Jatropha: A plant genus of the family EUPHORBIACEAE. Members contain jatrophone and other diterpenes.Biofuels: Hydrocarbon-rich byproducts from the non-fossilized BIOMASS that are combusted to generate energy as opposed to fossilized hydrocarbon deposits (FOSSIL FUELS).Plant Oils: Oils derived from plants or plant products.Manihot: A plant genus of the family EUPHORBIACEAE that is perennial with conspicuous, almost palmate leaves like those of RICINUS but more deeply parted into five to nine lobes. It is a source of a starch after removal of the cyanogenic glucosides. The common name of Arrowroot is also used with Maranta (MARANTACEAE). The common name of yuca is also used for YUCCA.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Telefacsimile: A telecommunication system combining the transmission of a document scanned at a transmitter, its reconstruction at a receiving station, and its duplication there by a copier.Vegetables: A food group comprised of EDIBLE PLANTS or their parts.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Seed Dispersal: The various physical methods which include wind, insects, animals, tension, and water, by which a plant scatters its seeds away from the parent plant.Germination: The initial stages of the growth of SEEDS into a SEEDLINGS. The embryonic shoot (plumule) and embryonic PLANT ROOTS (radicle) emerge and grow upwards and downwards respectively. Food reserves for germination come from endosperm tissue within the seed and/or from the seed leaves (COTYLEDON). (Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Grape Seed Extract: Exudate from seeds of the grape plant Vitis vinifera, composed of oils and secondary plant metabolites (BIOFLAVONOIDS and polyphenols) credited with important medicinal properties.PakistanConservation of Energy Resources: Planned management, use, and preservation of energy resources.Castor Bean: Common name for Ricinus communis, a species in the family EUPHORBIACEAE. It is the source of CASTOR OIL.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Plant Proteins: Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.Plant Roots: The usually underground portions of a plant that serve as support, store food, and through which water and mineral nutrients enter the plant. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982; Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)Genes, Plant: The functional hereditary units of PLANTS.Convolvulaceae: The morning glory family of flowering plants, of the order Solanales, which includes about 50 genera and at least 1,400 species. Leaves are alternate and flowers are funnel-shaped. Most are twining and erect herbs, with a few woody vines, trees, and shrubs.Cadmium: An element with atomic symbol Cd, atomic number 48, and atomic weight 114. It is a metal and ingestion will lead to CADMIUM POISONING.Acids: Chemical compounds which yield hydrogen ions or protons when dissolved in water, whose hydrogen can be replaced by metals or basic radicals, or which react with bases to form salts and water (neutralization). An extension of the term includes substances dissolved in media other than water. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Euphorbiaceae: The spurge family of flowering plants, in the order Euphorbiales, contains some 7,500 species in 275 genera. The family consists of annual and perennial herbs and woody shrubs or trees.Ethical Relativism: The philosophical view that conceptions of truth and moral values are not absolute but are relative to the persons or groups holding them. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed)Economic Development: Mobilization of human, financial, capital, physical and or natural resources to generate goods and services.Forestry: The science of developing, caring for, or cultivating forests.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Power Plants: Units that convert some other form of energy into electrical energy.Biomedical Engineering: Application of principles and practices of engineering science to biomedical research and health care.Analgesics: Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Morphine: The principal alkaloid in opium and the prototype opiate analgesic and narcotic. Morphine has widespread effects in the central nervous system and on smooth muscle.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.
  • We also compared the activity of the JcUEP promoter with that of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S ( CaMV35S ) promoter, a well-characterized constitutive promoter conferring strong transgene expression in dicot species, in various tissues of Jatropha . (springer.com)
  • For more information on this plant species, see Hank's page on Jatropha cardiophylla (opens in a new tab). (cabezaprieta.org)
  • or in home gardens in densely settled urban areas and monocultural rural agricultural areas, Pacific Islanders have selected for incorporation into their agroforestry systems a wide range of tree and tree-like species that meet their particular en vironmental and cultural needs. (nzdl.org)
  • Of the 419 agroforestry plants, approximately 329 are classified as large or small tree or tree-like species, whereas approximately 90 are smaller, more shrub-like perennials, which constitute common fixtures in Pacific Island agroforestry systems. (nzdl.org)
  • The division into shrubs and trees is, of course, somewhat arbitrary because some species, depending on the environment, the variety, or cultivar, can be either shrubby or tree-like. (nzdl.org)
  • For example, the species Hibiscus tiliaceus , Pipturus argenteus , and Vitex trifolia are all found as both shrubs and trees. (nzdl.org)
  • Similarly, groups of highly variable, closely related species of the genera Leucosyke, Pandanus , Pittosporum , Psychotria , Solanum , and Timonius are all represented by both shrubs and trees. (nzdl.org)
  • A very limited sampling of shrubs and shrub-like species would include the indigenous, often wild, plants such as Acalypha insulana, Dodonaea viscosa, and Pemphis acidula . (nzdl.org)
  • The genus Jatropha contains approximately 170 known species. (scirp.org)
  • Altogether 49 plant species were used which included large number shrubs, herbs, trees and climbers. (slideshare.net)
  • The Jatropha genus includes more than 175 species, among which Jatropha curcas L. and Jatropha platyphylla Müll. (feedipedia.org)
  • Most Jatropha species, including Jatropha curcas , contain numerous toxic components and the plant and its by-products, when not detoxified, are deleterious to humans and livestock. (feedipedia.org)
  • This species has thick succulent branches and its leaves, borne on long petioles, are glabrous and larger (25-35 cm) than those of Jatropha curcas . (feedipedia.org)
  • The most widely used species is Jatropha curcas . (futura-sciences.us)
  • When the Canadian company Bedford Biofuels (BB) started talks with local ranch owners in Tana Delta district (Kenya) about subleasing their land for a large jatropha plantation, they were not the first ones to come to the region for a large-scale agricultural project. (mdpi.com)
  • This initiated a gradual erosion of the rationale of the BB jatropha project in Tana Delta, which eventually led to the closure of the jatropha project and the departure of Bedford Biofuels from the area. (mdpi.com)
  • SG Biofuels has been working since it was founded in 2006 to develop ways of using the Jatropha shrub as a replacement for crude oil in the production of jet fuel, diesel, and other transportation fuels. (xconomy.com)
  • Mapping the entire Jatropha genome will enable SG Biofuels researchers to identify the plant characteristics they want to cultivate and compare those genetic traits to a library of 6,000 unique Jatropha genotypes the company has amassed. (xconomy.com)
  • As a non-edible shrub that can be grown on marginal lands considered undesirable for food crops, SG Biofuels says Jatropha is a sensible alternative to diverting corn, sugar cane, and other food crops into alternative fuel production. (xconomy.com)
  • Editor's note, 8/27/10: I've been reminded that San Diego-based Synthetic Genomics, which is developing algae-based biofuels technology, among other things, announced they had sequenced the Jatropha genome in May, 2009. (xconomy.com)
  • While creating a definitive "reference genome" for Jatropha is a valuable tool for researchers, SG Biofuels CEO Kirk Haney says the value of the whole genome is "enhanced significantly" by having a diverse collection of Jatropha genetic material for comparison. (xconomy.com)
  • In a joint statement issued this morning by the two companies, Wendy Jozsi, director of synthetic biology at Life Technologies , says, "There is significant opportunity to use advanced molecular techniques in the optimization of plant-based biofuels, especially Jatropha, for increased yields and a faster development cycle. (xconomy.com)
  • Since jatropha could grow on arid, barren lands, cultivating it would avoid displacing food crops such as corn and soybeans - a major drawback of so-called first generation biofuels. (zambian-economist.com)
  • That's surely why Scientific American in 2007 called jatropha "green gold in a shrub," a plant that "seems to offer all the benefits of biofuels without the pitfalls. (zambian-economist.com)
  • In India alone, the government has announced plans to subsidize an intensive program to plant jatropha for biofuels on 27 million acres of "wastelands" - an area roughly the size of Switzerland. (zambian-economist.com)
  • Today, most jatropha grown for biofuels is cultivated on plots of less than 12 acres and is primarily used locally. (zambian-economist.com)
  • A global biofuels market for jatropha is only just beginning to emerge. (zambian-economist.com)
  • One of the handful of companies involved in large-scale jatropha production is D1 Oils, a U.K.-based biofuels technology company that says it already has more than a half-million acres under cultivation, much of it in India. (zambian-economist.com)
  • 6. Pakistan has a large area of about80 Million Acres of Arid and WasteLand that is ideal for the cultivation ofenergy crops like Jatropha. (slideshare.net)
  • 11.  Jatrophas ability to grow on Marginal, Waste or Arid land and produce energy crops without displacing Food crops is perhaps of most Potential importance to Pakistan. (slideshare.net)
  • Fruits -Fruits are produced in winter when the shrub is leafless, or it may produce several crops during the year if soil moisture is good and temperatures are sufficiently high. (science20.com)
  • In Africa, Jatropha is widely planted as a "living fence" and hedgerows to protect food crops from damage by livestock and as a windbreak to prevent soil erosion moisture depletion. (science20.com)
  • The seed oil of Jatropha is a suitable source for biodiesel or bio jet fuel, and since it is not edible and can grow in semi-arid lands unsuitable for the cultivation of food crops, its production does not compete with that of food to inflate its price. (springer.com)
  • CHIBAS is a bio-fuels and sustainable agriculture research center in Haiti with a particular interest in promoting the cultivation of Jatropha, a plant already used in Vodoun ceremonies and as a natural fence to protect crops. (haitiinnovation.org)
  • The goal of second-generation biofuel is to increase the biofuel supply with crops such as Jatropha , castor (Ricinus communis), and Camelina (Camelina sativa) . (ufl.edu)
  • As for cultivation, why not replace the poppy fields in Afghanistan or the Coca crops in South America with Jatropha crops? (xconomy.com)
  • Jatropha and other non-food oil bearing crops are the cheapest and the viable business propositions with independent or combined options. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Jatropha can replace jet fuel and diesel from petroleum without interfering with food crops or leading to the clearing of forests. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The good thing about Jatropha, other nonfood oil crops/trees is that while producing a tree shrub that lives for a long time and does its job, producing oil, while it also sequesters lots of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.A number of new development projects and plantations involving thousands and hundreds of thousands of hectares with investment of billions of dollars have been initiated during the years 2007- 2009. (bio-medicine.org)
  • And that 5 new biodiesel crops/trees shall be introduced to the trainees with the agronomy, technology and economics of the said crops/trees with Jatropha biofuel projects for your own business needs. (bio-medicine.org)
  • CJP Makes Available Accessible Affordable Jatropha training Package that enables all stakeholders to understand, evaluate and explore the Jatropha, other nonfood biodiesel crops for designing and developing Failsafe Energy farms System in a true manner,' he said. (bio-medicine.org)
  • But questions are now emerging as to whether widespread jatropha cultivation is really feasible or whether it will simply displace badly-needed food crops in the developing world. (zambian-economist.com)
  • The resource analysis indicates that oil crops currently grown in the United States (namely soybean) have relatively low oil yield when compared to oil crops grown in other parts of the world, such as palm, coconut, and jatropha. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Jatropha does not compete with food crops for land and water, and the non-edible oil from Jatropha is favored for biodiesel production. (springeropen.com)
  • In this review, we will assess the current state of knowledge of the impact of three first generation biofuel crops - oil palm, soybean, and jatropha - on the biodiversity and ecosystem functions of the tropical forests. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In the proposed review we intend to assess objectively the current state of knowledge of the impact of three first generation biofuel crops (oil palm, soybean, and jatropha) on biodiversity in the tropics. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A taxonomic characteristic of the genus Jatropha is the occurrence of either latex-cells or latex vessels Rao and Malaviya, Curcin is similar to ricin, the toxic protein of castor oil plant Ricinus communis. (systeme-stellen.info)
  • Techno-economic analysis (TEA) was performed for five selected oil feedstocks-camelina, pennycress, jatropha, castor bean, and yellow grease-using the HEFA process concept. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Jatropha curcas plant was employed in Indian traditional medicine for the treatment of several disorders. (scirp.org)
  • In this study, evaluation of hypoglycemic and antidiabetic activities of Jatropha curcas plant will be studied. (scirp.org)
  • Jatropha: money doesn't grow on trees' warns investors away from jatropha - a shrub being increasingly planted for its oil-producing fruits and ability to survive in arid conditions - stating growing evidence that the crop is failing to deliver on its promises while simultaneously failing to prevent climate change or contribute to pro-poor development. (foeeurope.org)
  • Sixty-eight genes that encode enzymes, proteins or their subunits involved in fatty acid and lipid biosynthesis were identified from a normalized cDNA library of jatropha developing endosperm. (biomedcentral.com)
  • These results not only provide the initial information on spatial and temporal expression of fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes in jatropha developing endosperm, but are also valuable to identify the rate-limiting genes for storage lipid biosynthesis and accumulation during seed development. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Jatropha dioica forms colonies from subterranean rhizomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Jatropha dioica is traditionally used in the treatment of dental issues such as gingivitis, loose teeth, bleeding gums, and toothache. (wikipedia.org)
  • Efecto de las condiciones climáticas sobre el contenido de fenoles totales y la actividad antioxidante de Jatropha dioica Cerv. (conicyt.cl)
  • Effect of climate conditions on total phenolic content and antioxidant activity of Jatropha dioica Cerv. (conicyt.cl)
  • The aim of this work was to determine the antioxidant activity, total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC) in the rhizomes and stems of Jatropha dioica and their relation to collection season, collection location, extraction solvent and their interactions to understand the effect of climate conditions on the synthesis of the antioxidant compounds in J. dioica . (conicyt.cl)
  • El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la actividad antioxidante, el contenido de fenoles totales (TPC) y el contenido de flavonoides totales (TFC) en rizomas y tallos de Jatropha dioica , y su relación con la época de recolección, la localidad de la recolección, el solvente de extracción y sus interacciones, con el fin conocer el efecto de las condiciones climáticas sobre la síntesis de compuestos antioxidantes en J. dioica . (conicyt.cl)
  • Jatropha dioica , commonly known as "Sangre de drago", is a plant endemic to Mexico. (conicyt.cl)
  • Before 1996, few systematic provenance trials had been conducted to exam morphological characteristic differences among various jatropha collections. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Jatropha has been grown in developing countries for many years it's been used locally for production of oil that was used in local village based industries for soap production. (science20.com)
  • Jatropha is a tropical plant and can be grown in low to high rainfall and diverse soil types, but the plant is susceptible to freezes. (ufl.edu)
  • Trees, Shrubs, and Cacti of South Texas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trees and Shrubs of the Trans-Pecos and Adjacent Areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although their study is in its early stages, Bailis notes that it's already clear that, while jatropha can indeed grow on lands with minimal water and poor nutrition, "if you plant trees in a marginal area, and all they do is just not die, it doesn't mean you're going to get a lot of oil from them. (zambian-economist.com)
  • L. plant life, originating from seed products of Kenyan trees and shrubs were harvested in scorching and arid climatic circumstances in Melito di Porto Salvo (Reggio Calabria, Italy) on the sandy-loam reasonably alkaline garden soil. (solventcentral.com)
  • WASHINGTON - Burned by the cost of jet fuel, the aviation industry is trying everything from algae to camelina and jatropha as alternatives, but specialists say that some of the new fuels, which include coal, might simply trade one set of problems for another. (nytimes.com)
  • Additionally, Jatropha sheds its leaves during the dry season, allowing for soil enrichment and long-term improved soil fertility. (haitiinnovation.org)
  • Cheng acknowledges that distinction but adds that even if the jatropha oil yield from poor soil is low, a valuable biofuel is being generated from land that is unsuitable for food-producing purposes. (cnbc.com)
  • On Wednesday, Continental Airlines will test a fuel made from algae and jatropha, a tropical shrub with an oil-bearing seed, in a Boeing 737 jetliner, in a two-hour flight beginning and ending in Houston. (nytimes.com)
  • Jatropha produces renewable energy in the form of biodiesel, which emits 80% less CO 2 , 100% lower SO 2 , and has a higher flash point than fossil diesel fuel. (ufl.edu)