Mouth: The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.Mouth FloorMouth DiseasesMouth Mucosa: Lining of the ORAL CAVITY, including mucosa on the GUMS; the PALATE; the LIP; the CHEEK; floor of the mouth; and other structures. The mucosa is generally a nonkeratinized stratified squamous EPITHELIUM covering muscle, bone, or glands but can show varying degree of keratinization at specific locations.Mouth Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MOUTH.Mouthwashes: Solutions for rinsing the mouth, possessing cleansing, germicidal, or palliative properties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Mouth, Edentulous: Total lack of teeth through disease or extraction.Xerostomia: Decreased salivary flow.Enterovirus A, Human: A species of ENTEROVIRUS infecting humans and containing 10 serotypes, mostly coxsackieviruses.Mouth Protectors: Devices or pieces of equipment placed in or around the mouth or attached to instruments to protect the external or internal tissues of the mouth and the teeth.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Weight Perception: Recognition and discrimination of the heaviness of a lifted object.Trismus: Spasmodic contraction of the masseter muscle resulting in forceful jaw closure. This may be seen with a variety of diseases, including TETANUS, as a complication of radiation therapy, trauma, or in association with neoplastic conditions.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Saliva: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SALIVARY GLANDS and mucous glands of the mouth. It contains MUCINS, water, organic salts, and ptylin.Halitosis: An offensive, foul breath odor resulting from a variety of causes such as poor oral hygiene, dental or oral infections, or the ingestion of certain foods.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Tongue: A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A variety of conditions affecting the anatomic and functional characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Factors contributing to the complexity of temporomandibular diseases are its relation to dentition and mastication and the symptomatic effects in other areas which account for referred pain to the joint and the difficulties in applying traditional diagnostic procedures to temporomandibular joint pathology where tissue is rarely obtained and x-rays are often inadequate or nonspecific. Common diseases are developmental abnormalities, trauma, subluxation, luxation, arthritis, and neoplasia. (From Thoma's Oral Pathology, 6th ed, pp577-600)Sucking Behavior: Any suction exerted by the mouth; response of the mammalian infant to draw milk from the breast. Includes sucking on inanimate objects. Not to be used for thumb sucking, which is indexed under fingersucking.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Nose: A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.Enterovirus: A genus of the family PICORNAVIRIDAE whose members preferentially inhabit the intestinal tract of a variety of hosts. The genus contains many species. Newly described members of human enteroviruses are assigned continuous numbers with the species designated "human enterovirus".Lip: Either of the two fleshy, full-blooded margins of the mouth.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Dental Plaque: A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.Great BritainRespiratory Muscles: These include the muscles of the DIAPHRAGM and the INTERCOSTAL MUSCLES.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Pharynx: A funnel-shaped fibromuscular tube that conducts food to the ESOPHAGUS, and air to the LARYNX and LUNGS. It is located posterior to the NASAL CAVITY; ORAL CAVITY; and LARYNX, and extends from the SKULL BASE to the inferior border of the CRICOID CARTILAGE anteriorly and to the inferior border of the C6 vertebra posteriorly. It is divided into the NASOPHARYNX; OROPHARYNX; and HYPOPHARYNX (laryngopharynx).Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Temporomandibular Joint: An articulation between the condyle of the mandible and the articular tubercle of the temporal bone.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Guilt: Subjective feeling of having committed an error, offense or sin; unpleasant feeling of self-criticism. These result from acts, impulses, or thoughts contrary to one's personal conscience.Dentures: An appliance used as an artificial or prosthetic replacement for missing teeth and adjacent tissues. It does not include CROWNS; DENTAL ABUTMENTS; nor TOOTH, ARTIFICIAL.Touch Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of tactile stimuli are recognized and interpreted by the brain, such as realizing the characteristics or name of an object being touched.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Ankylosis: Fixation and immobility of a joint.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Jaw: Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Saliva, Artificial: A solution used for irrigating the mouth in xerostomia and as a substitute for saliva.Taste Disorders: Conditions characterized by an alteration in gustatory function or perception. Taste disorders are frequently associated with OLFACTION DISORDERS. Additional potential etiologies include METABOLIC DISEASES; DRUG TOXICITY; and taste pathway disorders (e.g., TASTE BUD diseases; FACIAL NERVE DISEASES; GLOSSOPHARYNGEAL NERVE DISEASES; and BRAIN STEM diseases).Enterovirus InfectionsSalivation: The discharge of saliva from the SALIVARY GLANDS that keeps the mouth tissues moist and aids in digestion.Yawning: An involuntary deep INHALATION with the MOUTH open, often accompanied by the act of stretching.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Neonatology: A subspecialty of Pediatrics concerned with the newborn infant.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Chlorhexidine: A disinfectant and topical anti-infective agent used also as mouthwash to prevent oral plaque.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Emergency Nursing: The specialty or practice of nursing in the care of patients admitted to the emergency department.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Depersonalization: State in which an individual perceives or experiences a sensation of unreality concerning the self or the environment; it is seen in disorders such as schizophrenia, affection disorders, organic mental disorders, and personality disorders. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Empathy: An individual's objective and insightful awareness of the feelings and behavior of another person. It should be distinguished from sympathy, which is usually nonobjective and noncritical. It includes caring, which is the demonstration of an awareness of and a concern for the good of others. (From Bioethics Thesaurus, 1992)Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Hoarseness: An unnaturally deep or rough quality of voice.Surgery, Plastic: The branch of surgery concerned with restoration, reconstruction, or improvement of defective, damaged, or missing structures.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Oral Ulcer: A loss of mucous substance of the mouth showing local excavation of the surface, resulting from the sloughing of inflammatory necrotic tissue. It is the result of a variety of causes, e.g., denture irritation, aphthous stomatitis (STOMATITIS, APHTHOUS); NOMA; necrotizing gingivitis (GINGIVITIS, NECROTIZING ULCERATIVE); TOOTHBRUSHING; and various irritants. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p842)Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.United StatesVideo Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Taste: The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.Inhalation: The act of BREATHING in.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Personal Space: Invisible boundaries surrounding the individual's body which are maintained in relation to others.Dental Articulators: Mechanical devices that simulate the temporomandibular joints and jaws to which maxillary and mandibular casts are attached. The entire assembly attempts to reproduce the movements of the mandible and the various tooth-to-tooth relationships that accompany those movements.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Ethics, Nursing: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of nurses themselves, their patients, and their fellow practitioners, as well as their actions in the care of patients and in relations with their families.Patient Participation: Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Ranula: A form of retention cyst of the floor of the mouth, usually due to obstruction of the ducts of the submaxillary or sublingual glands, presenting a slowly enlarging painless deep burrowing mucocele of one side of the mouth. It is also called sublingual cyst and sublingual ptyalocele.Mastication: The act and process of chewing and grinding food in the mouth.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Masks: Devices that cover the nose and mouth to maintain aseptic conditions or to administer inhaled anesthetics or other gases. (UMDNS, 1999)Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Touch: Sensation of making physical contact with objects, animate or inanimate. Tactile stimuli are detected by MECHANORECEPTORS in the skin and mucous membranes.Coercion: The use of force or intimidation to obtain compliance.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Nasal Cavity: The proximal portion of the respiratory passages on either side of the NASAL SEPTUM. Nasal cavities, extending from the nares to the NASOPHARYNX, are lined with ciliated NASAL MUCOSA.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Aphthovirus: A genus of the family PICORNAVIRIDAE infecting mainly cloven-hoofed animals. They cause vesicular lesions and upper respiratory tract infections. FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE VIRUS is the type species.Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Medical Receptionists: Individuals who receive patients in a medical office.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Oral Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.Inspiratory Capacity: The maximum volume of air that can be inspired after reaching the end of a normal, quiet expiration. It is the sum of the TIDAL VOLUME and the INSPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME. Common abbreviation is IC.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Feeding and Eating Disorders of Childhood: Mental disorders related to feeding and eating usually diagnosed in infancy or early childhood.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Sensation: The process in which specialized SENSORY RECEPTOR CELLS transduce peripheral stimuli (physical or chemical) into NERVE IMPULSES which are then transmitted to the various sensory centers in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Professional-Family Relations: The interactions between the professional person and the family.Cheek: The part of the face that is below the eye and to the side of the nose and mouth.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Hyoid Bone: A mobile U-shaped bone that lies in the anterior part of the neck at the level of the third CERVICAL VERTEBRAE. The hyoid bone is suspended from the processes of the TEMPORAL BONES by ligaments, and is firmly bound to the THYROID CARTILAGE by muscles.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Awareness: The act of "taking account" of an object or state of affairs. It does not imply assessment of, nor attention to the qualities or nature of the object.Mandibular Condyle: The posterior process on the ramus of the mandible composed of two parts: a superior part, the articular portion, and an inferior part, the condylar neck.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Sjogren's Syndrome: Chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease in which the salivary and lacrimal glands undergo progressive destruction by lymphocytes and plasma cells resulting in decreased production of saliva and tears. The primary form, often called sicca syndrome, involves both KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS SICCA and XEROSTOMIA. The secondary form includes, in addition, the presence of a connective tissue disease, usually rheumatoid arthritis.Facial Bones: The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Trust: Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.Deglutition: The act of taking solids and liquids into the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT through the mouth and throat.Stomatitis: INFLAMMATION of the soft tissues of the MOUTH, such as MUCOSA; PALATE; GINGIVA; and LIP.Stomatitis, Aphthous: A recurrent disease of the oral mucosa of unknown etiology. It is characterized by small white ulcerative lesions, single or multiple, round or oval. Two to eight crops of lesions occur per year, lasting for 7 to 14 days and then heal without scarring. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p742)Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Masticatory Muscles: Muscles arising in the zygomatic arch that close the jaw. Their nerve supply is masseteric from the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Oral Hygiene: The practice of personal hygiene of the mouth. It includes the maintenance of oral cleanliness, tissue tone, and general preservation of oral health.Anti-Infective Agents, Local: Substances used on humans and other animals that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. They are distinguished from DISINFECTANTS, which are used on inanimate objects.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Facial Pain: Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, facial, and glossopharyngeal nerves. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL PAIN SYNDROMES.Oral Submucous FibrosisSense of Coherence: A view of the world and the individual's environment as comprehensible, manageable, and meaningful, claiming that the way people view their life has a positive influence on their health.Masseter Muscle: A masticatory muscle whose action is closing the jaws.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Tongue DiseasesAdolescent Medicine: A branch of medicine pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases occurring during the period of ADOLESCENCE.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate: A four-year program in nursing education in a college or university leading to a B.S.N. (Bachelor of Science in Nursing). Graduates are eligible for state examination for licensure as RN (Registered Nurse).EnglandSulfur Compounds: Inorganic or organic compounds that contain sulfur as an integral part of the molecule.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Shame: An emotional attitude excited by realization of a shortcoming or impropriety.Stereotyping: An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Treatment Refusal: Patient or client refusal of or resistance to medical, psychological, or psychiatric treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Sublingual Gland: A salivary gland on each side of the mouth below the TONGUE.Loneliness: The state of feeling sad or dejected as a result of lack of companionship or being separated from others.Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus: The type species of APHTHOVIRUS, causing FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE in cloven-hoofed animals. Several different serotypes exist.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Airway Resistance: Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Salivary Glands: Glands that secrete SALIVA in the MOUTH. There are three pairs of salivary glands (PAROTID GLAND; SUBLINGUAL GLAND; SUBMANDIBULAR GLAND).Facial Muscles: Muscles of facial expression or mimetic muscles that include the numerous muscles supplied by the facial nerve that are attached to and move the skin of the face. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Povidone-Iodine: An iodinated polyvinyl polymer used as topical antiseptic in surgery and for skin and mucous membrane infections, also as aerosol. The iodine may be radiolabeled for research purposes.Chin: The anatomical frontal portion of the mandible, also known as the mentum, that contains the line of fusion of the two separate halves of the mandible (symphysis menti). This line of fusion divides inferiorly to enclose a triangular area called the mental protuberance. On each side, inferior to the second premolar tooth, is the mental foramen for the passage of blood vessels and a nerve.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Tooth Discoloration: Any change in the hue, color, or translucency of a tooth due to any cause. Restorative filling materials, drugs (both topical and systemic), pulpal necrosis, or hemorrhage may be responsible. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p253)Facial Expression: Observable changes of expression in the face in response to emotional stimuli.Ulmaceae: A plant family of the order Urticales, subclass Hamamelidae, class Magnoliopsida. Members are trees and shrubs of temperate regions that have watery sap and alternate leaves which are lopsided at the base. The flowers lack petals.Nail Biting: Common form of habitual body manipulation which is an expression of tension.Toothbrushing: The act of cleaning teeth with a brush to remove plaque and prevent tooth decay. (From Webster, 3d ed)Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Palate, Hard: The anteriorly located rigid section of the PALATE.Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Nasolabial Fold: A skin crease on each side of the face that runs from the outer corners of the nose to the corner of the mouth. It is a common site of PLASTIC SURGERY.Chewing Gum: A preparation of chicle, sometimes mixed with other plastic substances, sweetened and flavored. It is masticated usually for pleasure as a candy substitute but it sometimes acts as a vehicle for the administration of medication.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)
It is taken by mouth. Common side effects itching, facial swelling, headaches, and feeling tired. Other side effects include ...
When used by mouth, it can take a few weeks for effects to begin. Common side effects include feeling tired, tremor, nausea, ... Most individuals administered amiodarone on a chronic basis will experience at least one side effect. Side effects of ... It was pulled from the market in 1967 due to side effects. In 1974 it was found to be useful for arrhythmias and reintroduced. ... The incidence of severe side effects in this group is low. The benefit of amiodarone in the treatment of atrial fibrillation in ...
It is taken by mouth. Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and feeling tired. More serious side effects ...
It is taken by mouth. Common side effects include abdominal pain, feeling tired, and vaginal bleeding. Serious side effects may ... Other less common side effects included nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, fatigue, and fever. Pelvic inflammatory disease ... The approved dosing regimen is 200 mg of mifepristone taken by mouth (swallowed). 24 to 48 hours after taking mifepristone, 800 ...
... is taken by mouth and has an effect for at least a day. Common side effects include swelling, feeling tired, ... Side effects are rare in cats. In dogs, the primary side effect is gingival hyperplasia. "Medical Definition of AMLODIPINE". ... Serious side effects may include low blood pressure or a heart attack. It is unclear if use is safe during pregnancy or ... 0.6%). Some side effects are quite rare, occurring less than 1% of the time: blood disorders, impotence, depression, peripheral ...
It is taken by mouth. The combination is generally well tolerated. Common side effects include headaches, feeling tired, ... Common side effects (in more than 10% of people) are headache, fatigue and nausea. In studies, severe side effects were ...
It is taken by mouth twice a day. Common side effects include headache, feeling tired, nausea, diarrhea, and fever. Severe side ... Drug formulations: tablets by mouth Combivir: lamivudine 150 mg and zidovudine 300 mg (scored). 60 tablets cost $994. It is ... "Combivir - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses". www.drugs.com. Archived from the original on 8 November 2016. ... "Combivir - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses". www.drugs.com. Archived from the original on 2016-11-08. ...
It is taken by mouth. Common side-effects include dry mouth, feeling faint, vomiting, and headache. More serious side effects ... However, a side effect of trazodone, orthostatic hypotension, which may cause dizziness and increase the risk of falling, can ... The risk for this side effect appears to be greatest during the first month of treatment at low dosages (i.e. ... Because of its lack of anticholinergic side effects, trazodone is especially useful in situations in which antimuscarinic ...
It may be taken by mouth or by injection into a vein. Side effects may include abdominal pain, vomiting, headache, and feeling ...
It is taken by mouth. Common side effects include headache, nausea, feeling tired, and abdominal pain. It should not be used in ... Common side effects include nausea, abdominal pain, emesis, dysmenorrhea, pelvic pain, breast tenderness, headache, dizziness, ...
Common side effects include trouble sleeping, nausea, itchiness, and feeling tired. It is not recommended in those with liver ... It is taken by mouth twice a day for 12 to 24 weeks. ... taking ethinylestradiol are at an increased risk for this side ...
... is taken by mouth as a liquid or tablet. Common side effects include nausea, diarrhea, headaches, feeling tired, and ... Serious side effects include liver disease, lactic acidosis, and worsening hepatitis B among those already infected. It is safe ... Minor side effects may include nausea, fatigue, headaches, diarrhea, cough and nasal congestion. Do not prescribe lamivudine/ ... Lamivudine is administered by mouth, and it is rapidly absorbed with a bio-availability of over 80%. Some research suggests ...
It is taken by mouth. Common side effects include rash, headache, nausea, feeling tired, and liver problems. The liver problems ...
It is taken by mouth. Common side effects include trouble sleeping, nausea, sexual problems, and feeling tired. More serious ... Escitalopram, like other SSRIs, has been shown to affect sexual functions causing side effects such as decreased libido, ... making the side-effect profile relatively mild in comparison to less-selective SSRIs. Escitalopram is a substrate of P- ... and other negative side effects have been reported. Escitalopram discontinuation, particularly abruptly, may cause certain ...
It is taken by mouth once a day. Common side effects include rash, nausea, headache, feeling tired, and trouble sleeping. Some ... Other serious side effects include depression, thoughts of suicide, liver problems, and seizures. It is not safe for use during ...
It is taken by mouth as a tablet, capsule, or solution. Common side effects include diarrhea, vomiting, feeling tired, ... Severe side effects may include pancreatitis, liver problems, and high blood sugar. It is commonly used in pregnancy and it ...
"You're on the side of death, and we're here to get you back on the side of life." -"We're not here to make them feel bad. If ... Everything else that comes outta their mouth is just noise." -"You do a lousy job as a treatment center, so as of today, you're ... Many quotes are listed below: -"I see a bunch of people that love you like crazy and they feel like they are losing you. And ... feeling bad solved anything, this would already be solved." -"The bottom line message of an intervention is 'There is nothing ...
Antipsychotics can have side effects such as dry mouth that may make the patient feel thirsty. Primary polydipsia describes ...
It is taken by mouth once daily for typically 12 weeks. Common side effects include feeling tired, headache, rash, itchiness, ... Other side effects may include nausea, muscle pain, difficulty breathing and increased bilirubin. It may reactivate hepatitis B ...
Side effects are generally minimal. Common side effects include loss of appetite, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and feeling tired. ... Ethosuximide is taken by mouth. ... Serious side effects include suicidal thoughts, low blood cell ...
Common side effects include poor coordination, poor appetite, nausea, numbness, and feeling tired. More severe side effects ... It is taken by mouth. Side effects are those of the underlying medications. ... "Isoniazid/rifampin Side Effects in Detail - Drugs.com". www.drugs.com. Archived from the original on 21 December 2016. ...
Other side effects may include dry mouth, dry nose, nosebleeds, sore lips and gums. Excess body weight is thought to be an ... As it disrupts normal sleep, those affected may experience sleepiness or feel tired during the day. In children it may cause ... Surgery on the mouth and throat, as well as dental surgery and procedures, can result in postoperative swelling of the lining ... Snoring is the turbulent sound of air moving through the back of the mouth, nose, and throat. Although not everyone who snores ...
Side effects with short term use include nausea and feeling tired. More severe side effects include psychiatric problems, which ... It is used by mouth, injection into a vein, as a skin cream, and as eye drops. ... Common side effects with long term use include bone loss, weakness, yeast infections, and easy bruising. While short term use ...
It is taken by mouth. Common side effects include trouble sleeping, feeling tired, diarrhea, high blood sugar, and headache. ... Common side effects of dolutegravir in clinical trials included insomnia and headache. Serious side effects included allergic ... Severe side effects may include allergic reactions and liver problems. It is unclear if use during pregnancy or breastfeeding ...
It is taken by mouth as a tablet. Common side effects include trouble sleeping, headache, depression, feeling tired, nausea, ... Serious side effects may include high blood lactate levels, allergic reactions, and enlargement of the liver. It is not ...
The most common site of involvement is the commissural region of the buccal mucosa, usually on both sides of the mouth. Another ... Acute atrophic candidiasis may feel like the mouth has been scalded with a hot liquid. Another potential symptom is a metallic ... C. albicans is carried in the mouths of about 50% of the world's population as a normal component of the oral microbiota. This ... This refers to a group of rare syndromes characterized by chronic candidal lesions on the skin, in the mouth and on other ...
Dry mouth got you feeling parched?. Dry mouth can leave your mouth feeling dry and irritated. Try one of our toothpastes ... Dry Mouth. Definition. Known by its medical term, xerostomia (zeer-oh-stoh-mee-ah), dry mouth is when you do not have enough ... Yes, medications can have oral side effects - dry mouth being the most common. Be sure to tell your dentist about any ... Dry mouth can occur when the glands in the mouth that make saliva are not working properly. Some common causes include:. * ...
... learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus ... mouth and throat pain. *feeling tired. *anxiety. *hair loss. Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of these ... Pegvaliase-pqpz injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: * ... If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administrations (FDA) ...
WebMD explains how they work, their potential side effects, and how they may be able to help treat depression and other mood ... Dry mouth. ● Agitation or nervousness. ● Feeling dizzy. ● Pain in the joints or muscles ... While some people do have side effects, others do not, and in many cases, the side effects disappear after a few weeks of ... Everyone feels down from time to time. But for people with depression, the feelings of sadness can be so severe that they ...
a dry mouth. *constipation. *dizziness *feeling agitated or shaky These side effects should pass once your body gets used to ... Antidepressants usually need to be taken for at least a week before the benefit starts to be felt, so its important to keep ... Youll usually need to take them for around 6 months after you start to feel better. If you stop too early, your depression may ... talking to your partner, friends and family - try to help them understand how youre feeling and what they can do to support ...
Side effects. For the first 24 hours after your GH stimulation test, you may:. *Feel dizzy and lightheaded ... Feel sleepy. *Have a dry mouth. *Have dry eyes or blurry vision ... If you feel sick or have a temperature of 100.4° F (38° C) or ... Getting a good nights sleep after your GH stimulation testing can help these side effects go away. If these side effects dont ...
Injecting Palynziq when cold can make the injection feel uncomfortable.. *Do not warm up the prefilled syringe in any other way ... edema mouth, multiple allergies, lip edema, eye edema, exfoliative rash, drug hypersensitivity, dermatitis atopic, dermatitis ... These are not all the possible side effects of Palynziq. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report ... What are the possible side effects of Palynziq? Palynziq may cause serious side effects, including: ...
Learn about dosage, side effects, cost and more. ... If you feel down, depressed, or anxious, be sure to talk to ... white patches in your mouth. *burning or pain when urinating. It's very important to see your doctor if the infection ... Taltz side effects. Taltz can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that ... Side effect details. You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug, or whether certain side effects ...
However, flu shot side effects do include sore muscles, fatigue and fever. Heres why that happens. ... Symptoms include trouble breathing, hives, swelling around the eye or mouth area, weakness or dizziness. Typically, these ... 11 Flu Shot Side Effects You Might Mistake for Being Sick. The flu shot could make you feel ill, but you still need to get it. ... You get the flu shot to ward off getting sick, but feeling crappy is a common side effect of the vaccine. ...
... learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus ... flushing (feeling of warmth). *dry mouth. Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of these, call your doctor ... Rizatriptan may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: *drowsiness ... Rizatriptan comes as a tablet and an orally disintegrating tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken at the first sign of a ...
Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think ... swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat. *difficulty swallowing. *trouble breathing. *feeling faint or dizzy ... Nucala side effects. Nucala can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects ... Side effects and risks. Nucala and Xolair have some similar side effects and some different side effects. Below are examples of ...
Includes common and rare side effects information for consumers and healthcare professionals. ... Learn about the potential side effects of Pediatex (carbinoxamine). ... dry mouth, nose, and throat. *feeling excited. *feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings ... Gastrointestinal side effects have included vomiting, diarrhea, dry mouth, nausea, heartburn, and anorexia.[Ref] ...
Find a comprehensive guide to possible side effects including common and rare side effects when taking Wellbutrin XL (Bupropion ... 300 mg/day of bupropion HCl sustained-release: anorexia, dry mouth, rash, sweating, tinnitus, and tremor. ... a manic episode--racing thoughts, increased energy, reckless behavior, feeling extremely happy or irritable, talking more than ... This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You ...
... side effects, dosage, drug interactions, warnings, patient labeling, reviews, and related medications including drug comparison ... Gastrointestinal disorders: diarrhea, constipation, nausea, abdominal pain, dry mouth, fissuring in corner of mouth ... Postural hypotension may cause you to feel dizzy and faint (syncope).. *Changes in your blood pressure (hypotension or ... These are not all the side effects of PARNATE. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side ...
Our health professionals give advice on possible side effects of the painkiller co-codamol, including what to do if you take ... Get immediate medical advice if you or someone you know has taken too much co-codamol, even if you feel well, because of the ... Dry mouth.. *Abdominal pain.. *Loss of appetite.. *Difficulty passing urine (urinary retention). ... Just because a side effect is stated here doesnt mean that all people taking co-codamol will experience that or any side ...
sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth ... feeling of warmth * feeling that others are watching you or ... Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your ... Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. ... Side Effects. Drug information provided by: IBM Micromedex. Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted ...
dry mouth * extreme fatigue * false sense of well-being * feeling of unreality ... unusual drowsiness, dullness, or feeling of sluggishness Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention ... Side Effects. Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects ... Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. ...
What is White Patch at the back of mouth On Apr, 12, 2010 , 1 ... My gums are white and the sides of my cheeks feel raised. Can ... What are Common Traumatic Red Lesions in Mouth On Jan, 24, 2010 ... White gums and raised cheek sides feeling Home / Oral Lesions ...
Dehydration is a common side effect of cancer treatment. MD Anderson dietitian Debra Ruzensky shares how patients can manage ... Dehydration is a common side effect of cancer treatment. MD Anderson dietitian Debra Ruzensky shares how patients can manage ... feeling thirsty. *experiencing dry mouth, lips, gums, and nostrils *increased headaches. *dizziness ... Do you feel thirstier than usual? Are you experiencing dry lips or skin? These may be signs of dehydration. ...
... they still cause side effects. Learn what to expect here. ... Changes in how your skin feels: Your skin may start to feel ... The doctor may also prescribe an antibiotic you take by mouth. Drops or ointments may be prescribed to help with eye problems. ... Other side effects. Other side effects have also been linked to treatment with some targeted therapy drugs. Many of these side ... How long do side effects last?. Most side effects go away over time after treatment ends and the healthy cells recover. The ...
There are many possible side effects to chemotherapy treatment, but they can be reduced. There are practical ways to manage ... Mouth problems. Chemotherapy can cause mouth problems such as a sore mouth, mouth ulcers or infection. Drinking plenty of ... Feeling sick. Some chemotherapy drugs can make you feel sick (nauseated) or possibly be sick (vomit). Your cancer specialist ... Coping with side effects Related. All types of treatment can have different side effects. Know what to expect to help you find ...
... salbutamol side effects, using salbutamol inhaler in pregnancy ... Mouth or throat irritation.. *Flushing.. *Feeling sick or ... ︉ The most common side effects are feeling shaky or tense, headache and a fast heartbeat. These wear off soon after taking a ... Common side effects (affect between 1 in 10 and 1 in 100 people). *Feeling shaky. ... What are the side effects of salbutamol?. The following are some of the side effects that may be associated with salbutamol. ...
There are many possible side effects to chemotherapy treatment, but they can be reduced. There are practical ways to manage ... Feeling sick (nausea) and vomiting. *Tiredness (fatigue). *Loss of appetite. *Sore mouth ... Sore mouth. Your mouth may become sore (or dry), or you may notice small ulcers during treatment. Some people find that sucking ... Coping with side effects Related. All types of treatment can have different side effects. Know what to expect to help you find ...
... antidepressants can react poorly with your body and create unwanted side effects. Know the side effects ... Emotional numbness. Not feeling like yourself. Reduced positive feelings, caring less about others, feeling like youre ... addicted, and feeling suicidal.. Physical symptoms and pain. Nausea. Dry mouth which can cause problems for teeth. Constipation ... In some cases, side effects dont ever go away.. So its a good idea to know what are the side effects of your particular ...
Find medication information including related drug classes, side effects, patient statistics and answers to frequently asked ... Your mouth may get dry. Chewing sugarless gum or sucking hard candy, and drinking plenty of water may help. Contact your doctor ... signs and symptoms of low blood pressure like dizziness; feeling faint or lightheaded, falls; unusually weak or tired. -trouble ... What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?. Open Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health ...
Malaise: A general feeling of discomfort or illness. Mutagenicity: The ability of a drug or medical procedure to cause damage ... Stomatitis: Swelling or inflammation of the mucous membranes in the mouth. Teratogenicity: The ability of a drug to cause ... Hemiparesis: Paralysis on one side of the body. Hepatitis: Inflammation of the liver caused by either a microorganism (such as ... Bone Marrow Suppression: A general side effect associated with many chemotherapeutic drugs used to treat cancer and, sometimes ...
  • She pulled back her right hand and went in for a thrust directed at Evangeline's chest, her murderous intentions clear with the audible crack of the tensed knuckles in her hand, but the other mistress dodged to the side and grabbed her outstretched arm with both hands, pulling her quickly and turning her hips to send Dorothy flying over her head and crashing into the wall behind her. (fanfiction.net)
  • Going from warm room into open air ), Pressure in left side of chest. (abchomeopathy.com)
  • Shortly after I arrived home I began feeling chest pains, something I experienced frequently in my youth. (tinybuddha.com)
  • Your skin may start to feel like it's sunburned, before any redness or rash shows up. (cancer.org)
  • SSRIs should not be taken by children or adolescents under 18 years old to treat depression unless they are recommended by a specialist in mental health, and only with careful monitoring for side effects. (hse.ie)
  • Gritting his teeth against the heaviness of his body and the ache in his mind, he pushes his hands down thinking he should be feeling the comforting warmth of his sheets instead of the bed of muck his fingers meld themselves into. (fanfiction.net)
  • I started taking effexor xr 2 almost 2 weeks ago,my first anti-depressant(possibly last), and felt tired and terrible and dazed every waking hour of the day while taking it, headaches, cannot reach an orgasm at all. (dr-bob.org)
  • However, elderly patients may be more sensitive to the effects of indomethacin than younger adults, and are more likely to have unwanted side effects (eg, confusion, psychosis) and age-related kidney or stomach problems, which may require caution and an adjustment in the dose for patients receiving indomethacin. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Your review must discuss the beer's attributes (look, smell, taste, feel) and your overall impression in order to indicate that you have legitimately tried the beer. (beeradvocate.com)