Silicones: A broad family of synthetic organosiloxane polymers containing a repeating silicon-oxygen backbone with organic side groups attached via carbon-silicon bonds. Depending on their structure, they are classified as liquids, gels, and elastomers. (From Merck Index, 12th ed)Latex: A milky, product excreted from the latex canals of a variety of plant species that contain cauotchouc. Latex is composed of 25-35% caoutchouc, 60-75% water, 2% protein, 2% resin, 1.5% sugar & 1% ash. RUBBER is made by the removal of water from latex.(From Concise Encyclopedia Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 3rd ed). Hevein proteins are responsible for LATEX HYPERSENSITIVITY. Latexes are used as inert vehicles to carry antibodies or antigens in LATEX FIXATION TESTS.Catheters, Indwelling: Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.Silicone Oils: Organic siloxanes which are polymerized to the oily stage. The oils have low surface tension and density less than 1. They are used in industrial applications and in the treatment of retinal detachment, complicated by proliferative vitreoretinopathy.Silicone Elastomers: Polymers of silicone that are formed by crosslinking and treatment with amorphous silica to increase strength. They have properties similar to vulcanized natural rubber, in that they stretch under tension, retract rapidly, and fully recover to their original dimensions upon release. They are used in the encapsulation of surgical membranes and implants.Catheters: A flexible, tubular device that is used to carry fluids into or from a blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity.Latex Fixation Tests: Passive agglutination tests in which antigen is adsorbed onto latex particles which then clump in the presence of antibody specific for the adsorbed antigen. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Catheterization, Central Venous: Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.Breast Implants: Implants used to reconstruct and/or cosmetically enhance the female breast. They have an outer shell or envelope of silicone elastomer and are filled with either saline or silicone gel. The outer shell may be either smooth or textured.Central Venous Catheters: Catheters that are inserted into a large central vein such as a SUBCLAVIAN VEIN or FEMORAL VEIN.Urinary Catheterization: Passage of a CATHETER into the URINARY BLADDER or kidney.Catheterization, Peripheral: Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.Cardiac Catheters: Catheters inserted into various locations within the heart for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Urinary Catheters: Catheters inserted into the URINARY BLADDER or kidney for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.Catheter-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the use of catheters. Proper aseptic technique, site of catheter placement, material composition, and virulence of the organism are all factors that can influence possible infection.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Rubber: A high-molecular-weight polymeric elastomer derived from the milk juice (LATEX) of HEVEA brasiliensis and other trees and plants. It is a substance that can be stretched at room temperature to at least twice its original length and after releasing the stress, retract rapidly, and recover its original dimensions fully.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Retinal Detachment: Separation of the inner layers of the retina (neural retina) from the pigment epithelium. Retinal detachment occurs more commonly in men than in women, in eyes with degenerative myopia, in aging and in aphakia. It may occur after an uncomplicated cataract extraction, but it is seen more often if vitreous humor has been lost during surgery. (Dorland, 27th ed; Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p310-12).Gloves, Surgical: Gloves, usually rubber, worn by surgeons, examining physicians, dentists, and other health personnel for the mutual protection of personnel and patient.Dimethylpolysiloxanes: Silicone polymers which consist of silicon atoms substituted with methyl groups and linked by oxygen atoms. They comprise a series of biocompatible materials used as liquids, gels or solids; as film for artificial membranes, gels for implants, and liquids for drug vehicles; and as antifoaming agents.Catheterization, Swan-Ganz: Placement of a balloon-tipped catheter into the pulmonary artery through the antecubital, subclavian, and sometimes the femoral vein. It is used to measure pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure which reflects left atrial pressure and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. The catheter is threaded into the right atrium, the balloon is inflated and the catheter follows the blood flow through the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle and out into the pulmonary artery.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Vitrectomy: Removal of the whole or part of the vitreous body in treating endophthalmitis, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, intraocular foreign bodies, and some types of glaucoma.Hevea: A plant genus of the family EUPHORBIACEAE, order Euphorbiales, subclass Rosidae. Commercial natural RUBBER is mainly obtained from Hevea brasiliensis but also from some other plants.Foreign-Body Reaction: Chronic inflammation and granuloma formation around irritating foreign bodies.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Subclavian Vein: The continuation of the axillary vein which follows the subclavian artery and then joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.Fluoroscopy: Production of an image when x-rays strike a fluorescent screen.Polyvinyl Chloride: A polyvinyl resin used extensively in the manufacture of plastics, including medical devices, tubing, and other packaging. It is also used as a rubber substitute.Polyurethanes: A group of thermoplastic or thermosetting polymers containing polyisocyanate. They are used as ELASTOMERS, as coatings, as fibers and as foams.Siloxanes: Silicon polymers that contain alternate silicon and oxygen atoms in linear or cyclic molecular structures.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Dental Impression Materials: Substances used to create an impression, or negative reproduction, of the teeth and dental arches. These materials include dental plasters and cements, metallic oxide pastes, silicone base materials, or elastomeric materials.Atrial Fibrillation: Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.Pulmonary Veins: The veins that return the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.Microspheres: Small uniformly-sized spherical particles, of micrometer dimensions, frequently labeled with radioisotopes or various reagents acting as tags or markers.Peritoneal Dialysis: Dialysis fluid being introduced into and removed from the peritoneal cavity as either a continuous or an intermittent procedure.Vascular Access Devices: Devices to be inserted into veins or arteries for the purpose of carrying fluids into or from a peripheral or central vascular location. They may include component parts such as catheters, ports, reservoirs, and valves. They may be left in place temporarily for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.Gloves, Protective: Coverings for the hands, usually with separations for the fingers, made of various materials, for protection against infections, toxic substances, extremes of hot and cold, radiations, water immersion, etc. The gloves may be worn by patients, care givers, housewives, laboratory and industrial workers, police, etc.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Peritonitis: INFLAMMATION of the PERITONEUM lining the ABDOMINAL CAVITY as the result of infectious, autoimmune, or chemical processes. Primary peritonitis is due to infection of the PERITONEAL CAVITY via hematogenous or lymphatic spread and without intra-abdominal source. Secondary peritonitis arises from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY itself through RUPTURE or ABSCESS of intra-abdominal organs.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Bacteremia: The presence of viable bacteria circulating in the blood. Fever, chills, tachycardia, and tachypnea are common acute manifestations of bacteremia. The majority of cases are seen in already hospitalized patients, most of whom have underlying diseases or procedures which render their bloodstreams susceptible to invasion.Staphylococcus epidermidis: A species of STAPHYLOCOCCUS that is a spherical, non-motile, gram-positive, chemoorganotrophic, facultative anaerobe. Mainly found on the skin and mucous membrane of warm-blooded animals, it can be primary pathogen or secondary invader.Calotropis: A plant genus of the family ASCLEPIADACEAE. The downy akund floss fiber from the seeds is used like kapok.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Peritoneal Dialysis, Continuous Ambulatory: Portable peritoneal dialysis using the continuous (24 hours a day, 7 days a week) presence of peritoneal dialysis solution in the peritoneal cavity except for periods of drainage and instillation of fresh solution.Biofilms: Encrustations, formed from microbes (bacteria, algae, fungi, plankton, or protozoa) embedding in extracellular polymers, that adhere to surfaces such as teeth (DENTAL DEPOSITS); PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; and catheters. Biofilms are prevented from forming by treating surfaces with DENTIFRICES; DISINFECTANTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS; and antifouling agents.Atrial Flutter: Rapid, irregular atrial contractions caused by a block of electrical impulse conduction in the right atrium and a reentrant wave front traveling up the inter-atrial septum and down the right atrial free wall or vice versa. Unlike ATRIAL FIBRILLATION which is caused by abnormal impulse generation, typical atrial flutter is caused by abnormal impulse conduction. As in atrial fibrillation, patients with atrial flutter cannot effectively pump blood into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES).Granuloma, Foreign-Body: Histiocytic, inflammatory response to a foreign body. It consists of modified macrophages with multinucleated giant cells, in this case foreign-body giant cells (GIANT CELLS, FOREIGN-BODY), usually surrounded by lymphocytes.Body Surface Potential Mapping: Recording of regional electrophysiological information by analysis of surface potentials to give a complete picture of the effects of the currents from the heart on the body surface. It has been applied to the diagnosis of old inferior myocardial infarction, localization of the bypass pathway in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, recognition of ventricular hypertrophy, estimation of the size of a myocardial infarct, and the effects of different interventions designed to reduce infarct size. The limiting factor at present is the complexity of the recording and analysis, which requires 100 or more electrodes, sophisticated instrumentation, and dedicated personnel. (Braunwald, Heart Disease, 4th ed)Heart Atria: The chambers of the heart, to which the BLOOD returns from the circulation.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional: Minimally invasive procedures guided with the aid of magnetic resonance imaging to visualize tissue structures.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Renal Dialysis: Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.Radiography, Interventional: Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are invasive or surgical in nature, and require the expertise of a specially trained radiologist. In general, they are more invasive than diagnostic imaging but less invasive than major surgery. They often involve catheterization, fluoroscopy, or computed tomography. Some examples include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, percutaneous transthoracic biopsy, balloon angioplasty, and arterial embolization.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Anti-Infective Agents, Local: Substances used on humans and other animals that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. They are distinguished from DISINFECTANTS, which are used on inanimate objects.Silver Sulfadiazine: Antibacterial used topically in burn therapy.Emulsions: Colloids formed by the combination of two immiscible liquids such as oil and water. Lipid-in-water emulsions are usually liquid, like milk or lotion. Water-in-lipid emulsions tend to be creams. The formation of emulsions may be aided by amphiphatic molecules that surround one component of the system to form MICELLES.Biocompatible Materials: Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.Suction: The removal of secretions, gas or fluid from hollow or tubular organs or cavities by means of a tube and a device that acts on negative pressure.Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Vena Cava, Superior: The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest.PolyvinylsFemoral Vein: The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.Scleral Buckling: An operation for retinal detachment which reduces the size of the globe by indenting the sclera so that it approximates the retina.Intubation: Introduction of a tube into a hollow organ to restore or maintain patency if obstructed. It is differentiated from CATHETERIZATION in that the insertion of a catheter is usually performed for the introducing or withdrawing of fluids from the body.Contact Lenses, Hydrophilic: Soft, supple contact lenses made of plastic polymers which interact readily with water molecules. Many types are available, including continuous and extended-wear versions, which are gas-permeable and easily sterilized.Models, Anatomic: Three-dimensional representation to show anatomic structures. Models may be used in place of intact animals or organisms for teaching, practice, and study.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt: Surgical creation of a communication between a cerebral ventricle and the peritoneum by means of a plastic tube to permit drainage of cerebrospinal fluid for relief of hydrocephalus. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Euphorbiaceae: The spurge family of flowering plants, in the order Euphorbiales, contains some 7,500 species in 275 genera. The family consists of annual and perennial herbs and woody shrubs or trees.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Analgesia, Epidural: The relief of pain without loss of consciousness through the introduction of an analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal. It is differentiated from ANESTHESIA, EPIDURAL which refers to the state of insensitivity to sensation.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Cosmetic Techniques: Procedures for the improvement or enhancement of the appearance of the visible parts of the body.Tachycardia, Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry: Abnormally rapid heartbeats caused by reentry of atrial impulse into the dual (fast and slow) pathways of ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE. The common type involves a blocked atrial impulse in the slow pathway which reenters the fast pathway in a retrograde direction and simultaneously conducts to the atria and the ventricles leading to rapid HEART RATE of 150-250 beats per minute.Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunts: Tubes inserted to create communication between a cerebral ventricle and the internal jugular vein. Their emplacement permits draining of cerebrospinal fluid for relief of hydrocephalus or other condition leading to fluid accumulation in the ventricles.Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome: A form of ventricular pre-excitation characterized by a short PR interval and a long QRS interval with a delta wave. In this syndrome, atrial impulses are abnormally conducted to the HEART VENTRICLES via an ACCESSORY CONDUCTING PATHWAY that is located between the wall of the right or left atria and the ventricles, also known as a BUNDLE OF KENT. The inherited form can be caused by mutation of PRKAG2 gene encoding a gamma-2 regulatory subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Injections: Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Lacrimal Duct Obstruction: Interference with the secretion of tears by the lacrimal glands. Obstruction of the LACRIMAL SAC or NASOLACRIMAL DUCT causing acute or chronic inflammation of the lacrimal sac (DACRYOCYSTITIS). It is caused also in infants by failure of the nasolacrimal duct to open into the inferior meatus and occurs about the third week of life. In adults occlusion may occur spontaneously or after injury or nasal disease. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p250)Euphorbia: A large plant genus of the family EUPHORBIACEAE, order Euphorbiales, subclass Rosidae. They have a milky sap and a female flower consisting of a single pistil, surrounded by numerous male flowers of one stamen each. Euphorbia hirta is rarely called milkweed but that name is normally used for ASCLEPIAS.Surgery, Computer-Assisted: Surgical procedures conducted with the aid of computers. This is most frequently used in orthopedic and laparoscopic surgery for implant placement and instrument guidance. Image-guided surgery interactively combines prior CT scans or MRI images with real-time video.Vitreoretinopathy, Proliferative: Vitreoretinal membrane shrinkage or contraction secondary to the proliferation of primarily retinal pigment epithelial cells and glial cells, particularly fibrous astrocytes, followed by membrane formation. The formation of fibrillar collagen and cellular proliferation appear to be the basis for the contractile properties of the epiretinal and vitreous membranes.Chlorhexidine: A disinfectant and topical anti-infective agent used also as mouthwash to prevent oral plaque.Epidural Space: Space between the dura mater and the walls of the vertebral canal.Dental Impression Technique: Procedure of producing an imprint or negative likeness of the teeth and/or edentulous areas. Impressions are made in plastic material which becomes hardened or set while in contact with the tissue. They are later filled with plaster of Paris or artificial stone to produce a facsimile of the oral structures present. Impressions may be made of a full complement of teeth, of areas where some teeth have been removed, or in a mouth from which all teeth have been extracted. (Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Urinary Tract Infections: Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.Transducers, Pressure: Transducers that are activated by pressure changes, e.g., blood pressure.Tracheal StenosisTachycardia, Ventricular: An abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm usually in excess of 150 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle below the BUNDLE OF HIS, either as autonomic impulse formation or reentrant impulse conduction. Depending on the etiology, onset of ventricular tachycardia can be paroxysmal (sudden) or nonparoxysmal, its wide QRS complexes can be uniform or polymorphic, and the ventricular beating may be independent of the atrial beating (AV dissociation).Evaluation Studies as Topic: Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.Prosthesis Coloring: Coloring, shading, or tinting of prosthetic components, devices, and materials.Staphylococcal Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS.Tachycardia, Ectopic Atrial: Abnormally rapid heartbeats originating from one or more automatic foci (nonsinus pacemakers) in the HEART ATRIUM but away from the SINOATRIAL NODE. Unlike the reentry mechanism, automatic tachycardia speeds up and slows down gradually. The episode is characterized by a HEART RATE between 135 to less than 200 beats per minute and lasting 30 seconds or longer.Contact Lenses, Extended-Wear: Hydrophilic contact lenses worn for an extended period or permanently.Therapeutic Irrigation: The washing of a body cavity or surface by flowing water or solution for therapy or diagnosis.Lenses, Intraocular: Artificial implanted lenses.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Hydrogel: A network of cross-linked hydrophilic macromolecules used in biomedical applications.Dacryocystorhinostomy: Surgical fistulization of the LACRIMAL SAC for external drainage of an obstructed nasolacrimal duct.Bacterial Adhesion: Physicochemical property of fimbriated (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) and non-fimbriated bacteria of attaching to cells, tissue, and nonbiological surfaces. It is a factor in bacterial colonization and pathogenicity.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Atrioventricular Node: A small nodular mass of specialized muscle fibers located in the interatrial septum near the opening of the coronary sinus. It gives rise to the atrioventricular bundle of the conduction system of the heart.Breast Implantation: Surgical insertion of an inert sac filled with silicone or other material to augment the female form cosmetically.Cystostomy: Surgical creation of an opening (stoma) in the URINARY BLADDER for drainage.Staphylococcus aureus: Potentially pathogenic bacteria found in nasal membranes, skin, hair follicles, and perineum of warm-blooded animals. They may cause a wide range of infections and intoxications.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Contact Lens Solutions: Sterile solutions used to clean and disinfect contact lenses.Equipment Reuse: Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Nasolacrimal Duct: A tubular duct that conveys TEARS from the LACRIMAL GLAND to the nose.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Vitreoretinal Surgery: Specialized ophthalmic technique used in the surgical repair and or treatment of disorders that include retinal tears or detachment; MACULAR HOLES; hereditary retinal disease; AIDS-related retinal infections; ocular tumors; MACULAR DEGENERATION; DIABETIC RETINOPATHY; and UVEITIS.Phacoemulsification: A procedure for removal of the crystalline lens in cataract surgery in which an anterior capsulectomy is performed by means of a needle inserted through a small incision at the temporal limbus, allowing the lens contents to fall through the dilated pupil into the anterior chamber where they are broken up by the use of ultrasound and aspirated out of the eye through the incision. (Cline, et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed & In Focus 1993;1(1):1)Dermatitis, Occupational: A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.Burns, Electric: Burns produced by contact with electric current or from a sudden discharge of electricity.Bandages: Material used for wrapping or binding any part of the body.Thrombectomy: Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material from a blood vessel at the point of its formation. Removal of a clot arising from a distant site is called EMBOLECTOMY.Parenteral Nutrition: The administering of nutrients for assimilation and utilization by a patient who cannot maintain adequate nutrition by enteral feeding alone. Nutrients are administered by a route other than the alimentary canal (e.g., intravenously, subcutaneously).Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Electrodes: Electric conductors through which electric currents enter or leave a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.Equipment Safety: Freedom of equipment from actual or potential hazards.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Elastomers: A generic term for all substances having the properties of stretching under tension, high tensile strength, retracting rapidly, and recovering their original dimensions fully. They are generally POLYMERS.Arteriovenous Shunt, Surgical: Surgical shunt allowing direct passage of blood from an artery to a vein. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Endocardium: The innermost layer of the heart, comprised of endothelial cells.Polymethyl Methacrylate: Polymerized methyl methacrylate monomers which are used as sheets, moulding, extrusion powders, surface coating resins, emulsion polymers, fibers, inks, and films (From International Labor Organization, 1983). This material is also used in tooth implants, bone cements, and hard corneal contact lenses.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Infusions, Parenteral: The administration of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through some other route than the alimentary canal, usually over minutes or hours, either by gravity flow or often by infusion pumping.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Extravasation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Materials: The escape of diagnostic or therapeutic material from the vessel into which it is introduced into the surrounding tissue or body cavity.Acrylic ResinsEmbolism, Air: Blocking of a blood vessel by air bubbles that enter the circulatory system, usually after TRAUMA; surgical procedures, or changes in atmospheric pressure.Needles: Sharp instruments used for puncturing or suturing.Polystyrenes: Polymerized forms of styrene used as a biocompatible material, especially in dentistry. They are thermoplastic and are used as insulators, for injection molding and casting, as sheets, plates, rods, rigid forms and beads.Cryosurgery: The use of freezing as a special surgical technique to destroy or excise tissue.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Phlebitis: Inflammation of a vein, often a vein in the leg. Phlebitis associated with a blood clot is called (THROMBOPHLEBITIS).Catheter Obstruction: A hindrance to the passage of fluids through a CATHETER.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Lacrimal Apparatus Diseases: Diseases of the lacrimal apparatus.Viscosity: The resistance that a gaseous or liquid system offers to flow when it is subjected to shear stress. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Injections, Spinal: Introduction of therapeutic agents into the spinal region using a needle and syringe.Vitreous Body: The transparent, semigelatinous substance that fills the cavity behind the CRYSTALLINE LENS of the EYE and in front of the RETINA. It is contained in a thin hyaloid membrane and forms about four fifths of the optic globe.Coated Materials, Biocompatible: Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.Candida: A genus of yeast-like mitosporic Saccharomycetales fungi characterized by producing yeast cells, mycelia, pseudomycelia, and blastophores. It is commonly part of the normal flora of the skin, mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina, but can cause a variety of infections, including CANDIDIASIS; ONYCHOMYCOSIS; vulvovaginal candidiasis (CANDIDIASIS, VULVOVAGINAL), and thrush (see CANDIDIASIS, ORAL). (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Manufacturers usually produce Foley catheters using silicone or coated natural latex.[citation needed] Coatings include PTFE, ... indwelling urinary catheters are most commonly used to assist people who cannot urinate. Indications for using a catheter ... Indwelling urinary catheters should not be used to monitor stable people who are able to urinate or for the convenience of the ... Indwelling catheters should be avoided when there are alternatives, and when patients and caregivers discuss alternatives to ...
Some people develop allergies or sensitivities to latex after long-term latex catheter use making it necessary to use silicone ... Catheters come in several basic designs: A Foley catheter (indwelling urinary catheter) is retained by means of a balloon at ... The catheter may be a permanent one (indwelling catheter), or an intermittent catheter removed after each catheterization. ... They are commonly made in silicone rubber or natural rubber. An intermittent catheter/Robinson catheter is a flexible catheter ...
Liquid silicone rubbers are supplied in barrels. Because of their low viscosity, these rubbers can be pumped through pipelines and tubes to the vulcanization equipment. The two components are pumped through a static mixer by a metering pump. One of the components contains the catalyst, typically platinum based. A coloring paste as well as other additives can also be added before the material enters the static mixer section. In the static mixer the components are well mixed and are transferred to the cooled metering section of the injection molding machine. The static mixer renders a very homogeneous material that results in products that are not only very consistent throughout the part, but also from part to part. This is in contrast to solid silicone rubber materials that are purchased pre-mixed and partially vulcanized. In contrast, hard silicone rubbers are processed by transfer molding and result in less material consistency and control, leading to ...
... is widely used as a temporary sealant and a lubricant for interconnecting ground glass joints, as is typically used in laboratory glassware. Although silicones are normally assumed to be chemically inert, several historically significant compounds have resulted from unintended reactions with silicones.[3][4] The first salts of crown ethers (OSi(CH3)2)n (n = 6, 7) were produced by reactions of organolithium and organopotassium compounds with silicone greases[5] or the serendipitous reaction of stannanetriol with silicone grease to afford a cage-like compound having three Sn-O-Si-O-Sn linkages in the molecule.[6]. Lubrication of an apparatus with silicone grease may result in the reaction mixture being contaminated with the grease. The impurity may be carried through purification by chromatography in undesirable amounts. In NMR spectroscopy, the methyl groups in polydimethylsiloxane display 1H and 13C chemical shifts ...
... s are primarily used as lubricants, thermic fluid oils or hydraulic fluids. They are excellent electrical insulators[2] and, unlike their carbon analogues, are non-flammable. Their temperature stability and good heat-transfer characteristics make them widely used in laboratories for heating baths ("oil baths") placed on top of hotplate stirrers, as well as in freeze-dryers as refrigerants. Silicone oil is also commonly used as the working fluid in dashpots, wet-type transformers, diffusion pumps and in oil-filled heaters. Aerospace use includes the external coolant loop and radiators of the International Space Station Zvezda module, which rejects heat in the vacuum of space.[3] The class of silicone oils known as cyclosiloxanes has many of the same properties as other non-cyclic siloxane liquids but also has a relatively high volatility, making it useful in a number of cosmetic products such as antiperspirant. Some silicone oils, such as simethicone, are ...
F. S. Kipping and Matt Saunders coined the word silicone in 1901 to describe polydiphenylsiloxane by analogy of its formula, Ph2SiO (Ph stands for phenyl, C6H5), with the formula of the ketone benzophenone, Ph2CO (his term was originally silicoketone). Kipping was well aware that polydiphenylsiloxane is polymeric whereas benzophenone is monomeric and noted that Ph2SiO and Ph2CO had very different chemistry.[2][3] The discovery of the structural differences between Kippings' molecules and the ketones means that silicone is no longer the correct term (though it remains in common usage) and that the term siloxanes is correct according to the nomenclature of modern chemistry.[4]. Silicone is sometimes mistakenly referred to as silicon. The chemical element silicon is a crystalline metalloid widely used in computers and other electronic equipment. Although silicones contain silicon atoms, they also include carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and perhaps ...
Because silicones are heavily used in biomedical and cosmetic applications, their toxicology has been intensively examined. "The inertness of silicones toward warmblooded animals has been demonstrated in a number of tests." With an LD50 in rats of ,50 g/kg, they are virtually nontoxic.[12] Cyclomethicones are ubiquitous because they are widely used in biomedical and cosmetic applications and can be found at high levels in American cities and can be toxic to aquatic animals in concentrations often found in the environment.[13][14] The cyclomethicones D4 and D5 are bioaccumulative in some aquatic organisms, according to one report.[15] However, Norwegian researcher Nicholas Warner cautioned that findings about bioaccumulation have been largely based on laboratory studies, while field studies of bioaccumulation are still contradicting each other. "Even if the concentrations of siloxanes we have found in fish are high compared to concentrations of classical contaminants like ...
Because silicones are heavily used in biomedical and cosmetic applications, their toxicology has been intensively examined. "The inertness of silicones toward warmblooded animals has been demonstrated in a number of tests." With an LD50 in rats of ,50 g/kg, they are virtually nontoxic.[11] Cyclomethicones are ubiquitous because they are widely used in biomedical and cosmetic applications and can be found at high levels in American cities and can be toxic to aquatic animals in concentrations often found in the environment.[12][13] The cyclomethicones D4 and D5 are bioaccumulative in some aquatic organisms, according to one report.[14] However, Norwegian researcher Nicholas Warner cautioned that findings about bioaccumulation have been largely based on laboratory studies, while field studies of bioaccumulation are still contradicting each other. "Even if the concentrations of siloxanes we have found in fish are high compared to concentrations of classical contaminants like ...
... serves as a universal thickening agent and an anticaking agent (free-flow agent) in powders. Like silica gel, it serves as a desiccant. It is used in cosmetics for its light-diffusing properties. It is used as a light abrasive, in products like toothpaste. Other uses include filler in silicone elastomer and viscosity adjustment in paints, coatings, printing inks, adhesives and unsaturated polyester resins. It is also used in the production of cat litter box filler and as a core material in the production of vacuum insulated panels. ...
The best treatment is prevention in patients with a known predisposition. This includes preventing unnecessary trauma or surgery (including ear piercing, elective mole removal), whenever possible. Any skin problems in predisposed individuals (e.g., acne, infections) should be treated as early as possible to minimize areas of inflammation. Treatment of a keloid scar is age dependent. Radiotherapy, anti-metabolites and corticoids would not be recommended to be used in children, in order to avoid harmful side effects, like growth abnormalities.[9] In adults, corticosteriods combined with 5-FU and PDL in a triple therapy, enhance results and diminish side effects.[9] Further prophylactic and therapeutic strategies include pressure therapy, silicone gel sheeting, intra-lesional triamcinolone acetonide (TAC), cryosurgery, radiation, laser therapy, IFN, 5-FU and surgical excision as well as a multitude of extracts and topical agents.[10] Surgical excision is currently still the most common ...
... is a company based in Gangnam District, Seoul, South Korea. Clio Professional is a professional make up brand since 1993 with the philosophy of "Practical Professional" providing easy-use products but excellent performance. Peripera is a make up brand for young girls since 2005 with fun, pop, trendy images of "Instant Beauty" Goodal is a Korean natural skin care brand since 2011 using fermented ingredients and infused water. Healing bird is a botanical hair and body care brand with silicone free ingredients and various fragrance experiences of flower garden. Clio Cosmetics is a Korean cosmetic company founded in 1993 starting a professional make-up brand "Clio Professional". Over time, the company branched out into other make-up, skin care, hair and body care products. CLIO cosmetics launched Peripera in 2005, Goodal in 2011 and Healing bird in 2017.[better source needed] In 2012, Clio cosmetics opened the stand alone shop Club Clio selling all of its own brands (95 stores as of ...
... are available in many sizes, with individual beads measuring from 25 mm in diameter to 125 mm diameter or larger. Most users enjoy beads of approximately 45 mm, but most will become more adventurous with experience, and try larger sizes. Anal beads are commonly made of silicone, plastic, rubber, latex, glass or metal and end with a ring or similar handle designed for pulling. The purpose of this ring is to prevent the beads from becoming fully lodged in the rectum, and to ease removal. The beads may either be joined flexibly, requiring individual insertion, or by a semi-rigid thin shaft, allowing anal insertion in a single motion. Both arrangements are forms of the sexual art of "beading off". The many nerve endings of the sphincter provide arousal both during insertion and removal, and larger beads may create feelings of pressure while in the rectum. Some anal beads are enhanced with vibration technology to enhance pleasure. ...
The history of competitive swimwear has been dominated by concerns over public nudity in the first half of the 20th century and by efforts to reduce water drag in the second half. Those efforts initially lead swimmers to reduce the early sagging one-piece swimsuits down to briefs only. With the development of new materials that tightly fit the body and offered lower resistance to water than human skin, this trend was reversed to a complete body coverage from heels to neck and wrists. FINA banned full-body suits from competition effective from 1 January 2010, stating that it "wishes to recall the main and core principle is that swimming is a sport essentially based on the physical performance of the athlete". Goggles were used in the crossing of the English Channel back in 1911, but only in 1970 appeared at international competitions. With the advent of rubber technology, latex swimming caps became mass-produced in the 1920s, and more efficient silicone caps appeared in the ...
RNA interference is under study for possible use as a spray-on insecticide by multiple companies, including Monsanto, Syngenta, and Bayer. Such sprays do not modify the genome of the target plant. The RNA could be modified to maintain its effectiveness as target species evolve tolerance to the original. RNA is a relatively fragile molecule that generally degrades within days or weeks of application. Monsanto estimated costs to be on the order of $5/acre.[10]. RNAi has been used to target weeds that tolerate Monsanto's Roundup herbicide. RNAi mixed with a silicone surfactant that let the RNA molecules enter air-exchange holes in the plant's surface that disrupted the gene for tolerance, affecting it long enough to let the herbicide work. This strategy would allow the continued use of glyphosate-based herbicides, but would not per se assist a herbicide rotation strategy that relied on alternating Roundup with others.[10]. They can be made with enough precision to kill some insect species, ...
Výkal je v praktickom zmysle odpad pre daný organizmus, z ktorého je vylúčený. Pre iné organizmy, či už z oblasti rastlinnej alebo živočíšnej ríše, môže takýto odpad znamenať zdroj živín alebo energie. Kravský výkal vzhľadom na špecifickú konzistenciu a vysoký obsah vody je vo voľnej prírode okamžite atakovaný hmyzom, slúži ako zdroj živín a ako miesto pre nakladenie vajíčok hmyzu. Vyliahnuté larvy sa živia rozkladajúcim sa trusom, ktorý ich vďaka hnilobným procesom navyše udržuje v optimálnej teplote. Skarabeus je chrobák, ktorý vyhľadáva trus bylinožravcov. Samička nakladie larvy do guličky z trusu a následne ju zahrabe do zeme. Vyvíjajúca sa larva sa živí trusom. Podobným príkladom môže byť netopierí trus, ktorý v oblasti výskytu netopierej kolónie znamená nevyhnutné živiny pre šváby, chrobáky a iný hmyz.[2] Trus zvierat sa (okrem vyššie zmienených príkladov z prírody) často používa ľudmi ako hnojivo, či už ...
A urinary catheter is a tube placed in the body to drain and collect urine from the bladder. ... latex, silicone, Teflon), and types (straight or coude tip). A Foley catheter is a common type of indwelling catheter. It has, ... INDWELLING URETHRAL CATHETERS An indwelling urinary catheter is one that is left in the bladder. You may use an indwelling ... HOW TO CARE FOR A CATHETER To care for an indwelling catheter, clean the area where the catheter exits your body and the ...
The unique thing about the SpeediCath® catheter is its coating. Smooth and even, this coating creates minimal friction when ... catheter belongs to the new generation of hydrophilic-coated catheters. ... Coloplast Folysil Foley Indwelling Catheter $49.99 • Composed of 100% latex-free silicone. • Smooth edges aid in the ... Latex-free and phthalate/DEHP-free.. The SpeediCath® catheter belongs to the new generation of hydrophilic-coated catheters. ...
... foley catheters, intermittent catheters, leg bags, drainage bags, urine collection systems and more. ... Coloplast Folysil Foley Indwelling Catheter $49.99 • Composed of 100% latex-free silicone. • Smooth edges aid in the ... The silicone design eliminates allergen and toxin concerns that may be associated with latex male external catheters • Clear, ... Self-adhering, latex-free and has a long seal to ensure the catheter stays in place.• Designed with a longer length adhesive ...
... most of them made of silicone or silicone-latex. Trained health staff performs urethral catheterization and select the most ... Indwelling urethral catheters are periodically replaced about 30 days of use; to not interfere with current clinical practice, ... Device: Silver Alloy-Coated Urinary Catheters Other Name: BIP Foley catheter - Silicone Bactiguard Infection Protection ... the use of antiseptic silver alloy-coated silicone urinary catheters and the use of conventional silicone urinary catheters in ...
Buy Coloplast Folysil 2-Way Indwelling Catheter - Coude Tip - 15cc Balloon Capacity of COLOPLAST. On Sale Foley Catheters ... Silicone coating provides smoothness of the soft, flexible latex surface to ease catheterization ... The Folysil indwelling catheter also features a radio-opaque stripe in a transparent shaft for easy detection in an x-ray. ... Coloplasts indwelling catheters are for single-use only; discard it after use. - If you experience symptoms of a urinary tract ...
... strip for easy visualization during scans Symmetrical balloon shape for improved reliability Not made with natural rubber latex ... silicone Foley catheters Completely inert for less tissue irritation and encrustation during extended periods of indwelling use ... silicone Foley catheters. * Completely inert for less tissue irritation and encrustation during extended periods of indwelling ... Catheter Foley 14 Fr 5 cc Silicone Latex-Free. *Maximize safety and comfort with our 100% ...
Manufacturers usually produce Foley catheters using silicone or coated natural latex.[citation needed] Coatings include PTFE, ... indwelling urinary catheters are most commonly used to assist people who cannot urinate. Indications for using a catheter ... Indwelling urinary catheters should not be used to monitor stable people who are able to urinate or for the convenience of the ... Indwelling catheters should be avoided when there are alternatives, and when patients and caregivers discuss alternatives to ...
Most indwelling catheters are made of latex. Silicone catheters should be used in patients with latex allergies. Silver-coated ... urinary catheters may result in fewer infections than silicone, silicone-coated, or the common hydrogel-coated latex catheters ... Passage of a catheter.. catheterization. /cath·e·ter·iza·tion/ (kath″ĕ-ter-ĭ-za´shun) passage of a catheter into a body channel ... and the indwelling catheter is connected to a closed drainage bag, if not preconnected. The balloon at the tip of this catheter ...
About 1 year ago, I had some complications thaty resulted in me having to use an indwelling cath. I go to my uro to get it ... Indwelling Caths. For 25+yrs I used an external cath to manage my reflex voiding bladder. ... Every other change a friend does at my home; Dr gives me an insertion kit and cath from the office. He now gave me a script for ... It is a silicone cath, seems latex releases proteins that bind with silver negating the effect.. The silicone caths release 100 ...
Microbial biofilms are a major impediment to the use of indwelling medical devices, generating device-related infections with ... All-silicone, silicone-coated latex and nitrofurazone silicone catheters have been used in some cases in combination with ... hydrogel/silver-coatings of latex or silicone-based, silver-impregnated catheters. These strategies have been evaluated for ... randomized trial evaluating the use of hydrogel coated latex versus all silicone urethral catheters after urethral ...
Sterile and Latex Free. CSR Wrap / (1) Drape / (1) Underpad / (2) Powder-Free Vinyl Exam Gloves / (1) Forceps / Rayon Balls / ( ...
However, in my opinion, the question whether one should re-use catheters for intermittent catheterization is important and ... A debate has been going on concerning reusing catheters in this forum. Unfortunately, the debate involved personal criticism of ... Foley patented a one-piece latex-self-retaining catheter that bears his name. In the 1980s, silicone catheters were introduced ... For indwelling urethral or suprapubic catheters, bigger catheters are better, to avoid leakage around the catheter.. • A ...
2-way Silicone Foley Catheter from Bard, Straight Tip Foley Catheter, Medline Straight Tip Three-way Catheters at HPFY. ... These catheters are made of silicone, silicone-elastomer coated latex, hydrophilic-polymer coated latex, silver-alloy coated ... Foley catheter material: Foley catheters are generally made from silicone rubber or latex natural/rubber. The latter is cheaper ... Foley Catheters: Everything You Need to Know. Also known as an indwelling catheter, Foley catheter is a urinary device for long ...
Silicone, Latex-free An innovative manufacturing process provides the maximum amount of silicone coating available. This ... technology provides smoothness of the soft, flexible latex surface to ease catheterization. T ... 2-Way Silicone Foley Catheter 16Fr 17 L, 5cc Balloon Capacity, Coude Tip, 100% ... The silicone coating retards encrustation allowing for longer catheter indwelling periods and minimizes urethral tissue ...
Use only catheters made of vinyl (uncoated or coated with hydrogel), latex (amber or red), and silicone to instill the ... Do not use catheters coated or embedded with silver or antibiotics. In-dwelling bladder catheters (Foley catheters) may be used ... Insert the tapered end of the catheter adapter into the funnel opening of the catheter. See Figure 11, with the connection ... first insert the urethral catheter into the bladder of the patient and use the catheter to completely empty the patients ...
This catheter is an alternative for those who are allergic or sensitive to latex, as the product is latex-free. This is a ... pliable catheter with a firm tip, making insertion easier. ... The 100% Silicone Foley Catheter by Rusch is an indwelling ... Rusch 100% Silicone Foley Catheters - 5cc, 2-Way. 100% Silicone Foley Catheter. 10ML - 5cc. ... This catheter is an alternative for those who are allergic or sensitive to latex, as the product is latex-free. This is a ...
... plain latex, polytetrafluoroethylene, silicone elastomer, pure silicone hydrogel and polymer hydromer. Specialized catheters ... There are many different types of catheters available for use. Standard indwelling catheters are made from a variety of ... However, Urinary tract infections(UTI) associated with indwelling catheter is the second leading cause of nosocomial infections ... Silver-impregnated Suprapubic Catheters (SPC) in Urogynecology. Rochester, Minn.. Urinary catheters are used routinely in the ...
Use only catheters made of vinyl (uncoated or coated with hydrogel), latex (amber or red), and silicone to instill the ... In-dwelling bladder catheters (Foley catheters) may be used if the catheters are inserted shortly prior to Cysview ( ... Insert the tapered end of the catheter adapter into the funnel opening of the catheter. See Figure 7, with the connection ... catheter into the bladder of the patient and use the catheter to completely empty the patients bladder before instillation of ...
Buy Coloplast Folysil 2-Way Pediatric Indwelling Catheter - Straight Tip - 3cc Balloon Capacity of COLOPLAST. On Sale Two-Way ... Urinary Catheters - Silicone versus Latex. Urinary catheters are available in a large variety of sizes, materials and types. ... More About Folysil Indwelling Catheters. *Safety Information. - Folysil Indwelling Catheters empties urine from the bladder ... Coloplasts indwelling catheters are for single-use only; discard it after use. - If you experience symptoms of a urinary tract ...
Some people develop allergies or sensitivities to latex after long-term latex catheter use making it necessary to use silicone ... Catheters come in several basic designs: A Foley catheter (indwelling urinary catheter) is retained by means of a balloon at ... The catheter may be a permanent one (indwelling catheter), or an intermittent catheter removed after each catheterization. ... They are commonly made in silicone rubber or natural rubber. An intermittent catheter/Robinson catheter is a flexible catheter ...
Coloplast along with more selection of Urological Catheters and Foley Catheters at our medical supply store ... Featuring the Cysto-Care Silicone-Coated Latex Catheter - ... and helps prevent encrustation to allow longer indwelling time ... Catheter material is soft, flexible latex, that, combined with the silicone coating, minimizes urethral tissue trauma. Straight ... Two-way foley catheter features a silicone coating that allows easy, comfortable catheter insertion ...
... such as the Infection Control Plus Foley Catheter Kit, by Bard, to assist with sterile catheterization at affordable prices! ... BARDIA Silicone Elastomer Latex Foley Catheter. Starting at: $0.87 * Bard Bedside Drainage Bag ... Compare the Infection Control Plus Foley Catheter Kit to this catheter kit and catheter tray. ... Do not attempt to re-sterilize these catheter supplies after use, as they can cause CAUTIs, catheter-associated urinary tract ...
This could be an external (latex or silicone external male catheter) or an indwelling catheter. Unfortunately, catheters […]. ... Blog, Male External Catheters. Using Silicone External Male Catheter Instead of Latex. ... Male External Catheters. Applying the Conveen Optima Male External Catheter. Posted on January 7, 2017. March 10, 2020. by ... Posted in Blog, Male External Catheters Leave a comment. Blog, Dealing with Incontinence, Male External Catheters. Taking The ...
Find urethral and suprapubic catheters, drainage bags, dialysis supplies, and much more! ... Bard Rochester - 265716 - Foley Catheter, Silicone, 16FR, 5cc, Latex Free (LF), 12/cs Code: 265716 ... Coude Indwelling Catheter. *. Hydrogel Indwelling Catheter. *. Hydrophilic Indwelling Catheter. *. Red Rubber Indwelling ... Rusch - 170605260 - 171305240 - Silkomed 2-Way 100% Silicone Foley Catheter 26 Fr 5 Cc Tiemann 24 Code: 170605260 - 171305240 ...
... catheters and urinary management,items for enema and stool elimination management, equipment for care of the pelvic region ... Foley catheter equipment Complete Medical 165L16 Bardex Lubricath Latex Foley Catheter 16 French ... DeviceExcellent solution for patients who cannot keep an external catheter on or when diapers or indwelling catheters are not ... Pliable catheter with a fi rm tip eases insertion.. *Clear silicone color makes it easy for visualization of clots mucus and ...
  • This device, called the straight catheter, probably has saved more lives than any other medical device in the world. (rutgers.edu)
  • Documentation of medical necessity (such as recurrent encrustation, inability to pass a straight catheter, or sensitivity to latex) is required for a specialty indwelling catheter (A4340) or a silicone catheter (A4312, A4315, A4344). (mn.us)
  • Indications for using a catheter include providing relief when there is urinary retention, monitoring urine output for critically ill persons, managing urination during surgery, and providing end-of-life care. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most effective preventive strategy is to limit catheter use to patients with clear indications and, when a catheter is used, to remove the device as soon as possible. (cancertherapyadvisor.com)
  • Albany NY, 11 January 2019 -- Increasing prevalence of urologic diseases, hospitalization, increasing adoption of new product, and increasing demand from emerging market are the major factor that drives the growth for global indwelling catheter market. (scoopasia.com)
  • North America occupies the substantially larger market share of global indwelling catheter market, which is followed by Europe. (scoopasia.com)