Silicosis: A form of pneumoconiosis resulting from inhalation of dust containing crystalline form of SILICON DIOXIDE, usually in the form of quartz. Amorphous silica is relatively nontoxic.Pneumoconiosis: A diffuse parenchymal lung disease caused by inhalation of dust and by tissue reaction to their presence. These inorganic, organic, particulate, or vaporized matters usually are inhaled by workers in their occupational environment, leading to the various forms (ASBESTOSIS; BYSSINOSIS; and others). Similar air pollution can also have deleterious effects on the general population.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Silicon Dioxide: Transparent, tasteless crystals found in nature as agate, amethyst, chalcedony, cristobalite, flint, sand, QUARTZ, and tridymite. The compound is insoluble in water or acids except hydrofluoric acid.MiningSilicotuberculosis: Pulmonary or extrapulmonary infection caused by MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS or nontuberculous mycobacteria in a patient with silicosis.Quartz: Quartz (SiO2). A glassy or crystalline form of silicon dioxide. Many colored varieties are semiprecious stones. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Dust: Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Lung Diseases, Interstitial: A diverse group of lung diseases that affect the lung parenchyma. They are characterized by an initial inflammation of PULMONARY ALVEOLI that extends to the interstitium and beyond leading to diffuse PULMONARY FIBROSIS. Interstitial lung diseases are classified by their etiology (known or unknown causes), and radiological-pathological features.MedlinePlus: NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.Asbestosis: A form of pneumoconiosis caused by inhalation of asbestos fibers which elicit potent inflammatory responses in the parenchyma of the lung. The disease is characterized by interstitial fibrosis of the lung, varying from scattered sites to extensive scarring of the alveolar interstitium.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Pulmonary Fibrosis: A process in which normal lung tissues are progressively replaced by FIBROBLASTS and COLLAGEN causing an irreversible loss of the ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream via PULMONARY ALVEOLI. Patients show progressive DYSPNEA finally resulting in death.IndiaMedical Waste Disposal: Management, removal, and elimination of biologic, infectious, pathologic, and dental waste. The concept includes blood, mucus, tissue removed at surgery or autopsy, soiled surgical dressings, and other materials requiring special control and handling. Disposal may take place where the waste is generated or elsewhere.Equipment Reuse: Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Coal MiningMoscowUSSRSuperoxide Dismutase: An oxidoreductase that catalyzes the reaction between superoxide anions and hydrogen to yield molecular oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme protects the cell against dangerous levels of superoxide. EC 1.15.1.1.RussiaOccupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Medical Device Legislation: Laws and regulations pertaining to devices used in medicine, proposed for enactment, or enacted by a legislative body.Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Gold: A yellow metallic element with the atomic symbol Au, atomic number 79, and atomic weight 197. It is used in jewelry, goldplating of other metals, as currency, and in dental restoration. Many of its clinical applications, such as ANTIRHEUMATIC AGENTS, are in the form of its salts.Air Pollutants, Occupational: Air pollutants found in the work area. They are usually produced by the specific nature of the occupation.WisconsinPyran Copolymer: Copolymer of divinyl ether and maleic anhydride that acts as an immunostimulant with antineoplastic and anti-infective properties. It is used in combination with other antineoplastic agents.Asbestos: Asbestos. Fibrous incombustible mineral composed of magnesium and calcium silicates with or without other elements. It is relatively inert chemically and used in thermal insulation and fireproofing. Inhalation of dust causes asbestosis and later lung and gastrointestinal neoplasms.Lentinan: Polysaccharide isolated from the edible mushroom LENTINULA EDODES. The exact composition is unknown.Malpractice: Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Antitussive Agents: Agents that suppress cough. They act centrally on the medullary cough center. EXPECTORANTS, also used in the treatment of cough, act locally.Multimedia: Materials, frequently computer applications, that combine some or all of text, sound, graphics, animation, and video into integrated packages. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, 1994)Skin Tests: Epicutaneous or intradermal application of a sensitizer for demonstration of either delayed or immediate hypersensitivity. Used in diagnosis of hypersensitivity or as a test for cellular immunity.Click Chemistry: Organic chemistry methodology that mimics the modular nature of various biosynthetic processes. It uses highly reliable and selective reactions designed to "click" i.e., rapidly join small modular units together in high yield, without offensive byproducts. In combination with COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES, it is used for the synthesis of new compounds and combinatorial libraries.Manuscripts, MedicalCzech Republic: Created 1 January 1993 as a result of the division of Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.Breath Tests: Any tests done on exhaled air.Exhalation: The act of BREATHING out.JapanLeukotrienes: A family of biologically active compounds derived from arachidonic acid by oxidative metabolism through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. They participate in host defense reactions and pathophysiological conditions such as immediate hypersensitivity and inflammation. They have potent actions on many essential organs and systems, including the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and central nervous system as well as the gastrointestinal tract and the immune system.Judicial Role: The kind of action or activity proper to the judiciary, particularly its responsibility for decision making.Compensation and Redress: Payment, or other means of making amends, for a wrong or injury.Lawyers: Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)

Crystalline silica exposure, radiological silicosis, and lung cancer mortality in diatomaceous earth industry workers. (1/330)

BACKGROUND: The role of silicosis as either a necessary or incidental condition in silica associated lung cancer remains unresolved. To address this issue a cohort analysis of dose-response relations for crystalline silica and lung cancer mortality was conducted among diatomaceous earth workers classified according to the presence or absence of radiological silicosis. METHODS: Radiological silicosis was determined by median 1980 International Labour Organisation system readings of a panel of three "B" readers for 1809 of 2342 white male workers in a diatomaceous earth facility in California. Standardised mortality ratios (SMR) for lung cancer, based on United States rates for 1942-94, were calculated separately for workers with and without radiological silicosis according to cumulative exposures to respirable crystalline silica (milligrams per cubic meter x years; mg/m3-years) lagged 15 years. RESULTS: Eighty one cases of silicosis were identified, including 77 with small opacities of > or = 1/0 and four with large opacities. A slightly larger excess of lung cancer was found among the subjects with silicosis (SMR 1.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.43 to 4.03) than in workers without silicosis (SMR 1.19, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.57). An association between silica exposure and lung cancer risk was detected among those without silicosis; a statistically significant (p = 0.02) increasing trend of lung cancer risk was seen with cumulative exposure, with SMR reaching 2.40 (95% CI 1.24 to 4.20) at the highest exposure level (> or = 5.0 mg/m3-years). A similar statistically significant (p = 0.02) dose-response gradient was observed among non-silicotic subjects when follow up was truncated at 15 years after the final negative radiograph (SMR 2.96, 95% CI 1.19 to 6.08 at > or = 5.0 mg/m3-years), indicating that the association among non-silicotic subjects was unlikely to be accounted for by undetected radiological silicosis. CONCLUSIONS: The dose-response relation observed between cumulative exposure to respirable crystalline silica and lung cancer mortality among workers without radiological silicosis suggests that silicosis is not a necessary co-condition for silica related lung carcinogenesis. However, the relatively small number of silicosis cases in the cohort and the absence of radiographic data after employment limit interpretations.  (+info)

End stage renal disease among ceramic workers exposed to silica. (2/330)

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether ceramic workers exposed to silica experience an excess of end stage renal disease. METHODS: On the basis of a health surveillance programme, a cohort of 2980 male ceramic workers has been enrolled during the period 1974-91 in Civitacastellana, Lazio, Italy. For each worker, employment history, smoking data, and x ray film readings were available. The vital status was ascertained for all cohort members. All 2820 people still alive and resident in the Lazio region as in June 1994 were searched for a match in the regional end stage renal diseases registry, which records (since June, 1994) all patients undergoing dialysis treatment in public and private facilities of the region. Expected numbers of prevalent cases from the cohort were computed by applying the rate of patients on dialysis treatment by the age distribution of the cohort. RESULTS: A total of six cases was detected when 1.87 were expected (observed/expected (O/E) = 3.21; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.17 to 6.98). The excess risk was present among non-smokers (O = 2; O/E = 4.34) and smokers (O = 4; O/E = 2.83), as well as among workers without silicosis (O = 4; O/E = 2.78) and workers with silicosis (O = 2; O/E = 4.54). The risk was higher among subjects with < 20 years since first employment (O = 4; O/E = 4.65) than among those employed > 20 years. CONCLUSION: These results provide further evidence that exposure to silica dust among ceramic workers is associated with nephrotoxic effects.  (+info)

Left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy associated with silicosis. (3/330)

Left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy usually results from invasion or compression of the nerve caused by diseases localized within the aortopulmonary window. This study reports the case of a 76-yr-old male with vocal cord paralysis due to lymph node involvement by silicosis. This rare entity was identified by video-mediastinoscopy, which revealed a granulomatous and fibrosed recurrent lymph node encasing the nerve. The nerve was dissected and released from scar tissues. Progressive clinical improvement was observed followed by total and durable recovery of the voice after 15 weeks follow-up.  (+info)

Serum levels of soluble Fas ligand in patients with silicosis. (4/330)

Certain patients with silicosis have been reported to exhibit immunological abnormalities such as the appearance of antinuclear antibodies and the occurrence of autoimmune diseases. Fas ligand (FasL) is a type II membrane protein which induces apoptosis by binding to its membrane receptor, Fas. FasL is converted to a soluble form by a metalloproteinase-like enzyme. We have already found serum soluble Fas (sFas) levels in silicosis patients as well as in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) to be significantly higher than those in healthy volunteers. To examine further the role of the Fas/FasL system in silica-induced immunological abnormalities, we investigated serum soluble FasL (sFasL) levels in silicosis patients with no clinical symptoms of autoimmune diseases, using ELISA for sFasL. Although the serum sFasL levels in patients with SLE were significantly higher than those in healthy volunteers and showed a slight positive correlation with serum sFas levels, those in silicosis patients exhibited no significant difference from those in healthy volunteers, and there was no correlation with serum sFas levels. However, sFasL levels were elevated in silicosis patients with slight dyspnoea or normal PCO2 among various clinical parameters of silicosis. It may be speculated that the immunological disturbances presented by the abnormalities of apoptosis-related molecules in silicosis patients do not occur with a similar degree of respiratory involvement. Further studies are required to clarify which kinds of factors are involved in silicosis patients who exhibit immunological abnormalities.  (+info)

Over-expression of the decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) gene in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) derived from silicosis patients. (5/330)

Dysregulation of apoptosis, particularly in the Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) pathway, is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Recently, a soluble decoy receptor, termed decoy receptor 3 (DcR3), that binds FasL and inhibits FasL-induced apoptosis, has been identified. Silicosis is clinically characterized not only by respiratory disorders but by immunological abnormalities. We have found that serum soluble Fas (sFas) levels are elevated in silicosis patients and that sFas message is dominantly expressed in PBMC derived from these patients. This study examined DcR3 gene expression in PBMC derived from patients with silicosis, SLE, or progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), and compared it with that in healthy volunteers (HV). The relative expression level of the DcR3 gene was examined in PBMC derived from 37 patients with silicosis without clinical symptoms of autoimmune disease, nine patients with SLE, 12 patients with PSS, and 28 HV using the semiquantitative multiplex-reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (MP-RT-PCR). The correlation between the relative expression level of the DcR3 gene and multiple clinical parameters for respiratory disorders and immunological abnormalities in individuals with silicosis was analysed. The DcR3 gene was significantly over-expressed in cases of silicosis or SLE when compared with HV. In addition, the DcR3 relative expression level was positively correlated with the serum sFas level in silicosis patients. It is unclear, however, whether over-expression of the DcR3 gene in silicosis is caused by chronic silica exposure, merely accompanies the alteration in Fas-related molecules, or precedes the clinical onset of autoimmune abnormalities. It will be necessary to study these patients further, establish an in vitro model of human T cells exposed recurrently to silica compounds, and resolve whether the increase in DcR3 mRNA expression is a cause or consequence of disease.  (+info)

Occupational lung cancer risk for men in Germany: results from a pooled case-control study. (6/330)

Occupational exposures such as crystalline silica, diesel engine exhaust, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and man-made mineral fibers are strongly suspected to increase lung cancer risk. Two case-control studies in Germany conducted between 1988 and 1996 were pooled for a joint analysis. A total of 3,498 male cases and 3,541 male population controls, frequency matched for age and region, were included in the study. The lifelong history of all jobs and industries was coded and occupational exposures were evaluated by expert rating. Odds ratios, crude and adjusted for smoking and asbestos exposure, were calculated by conditional logistic regression. Job-related evaluation showed a statistically significant increased odds ratio adjusted for smoking among farmers; forestry workers, fishermen, and livestock workers; miners and quarrymen; chemical processors; cabinet makers and related wood workers; metal producers and processors; bricklayers and carpenters; road construction workers, pipelayers and well diggers; plasterers, insulators, and upholsterers; painters and lacquerers; stationary engine and heavy equipment operators; transport workers and freight handlers; and service workers. With regard to specific occupational exposures, elevated odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals (CI)) for lung cancer risk adjusted for smoking and asbestos exposure were observed for man-made mineral fibers (OR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.17, 1.88); crystalline silica (OR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.22, 1.62); diesel engine exhaust (OR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.23, 1.67); and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OR = 1.53, 95% CI 1.14, 2.04). The risk of asbestos exposure, adjusted for smoking was also increased (OR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.24, 1.60).  (+info)

Risk factors for pulmonary disease due to culture-positive M. tuberculosis or nontuberculous mycobacteria in South African gold miners. (7/330)

The aim of this study was to determine risk factors for disease due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) compared to those due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in South African gold miners with pulmonary mycobacterial disease. A case/control study comparing tuberculosis and NTM cases amongst all patients with a positive sputum mycobacterial culture in 1995 was carried out. The 51 cases of disease due to NTM and 425 tuberculosis cases were similar with regard to age, education, home region, smoking habits and percentage of CD4 cells. After adjustment for confounders, those with NTM were more likely to have had previous tuberculosis treatment (odds ratio (OR) 3.61; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.9-6.9), have worked longer underground (p-value for trend=0.05) or have evidence of silicosis (OR 12.6; 95% CI 2.2-71) and were less likely to drink regularly (OR 0.12; 95% CI 0.02-0.93) than patients with tuberculosis. In patients with disease due to NTM, 35.3% were human immunodeficiency virus-positive compared with 48.8% of tuberculosis patients (p=0.2) and an estimated 21% overall in the mines at the time of the study. Previous tuberculosis treatment, silicosis and duration of underground work are even more strongly associated with disease due to nontuberculous mycobacteria than with tuberculosis. Attempts to reduce the incidence of all pulmonary mycobacterial disease in this community should address recognized risk factors and ensure that those with tuberculosis are diagnosed, treated and cured.  (+info)

Low serum alpha-1-antitrypsin level as a contributory factor of combined emphysema in silicosis. (8/330)

In order to evaluate low serum alpha-1-antitrypsin level as a contributory factor of combined emphysema in silicotic patients, serum alpha-1-antitrypsin analysis was carried out in 80 patients with silicosis. Low serum alpha-1-antitrypsin level was found in 5 patients. Large opacities were observed roentgenologically in only 1 out of these 5 cases in contrast to 31 of the other 75 cases. Also the suggestive findings for the emphysema were showed in 4 of these 5 cases while such findings were found on their chest X-ray films in only 43 of the other 75 cases. FEV 1.0% below 50 were calculated in 3 of the 5 cases, on the contrary in 22 of the 75 cases. RV above 50% predicted value was showed by all the 5 low antitrypsin patients, in contrast to only 25 of other 74 cases. The silicotic patients with low serum alpha-1-antitrypsin concentration are most likely to have an association with a high incidence of complicated emphysema.  (+info)

  • Contrary to what she refers to as conventional wisdom-namely, that the miners' own carelessness caused their illness, that the disease was not preventable, or that technology alone caused excessive disease-she focuses on a number of other issues to explain the failure to prevent silicosis. (jhu.edu)
  • How Do I Prevent Silicosis? (festool.com.au)
  • Given the state of medical knowledge about silicosis and its prevention, physicians' denial of responsibility for high disease rates was reprehensible. (jhu.edu)
  • Before we look at some silicosis prevention tips, let's explore what the disease could do. (festool.com.au)
  • However, in most cases, there are no signs of silicosis until later stages of the disease. (shine.com.au)
  • While exploring the response to silicosis by the entire community-the state, the medical profession, the industrialists, the press, and the mine workers-she presents a history of greed, indifference, and apathy. (jhu.edu)
  • Coal miners are at risk of mixed silicosis and coal workers' pneumoconiosis . (merckmanuals.com)
  • Silicosis has become less common since the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) created regulations requiring the use of protective equipment, which limits the amount of silica dust workers inhale. (stlukes-stl.com)
  • Workers exposed to silica dust may go on to develop silicosis, which is a preventable but incurable respiratory disease. (imperiumlaw.co.uk)
  • Silicosis patients are at high risk for TB, and should be checked for the disease during the doctor's examination. (encyclopedia.com)
  • If you are at risk of Silicosis and are worried about the potential impact on your health, make sure you book in with a doctor as soon as possible. (festool.com.au)
  • Technology created more dust, but the decisive factor in the growing incidence and severity of silicosis was the labor practices peculiar to the Witwatersrand gold mines, which elevated dust levels. (jhu.edu)
  • The first round in the highly publicised silicosis class action litigation in South Africa - which could cost the gold mining industry almost $3.25bn - was recently decided in the claimants' favour. (lexology.com)
Blog: How to stop silicosis becoming the new asbestos - Insurance Post
Blog: How to stop silicosis becoming the new asbestos - Insurance Post (postonline.co.uk)
Construction Workers: It's Not Just Dust!...Prevent Silicosis | NIOSH | CDC
Construction Workers: It's Not Just Dust!...Prevent Silicosis | NIOSH | CDC (cdc.gov)
Stonemason diagnosed with deadly disease that killed his brother calls for change  | Daily Mail Online
Stonemason diagnosed with deadly disease that killed his brother calls for change | Daily Mail Online (dailymail.co.uk)
What rock drillers can do to protect their lungs from silica dust | NIOSH | CDC
What rock drillers can do to protect their lungs from silica dust | NIOSH | CDC (cdc.gov)
Silicosis in Sandblasters | NIOSH | CDC
Silicosis in Sandblasters | NIOSH | CDC (cdc.gov)
Silicosis: Learn the Facts! | NIOSH | CDC
Silicosis: Learn the Facts! | NIOSH | CDC (cdc.gov)
CDC - Publicaciones de NIOSH - Silicosis: ¡Conozca los datos! (2004-108)
CDC - Publicaciones de NIOSH - Silicosis: ¡Conozca los datos! (2004-108) (cdc.gov)
NIOSHTIC-2  Publications Search - 20030134 - Connective tissue disease and silicosis.
NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search - 20030134 - Connective tissue disease and silicosis. (cdc.gov)
Preventing Silicosis and Deaths From Sandblasting (92-102) | NIOSH | CDC
Preventing Silicosis and Deaths From Sandblasting (92-102) | NIOSH | CDC (cdc.gov)
Respiratory disease - Occupational lung disease | Britannica
Respiratory disease - Occupational lung disease | Britannica (britannica.com)
Silicosis In Sandblasters, Book by Department of Health and Human Services: (Paperback) | chapters.indigo.ca
Silicosis In Sandblasters, Book by Department of Health and Human Services: (Paperback) | chapters.indigo.ca (chapters.indigo.ca)
Preventing Silicosis & Deaths in Construction Workers | NIOSH | CDC
Preventing Silicosis & Deaths in Construction Workers | NIOSH | CDC (cdc.gov)
Volume 4, Issue 12, June  2019 | NIOSH Research Rounds | CDC
Volume 4, Issue 12, June 2019 | NIOSH Research Rounds | CDC (cdc.gov)
Preventing Silicosis and Deaths in Rock Drillers (92-107) | NIOSH | CDC
Preventing Silicosis and Deaths in Rock Drillers (92-107) | NIOSH | CDC (cdc.gov)
Novel Blood Test Predicts Risk of Tuberculosis (TB) Two Years Before Onset
Novel Blood Test Predicts Risk of Tuberculosis (TB) Two Years Before Onset (medindia.net)
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New Tuberculosis Vaccine Hopes Raises With Biomarker Discovery (medindia.net)
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What Causes Lung Injury in Severe Flu? (medindia.net)
Inhalation Toxicology in the Equine Respiratory Tract | IVIS
Inhalation Toxicology in the Equine Respiratory Tract | IVIS (ivis.org)
Curcumin may Protect Against Lung Damage in Premature Babies
Curcumin may Protect Against Lung Damage in Premature Babies (medindia.net)
Spot Pneumonia With Four Simple Tests: A Guide For Doctors
Spot Pneumonia With Four Simple Tests: A Guide For Doctors (medindia.net)
Clinical Testing Enrolls Vaccine Directed at Latent TB
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WHO Requires Billions To Combat TB Spread: Report
WHO Requires Billions To Combat TB Spread: Report (medindia.net)
4-Drug Tuberculosis Treatment Among HIV/AIDS Patients Does Not Save More Lives
4-Drug Tuberculosis Treatment Among HIV/AIDS Patients Does Not Save More Lives (medindia.net)
Tuberculosis Tricks Our Immune System to Allow It to Spread
Tuberculosis Tricks Our Immune System to Allow It to Spread (medindia.net)
Pneumonia Causing Bacteria Attack Through Bleaching Agent
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Schizophrenia Risk Increased by Childhood Lung Infections
Schizophrenia Risk Increased by Childhood Lung Infections (medindia.net)
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New Strategies for Preventing Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Children Offered By Pediatric-Specific Bundle
New Strategies for Preventing Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Children Offered By Pediatric-Specific Bundle (medindia.net)
World Pneumonia Day 2015:  Every Breath Counts: Stop Pneumonia Now
World Pneumonia Day 2015: Every Breath Counts: Stop Pneumonia Now (medindia.net)
Lung Cancer Mortality Rates Among Women May Increase to 40% by 2030
Lung Cancer Mortality Rates Among Women May Increase to 40% by 2030 (medindia.net)
Some Lung Diseases Reversed in Mice by Coaxing Production of Healthy Cells
Some Lung Diseases Reversed in Mice by Coaxing Production of Healthy Cells (medindia.net)
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Why Injured Lungs Are Susceptible To Further Damage (medindia.net)