Vital Signs: The signs of life that may be monitored or measured, namely pulse rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, and blood pressure.Location Directories and Signs: Directory signs or listings of designated areas within or without a facility.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Horse Diseases: Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.Deafness: A general term for the complete loss of the ability to hear from both ears.Physical Examination: Systematic and thorough inspection of the patient for physical signs of disease or abnormality.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Manual Communication: Method of nonverbal communication utilizing hand movements as speech equivalents.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Symbolism: A concept that stands for or suggests something else by reason of its relationship, association, convention, or resemblance. The symbolism may be mental or a visible sign or representation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Neurologic Examination: Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.Reflex, Abnormal: An abnormal response to a stimulus applied to the sensory components of the nervous system. This may take the form of increased, decreased, or absent reflexes.Pallor: A clinical manifestation consisting of an unnatural paleness of the skin.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Education of Hearing Disabled: The teaching or training of those individuals with hearing disability or impairment.Plant Poisoning: Poisoning by the ingestion of plants or its leaves, berries, roots or stalks. The manifestations in both humans and animals vary in severity from mild to life threatening. In animals, especially domestic animals, it is usually the result of ingesting moldy or fermented forage.Signs and Symptoms: Clinical manifestations that can be either objective when observed by a physician, or subjective when perceived by the patient.Persons With Hearing Impairments: Persons with any degree of loss of hearing that has an impact on their activities of daily living or that requires special assistance or intervention.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Substance Withdrawal Syndrome: Physiological and psychological symptoms associated with withdrawal from the use of a drug after prolonged administration or habituation. The concept includes withdrawal from smoking or drinking, as well as withdrawal from an administered drug.Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Muscle Rigidity: Continuous involuntary sustained muscle contraction which is often a manifestation of BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES. When an affected muscle is passively stretched, the degree of resistance remains constant regardless of the rate at which the muscle is stretched. This feature helps to distinguish rigidity from MUSCLE SPASTICITY. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p73)Brain Diseases: Pathologic conditions affecting the BRAIN, which is composed of the intracranial components of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. This includes (but is not limited to) the CEREBRAL CORTEX; intracranial white matter; BASAL GANGLIA; THALAMUS; HYPOTHALAMUS; BRAIN STEM; and CEREBELLUM.Cat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Torsion Abnormality: An abnormal twisting or rotation of a bodily part or member on its axis.Observer Variation: The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A variety of conditions affecting the anatomic and functional characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Factors contributing to the complexity of temporomandibular diseases are its relation to dentition and mastication and the symptomatic effects in other areas which account for referred pain to the joint and the difficulties in applying traditional diagnostic procedures to temporomandibular joint pathology where tissue is rarely obtained and x-rays are often inadequate or nonspecific. Common diseases are developmental abnormalities, trauma, subluxation, luxation, arthritis, and neoplasia. (From Thoma's Oral Pathology, 6th ed, pp577-600)Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Umbilicus: The pit in the center of the ABDOMINAL WALL marking the point where the UMBILICAL CORD entered in the FETUS.Swine Diseases: Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Portraits as Topic: Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)Fever: An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Cerebellar Diseases: Diseases that affect the structure or function of the cerebellum. Cardinal manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction include dysmetria, GAIT ATAXIA, and MUSCLE HYPOTONIA.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Spinal Cord Diseases: Pathologic conditions which feature SPINAL CORD damage or dysfunction, including disorders involving the meninges and perimeningeal spaces surrounding the spinal cord. Traumatic injuries, vascular diseases, infections, and inflammatory/autoimmune processes may affect the spinal cord.Neurologic Manifestations: Clinical signs and symptoms caused by nervous system injury or dysfunction.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Parking Facilities: Indoor or outdoor areas designated for the parking of vehicles.Ataxia: Impairment of the ability to perform smoothly coordinated voluntary movements. This condition may affect the limbs, trunk, eyes, pharynx, larynx, and other structures. Ataxia may result from impaired sensory or motor function. Sensory ataxia may result from posterior column injury or PERIPHERAL NERVE DISEASES. Motor ataxia may be associated with CEREBELLAR DISEASES; CEREBRAL CORTEX diseases; THALAMIC DISEASES; BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES; injury to the RED NUCLEUS; and other conditions.Auscultation: Act of listening for sounds within the body.Basal Ganglia Diseases: Diseases of the BASAL GANGLIA including the PUTAMEN; GLOBUS PALLIDUS; claustrum; AMYGDALA; and CAUDATE NUCLEUS. DYSKINESIAS (most notably involuntary movements and alterations of the rate of movement) represent the primary clinical manifestations of these disorders. Common etiologies include CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS; NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES; and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Signs and Symptoms, Respiratory: Respiratory system manifestations of diseases of the respiratory tract or of other organs.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Early Diagnosis: Methods to determine in patients the nature of a disease or disorder at its early stage of progression. Generally, early diagnosis improves PROGNOSIS and TREATMENT OUTCOME.Signs and Symptoms, Digestive: Digestive system manifestations of diseases of the gastrointestinal system or of other organs.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Meningoencephalitis: An inflammatory process involving the brain (ENCEPHALITIS) and meninges (MENINGITIS), most often produced by pathogenic organisms which invade the central nervous system, and occasionally by toxins, autoimmune disorders, and other conditions.Abdomen, Acute: A clinical syndrome with acute abdominal pain that is severe, localized, and rapid in onset. Acute abdomen may be caused by a variety of disorders, injuries, or diseases.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Hematoma: A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.Paresthesia: Subjective cutaneous sensations (e.g., cold, warmth, tingling, pressure, etc.) that are experienced spontaneously in the absence of stimulation.Edema: Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Sheep Diseases: Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Polyneuropathies: Diseases of multiple peripheral nerves simultaneously. Polyneuropathies usually are characterized by symmetrical, bilateral distal motor and sensory impairment with a graded increase in severity distally. The pathological processes affecting peripheral nerves include degeneration of the axon, myelin or both. The various forms of polyneuropathy are categorized by the type of nerve affected (e.g., sensory, motor, or autonomic), by the distribution of nerve injury (e.g., distal vs. proximal), by nerve component primarily affected (e.g., demyelinating vs. axonal), by etiology, or by pattern of inheritance.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Abdominal Pain: Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.Peripheral Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the peripheral nerves external to the brain and spinal cord, which includes diseases of the nerve roots, ganglia, plexi, autonomic nerves, sensory nerves, and motor nerves.Spinal Cord Compression: Acute and chronic conditions characterized by external mechanical compression of the SPINAL CORD due to extramedullary neoplasm; EPIDURAL ABSCESS; SPINAL FRACTURES; bony deformities of the vertebral bodies; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations vary with the anatomic site of the lesion and may include localized pain, weakness, sensory loss, incontinence, and impotence.Nystagmus, Pathologic: Involuntary movements of the eye that are divided into two types, jerk and pendular. Jerk nystagmus has a slow phase in one direction followed by a corrective fast phase in the opposite direction, and is usually caused by central or peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Pendular nystagmus features oscillations that are of equal velocity in both directions and this condition is often associated with visual loss early in life. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p272)Suppuration: A pathologic process consisting in the formation of pus.Ophthalmoplegia: Paralysis of one or more of the ocular muscles due to disorders of the eye muscles, neuromuscular junction, supporting soft tissue, tendons, or innervation to the muscles.Muscle Weakness: A vague complaint of debility, fatigue, or exhaustion attributable to weakness of various muscles. The weakness can be characterized as subacute or chronic, often progressive, and is a manifestation of many muscle and neuromuscular diseases. (From Wyngaarden et al., Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p2251)Eye Diseases: Diseases affecting the eye.Cerebral Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Lameness, Animal: A departure from the normal gait in animals.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Erythema: Redness of the skin produced by congestion of the capillaries. This condition may result from a variety of causes.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Dental Occlusion, Traumatic: An occlusion resulting in overstrain and injury to teeth, periodontal tissue, or other oral structures.Colic: A clinical syndrome with intermittent abdominal pain characterized by sudden onset and cessation that is commonly seen in infants. It is usually associated with obstruction of the INTESTINES; of the CYSTIC DUCT; or of the URINARY TRACT.Bruxism: A disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth.Cerebellar Ataxia: Incoordination of voluntary movements that occur as a manifestation of CEREBELLAR DISEASES. Characteristic features include a tendency for limb movements to overshoot or undershoot a target (dysmetria), a tremor that occurs during attempted movements (intention TREMOR), impaired force and rhythm of diadochokinesis (rapidly alternating movements), and GAIT ATAXIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p90)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Seizures: Clinical or subclinical disturbances of cortical function due to a sudden, abnormal, excessive, and disorganized discharge of brain cells. Clinical manifestations include abnormal motor, sensory and psychic phenomena. Recurrent seizures are usually referred to as EPILEPSY or "seizure disorder."Gestures: Movement of a part of the body for the purpose of communication.Central Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of any component of the brain (including the cerebral hemispheres, diencephalon, brain stem, and cerebellum) or the spinal cord.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Mice, Inbred C57BLFacial Pain: Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, facial, and glossopharyngeal nerves. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL PAIN SYNDROMES.Linguistics: The science of language, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and historical linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Cerebral Hemorrhage: Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES including the BASAL GANGLIA and the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is often associated with HYPERTENSION and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Movement Disorders: Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Paralysis: A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)Eyelid DiseasesMedicine in ArtElectromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Encephalomalacia: Softening or loss of brain tissue following CEREBRAL INFARCTION; cerebral ischemia (see BRAIN ISCHEMIA), infection, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, or other injury. The term is often used during gross pathologic inspection to describe blurred cortical margins and decreased consistency of brain tissue following infarction. Multicystic encephalomalacia refers to the formation of multiple cystic cavities of various sizes in the cerebral cortex of neonates and infants following injury, most notably perinatal hypoxia-ischemic events. (From Davis et al., Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p665; J Neuropathol Exp Neurol, 1995 Mar;54(2):268-75)Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Retinal DiseasesSensation Disorders: Disorders of the special senses (i.e., VISION; HEARING; TASTE; and SMELL) or somatosensory system (i.e., afferent components of the PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM).Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.Muscular Diseases: Acquired, familial, and congenital disorders of SKELETAL MUSCLE and SMOOTH MUSCLE.Bone Retroversion: Attachment of a bone in which its head and neck is rotated excessively backward.Tremor: Cyclical movement of a body part that can represent either a physiologic process or a manifestation of disease. Intention or action tremor, a common manifestation of CEREBELLAR DISEASES, is aggravated by movement. In contrast, resting tremor is maximal when there is no attempt at voluntary movement, and occurs as a relatively frequent manifestation of PARKINSON DISEASE.Animals, ZooPain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Rupture: Forcible or traumatic tear or break of an organ or other soft part of the body.Ischium: One of three bones that make up the coxal bone of the pelvic girdle. In tetrapods, it is the part of the pelvis that projects backward on the ventral side, and in primates, it bears the weight of the sitting animal.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Ecchymosis: Extravasation of blood into the skin, resulting in a nonelevated, rounded or irregular, blue or purplish patch, larger than a petechia.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Hypokinesia: Slow or diminished movement of body musculature. It may be associated with BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES; MENTAL DISORDERS; prolonged inactivity due to illness; and other conditions.Diagnostic Techniques, Neurological: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the nervous system, central and peripheral, or demonstration of neurologic function or dysfunction.Dry Eye Syndromes: Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.Neural Conduction: The propagation of the NERVE IMPULSE along the nerve away from the site of an excitation stimulus.Necrosis: The pathological process occurring in cells that are dying from irreparable injuries. It is caused by the progressive, uncontrolled action of degradative ENZYMES, leading to MITOCHONDRIAL SWELLING, nuclear flocculation, and cell lysis. It is distinct it from APOPTOSIS, which is a normal, regulated cellular process.Cerebral Infarction: The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).Cervical Vertebrae: The first seven VERTEBRAE of the SPINAL COLUMN, which correspond to the VERTEBRAE of the NECK.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Diplopia: A visual symptom in which a single object is perceived by the visual cortex as two objects rather than one. Disorders associated with this condition include REFRACTIVE ERRORS; STRABISMUS; OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES; TROCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES; and diseases of the BRAIN STEM and OCCIPITAL LOBE.Neuromuscular Diseases: A general term encompassing lower MOTOR NEURON DISEASE; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and certain MUSCULAR DISEASES. Manifestations include MUSCLE WEAKNESS; FASCICULATION; muscle ATROPHY; SPASM; MYOKYMIA; MUSCLE HYPERTONIA, myalgias, and MUSCLE HYPOTONIA.Autonomic Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the parasympathetic or sympathetic divisions of the AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; which has components located in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Autonomic dysfunction may be associated with HYPOTHALAMIC DISEASES; BRAIN STEM disorders; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; and PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES. Manifestations include impairments of vegetative functions including the maintenance of BLOOD PRESSURE; HEART RATE; pupil function; SWEATING; REPRODUCTIVE AND URINARY PHYSIOLOGY; and DIGESTION.Extravasation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Materials: The escape of diagnostic or therapeutic material from the vessel into which it is introduced into the surrounding tissue or body cavity.Body Temperature: The measure of the level of heat of a human or animal.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Duodenoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the duodenum.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms: Animals or humans raised in the absence of a particular disease-causing virus or other microorganism. Less frequently plants are cultivated pathogen-free.Respiratory Tract Infections: Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.Cough: A sudden, audible expulsion of air from the lungs through a partially closed glottis, preceded by inhalation. It is a protective response that serves to clear the trachea, bronchi, and/or lungs of irritants and secretions, or to prevent aspiration of foreign materials into the lungs.Appendicitis: Acute inflammation of the APPENDIX. Acute appendicitis is classified as simple, gangrenous, or perforated.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Skin DiseasesEncephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental: An experimental animal model for central nervous system demyelinating disease. Inoculation with a white matter emulsion combined with FREUND'S ADJUVANT, myelin basic protein, or purified central myelin triggers a T cell-mediated immune response directed towards central myelin. The pathologic features are similar to MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, including perivascular and periventricular foci of inflammation and demyelination. Subpial demyelination underlying meningeal infiltrations also occurs, which is also a feature of ENCEPHALOMYELITIS, ACUTE DISSEMINATED. Passive immunization with T-cells from an afflicted animal to a normal animal also induces this condition. (From Immunol Res 1998;17(1-2):217-27; Raine CS, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p604-5)Intracranial Hypotension: Reduction of CEREBROSPINAL FLUID pressure characterized clinically by HEADACHE which is maximal in an upright posture and occasionally by an abducens nerve palsy (see ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES), neck stiffness, hearing loss (see DEAFNESS); NAUSEA; and other symptoms. This condition may be spontaneous or secondary to SPINAL PUNCTURE; NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES; DEHYDRATION; UREMIA; trauma (see also CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA); and other processes. Chronic hypotension may be associated with subdural hematomas (see HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL) or hygromas. (From Semin Neurol 1996 Mar;16(1):5-10; Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp637-8)Meninges: The three membranes that cover the BRAIN and the SPINAL CORD. They are the dura mater, the arachnoid, and the pia mater.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Symptom Assessment: Evaluation of manifestations of disease.Hematoma, Subdural, Intracranial: Accumulation of blood in the SUBDURAL SPACE over the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE.Nerve Compression Syndromes: Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.Eye Manifestations: Ocular disorders attendant upon non-ocular disease or injury.Fetal Diseases: Pathophysiological conditions of the FETUS in the UTERUS. Some fetal diseases may be treated with FETAL THERAPIES.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Cerebrospinal Fluid: A watery fluid that is continuously produced in the CHOROID PLEXUS and circulates around the surface of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and in the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Rupture, Spontaneous: Tear or break of an organ, vessel or other soft part of the body, occurring in the absence of external force.Intestinal Perforation: Opening or penetration through the wall of the INTESTINES.Communication Methods, Total: Utilization of all available receptive and expressive modes for the purpose of achieving communication with the hearing impaired, such as gestures, postures, facial expression, types of voice, formal speech and non-speech systems, and simultaneous communication.Parkinson Disease: A progressive, degenerative neurologic disease characterized by a TREMOR that is maximal at rest, retropulsion (i.e. a tendency to fall backwards), rigidity, stooped posture, slowness of voluntary movements, and a masklike facial expression. Pathologic features include loss of melanin containing neurons in the substantia nigra and other pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. LEWY BODIES are present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but may also be found in a related condition (LEWY BODY DISEASE, DIFFUSE) characterized by dementia in combination with varying degrees of parkinsonism. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1059, pp1067-75)Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Brain Stem: The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Hypesthesia: Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.Atrophy: Decrease in the size of a cell, tissue, organ, or multiple organs, associated with a variety of pathological conditions such as abnormal cellular changes, ischemia, malnutrition, or hormonal changes.Abscess: Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Coma: A profound state of unconsciousness associated with depressed cerebral activity from which the individual cannot be aroused. Coma generally occurs when there is dysfunction or injury involving both cerebral hemispheres or the brain stem RETICULAR FORMATION.Encephalomyelitis: A general term indicating inflammation of the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD, often used to indicate an infectious process, but also applicable to a variety of autoimmune and toxic-metabolic conditions. There is significant overlap regarding the usage of this term and ENCEPHALITIS in the literature.Intestinal Obstruction: Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures: Methods, procedures, and tests performed to diagnose disease, disordered function, or disability.Conjunctiva: The mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the eyelids and the anterior pericorneal surface of the eyeball.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Lipreading: The process by which an observer comprehends speech by watching the movements of the speaker's lips without hearing the speaker's voice.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Pneumoperitoneum: A condition with trapped gas or air in the PERITONEAL CAVITY, usually secondary to perforation of the internal organs such as the LUNG and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, or to recent surgery. Pneumoperitoneum may be purposely introduced to aid radiological examination.
  • As of the Dec. 15 deadline, 218,435 people had signed up for 2018 plans in South Carolina , a 5.4 percent drop from last year's enrollment. (insurancenewsnet.com)
  • The Rams, who'll play in Los Angeles in 2016, released Laurinaitis as he headed into the final year of a five-year contract signed in 2012. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • I'm very ambitious, I come here to try to win everything, to try to push Ali from the first minute and to make us better, Spaniard Adrian said in a statement https://www.liverpoolfc.com/news/first-team/359359-liverpool-fc-complete-signing-of-goalkeeper-adrian?utm_source=Social&utm_medium=TwitterWebsiteCards&utm_content=Digital&utm_campaign=LFCTwitterCards on the club's website. (nytimes.com)
  • Bruges announced https://www.clubbrugge.be/en/news/agreement-principle-simon-mignolet-joins-club-brugge on Sunday that the Belgium international agreed a five-year deal, while British media said the transfer fee was about 7 million pounds ($8.51 million). (nytimes.com)
  • The Seattle Times does not append comment threads to stories from wire services such as the Associated Press, The New York Times, The Washington Post or Bloomberg News. (seattletimes.com)
  • Gov. Deval Patrick on Monday signed a $30.6 billion annual state budget, putting a spending blueprint featuring government reforms and no new taxes on the books 11 days into the new fiscal year, the State House News Service reported. (mvtimes.com)
  • What parents mean by "part-time" work, why the future of your Nook books is uncertain, free theater in the park (and parking lot) and other consumer-focused news from The New York Times. (nytimes.com)
  • How faith can affect mental health therapy, freshening up a kitchen for a home sale, creating your own personal weather station and other consumer-focused news from The New York Times. (nytimes.com)
  • Travel warnings are issued on Egypt, the Ford F-250 is now thieves' favorite target, regulators crack down on abusive debt collection and other consumer-focused news from The New York Times. (nytimes.com)
  • Free unlimited access to Credit Union Times' trusted and independent team of experts for extensive industry news, conference coverage, people features, statistical analysis, and regulation and technology updates. (cutimes.com)
  • ALBANY -- Following years of debate and false starts, Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed a bill Tuesday requiring insurers to cover screening, diagnosis and treatment of autism. (timesunion.com)
  • The children will get the help, the families will get the support," Cuomo said before signing the measure, which was passed by lawmakers last session. (timesunion.com)
  • ALBANY - Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, flanked by Democratic leaders of the state Legislature, on Tuesday night signed into law a series of measures codifying abortion protections and expanding reproductive health rights for women and their health care providers. (timesunion.com)
  • Weddington, the youngest attorney to successfully argue a case before the Supreme Court, sat next to Cuomo as he signed the bill just before 7 p.m. (timesunion.com)
  • Just before signing the bill, Cuomo presented Weddington with a New York Public Service Award. (timesunion.com)
  • This quality improvement project set out to increase real-time collection and documentation of vital signs data by using interfaced mobile vital signs machines. (lww.com)
  • Assessing and documenting vital signs are essential tasks routinely performed by nurses and unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP). (lww.com)
  • When vital signs information is documented in the electronic health record (EHR), clinical decision support tools can alert clinicians to subtle changes or deterioration in a patient's clinical condition. (lww.com)
  • Without timely documentation of vital signs, clinical decision support alerts may trigger too late to impact patient outcomes. (lww.com)
  • That's why there's a growing need to improve efficiencies in obtaining and documenting vital signs data to ensure patient safety, enhance the patient experience, and improve clinician workflows. (lww.com)
  • The time between vital signs collection and documentation can be lengthy due to numerous factors, including nurse-to-patient ratios, interruptions, vital signs machines not interfacing with the EHR, requirements to log into the EHR between each patient, and patient care taking priority over documentation. (lww.com)
  • 2 In addition, despite the availability of mobile computers, nurses and UAPs have voiced concerns about taking the computer and vital signs machine into a patient's room when completing vital signs documentation, due to room capacity and ergonomic hazards. (lww.com)
  • For these reasons, clinicians typically collect one patient's vital signs, document the findings on paper, go to the next assigned patient, and repeat. (lww.com)
  • Once the process is complete for all assigned patients, clinicians batch document all of the vital signs into the EHR at a computer station. (lww.com)
  • Entering vital signs in batches further delays documentation and creates duplicative work and the potential for errors. (lww.com)
  • We embarked on a quality improvement project to improve the rate of real-time collection and documentation of vital signs data by using interfaced mobile vital signs machines. (lww.com)
  • Using the Dartmouth Clinical Microsystem Action Guide and Institute for Healthcare Improvement methodology, we put together a team of nurses, UAPs, informatics staff, and key nurse leaders to assess the clinical microsystem for vital signs collection, documentation in the EHR, contribution to clinical decision alerts, and identification of patient deterioration. (lww.com)
  • Vital signs, or signs of life, include the following objective measures for a person: temperature, respiratory rate, heart beat (pulse), and blood pressure. (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • All of these vital signs can be observed, measured, and monitored. (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • Normal ranges of measurements of vital signs change with age and medical condition. (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • The purpose of recording vital signs is to establish a baseline on admission to a hospital, clinic, professional office, or other encounter with a health care provider. (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • Vital signs may be recorded by a nurse, physician, physician's assistant, or other health care professional. (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • Vital signs are usually recorded from once hourly to four times hourly, as required by a person's condition. (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • The vital signs are recorded and compared with normal ranges for a person's age and medical condition. (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • All persons should be made comfortable and reassured that recording vital signs is normal part of health checks, and that it is necessary to ensure that the state of their health is being monitored correctly. (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • Any abnormalities in vital signs should be reported to the health care professional in charge of care. (surgeryencyclopedia.com)
  • Here, we propose such a framework for extracting specific ERPs as potential "brain vital signs. (frontiersin.org)
  • The findings represent an initial critical step in developing, extracting, and characterizing ERPs as vital signs, critical for subsequent evaluation of dysfunction in conditions like concussion and/or dementia. (frontiersin.org)
  • Vital signs such as heart rate, pulse oxygenation, and blood pressure are essential to monitoring and managing the health of various body systems. (frontiersin.org)
  • Yet there are no such vital signs identified for brain function-despite the clearly instrumental role such vital signs could play. (frontiersin.org)
  • Only time will tell what is to become of this organization as they search for the answers to heal their ailing pitching needs. (bleacherreport.com)
  • The governor of Utah is considering whether to sign a bill this week that would make Utah the first state to require doctors to give anesthesia to women having an abortion at 20 weeks of pregnancy or later. (washingtontimes.com)
  • As he prepared to sign the legislation in the state Capitol's Red Room, which was packed with supporters, the governor thanked Sarah Ragle Weddington, a Texas attorney and law professor who, at the age of 26, represented "Jane Roe" - Norma McCorvey - in the milestone constitutional case in which the Texas woman challenged a state law banning abortion. (timesunion.com)
  • The Democratic governor announced Tuesday that he signed SB269. (californiahealthline.org)
  • Gov. Brian Sandoval signed legislation Thursday legalizing online gambling in Nevada, capping a dizzying day at the Legislature as lawmakers passed the bill through the Assembly and Senate as an emergency measure. (timesfreepress.com)
  • RALEIGH Gov. Pat McCrory signed legislation into law Wednesday that he said will help North Carolina consumers make better health care decisions and aid his administration in running state government more efficiently. (thetimesnews.com)
  • The Gazette (https://bit.ly/1kvWsh2 ) reported Wednesday that the state has added four full-time employees and 13 temporary employees to keep up with demand. (washingtontimes.com)
  • The signed contract of Grover CIeveland Alexander, star pitcher of the Chicago Nationals, was received at Cub headquarters today. (nytimes.com)
  • Along with Colon, the Yankees have also recently signed pitcher Mark Prior, who has not pitched in the big leagues since 2006. (bleacherreport.com)
  • Stress the need to prevent infections, manage chronic conditions, and seek care if signs of severe infection or sepsis are present. (cdc.gov)
  • Know sepsis signs and symptoms to identify and treat patients early. (cdc.gov)
  • The information gathered is useful in identifying a patient's overall health status and physiologic signs of deterioration, and can lead to early recognition and treatment of serious conditions such as sepsis. (lww.com)
  • FAST" is an acronym that stands for three main symptoms - "facial drooping, arm weakness, speech difficulties and time to call emergency services" - and it can be used to help people remember and identify the most common symptoms of a stroke. (taipeitimes.com)
  • Facial drooping can be recognized as facial asymmetry or a crooked smile, arm weakness is the sudden inability to raise one's arm or leg fully, and speech difficulties can be recognized by slurred speech or difficulty speaking, he said, adding that it is time to call the emergency services or go to hospital if any of the symptoms appear. (taipeitimes.com)
  • Because of lad culture, men can see talking about problems as a sign of weakness. (thesun.co.uk)
  • The ministry said the pact was signed in Taipei by Representative to the Philippines Gary Lin (林松煥) and his Philippine counterpart, Antonio Basilio, at a ceremony witnessed by the two nations' heads of fisheries agencies and Manila Economic and Cultural Office chairman Amadeo Perez. (taipeitimes.com)
  • VIENNA (AFP) - The United Nations and Bogota signed a major pact on Friday (Nov 3) to uproot Colombia's booming cocaine business, as part of peace efforts between the government and drug trade-controlling rebels. (straitstimes.com)
  • Former Malaysian prime minister and Proton Chairman Mahathir Mohamad said details of the pact haven't been worked out and that a definite agreement will be signed by next year. (businesstimes.com.sg)
  • The results of this researcher's meta-analysis affirm that total communication, combining sign language with speech, is a highly effective strategy for increasing functional communication skills in children and young adults with autism. (signingtime.com)
  • This should provide hope for individuals working with children with autism, being that nonverbal children do have the capacity to develop some functional communication skills in the form of sign language. (signingtime.com)
  • Additionally, children with autism and moderate mental retardation have the ability to acquire sign language. (signingtime.com)
  • Resources such as Signing Time are invaluable for families of individuals with autism. (signingtime.com)
  • This award-winning video was produced by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health, to build awareness about the signs of stroke and the need to call 911 to receive immediate medical treatment. (merlot.org)
  • In an interesting commentary published in the Cleveland Plain Dealer, William F. Shughart II, the F.A.P. Barnard Distinguished Professor of Economics at the University of Mississippi and a senior fellow at The Independent Institute, says that it "has been known for years that shifting time forward or backward has negative, and possibly deadly, health consequences. (blogspot.com)
  • Knowing what health issues your dog is susceptible to gives you the chance to catch a malady early when you have ample time to modify it. (petmd.com)
  • The truth is, we now know our pet's dietary needs can and do change over time due to factors like their life stage, their overall health, and their activity level. (petmd.com)
  • These signs and symptoms should not be ignored as paying attention to them can help you avoid major health issues. (indiatimes.com)
  • I want to be proactive and focus on maintaining my health and happiness and have decided that the best way forward is to take some time off,' Gomez said in her statement. (self.com)
  • But there are certainly things they should be on the lookout for that, if they have a lot of signs, maybe they would benefit from speaking with someone in the mental health field. (self.com)
  • If these things are happening and there's no real reason behind it, that can be a sign that maybe something's happening with regards to your mental health,' he says. (self.com)
  • Dec. 22 -- South Carolina residents got some extra time over the holidays to get their health insurance straightened out, thanks to Hurricane Irma. (insurancenewsnet.com)
  • The national sign-up period under the Affordable Care Act came to an end Dec. 15 , but the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services extended the deadline for another two weeks for areas affected by this fall's massive hurricanes. (insurancenewsnet.com)
  • After the sign-up period ended, Congress voted to approve the repeal of the individual mandate to buy health insurance as part of a tax bill. (insurancenewsnet.com)
  • The glove does not translate British Sign Language, the other dominant sign language in the English-speaking world, which is used by about 151,000 adults in the UK, according to the British Deaf Association. (cnn.com)
  • It naturally puts a lot of parents in an overdrive, without knowing that it may actually be a sign of anxiety. (indiatimes.com)
  • If you're having major issues of anxiety and depression more days than not, then that's often a sign that something's wrong. (self.com)
  • If I normally love going out with my friends on a Friday night, and now it's just not fun anymore-I don't like it I find it boring-that's often another sign of depression or anxiety or something's wrong,' he says. (self.com)
  • Sometimes this can be achieved through simple at-home practices, and other times enlisting the help of a therapist is key in managing anxiety. (mindbodygreen.com)
  • So, how do you know when it's time to see a therapist for your anxiety? (mindbodygreen.com)
  • Like so many words, "anxiety" gets misused all the time. (mindbodygreen.com)
  • Healthy vs. unhealthy anxiety: When is it time to see a therapist? (mindbodygreen.com)
  • Dr. Christopher Moreland assisted by sign language interpreter Todd Agan, reviews a patient's case with his attending physician, Maya Mitchell. (ucdavis.edu)
  • This software intelligently reviews millions of records in a short amount of time, enabling us to determine breast cancer risk more efficiently using a patient's mammogram," said Stephen T Wong, chair of the Department of Systems Medicine and Bioengineering at the institute. (wired.co.uk)
  • The Jordan Times is an independent English-language daily published by the Jordan Press Foundationsince October 26, 1975. (jordantimes.com)
  • The government has to… show the international community that meeting the implications of the crisis is highly negative on Jordan," Wazani told The Jordan Times in a phone interview. (jordantimes.com)
  • More and more emphasis is now placed on response in host communities where 80 per cent of the refugees live and where children are the most exposed to violence and neglect," Servadei told The Jordan Times in an e-mail interview on Wednesday. (jordantimes.com)
  • A New York Times article last week, " How Visa, Using Card Fees, Dominates a Market ," detailed the behind-the-scenes struggle between banks and retailers to encourage customers to sign when making debit card purchases or to punch in their PIN number because of the higher fees that stores pay banks for signatures. (nytimes.com)
  • You just viewed Know Stroke Know the Signs Act in... . (merlot.org)
  • The optimal timing of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is within three hours and it can help limit damage and disability, Wang Ying-wei said. (taipeitimes.com)
  • So, if you started noticing that wherever you go, you trip on something or get bruises, it is definitely a time to move. (fotolog.com)
  • Please sign up or log in to continue reading the article. (straitstimes.com)
  • Many readers took issue with the notion in the article that the debate over signing versus typing in a PIN "is a pointless distinction to most consumers, since the price is the same either way. (nytimes.com)
  • The wearable device contains sensors that run along the four fingers and thumb to identify each word, phrase or letter as it is made in American Sign Language. (cnn.com)
  • The anticipated passage generated passionate debate in the halls of the Capitol Tuesday, where protesters and supporters armed with signs crowded hallways and fired off competing chants and songs. (timesunion.com)
  • Signs warning against staying overnight at Los Angeles City Hall drew mixed reactions from Occupy L.A. protesters and others camped outside the downtown landmark, with some saying they feared eviction and others insisting they were determined to stay unless forced out. (latimes.com)
  • For the first time in almost two months Manger Square and the streets of Bethlehem were filled with people after dark as several hundred people participated in a candlelight march to protest Israeli-Palestinian clashes. (americamagazine.org)
  • A glove that translates sign language into speech in real time has been developed by scientists -- potentially allowing deaf people to communicate directly with anyone, without the need for a translator . (cnn.com)
  • Our hope is that this opens up an easy way for people who use sign language to communicate directly with non-signers without needing someone else to translate for them," said lead researcher Jun Chen. (cnn.com)
  • In addition, we hope it can help more people learn sign language themselves," he added. (cnn.com)
  • Between 100,000 and 1 million people are estimated to use American Sign Language in the United States. (cnn.com)
  • More than 300 sign languages are used by more than 70 million deaf people across the world. (cnn.com)
  • The researchers also added adhesive sensors to the faces of people used to test the device -- between their eyebrows and on one side of their mouths -- to capture facial expressions that are a part of American Sign Language. (cnn.com)
  • What inventions like signing gloves totally ignore is the fact that deaf people are the ones living these daily lives in the hearing communities the inventors try to serve," added Julie A. Hochgesang, an associate professor in the Department of Linguistics at Gallaudet University in the US, who uses ASL. (cnn.com)
  • Inventions like signing gloves pigeonhole deaf people and put the communication burden on deaf people," she added. (cnn.com)
  • People in times of need will always need to connect," McCracken told NPR , "and when the consumers have asked us for a way to connect in those difficult situations, we try to respond in an authentic way and we think that's what the greeting card does. (patheos.com)
  • During the crisis people who work within their community can play an important role in helping keep children safe and spotting possible signs of child abuse, neglect and domestic violence," they said in a joint statement. (thetimes.co.uk)
  • Many of those are people were automatically re-enrolled in their current plan at the end of the sign-up period. (insurancenewsnet.com)
  • It's unclear how many people who missed the Dec. 15 sign-up will now rush to sign up by the new year. (insurancenewsnet.com)
  • But at the same time I was learning about planets and atoms, down the hall from my bedroom an older sibling was being quietly indoctrinated by one of many seemingly innocent evangelical Christian outreach efforts aimed at young people, this one was called Young Life , but it was just one among many. (freethoughtblogs.com)
  • MONTGOMERY - Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley says he expects to sign redistricting plans for the Alabama House and Senate passed by lawmakers early Thursday at the end of an emotional special session. (gadsdentimes.com)
  • A comparative study between the basic sign algorithms and these two variants in case of time-varying environments, including additive impulsive noise, jumping systems and markovian non stationarities, is carried. (psu.edu)
  • Furthermore, the broad presence of women in the sample has made it possible, for the first time, to associate some of these genetic variants with a high level of alcohol intake in women. (healthcanal.com)
  • These diets take advantage of the latest research in pet weight management to ensure your pet is on their way to a healthier weight in no time! (petmd.com)
  • If your family and friends make comments that you're acting differently, that's a key sign that something might be off. (self.com)
  • Although he uses a variety of communications methods, Moreland relies on a sign language interpreter when meeting a patient or someone new at work. (ucdavis.edu)
  • At the Agland at 16th Street and U.S. 85 Bypass in Greeley, in the men's restroom, there's a sign that reads: "All employees must wash your hands before returning back to your work area. (greeleytribune.com)
  • In the third of the four-part series on eating according to your zodiac sign, Shikha Sharma writes on food you should have if you are born under the following signs - Aries, Leo and Sagittarius. (hindustantimes.com)
  • Porsche has already announced that works drivers Timo Bernhard and Romain Dumas will drive the new Porsche, and also signed former Rebellion Racing driver Neel Jani earlier this week. (theepochtimes.com)
  • It looks like Florida's texting-and-driving ban, which was at one point was almost derailed by the House added some frivolous amendments to it last month, will become a thing when Rick Scott signs it into law next week . (browardpalmbeach.com)
  • The Saints, who announced the moves Thursday, say Laurinaitis has signed for three years and Sanford for one year. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Morel, 28, has played 220 major league games over the past six years and played for the Pittsburgh Pirates three times this past season. (japantimes.co.jp)
  • Initial tests showed ligament damage, and he is undergoing further examination to determine if he needs surgery for the second time in less than four years. (timesfreepress.com)
  • If you have been working on your career for years and that has finally started paying off, then it is time to treat your family and yourself with the comfort that you deserve. (fotolog.com)
  • And with an unemployment rate that has sat above 8 percent for over two and a half years now , it might be about time. (patheos.com)
  • New research by the team from Wits, with collaborators from the University of Cape Town and University of Pretoria, reveals what a shift from night-time to daytime activity means for the well-being of aardvarks in a warming and drying world. (phys.org)
  • TSYS , the nation's second-largest card processor, has signed credit card processing contracts with two credit unions, the firm said Wednesday. (cutimes.com)