disorder and generally develops only after exposure over decades. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Conglomerate silicosis (also known as progressive massive fibrosis or complicated silicosis) is the advanced form of chronic or accelerated silicosis and is characterized by widespread masses of fibrosis, typically in the upper lung zones. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Silicosis is a chronic progressive disease caused by inhalation of crystalline silica. (archbronconeumol.org)
  • [iii] The 1997 IARC Monograph noted the greater part of epidemiologic studies reported the presence of silicosis (referring to the chronic or also known as classic type), a fibrotic disease of the lung that is associated with high exposure to respirable crystalline silica dust, increases excess lung cancer risk among workers exposed to silica. (ukessays.com)
  • Chronic silicosis can be either simple silicosis or complicated silicosis. (carlsonattorneys.com)
  • There are three types of silicosis: Simple chronic silicosis, the most common type of silicosis, results from long-term exposure (usually more than 20 years) to low amounts of silica dust. (malacards.org)
  • Simple chronic silicosis may cause people to have difficulty breathing. (malacards.org)
  • Swelling of the lungs and other symptoms occur faster in this type of silicosis than in the simple chronic form. (malacards.org)
  • Silicosis is characterized by chronic lung inflammation and fibrosis, which are extremely harmful to human health. (frontiersin.org)
  • This is the classic chronic form of silicosis. (healthhype.com)
  • The clinical presentation between chronic, accelerated and acute silicosis is largely the same. (healthhype.com)
  • Chronic simple silicosis , which occurs from long term exposure (10 or more years), this is the most common form of silicosis. (findapersonalinjuryattorney.com)
  • People with severe silicosis may need to have a lung transplant. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In this week's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report , researchers from California, Colorado, Texas and Washington report 18 cases of severe silicosis, and two fatalities, among young, mostly Hispanic men, who worked at engineered stone fabrication plants. (eurekalert.org)
  • Cutting and grinding artificial stone is associated with generation of very high levels of respirable crystalline silica, and the frequency of cases of severe silicosis associated with this exposure is rapidly increasing. (bmj.com)
  • They will collaborate with Monash Health and Monash University to collect and screen samples from patients with mild and severe silicosis, and those without the disease. (biomelbourne.org)
  • Where workers are regularly exposed to RCS dust and there is a reasonable likelihood that silicosis may develop, health surveillance must be provided. (hse.gov.uk)
  • Silicosis is a lung disease caused by breathing in (inhaling) silica dust. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Silicosis has become less common since the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) created regulations requiring the use of protective equipment, which limits the amount of silica dust workers inhale. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Most people get silicosis because they're exposed to silica dust at work. (webmd.com)
  • Silicosis is your body's reaction to silica dust buildup in your lungs . (webmd.com)
  • Silicosis is a form of occupational lung disease caused by inhalation of crystalline silica dust. (wikipedia.org)
  • Silicosis (previously miner's phthisis, grinder's asthma, potter's rot and other occupation-related names) is a form of occupational lung disease caused by inhalation of crystalline silica dust, and is marked by inflammation and scarring in the form of nodular lesions in the upper lobes of the lungs. (dbpedia.org)
  • Silica dust exposure reduction and effective regulatory enforcement, along with enhanced workplace medical and public health surveillance, are urgently needed to address the emerging public health threat of silicosis in the stone fabrication industry. (medscape.com)
  • Accelerated silicosis is caused by the inhalation of large amounts of respirable crystalline silica (very fine silica dust). (edu.au)
  • Occupational exposure and inhalation of airborne crystalline silica can produce silicosis, a disabling, dust-related disease of the lungs. (amfam.com)
  • Silica dust is an inhalation hazard and workers may be at risk of silicosis when high-velocity impact shatters the sand into smaller dust particles. (amfam.com)
  • Silicosis is an incurable disease caused by inhaling silica dust from gold-bearing rocks. (news24.com)
  • Khambat, once a commercial port of Gujarat, has become a death trap for the thousands employed in the agate industry as the dust generated while grinding and polishing the mineral gets into the lungs, causing silicosis, says a study by the NGO People's Union for Civil Liberties (PUCL). (medindia.net)
  • Silicosis is a respiratory disorder caused by inhalation of crystalline silica dust and causes inflammation and nodular lesions in the lungs. (medindia.net)
  • Mining and cutting of stones produces silica dust and prolonged exposure causes silicosis among workers. (medindia.net)
  • Accelerated silicosis usually occurs over as few as five to ten years, the hastened development stemming from exposure to unusually high levels of silica dust. (microscopyu.com)
  • Acute silicosis develops even faster, sometimes in as little as a few weeks of heavy contact with silica dust. (microscopyu.com)
  • The class action suit was launched six years ago on behalf of miners suffering from silicosis, an incurable disease caused by inhaling silica dust from gold-bearing rocks. (reuters.com)
  • Symptoms of silicosis can appear from a few weeks to many years after exposure to silica dust. (lung.org)
  • Silicosis, a massive fibrosis of the lungs, results from the inhalation of excessive amounts of silica dust. (jhu.edu)
  • Technology created more dust, but the decisive factor in the growing incidence and severity of silicosis was the labor practices peculiar to the Witwatersrand gold mines, which elevated dust levels. (jhu.edu)
  • By IANS, Over 200,000 miners in Rajasthan suffer from silicosis - a dangerous lung disease caused by the inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica, according to recent research. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Of these, 500,000 miners work in mines containing silica dust and around 41 percent of them suffer from silicosis, claims an independent research report. (rxpgnews.com)
  • The NSW Labor Opposition has joined calls by medical professionals and former stonemasons for urgent action to protect workers from the dust lung disease silicosis. (abc.net.au)
  • Stonemasons who cut engineered stone into a popular type of kitchen benchtop are contracting accelerated silicosis at alarming levels, after being exposed to unsafe levels of silica dust . (abc.net.au)
  • I didn't know this dust will give me silicosis. (abc.net.au)
  • Silicosis is a debilitating disease that can only be contracted through exposure to silica dust, a by-product of gold mining. (lexology.com)
  • In the United States, most silicosis-associated deaths occur among persons aged greater than or equal to 65 years (2), often following many years of silica dust exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • Two sandblasters died from progressive massive fibrosis (PMF), an advanced form of silicosis, following intensive dust exposure during abrasive sandblasting of oil field pipes and tanks in western Texas (3). (cdc.gov)
  • In recent years, Australia has seen a surge in silicosis cases - an incurable, often fatal, lung disease caused by breathing in silica dust. (mauriceblackburn.com.au)
  • In 2014, David Wood, 64, from Batley was diagnosed with silicosis - a long-term condition caused by inhaling large amounts of crystalline silica dust, usually over many years. (irwinmitchell.com)
  • Silicosis is caused by inhalation of unbound (free) crystalline silica dust and is characterized by nodular pulmonary fibrosis. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Acute silicosis, also known as acute silicoproteinosis, and the rarer accelerated silicosis are caused by intense silica dust exposure over short periods (several months or years). (merckmanuals.com)
  • Mining companies set aside R5billion towards compensation in November for thousands of miners who contracted TB and silicosis, a lung disease caused by the inhalation of dust containing silica, as of 1965. (iol.co.za)
  • Silicosis is a form of occupational lung disease due to exposure to silica dust. (internationalsos.com)
  • Silicosis is a degenerative lung disease arising from exposure to and inhalation of silica dust during mining. (genderjustice.org.za)
  • Silicosis is an occupational lung disease caused by inhaling dust that contains free crystalline silica. (ohsonline.com)
  • Silicosis is caused by the long-term inhalation of fine dust particles known as respirable crystalline silica. (etui.org)
  • Sandblasting was done mostly by young men in unregistered workplaces without any protection, leading to high exposure to fine silica dust and extremely high rates of silicosis - and, in many cases, death. (etui.org)
  • One of the deadliest conditions you can contract when breathing in dust is called Silicosis. (festool.com.au)
  • Silicosis can be caused when you breathe in microscopic crystals of silica dust. (festool.com.au)
  • If you work with hazardous dust, you must protect against Silicosis and other occupational diseases. (festool.com.au)
  • As a result, construction workers risk developing silicosis or "sandblasting disease" from inhaling silica particles in the dust. (carlsonattorneys.com)
  • If you have been exposed to silica dust during the course of your job and have developed silicosis, mesothelioma, asbestosis, or any other type of cancer, immediately seek the help of a Texas silica exposure lawyer at The Carlson Law Firm. (carlsonattorneys.com)
  • According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), breathing in silica dust can lead to a debilitating, irreversible, and potentially fatal respiratory disease called silicosis, as well as a number of other health conditions and cancers. (carlsonattorneys.com)
  • Over 200 years later, Dr. Alice Hamilton saw the same connections between silicosis and the dust being inhaled by granite cutters. (carlsonattorneys.com)
  • Methods: We reviewed data from all cases of silicosis due to synthetic stone dust referred for lung transplant assessment. (ersjournals.com)
  • Silicosis is a lung disease caused by silica dust, and has long been associated with mining. (wfpl.org)
  • Silicosis And Overexposure To Silica Dust Am I At Risk? (ehealthforum.com)
  • Intensity of silicosis symptoms depends on the duration and quantity of silica dust inhalation. (healthhype.com)
  • Exposure to silica dust can cause a condition known as silicosis, which occurs when lung tissue becomes scarred from breathing in silica particles. (tenlaw.com)
  • Silicosis , also known as Potter's rot, is a type of occupational lung disease which is caused by inhalation of crystalline silica dust. (findapersonalinjuryattorney.com)
  • The people who work in occupations where they are exposed to silica dust are at the greatest risk for developing silicosis. (findapersonalinjuryattorney.com)
  • Accelerated silicosis, develops 5 - 10 years after first exposure to higher concentrations of silica dust. (findapersonalinjuryattorney.com)
  • Acute silicosis develops a few weeks to 5 years after exposure to highly concentrated levels of silica dust. (findapersonalinjuryattorney.com)
  • This form of silicosis appears after 5-10 years of intense exposure. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This is the most common form of silicosis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • There is no real cure for any form of silicosis, and the condition can worsen even when exposure is discontinued. (microscopyu.com)
  • Even workers with prolonged silica exposure, but without silicosis, are at a similarly increased risk for TB. (wikipedia.org)
  • The National Jewish Health Center of Excellence for Silicosis and Its Prevention offers diagnosis and treatment of silicosis as well as surveillance and exposure reduction consultations for employers in industries with potential silica exposure. (eurekalert.org)
  • Acute silicosis may develop within months following massive silica exposure. (solidaritycenter.org)
  • Crystalline silica exposure is found to be instrumental for the development of silicosis. (medsci.org)
  • Determining if silicosis is a prerequisite for lung cancer development has important public health implications for setting occupational standard for silica exposure, implementing workplace medical surveillance programs and determining causation in medico-legal cases. (ukessays.com)
  • For example, if it is determined that lung cancer risk increases among workers exposed to silica only in the presence of silicosis, then efforts should be focused on reducing high silica exposure to a level that reduces the risk of developing silicosis. (ukessays.com)
  • Silicosis is marked by the formation of lumps (nodules) and fibrous scar tissue in the lungs. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Patients with complicated silicosis have noticeable shortness of breath, weight loss, and extensive formation of fibrous tissue (fibrosis) in the lungs. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Fibrosis of the lungs is a symptom of silicosis. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Prolonged inhalation of silica-containing dusts puts these workers at risk for the disease silicosis-a nodular fibrosis of the lungs that causes shortness of breath. (cdc.gov)
  • Swelling in the lungs and symptoms occur faster than in simple silicosis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • [ 3 ] Complicated silicosis, also called progressive massive fibrosis (PMF), is characterized by the radiographic presence of large opacities with areas of homogeneous consolidation that mainly affect the superior and middle segments of the lungs. (medscape.com)
  • Silicosis affects the lungs by damaging the lining of the lung air sacs. (lung.org)
  • In acute silicosis, the lungs become very inflamed and can fill with fluid, which causes severe shortness of breath and low blood oxygen levels. (lung.org)
  • Silicosis causes inflammation and accumulation of excessive collagen (fibrosis) forming nodular lesions (grey/black) particularly in the upper lobes of the lungs. (sciencephoto.com)
  • Like silicosis it also affects the lungs but can affect other parts of the body as well. (ngopulse.org)
  • However, when we saw the image of his chest CT scan, we were struck by the numerous small white spots all over his lungs, typical of silicosis. (etui.org)
  • That means, your lungs will become inefficient, and silicosis may become fatal. (festool.com.au)
  • They can only be read by radiologists who are trained and skilled in detecting the minute changes in the lungs that could indicate silicosis. (carestream.com)
  • He has developed silicosis - a serious respiratory condition that will almost certainly shorten his life after breathing in RCS. (hse.gov.uk)
  • Acute silicosis is often treated with steroids, but the prognosis is usually poor because once respiratory failure begins it cannot be readily reversed. (microscopyu.com)
  • Methods Respiratory physicians voluntarily reported cases of artificial stone-associated silicosis identified in their clinical practices. (bmj.com)
  • The symptoms of silicosis are non-specific and may be seen with many other respiratory conditions. (healthhype.com)
  • Silicosis may only be diagnosed during screening for other respiratory conditions. (healthhype.com)
  • Pleuritic pain , weight loss and malaise are prominent with acute silicosis and culminates with respiratory failure within 18 to 24 months. (healthhype.com)
  • Conclusions All available data indicate that construction workers exposed to quartz levels above occupational exposure limits are clearly at elevated risk of silicosis and other respiratory diseases. (sjweh.fi)
  • The ToxicDocs collection includes all of the archives' notable materials on asbestosis and silicosis, including key reports from the 1930s. (springer.com)
  • Can a person suffer from both silicosis and asbestosis? (madisonrecord.com)
  • But several doctors who testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee and in the federal silica multidistrict litigation in Texas earlier this year, say it would be very rare for anyone to have both silicosis and asbestosis. (madisonrecord.com)
  • While it is theoretically possible for one person to have both silicosis and asbestosis, it would be a clinical rarity," stated John Parker, M.D., a former fellow of pulmonary diseases at the National Institute for Occupation Safety and Health. (madisonrecord.com)
  • When the Industrial Commission is advised by an employer or employee that an employee has or allegedly has asbestosis or silicosis, the employee, when ordered by the Industrial Commission, shall submit to X rays and a physical examination by the advisory medical committee or other designated qualified physician who is not a member of the advisory medical committee. (onecle.com)
  • 2) Whether or not the claimant has contracted asbestosis or silicosis. (onecle.com)
  • The relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and silicosis was studied by means of a case-control study in South African gold miners. (bmj.com)
  • Contrary to what she refers to as conventional wisdom-namely, that the miners' own carelessness caused their illness, that the disease was not preventable, or that technology alone caused excessive disease-she focuses on a number of other issues to explain the failure to prevent silicosis. (jhu.edu)
  • Though the existence of this occupational disease is common knowledge, the government of Rajasthan continues to flout the rights of the miners by failing to ensure that they are protected from the cause of silicosis and those who contract silicosis receive compensation. (rxpgnews.com)
  • The NGO has urged the president to constitute an independent commission for the examination and identification of miners with silicosis and to ensure that victims of silicosis receive food and treatment. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Multifactorial study of the risk of lung cancer among French uranium miners: radon, smoking and silicosis. (nih.gov)
  • This case-control study nested in the French cohort of uranium miners provides an opportunity to take account of silicosis and smoking in the assessment of the relation between radon and lung cancer. (nih.gov)
  • To identify cases of silicosis among the 600 miners surveyed, appraisals carried out as part of the compensation process for occupational diseases are used. (nih.gov)
  • This large study conducted in a population of working Southern African gold miners finds a flat or even declining trend in silicosis prevalence in contrast to autopsy data that shows a rising trend. (internationalsos.com)
  • The news that the mining companies will appeal against the decision of the High Court in South Africa on 13 May 2016 to certify (i.e. allow to proceed) the class action on behalf of 30,000 current and ex-gold miners with silicosis and TB is deeply disappointing. (business-humanrights.org)
  • ACTSA called on the mining companies when the High Court decision was announced not to appeal but to meet urgently with the representatives of the miners and ex-miners with silicosis and TB to agree a settlement which provides decent health care and compensation. (business-humanrights.org)
  • To reanalyse exposure-response data from a Scottish colliery to gain a more detailed knowledge of the relations between exposure to quartz and risks of silicosis in coal miners, and hence inform the debate on an appropriate occupational standard for respirable quartz. (bmj.com)
  • dwarfing Chernobyl', 10 000 known silicosis-affected southern African gold miners are finally set to negotiate a payout that could induce a painful paroxysm of shareholder coughing across the Johannesburg Stock Exchange. (scielo.org.za)
  • And then began the silicosis litigation for the South African gold miners. (ngopulse.org)
  • There is no cure for silicosis. (encyclopedia.com)
  • There's no cure for silicosis right now. (webmd.com)
  • There is no cure for silicosis, but it is a preventable occupational disease. (amfam.com)
  • There is no cure for silicosis, but it can be prevented. (lung.org)
  • It is estimated that there are TWO million workers in the United States employed in occupations at risk for the development of silicosis. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The precise mechanism that triggers the development of silicosis is still unclear. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Sandblasting seems to have the highest risk for the development of silicosis. (nih.gov)
  • Followed by the inflammatory events, the fibrotic processes such as production of growth factors will be initiated, which will finally determine the development of silicosis [ 3 ]. (medsci.org)
  • Silicosis is an incurable occupational lung disease caused by inhaling particles of respirable crystalline silica. (medscape.com)
  • Silicosis is incurable, but preventable through effective control and elimination of exposure to respirable crystalline silica (1). (redorbit.com)
  • Silicosis is an ancient but still life-threatening occupational lung disease because of its incurable nature. (nih.gov)
  • Silicosis is an incurable lung disease affecting millions of workers in hazardous occupations. (medsci.org)
  • Silicosis is an irreversible and incurable lung disease. (medsci.org)
  • Considered by many a malady of the past, silicosis, a progressive and incurable lung disease, has emerged on a worrying scale amongst workers fabricating and installing artificial stone kitchen and bathroom countertops. (etui.org)
  • A deadly and incurable lung disease afflicting Australian tradies could be prevented from progressing and successfully treated, following a multi-million federal funding boost to silicosis research. (biomelbourne.org)
  • Acute silicosis develops within six months to two years of intense exposure to silica. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Health surveillance for silicosis should be considered for workers who are involved in high-risk occupations, including construction, foundry work, brick and tile work, ceramics, slate, manufacturing, quarries and stonework. (hse.gov.uk)
  • Silicosis can develop in workers exposed to RCS in a number of industries including construction, stone working, quarrying, brick making and ceramics. (hse.gov.uk)
  • More than one million American workers are currently at risk of developing silicosis, a debilitating, irreversible, sometimes fatal disease. (cdc.gov)
  • A subsequent study of the worksite found several additional workers with silicosis. (cdc.gov)
  • It is unacceptable to allow workers to continue to die from preventable diseases such as silicosis. (cdc.gov)
  • NIOSH has issued an Alert nationwide to notify other workers, employers, trade unions, regulatory agencies, and other occupational and public health agencies of the risk of silicosis from sandblasting. (cdc.gov)
  • Recently, silicosis outbreaks have been reported in several countries among workers who cut and finish stone slabs for countertops, a process known as stone fabrication. (medscape.com)
  • [ 6 ] This report describes 18 cases of silicosis, including the first two fatalities reported in the United States, among workers in the stone fabrication industry in California, Colorado, Texas, and Washington. (medscape.com)
  • AFOEM and TSANZ are also requesting industry regulators take urgent action to address silicosis as it continues to put workers' lives at risk. (edu.au)
  • Read more about Har approves policy for workers suffering from Silicosis on Business Standard. (scoop.it)
  • The Haryana government has approved an integrated policy that would provide free treatment, investigations and medicines to workers suffering from Silicosis at ESI and district hospitals and medical colleges in the state. (scoop.it)
  • We believe there may be hundreds, if not thousands of cases of silicosis among workers in the engineered stone industry. (eurekalert.org)
  • After sensing a rise in silicosis cases among her patients, Dr. Rose reviewed patient files and discovered seven recent cases of silicosis among engineered stone workers in her Colorado practice alone. (eurekalert.org)
  • In Australia, screening of workers in the stone fabrication industry found about 12 percent of the workers had developed silicosis. (eurekalert.org)
  • Comparable rates of silicosis in the U.S. would mean that 11,500 workers in the industry could have silicosis. (eurekalert.org)
  • According to the PUCL and social activists, the economically impoverished workers in the agate industry have been dying of silicosis at regular intervals for the last 40 years in Khambhat. (medindia.net)
  • The PUCL investigators found, 'The facts of silicosis menace among the workers have been suppressed by traders, employers and government machineries. (medindia.net)
  • The workers treated in the hospitals are never or hardly diagnosed with silicosis. (medindia.net)
  • Although everyone knows that the workers have been infected with silicosis, on record it is hardly recognised by the government. (medindia.net)
  • In recent years the gold mining industry has taken precautions to prevent its workers from contracting silicosis, including the use of masks and other measures. (reuters.com)
  • More than 15,000 mine workers are affected by occupational disease called silicosis which is non-curable. (indiatimes.com)
  • The state government of the Gujarat has issued official notification of a 2007 resolution specifying that the heirs of agate workers who die as a result of the occupational lung disease silicosis be compensated Rs.1 lakh (approximately $1,800) through an insurance scheme. (solidaritycenter.org)
  • While heartened by the initial victory, activists continue to press forward with several crucial demands: that the state back-date enforcement to the 2007 Resolution, increase the compensatory amount for heirs, provide compensation for gem workers living with silicosis and take action geared toward prevention. (solidaritycenter.org)
  • Without proper safety precautions, all agate-processing workers are at high risk of developing silicosis. (solidaritycenter.org)
  • While exploring the response to silicosis by the entire community-the state, the medical profession, the industrialists, the press, and the mine workers-she presents a history of greed, indifference, and apathy. (jhu.edu)
  • The number of silicosis claims in Queensland has now increased to 35, and doctors believe the numbers will reach into the hundreds by the end of the year as workers continue to be screened. (abc.net.au)
  • Dental prosthodontists are also at risk, as are sandblasters, pencil factory workers in developing nations, and anyone who handles concentrated sand squirt to clean oil tanks, build ships, or fade blue jeans.In Silicosis, eleven experts argue that silicosis is more than one of the most pressing global health concerns today-it is an epidemic in the making. (whsmith.co.uk)
  • In addition to the silicosis cases, the Beaumont, Texas-based law firm also brought 139 asbestos lawsuits on behalf of former state of Illinois workers to Madison County last week. (madisonrecord.com)
  • As one of the medical experts who testified before U.S. District Judge Janis Graham Jack in February, Parker said he was "stunned" that just a few doctors diagnosed nearly 10,000 workers with silicosis. (madisonrecord.com)
  • Unfortunately, many of the silicosis claims are derived from the same workers who originally filed asbestos claims. (madisonrecord.com)
  • Silicosis is an occupational lung disease affecting workers engaged in a wide variety of occupations. (epw.in)
  • The R5bn was a "top-up" to the R3.5bn compensation set aside by the government through the Department of Health to pay former mine workers who contracted silicosis in gold mines. (iol.co.za)
  • Aim To report the characteristics of a clinical series of Australian workers with artificial stone-associated silicosis. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusions This series of silicosis in Australian workers further demonstrates the risk-associated high-silica content artificial stone. (bmj.com)
  • Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of renal disease among workers with silicosis. (sjweh.fi)
  • Methods A population of 1328 workers with definite silicosis and adequate work history information, drawn from three states with silicosis surveillance systems, was followed. (sjweh.fi)
  • In view of the progressive emergence of new cases of silicosis in artificial quartz conglomerate workers, we performed a study to analyze the characteristics of silicosis produced by this new agent in Spain. (archbronconeumol.org)
  • However, it remains unclear whether lung cancer development among these workers is due to the presence of silicosis or due to exposure to significant silica levels with silicosis being a confounder rather than a prerequisite. (ukessays.com)
  • The Health and Safety Executive advises that companies provide health surveillance for silicosis for their workers in high-risk occupations. (carestream.com)
  • And we are hopeful that it will result in earlier detection of silicosis from more of the UK's RCS exposed workers. (carestream.com)
  • Risk assessment of silicosis and lung cancer among construction workers. (sjweh.fi)
  • Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the magnitude of the silicosis and cancer risk among construction workers. (sjweh.fi)
  • Methods In 1998, 1335 of 4173 invited construction workers with expected high cumulative exposure to quartz were studied for early signs of silicosis. (sjweh.fi)
  • Silicosis risk was assessed by converting study results to the whole group of construction workers and by risk analysis based on exposure data combined with documented exposure response relations. (sjweh.fi)
  • On the basis of the exposure data, a lifetime risk of silicosis above 5% is expected for workers exposed to levels above the occupational exposure limits. (sjweh.fi)
  • There has been a recent increase in silicosis cases among workers in the Australian artificial stone benchtop industry, leading to calls to ban the popular benchtops. (biomelbourne.org)
  • These projects include investigating the efficacy and sensitivity of high-resolution CT scans compared with plain chest x-rays to screen workers for early silicosis, the efficacy of ultralow dose CT scans to detect silicosis and assessing how artificial intelligence can be used to enhance radiological evaluation. (biomelbourne.org)
  • No specific therapy for silicosis cures or alters the course of the disease, thus prevention is essential. (medscape.com)
  • Given the state of medical knowledge about silicosis and its prevention, physicians' denial of responsibility for high disease rates was reprehensible. (jhu.edu)
  • Hazard surveillance, workplace-specific interventions, and further silicosis prevention and elimination efforts, especially among young adults, are needed. (redorbit.com)
  • Because of the lack of a definite treatment of silicosis, prevention of the disease should be the main target. (nih.gov)
  • In the United States, Australia and Europe, the occurrence of silicosis has been declining in recent decades due to improved prevention strategies but also to a large extent because many hazardous industries such as mining have closed down or moved to the global South. (etui.org)
  • Before we look at some silicosis prevention tips, let's explore what the disease could do. (festool.com.au)
  • However, if it is determined that silicosis is not a prerequisite, then lung cancer development can occur at silica exposures lower than those likely to cause silicosis, which makes prevention of exposure to high silica levels not adequate for worker protection. (ukessays.com)
  • Of the 99 cases, 14 have already died of the disease, and the remaining 85 may eventually die from silicosis or its complications. (cdc.gov)
  • Complications of silicosis can cause related morbidity. (medscape.com)
  • Although silicosis currently has no cure, treatments can relieve symptoms and prevent complications. (ucsfhealth.org)
  • Objective: Due to a outbreak of silica-related autoimmune disease in synthetic stone construction, we found an opportunity to characterize the rheumatologic complications in silicosis within these highly exposed patients. (ersjournals.com)
  • Vigilance is warranted for the recognition of auto-immune complications in persons with known silicosis. (ersjournals.com)
  • Those patients afflicted with accelerated silicosis are at a greater risk for complications. (findapersonalinjuryattorney.com)
  • Dr David Fishwick interviews Terry who suffers from silicosis after being exposed to respirable crystalline silica (RCS) at work. (hse.gov.uk)
  • Silicosis is caused by breathing in particles of crystalline silica-the primary component of sand. (cdc.gov)
  • Occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica occurs in construction, mining, manufacturing, and other industries and can result in silicosis and other lung diseases. (redorbit.com)
  • Silicosis, the oldest known occupational pulmonary disease, is caused by inhalation of tiny particles of silicon dioxide in the form of unbound (free) crystalline silica (usually quartz) or, less commonly, by inhalation of silicates, minerals containing silicon dioxide bound to other elements, such as talc. (merckmanuals.com)
  • The mechanism of crystalline silica induced silicosis is not yet fully understood. (medsci.org)
  • Silicosis is a potentially fatal, but preventable, occupational lung disease caused by inhaling respirable crystalline silica ( 1 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • It is estimated that approximately 20 per cent of Australian stonemasons exposed to respirable crystalline silica (RCS) are at risk of developing a lung condition like silicosis, and treatments are desperately needed. (biomelbourne.org)
  • In May the High Court ruled that mineworkers could launch a silicosis class action suit against mining companies. (news24.com)
  • 56 applicants, representing tens of thousands of mineworkers, are seeking to hold 32 gold mining companies in South Africa (collectively comprising the entire gold mining industry in the country) accountable for failing to prevent and respond to silicosis in gold mines. (genderjustice.org.za)
  • Hence, when mineworkers return home sick with silicosis and TB, it is usually women and children who take care of them - at considerable personal and financial expense. (genderjustice.org.za)
  • JOHANNESBURG - A new website and a Facebook page were launched on Tuesday in a bid to assist former mineworkers and their dependents who may be entitled to compensation under the provisions of a Trust Fund set up to pay mineworkers who contracted silicosis or TB at work. (enca.com)
  • It's the most common type of silicosis. (webmd.com)
  • The cause of silicosis has been known for centuries, yet Americans continue to die each and every year of this completely preventable disease. (cdc.gov)
  • It is classified as a human lung carcinogen and is the known cause of silicosis, a fatal lung disease. (carlsonattorneys.com)
  • These encouraging findings suggest that NAC exerts pulmonary protective effects in CS-induced pulmonary fibrosis and might be considered as a promising agent for the treatment of silicosis. (portlandpress.com)
  • There are some data revealing an association between silicosis and certain autoimmune diseases, including nephritis, scleroderma, and systemic lupus erythematosus, especially in acute or accelerated silicosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several of the patients with silicosis also had autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and scleroderma. (eurekalert.org)
  • Fifty-eight silicosis patients with no clinical symptoms of autoimmune diseases were the subjects of this study. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • The factor analysis clearly demonstrated that the parameters related to Fas-mediated apoptosis should be the most beneficial for predicting the pre-clinical status of complicated autoimmune diseases in silicosis. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • In addition to silicosis-specific data, we extracted data relevant to the manifestations of autoimmune diseases in these patients. (ersjournals.com)
  • Results: Of 40 patients in our silicosis cohort, we identified nine (22.5%) with findings consistent with various autoimmune disease. (ersjournals.com)
  • Conclusions:These cases underscore the strong link between silicosis and multiple distinct syndromes of autoimmune diseases. (ersjournals.com)
  • Among young persons (i.e., aged 15-44 years), deaths from silicosis declined less during 1968-1994 ( Figure 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Young silicosis deaths were defined as those occurring in persons aged 15-44 years. (redorbit.com)
  • Of all silicosis decedents aged 15-64 years, 177 (8.9%) were considered young (aged 15-44 years), which accounted for 4,693 YPLL (mean per decedent: 26.5 YPLL), representing 27-4% of the total YPLL for the period. (redorbit.com)
  • Silicosis is reported to be a special concern in young adults (aged 15-44 years) ( 3 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Patients with advanced silicosis may have trouble sleeping and experience chest pain, hoarseness, and loss of appetite. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Silicosis patients are at high risk for TB, and should be checked for the disease during the doctor's examination. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Srikant Dubey MLA Panna, who had raised the silicosis issue in legislative assembly in the monsoon session this year said, "Nothing has been done to save the patients in the district. (hindustantimes.com)
  • JAIPUR: About 1000 silicosis-affected patients gathered from all over Rajasthan in Jaipur on Wednesday demanding their rights as 'patients affected with a non-curable disease. (indiatimes.com)
  • Patients with silicosis need to maintain their health by leading an active lifestyle and avoiding further exposure. (lung.org)
  • The rate of progression of silicosis in both the "definite" and the "probable" groups was greater than for the control patients with silicosis, as was the probability of silicosis presenting at the start with larger nodules (type r). (bmj.com)
  • Finally, optimal healthcare and better living conditions for patients with silicosis should be ensured. (nih.gov)
  • Conclusions The results do not clearly show that patients with silicosis have an excess of end-state renal disease, although they do suggest an excess of glomerular end-stage renal disease. (sjweh.fi)
  • 8-isoprostane, a marker of oxidative stress and leukotrienes B4, C4, D4, and E4 were measured in exhaled breath condensate in patients with silicosis. (go.jp)
  • The mean level of 8-isoprostane in the patients with silicosis was 73.6±9.9 vs. 43±10 pg/ml ( p =0.0001) in the controls. (go.jp)
  • In the patients with complicated silicosis, a high level of 8-isoprostane was found more frequently ( p =0.0194). (go.jp)
  • This is the first study using exhaled breath condensate analysis in patients with silicosis. (go.jp)
  • Ten patients were diagnosed with accelerated silicosis, with a mean age of 33 years. (archbronconeumol.org)
  • However, little is known about the role of Bregs in silicosis patients (SP). (frontiersin.org)
  • In acute silicosis, patients present with symptoms within weeks or months. (healthhype.com)
  • To determine whether oxidative-stress damage play an important role in the mechanism of silicosis, the oxidative stress parameters were investigated in silicosis patients and controls group. (ajol.info)
  • 128 silicosis patients and 130 healthy controls were included. (ajol.info)
  • The levels of GSH and MDA in silicosis patients were significantly higher than those of the controls group. (ajol.info)
  • None of the 3 variables examined were associated with the age among both the controls and silicosis patients. (ajol.info)
  • Silicosis is a progressive disease that belongs to a group of lung disorders called pneumoconioses. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Joining a support group where you can meet other people with silicosis or related diseases can help you understand your disease and adapt to its treatments. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Every diagnosis of silicosis demonstrates the continuing human tragedy of this clearly preventable disease. (cdc.gov)
  • On rare occasions a lung biopsy has to be performed to determine the cause of an interstitial, scarring lung disease such as silicosis (silica-related lung disease). (nationaljewish.org)
  • Silicosis is a lung disease . (webmd.com)
  • Panel formed to tackle silicosis in Coimbatore district The Hindu The State Government has formed a district-level committee comprising health and industry officials in Coimbatore on Wednesday to exclusively tackle silicosis, a disease that causes. (scoop.it)
  • Depending on the length of exposure, silicosis is a progressive and fatal disease. (amfam.com)
  • Silicosis is a lung disease caused by breathing in tiny bits of silica, a mineral that is part of sand, rock, and mineral ores such as quartz. (lung.org)
  • I particularly appreciate the author's understanding of the disease silicosis. (jhu.edu)
  • Silicosis is a terrible disease, and is entirely preventable if the correct safety measures are in place. (abc.net.au)
  • In October 2006, a South African gold miner named Thembekile Mankayi sued AngloGold Ashanti, his former employer, stating that he developed the lung disease silicosis while working in Vaal Reefs mine. (business-humanrights.org)
  • However, the continuing occurrence of silicosis deaths in young adults reflects relatively recent overexposures, some of sufficient magnitude to cause severe disease and death after relatively short periods of exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • Examining the global reactions to silicosis, the authors trace the history of the disease and show how this occupational health hazard first came to be recognized as well as the steps that were necessary to deal with it at that time.Adopting a global perspective, Silicosis offers comparative insights into a variety of different medical and political strategies to combat silicosis. (whsmith.co.uk)
  • Ultimately, by bringing together historians and physicians from around the world, Silicosis pioneers a new collective method of writing the global history of disease. (whsmith.co.uk)
  • In a disease like silicosis that is dose-dependent, a reduction in exposure levels would be expected to result in a decrease in disease incidence, and this is exactly what we have seen in the clinical setting. (madisonrecord.com)
  • In the litigation arena, the vast majority of the alleged silicotics that I have reviewed do not involve real silicosis at all, which is not surprising because silicosis is a relatively rare disease today. (madisonrecord.com)
  • It is possible that some persons with end-stage renal disease died before being entered into the silicosis registers. (sjweh.fi)
  • In 1938, the US Department of Labor released this film aimed at preventing the occupational disease of silicosis. (archive.org)
  • From July 1, the NSW Government's Silicosis Reduction Strategy will come into effect, introducing the most comprehensive series of reforms in Australia to stamp out the deadly lung disease. (nsw.gov.au)
  • Silicosis is an incredibly painful and aggressive disease, but it is also preventable. (nsw.gov.au)
  • Making silicosis a notifiable disease is the next step in our journey to stamp out silicosis cases in this state. (nsw.gov.au)
  • Silicosis, an occupational disease first recognised centuries ago, remains a global health problem today, mainly hitting low- and middle-income countries. (etui.org)
  • This made many in Europe think that silicosis was a disease of the past. (etui.org)
  • Silicosis is an occupational lung disease. (festool.com.au)
  • Silicosis, also known as silicotuberculosis , is related to beryllium disease and anthracosis . (malacards.org)
  • Silicosis has become the most serious occupational disease in both developed and developing countries, yet little is known about the crucial cellular and molecular mechanisms that initiate and propagate the process of silicosis. (frontiersin.org)
  • Silicosis is a potentially fatal lung disease associated with breathing in dangerous silica fibres from cutting artificial stone benchtops. (biomelbourne.org)
  • The samples will be analysed for inflammatory markers and potential biomarkers to potentially predict disease severity and progression to developing silicosis. (biomelbourne.org)
  • The role of this inflammasome in promoting silicosis disease suggests that its activity could correlate with disease severity. (biomelbourne.org)
  • Identifying biomarkers for accelerated silicosis could improve diagnosis and prognosis or outlook of the disease, including the risk of it progressing and the effectiveness of potential treatments," A/Prof Tate said. (biomelbourne.org)
  • [ 1 , 2 ] Simple silicosis is characterized by the radiographic presence of multiple nodules measuring 1-10 mm in diameter that are distributed predominantly in the superior and posterior segments of the upper lobes. (medscape.com)
  • Characteristic lung tissue pathology in nodular silicosis consists of fibrotic nodules with concentric "onion-skinned" arrangement of collagen fibers, central hyalinization, and a cellular peripheral zone, with lightly birefringent particles seen under polarized light. (wikipedia.org)
  • Early symptoms of silicosis include shortness of breath after exercising and a harsh, dry cough. (encyclopedia.com)
  • If you've been diagnosed with silicosis, call your provider right away if you develop a cough, shortness of breath, fever, or other signs of a lung infection, especially if you think you have the flu. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Silicosis (particularly the acute form) is characterized by shortness of breath, cough, fever, and cyanosis (bluish skin). (wikipedia.org)
  • It was the culmination of several admirable steps taken by the Government of Rajasthan (GoR) since 2013 to detect silicosis cases and give monetary assistance to the affected. (epw.in)
  • Acute silicosis progresses rapidly and can be fatal within months. (malacards.org)
  • The symptoms of silicosis include coughing, breathlessness, weakness and difficulty to exercise. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Exposure to higher concentrations of silica for 5-10 years can cause accelerated silicosis, and symptoms of acute silicosis can sometimes develop within weeks of initial exposure to extreme concentrations of silica (I). Deaths in young adults from acute or accelerated silicosis generally reflect more recent and intense exposures (2). (redorbit.com)
  • Today, it is estimated that 100,000 American sandblasters are at risk of developing silicosis. (cdc.gov)
  • The document describes 99 cases of silicosis among sandblasters. (cdc.gov)
  • I had never heard of silicosis," said the worker speaking of his diagnosis. (cdc.gov)
  • The better understanding of early stage of silica-induced inflammatory process may help to develop earlier diagnosis of silicosis. (medsci.org)
  • No association between lung cancer and silicosis of the parenchyma or pleura was found, but a positive association existed between silicosis of the hilar glands and lung cancer. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • UCSF provides comprehensive evaluations and care for work-related lung diseases, such as silicosis. (ucsfhealth.org)
  • [ 1 ] Although silicosis has been recognized for many centuries, its prevalence increased markedly with the introduction of mechanized mining. (medscape.com)
  • The pneumatic hammer drill was introduced in 1897 and sandblasting was introduced in about 1904, both significantly contributing to the increased prevalence of silicosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the years under discussion the prevalence, incidence, and rate of silicosis were higher on the Witwatersrand than at any other metalliferous (hardrock) mining center in the world. (jhu.edu)
  • The department sponsored the seminar as part of the government's effort to reduce the prevalence of silicosis significantly by 2015 and eliminate it from workplaces by 2030 in line with the International Labour Organization and the World Health Organisation's Global Programme for the Elimination of Silicosis. (ohsonline.com)
  • There were 95 cases of silicosis in 2007 and 85 in 2008 reported from the Industrial Injury Disablement Benefit (IIDB) scheme . (hse.gov.uk)
  • According to Wagner, "Nationally, the cases reported may be only the tip of the iceberg of people afflicted with silicosis. (cdc.gov)
  • The risk was best seen in cases with underlying silicosis, with relative risks for lung cancer of 2-4. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the age of 17, Urmila Yadav became one of the youngest certified cases of silicosis in India. (scoop.it)
  • Eighty-two new cases of silicosis have been identified in Panna in a recent survey conducted by Environics Trust (Occupation Health and Safety Centre) in October. (hindustantimes.com)
  • Evaluation of cases with silicosis using the parameters related t. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Evaluation of cases with silicosis using the parameters related to Fas-mediated apoptosis. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • These parameters of factor 2 are indicative of the immunological disorders occurring in silicosis cases. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • An investigation by 7.30 has also discovered silicosis cases amongst stonemasons in New South Wales, Victoria and the ACT. (abc.net.au)
  • an estimated 3,600-7,300 new silicosis cases occur annually (4). (redorbit.com)
  • Silicosis among 72 cases of lung cancer and among 314 referents, all deceased, was ascertained through checking the individual files of compensated cases of silicosis. (nih.gov)
  • A 2009 collaborative study by the University of the Witwatersrand and University College, London, estimates there to be 288 000 cases of compensable silicosis in South Africa, which would put that unpaid liability at R10 billion in 1998 values (R27 billion in today's values). (scielo.org.za)
  • Minister for Better Regulation Kevin Anderson said the changes make silicosis a scheduled medical condition, enabling NSW medical practitioners to notify NSW Health of identified cases of silicosis, and provide this information to SafeWork NSW. (nsw.gov.au)
  • Thanks to this comprehensive compliance program including on-the-spot fines, a reduction in the exposure standard and the requirement to notify silicosis cases, we will put a stop to the increase in cases and ensure that people in NSW are protected," Mr Anderson concluded. (nsw.gov.au)
  • The study consisted of a series of 96 cases of silicosis diagnosed according to international criteria during the period 2010-2017. (archbronconeumol.org)
  • Biopsy-proved silicoproteinosis was found in a 34-year-old surface coalmine driller, and two of nine other drill crew members who worked for the same company had chest radiographic findings compatible with simple silicosis. (bmj.com)
  • People with acute silicosis experience cough, weight loss, tiredness, and may have fever or a sharp chest pain. (lung.org)
  • The only effective method for early detection of silicosis is a chest X-ray. (carestream.com)
  • Under the microscope is the NLRP3 'inflammasome', a key part of our immune system which recognises these silica particles, activates an inflammatory response and plays a major role in instigating silicosis. (biomelbourne.org)
  • Links to resources on silica and silicosis, from the Electronic Library of Construction Occupational Safety and Health (eLCOSH). (findlaw.com)
  • Former member of Rajasthan State Human Rights Commission (SHRC) Dr M K Devarajan in a letter to the chairperson of SHRC has said that the number of those certified positive with silicosis by now, according to knowledgeable sources, is over 8,000. (scoop.it)
  • Silicosis is the silent killer of over 100,000 lives in Rajasthan. (rxpgnews.com)
  • On 10 June 2019, the Chief Minister of Rajasthan, Ashok Gehlot, in his budget speech, announced his government's intention to introduce a silicosis policy for the state, adding that a special law would be enacted for this purpose, if needed. (epw.in)
  • Rajasthan, apart from Haryana, is the only state in the country that has shown considerable responsiveness to the problem of silicosis in the past decade. (epw.in)
  • Accelerated silicosis, which occurs after exposure to larger amounts of silica over a shorter period of time (5 to 15 years). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Silicosis, one of the oldest known occupational diseases, [End Page 132] still occurs. (jhu.edu)
  • Accelerated silicosis, which occurs within 10 years of high-level exposure. (lung.org)
  • Accelerated silicosis occurs after 5 to 15 years of exposure of higher levels of silica. (malacards.org)
  • Complicated silicosis occurs with the development of severe scars. (findapersonalinjuryattorney.com)
  • The current rise in silicosis claims cannot be explained by medical factors. (madisonrecord.com)
  • They'll check it under a microscope for signs of silicosis. (webmd.com)
  • We want to play an active role by concentrating on both employer and employees through training programs and creating an awareness of the effects of silicosis. (ohsonline.com)
  • The effects of silicosis were first documents in 1700 by Dr. Bernardino Ramazzini when he recognized common symptoms in stone cutters. (carlsonattorneys.com)
  • This gap between the hazard of silicosis and effective action to eliminate it is a recurrent feature of the history of silicosis. (jhu.edu)
  • It also analyzes the importance of transnational processes-carried on by international organizations and NGOs and sparked by waves of migrant labor-which have been central to the history of silicosis since the early twentieth century. (whsmith.co.uk)
  • Trouble breathing as an early symptom of silicosis. (webmd.com)
  • The presence of silicosis did not contribute to predicting the risk independently of the years spent underground. (ilo.org)
  • There were 14 deaths from silicosis reported in 2006 and 7 in 2007. (hse.gov.uk)
  • This report describes deaths among two young adults with silicosis and underscores the risk for deaths from silicosis at relatively young ages. (cdc.gov)