Helicobacter pylori: A spiral bacterium active as a human gastric pathogen. It is a gram-negative, urease-positive, curved or slightly spiral organism initially isolated in 1982 from patients with lesions of gastritis or peptic ulcers in Western Australia. Helicobacter pylori was originally classified in the genus CAMPYLOBACTER, but RNA sequencing, cellular fatty acid profiles, growth patterns, and other taxonomic characteristics indicate that the micro-organism should be included in the genus HELICOBACTER. It has been officially transferred to Helicobacter gen. nov. (see Int J Syst Bacteriol 1989 Oct;39(4):297-405).Helicobacter Infections: Infections with organisms of the genus HELICOBACTER, particularly, in humans, HELICOBACTER PYLORI. The clinical manifestations are focused in the stomach, usually the gastric mucosa and antrum, and the upper duodenum. This infection plays a major role in the pathogenesis of type B gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.Gastritis: Inflammation of the GASTRIC MUCOSA, a lesion observed in a number of unrelated disorders.Gastric Mucosa: Lining of the STOMACH, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. The surface cells produce MUCUS that protects the stomach from attack by digestive acid and enzymes. When the epithelium invaginates into the LAMINA PROPRIA at various region of the stomach (CARDIA; GASTRIC FUNDUS; and PYLORUS), different tubular gastric glands are formed. These glands consist of cells that secrete mucus, enzymes, HYDROCHLORIC ACID, or hormones.Urease: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of urea and water to carbon dioxide and ammonia. EC 3.5.1.5.Pylorus: The region of the STOMACH at the junction with the DUODENUM. It is marked by the thickening of circular muscle layers forming the pyloric sphincter to control the opening and closure of the lumen.Peptic Ulcer: Ulcer that occurs in the regions of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT which come into contact with GASTRIC JUICE containing PEPSIN and GASTRIC ACID. It occurs when there are defects in the MUCOSA barrier. The common forms of peptic ulcers are associated with HELICOBACTER PYLORI and the consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).Stomach: An organ of digestion situated in the left upper quadrant of the abdomen between the termination of the ESOPHAGUS and the beginning of the DUODENUM.Clarithromycin: A semisynthetic macrolide antibiotic derived from ERYTHROMYCIN that is active against a variety of microorganisms. It can inhibit PROTEIN SYNTHESIS in BACTERIA by reversibly binding to the 50S ribosomal subunits. This inhibits the translocation of aminoacyl transfer-RNA and prevents peptide chain elongation.Amoxicillin: A broad-spectrum semisynthetic antibiotic similar to AMPICILLIN except that its resistance to gastric acid permits higher serum levels with oral administration.Metronidazole: A nitroimidazole used to treat AMEBIASIS; VAGINITIS; TRICHOMONAS INFECTIONS; GIARDIASIS; ANAEROBIC BACTERIA; and TREPONEMAL INFECTIONS. It has also been proposed as a radiation sensitizer for hypoxic cells. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985, p133), this substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen (Merck, 11th ed).Dyspepsia: Impaired digestion, especially after eating.Duodenal Ulcer: A PEPTIC ULCER located in the DUODENUM.Anti-Ulcer Agents: Various agents with different action mechanisms used to treat or ameliorate PEPTIC ULCER or irritation of the gastrointestinal tract. This has included ANTIBIOTICS to treat HELICOBACTER INFECTIONS; HISTAMINE H2 ANTAGONISTS to reduce GASTRIC ACID secretion; and ANTACIDS for symptomatic relief.Omeprazole: A 4-methoxy-3,5-dimethylpyridyl, 5-methoxybenzimidazole derivative of timoprazole that is used in the therapy of STOMACH ULCERS and ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME. The drug inhibits an H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE which is found in GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Stomach Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the STOMACH.Pyloric Antrum: The region between the sharp indentation at the lower third of the STOMACH (incisura angularis) and the junction of the PYLORUS with the DUODENUM. Pyloric antral glands contain mucus-secreting cells and gastrin-secreting endocrine cells (G CELLS).Stomach Diseases: Pathological processes involving the STOMACH.Gastritis, Atrophic: GASTRITIS with atrophy of the GASTRIC MUCOSA, the GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS, and the mucosal glands leading to ACHLORHYDRIA. Atrophic gastritis usually progresses from chronic gastritis.Breath Tests: Any tests done on exhaled air.Stomach Ulcer: Ulceration of the GASTRIC MUCOSA due to contact with GASTRIC JUICE. It is often associated with HELICOBACTER PYLORI infection or consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).Bismuth: A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Bi, atomic number 83 and atomic weight 208.98.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Gastroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the stomach.Lansoprazole: A 2,2,2-trifluoroethoxypyridyl derivative of timoprazole that is used in the therapy of STOMACH ULCERS and ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME. The drug inhibits H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE which is found in GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS. Lansoprazole is a racemic mixture of (R)- and (S)-isomers.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Pepsinogen A: This is one of 2 related pepsinogen systems in humans and is also known as pepsinogen. (The other is PEPSINOGEN C.) This includes isozymogens Pg1-Pg5 (pepsinogens 1-5, group I or products of PGA1-PGA5 genes). This is the main pepsinogen found in urine.Metaplasia: A condition in which there is a change of one adult cell type to another similar adult cell type.Proton Pump Inhibitors: Compounds that inhibit H(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE. They are used as ANTI-ULCER AGENTS and sometimes in place of HISTAMINE H2 ANTAGONISTS for GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.Tinidazole: A nitroimidazole antitrichomonal agent effective against Trichomonas vaginalis, Entamoeba histolytica, and Giardia lamblia infections.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Lewis Blood-Group System: A group of dominantly and independently inherited antigens associated with the ABO blood factors. They are glycolipids present in plasma and secretions that may adhere to the erythrocytes. The phenotype Le(b) is the result of the interaction of the Le gene Le(a) with the genes for the ABO blood groups.Duodenitis: Inflammation of the DUODENUM section of the small intestine (INTESTINE, SMALL). Erosive duodenitis may cause bleeding in the UPPER GI TRACT and PEPTIC ULCER.Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the gastrointestinal tract.Gerbillinae: A subfamily of the Muridae consisting of several genera including Gerbillus, Rhombomys, Tatera, Meriones, and Psammomys.Urea: A compound formed in the liver from ammonia produced by the deamination of amino acids. It is the principal end product of protein catabolism and constitutes about one half of the total urinary solids.Furazolidone: A nitrofuran derivative with antiprotozoal and antibacterial activity. Furazolidone acts by gradual inhibition of monoamine oxidase. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p514)Ranitidine: A non-imidazole blocker of those histamine receptors that mediate gastric secretion (H2 receptors). It is used to treat gastrointestinal ulcers.Helicobacter: A genus of gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacteria that has been isolated from the intestinal tract of mammals, including humans. It has been associated with PEPTIC ULCER.Campylobacter: A genus of bacteria found in the reproductive organs, intestinal tract, and oral cavity of animals and man. Some species are pathogenic.Gastrins: A family of gastrointestinal peptide hormones that excite the secretion of GASTRIC JUICE. They may also occur in the central nervous system where they are presumed to be neurotransmitters.Pepsinogens: Proenzymes secreted by chief cells, mucous neck cells, and pyloric gland cells, which are converted into pepsin in the presence of gastric acid or pepsin itself. (Dorland, 28th ed) In humans there are 2 related pepsinogen systems: PEPSINOGEN A (formerly pepsinogen I or pepsinogen) and PEPSINOGEN C (formerly pepsinogen II or progastricsin). Pepsinogen B is the name of a pepsinogen from pigs.Gastric Acid: Hydrochloric acid present in GASTRIC JUICE.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Pepsinogen C: This is one of the 2 related pepsinogen systems in humans. It is found in prostate and seminal fluid whereas PEPSINOGEN A is not.Antacids: Substances that counteract or neutralize acidity of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Tetracycline: A naphthacene antibiotic that inhibits AMINO ACYL TRNA binding during protein synthesis.Cytotoxins: Substances that are toxic to cells; they may be involved in immunity or may be contained in venoms. These are distinguished from CYTOSTATIC AGENTS in degree of effect. Some of them are used as CYTOTOXIC ANTIBIOTICS. The mechanism of action of many of these are as ALKYLATING AGENTS or MITOSIS MODULATORS.Gastric Juice: The liquid secretion of the stomach mucosa consisting of hydrochloric acid (GASTRIC ACID); PEPSINOGENS; INTRINSIC FACTOR; GASTRIN; MUCUS; and the bicarbonate ion (BICARBONATES). (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p651)Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Antitrichomonal Agents: Agents used to treat trichomonas infections.Lymphoma, B-Cell, Marginal Zone: Extranodal lymphoma of lymphoid tissue associated with mucosa that is in contact with exogenous antigens. Many of the sites of these lymphomas, such as the stomach, salivary gland, and thyroid, are normally devoid of lymphoid tissue. They acquire mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type as a result of an immunologically mediated disorder.Bacterial Adhesion: Physicochemical property of fimbriated (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) and non-fimbriated bacteria of attaching to cells, tissue, and nonbiological surfaces. It is a factor in bacterial colonization and pathogenicity.Organometallic Compounds: A class of compounds of the type R-M, where a C atom is joined directly to any other element except H, C, N, O, F, Cl, Br, I, or At. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Penicillins: A group of antibiotics that contain 6-aminopenicillanic acid with a side chain attached to the 6-amino group. The penicillin nucleus is the chief structural requirement for biological activity. The side-chain structure determines many of the antibacterial and pharmacological characteristics. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1065)Seroepidemiologic Studies: EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES based on the detection through serological testing of characteristic change in the serum level of specific ANTIBODIES. Latent subclinical infections and carrier states can thus be detected in addition to clinically overt cases.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Virulence Factors: Those components of an organism that determine its capacity to cause disease but are not required for its viability per se. Two classes have been characterized: TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL and surface adhesion molecules that effect the ability of the microorganism to invade and colonize a host. (From Davis et al., Microbiology, 4th ed. p486)Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Endoscopy, Digestive System: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the digestive tract.Azure Stains: PHENOTHIAZINES with an amino group at the 3-position that are green crystals or powder. They are used as biological stains.Gastric Mucins: Mucins that are found on the surface of the gastric epithelium. They play a role in protecting the epithelial layer from mechanical and chemical damage.Nitroreductases: Enzymes which reduce nitro groups (NITRO COMPOUNDS) and other nitrogenous compounds.Achlorhydria: A lack of HYDROCHLORIC ACID in GASTRIC JUICE despite stimulation of gastric secretion.Gastrointestinal Diseases: Diseases in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.Gastroesophageal Reflux: Retrograde flow of gastric juice (GASTRIC ACID) and/or duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the distal ESOPHAGUS, commonly due to incompetence of the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER.Duodenum: The shortest and widest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE adjacent to the PYLORUS of the STOMACH. It is named for having the length equal to about the width of 12 fingers.Antigens, CD15: A trisaccharide antigen expressed on glycolipids and many cell-surface glycoproteins. In the blood the antigen is found on the surface of NEUTROPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and MONOCYTES. In addition, CD15 antigen is a stage-specific embryonic antigen.Adhesins, Bacterial: Cell-surface components or appendages of bacteria that facilitate adhesion (BACTERIAL ADHESION) to other cells or to inanimate surfaces. Most fimbriae (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) of gram-negative bacteria function as adhesins, but in many cases it is a minor subunit protein at the tip of the fimbriae that is the actual adhesin. In gram-positive bacteria, a protein or polysaccharide surface layer serves as the specific adhesin. What is sometimes called polymeric adhesin (BIOFILMS) is distinct from protein adhesin.Parietal Cells, Gastric: Rounded or pyramidal cells of the GASTRIC GLANDS. They secrete HYDROCHLORIC ACID and produce gastric intrinsic factor, a glycoprotein that binds VITAMIN B12.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Endoscopy: Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Sulfoxides: Organic compounds that have the general formula R-SO-R. They are obtained by oxidation of mercaptans (analogous to the ketones). (From Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 4th ed)Interleukin-8: A member of the CXC chemokine family that plays a role in the regulation of the acute inflammatory response. It is secreted by variety of cell types and induces CHEMOTAXIS of NEUTROPHILS and other inflammatory cells.Peptic Ulcer Hemorrhage: Bleeding from a PEPTIC ULCER that can be located in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Esophagitis: INFLAMMATION, acute or chronic, of the ESOPHAGUS caused by BACTERIA, chemicals, or TRAUMA.Serologic Tests: Diagnostic procedures involving immunoglobulin reactions.Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Esophagitis, Peptic: INFLAMMATION of the ESOPHAGUS that is caused by the reflux of GASTRIC JUICE with contents of the STOMACH and DUODENUM.Genomic Islands: Distinct units in some bacterial, bacteriophage or plasmid GENOMES that are types of MOBILE GENETIC ELEMENTS. Encoded in them are a variety of fitness conferring genes, such as VIRULENCE FACTORS (in "pathogenicity islands or islets"), ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE genes, or genes required for SYMBIOSIS (in "symbiosis islands or islets"). They range in size from 10 - 500 kilobases, and their GC CONTENT and CODON usage differ from the rest of the genome. They typically contain an INTEGRASE gene, although in some cases this gene has been deleted resulting in "anchored genomic islands".Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Helicobacter felis: A species of HELICOBACTER that colonizes in the STOMACH of laboratory MICE; CATS; and DOGS. It is associated with lymphoid follicular hyperplasia and mild GASTRITIS in CATS.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Helicobacter heilmannii: A species of gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacteria found in the gastric mucosa that is associated with chronic antral gastritis. This bacterium was first discovered in samples removed at endoscopy from patients investigated for HELICOBACTER PYLORI colonization.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Gastric Acidity Determination: Gastric analysis for determination of free acid or total acid.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Genome, Bacterial: The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Bacterial Vaccines: Suspensions of attenuated or killed bacteria administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious bacterial disease.Histamine H2 Antagonists: Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H2 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine. Their clinically most important action is the inhibition of acid secretion in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers. Smooth muscle may also be affected. Some drugs in this class have strong effects in the central nervous system, but these actions are not well understood.Precancerous Conditions: Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)RNA, Ribosomal, 23S: Constituent of 50S subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes containing about 3200 nucleotides. 23S rRNA is involved in the initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Campylobacter Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus CAMPYLOBACTER.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Anti-Infective Agents: Substances that prevent infectious agents or organisms from spreading or kill infectious agents in order to prevent the spread of infection.Benzimidazoles: Compounds with a BENZENE fused to IMIDAZOLES.Drug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Cardia: That part of the STOMACH close to the opening from ESOPHAGUS into the stomach (cardiac orifice), the ESOPHAGOGASTRIC JUNCTION. The cardia is so named because of its closeness to the HEART. Cardia is characterized by the lack of acid-forming cells (GASTRIC PARIETAL CELLS).Gastric Fundus: The superior portion of the body of the stomach above the level of the cardiac notch.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Dental Plaque: A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Duodenoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the duodenum.
H. pylori. H. rappini. H. rodentium. H. saguini[1]. H. salomonis. H. suis. H. trogontum. H. typhlonius. H. valdiviensis[1]. H. ... These encompass two (gastric and enterohepatic) groups, showing different organ specificity. Importantly, some species, such as ... H. pylori is of primary importance for medicine, but non-H. pylori species, which naturally inhabit mammals (except humans) and ... 1989). "Transfer of Campylobacter pylori and Campylobacter mustelae to Helicobacter gen. nov. as Helicobacter pylori comb. nov ...
The first one shown to cause cancer in animals is Rous sarcoma virus, discovered in 1910 by Peyton Rous. Other infectious ... Thus H. pylori-induced ROS appear to be the major carcinogens in stomach cancer because they cause oxidative DNA damage leading ... Furthermore, 14 studies showed that DCA and LCA induce DNA damage in colon cells. Also 27 studies reported that bile acids ... Handa O, Naito Y, Yoshikawa T (2011). "Redox biology and gastric carcinogenesis: the role of Helicobacter pylori". Redox Rep. ...
L-CAZ exhibited an inhibitory effect on Helicobacter pylori. •Table 2 shows the healing efficacy of L-CAZ along with those of ... It has been shown to stimulate mucus production and to maintain the integrity of the gastric mucosal barrier. In summary, it ... The results showed that the copper amino acid chelate supplementation increased erythrocyte Cu-Zn SOD activity in 18 of 23 ... Zinc acexamate has also been shown to have a potent-anabolic effect on bone. The oral administration of AHZ or zinc acexamate ...
... s have shown also potential antibacterial effects against Helicobacter pylori. In the past few years, ... 2004). "Antibacterial activity of hydrolyzable tannins derived from medicinal plants against Helicobacter pylori" (PDF). ...
Such salts have been shown to inhibit proliferation of Helicobacter pylori, other enteric bacteria, and some fungi. Bismuth ... As of 1946, Canadian advertisements placed by Norwich show the product as Pepto-Besmol both in graphic and text. Pepto-Bismol ... of heavy metals such as bismuth are toxic for a number of microbes Weak antacid properties In vitro and in vivo data have shown ...
In addition, a connection was found between Helicobacter pylori infection and the presence of the 5939C allele.[34] ... As shown, different ligands bind either the allosteric or the catalytic subunit. Allosteric subunit binds a non-substrate, ... polar interactions between Archidonic Acid (cyan) and Ser-530 and Tyr-385 residues are shown with yellow dashed lines. The ... The mutant allele PTGS2 5939C carriers among the Han Chinese population have been shown to have a higher risk of gastric cancer ...
Some studies show, however, that erythromycin rapidly eliminates Campylobacter from the stool without affecting the duration of ... Furthermore, Helicobacter pylori is closely related to Campylobacter and causes peptic ulcer disease. Complications include ... There are other diseases showing similar symptoms. For instance, abdominal pain and tenderness may be very localized, mimicking ...
Extracts of the plant have shown activity against Helicobacter pylori and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Parts of the plant are also ... Silva O, Viegas S, De Mello-Sampayo C, Costa M, Serrano R, Cabrita J, Gomes ET (2012). "Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of ...
... eradication of Heliobacter pylori show marked decreases in ammonia levels. Urease in peptic ulcers Helicobacter pylori is also ... Urease in hepatic encephalopathy / hepatic coma Studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori along with cirrhosis of the liver ... Heliobacter pylori are microbial ureases found in the stomach. As ureases they hydrolyze urea to produce ammonia and carbonic ... Helicobacter pylori: Physiology and Genetics. Washington (DC): ASM Press. ISBN 1-55581-213-9. PMID 21290719. Molecular and ...
Helicobacter pylori has been shown by studies to significantly correlate with the development of a gastrointestinal tumors. In ... When the Helicobacter pylori infection is left to progress in the intestine it develops into chronic inflammation, atrophy and ... Each of the TLR has been shown to interact with a specific PAMP. TLRs tend to dimerize, TLR4 forms homodimers, and TLR6 can ... Studies have been conducted on TLR11 as well, and it has been shown that it recognizes flagellin and profilin-like proteins in ...
Epidemiological studies have shown roles of cagA- positive H. pylori in the development of atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer ... The bacterium Helicobacter pylori has been associated with gastric cancer, and this is thought to be mediated in part by the ... PTPN11 has been shown to interact with CagA, Cbl gene, CD117, CD31, CEACAM1, Epidermal growth factor receptor, Erk FRS2, GAB1, ... CagA is a protein and virulence factor inserted by Helicobacter pylori into gastric epithelia. Once activated by SRC ...
... pylori infected gastric cancer patients. H. Pylori has been shown to be associated with gastric cancer, and NIHE is hoping to ... Vietnam: Use Molecular Methods to Study and Identify the cagA Gene in H. pylori Infected Gastric Cancer Patients[98] ... can track potential outbreaks and emerging threats that typically show up first in far-flung locations. IEDCR is enhancing its ... determine the role of the cagA gene in H. Pylori. NIHE hopes to get a better understanding of the biological mechanism for ...
... counteracts the inhibitory effects of H. pylori lipopolysaccharides. Ebrotidine has been shown to be as effective as ... Ebrotidine has anti-Helicobacter pylori activity via inhibition of the urease enzyme and the proteolytic and mucolytic ...
Its has been shown to be involved in the onset of many diseases, which includes Inflammatory bowel disease. Recent studies have ... Chronic inflammation in GI tract has been known to increase the risk of gastric cancer, with H. pylori being one of the most ... This suggests that an unknown H. pylori factor is responsible for this response In addition to inflammation induction, TLR5 is ... However, TLR5 interaction with H. pylori only induces weak TLR5 activation. The inflammatory response induced by TLR5 during H ...
Examples of this are Homo sapiens (human) and Helicobacter pylori. Organisms that show an intermediate level of codon usage ... Several studies have shown that pausing of translation as a result of local mRNA structure occurs for certain proteins, which ... Although it has been shown that the rate of amino acid incorporation at more frequent codons occurs at a much higher rate than ... In other organisms that do not show high growing rates or that present small genomes, codon usage optimization is normally ...
For example, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a microbial pathogen linked to chronic stomach inflammation, and has been ... Clinical trials show success in treatment when using drugs such as bendamustine and lenalidomida in combination with rituximab ... The original route of treatment for MALT is antibiotics to treat an underlying infection such as H.pylori. H.pylori is directly ... If the lymphoma is in the stomach, the physician will test for H.pylori infection through a stool sample. This infection would ...
Recent research has shown that AMAG is a result of the immune system attacking the parietal cells. Environmental Metaplastic ... It can be caused by persistent infection with Helicobacter pylori, or can be autoimmune in origin. Those with the autoimmune ... Type B gastritis primarily affects the antrum, and is more common with H. pylori infection. Patients with atrophic gastritis ... "Helicobacter pylori evolution during progression from chronic atrophic gastritis to gastric cancer and its impact on gastric ...
Similarly, recent European trials have not shown significant differences in symptoms after H. pylori eradication as compared ... pylori. In contrast, a Cochrane review found a small but statistically significant effect in curing symptoms (H. pylori cure vs ... They have been shown in a meta-analysis to produce a relative risk reduction of up to 50%, but the studies evaluated to come to ... Investigation for H. pylori infection is usually performed when there is a moderate to high prevalence of this infection in the ...
Marshall and Robin Warren showed that the bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) plays a major role in causing many peptic ... Marshall showed that antibiotic and bismuth salt regimens that killed H. pylori resulted in the cure of duodenal ulcers. The ... In 1985, Marshall showed by self administration that this bacterium, now called Helicobacter pylori, causes acute gastritis and ... On day eight, he had a repeat endoscopy, which showed massive inflammation (gastritis), and a biopsy from which H. pylori was ...
Mice raised under SPF conditions (no Helicobacter pylori) were shown to develop colitis rather than enterocolitis. Gnotobiotic ...
... may also be used in combination with antibiotics to treat ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori. It can also be ... However, in rodent cancer studies, pantoprazole has been shown to potentially cause tumor growth. The clinical relevance of the ... pylori with Pantoprazole, Clarithromycin, and Metronidazole in Duodenal Ulcer Patients: A Head-to-Head Comparison Between Two ...
In the Helicobacter pylori NixA homologue, several conserved motifs have been shown to be important for Ni2+ binding and ... low-affinity nickel-binding amino acids are essential for the function of the nickel permease NixA of Helicobacter pylori". J. ...
The mutant allele PTGS2 5939C carriers among the Han Chinese population have been shown to have a higher risk of gastric cancer ... In addition, a connection was found between Helicobacter pylori infection and the presence of the 5939C allele. PTGS2 has been ... The conversion of arachidonic acid to PGG2 can be shown as a series of radical reactions analogous to polyunsaturated fatty ... were suspected to show fewer side-effects but proved to substantially increase risk for cardiovascular events such as heart ...
The addition of S. boulardii to the standard triple medication protocol for elimination of Helicobacter pylori infection showed ... Also, some evidence shows potential benefits of S. boulardii in treatment of blastocystosis. A position paper published by ... Saccharomyces boulardii showed reduction of relapses in some specific patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection ... In healthy patients, S. boulardii has been shown to be nonpathogenic and nonsystemic (it remains in the gastrointestinal tract ...
This study also showed that certain side effects of high doses of garlic oil are not attributable to the diallyl disulfide. By ... It is also acts against the stomach ulcer germ Helicobacter pylori, however not as efficiently as allicin. Because of its ... A clinical study showed that such preparations prevent endotoxemia in heart valve operations. Garlic can prevent colorectal ... diallyl disulfide and related diallyl polysulfides show useful activity as environmentally-benign nematicides. Diallyl ...
One study showed Balsam of Peru, which is in many processed foods, to be the most common cause of immediate contact urticaria. ... A less common cause is exposure to certain bacteria, such as Streptococcus species or possibly Helicobacter pylori. Hives ... No evidence shows regular allergy testing results in identification of a problem or relief for people with chronic hives. ... Sirolimus and mycophenolate have less evidence for their use in the treatment of chronic hives but reports have shown them to ...
The news of a violent plague outburst in Yunman enabled Yersin to truly show and reach his potential as he was summoned, as ... a genetically engineered vaccine against hepatitis B and a rapid diagnostic test for the detection of the Helicobacter pylori ...
Many studies have shown that hospitals where a given operation is performed more frequently have better overall results ( ... Karanicolas, PJ; Davies, E; Kunz, R; Briel, M; Koka, HP; Payne, DM; Smith, SE; Hsu, HP; Lin, PW (2007). "The pylorus: Take it ... The main advantage of this technique is that the pylorus, and thus normal gastric emptying, should in theory be preserved. ... In practice, it shows similar long-term survival as a Whipple's (pancreaticoduodenectomy + hemigastrectomy), but patients ...
It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into [[::Pylorus,Pylorus]]. (Discuss) ... Outline of stomach, showing its anatomical landmarks. (Pyloric antrum visible at left.) ... rugae - gastric pits - cardia/gland - fundus/gland - pylorus/gland - pyloric antrum - pyloric canal - greater curvature - ... Pylorus - lesser, atrum - cave; cavern; hollow place with overarching foliage; cavity, hollow; tomb ...
Eradicating H pylori seems to reduce incidence of gastric cancer, review shows BMJ 2015; 351 :h3963 ... Eradicating H pylori seems to reduce incidence of gastric cancer, review shows ... Eradicating H pylori seems to reduce incidence of gastric cancer, review shows ... Eradicating H pylori seems to reduce incidence of gastric cancer, review shows. BMJ 2015; 351 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj. ...
... pylori is a class 1 human carcinogen according to the World...,H.,pylori,vaccine,shows,promise,in,mouse,studies,biological, ... H. pylori vaccine shows promise in mouse studies. ...Researchers from Southern Medical University in Guangdong Guangzhou ...The ... Ironing out the link between H. pylori infection and gastric cancer. 2. Special issue of Gut Microbes on Helicobacter pylori. 3 ... A vaccine against H. pylori could circumvent these difficulties. L. acidophilus, a bacterium which is common in yogurt cultures ...
H. pylori is a class 1 human carcinogen, according to the World Health Organization. It causes gastritis, peptic ulcers, ... A vaccine against H. pylori could circumvent these difficulties. L. acidophilus, a bacterium which is common in yogurt cultures ... The current first-line treatment option for H. pylori infection includes two antibiotics and a proton pump inhibitor, but is ... Roughly 15-30 percent of patients relapse quickly, she says, noting that after treatment, H. pylori may be resupplied to the ...
Type I Helicobacter pylori shows Lewis(b)-independent adherence to gastric cells requiring de novo protein synthesis in both ... Type I Helicobacter pylori strains frequently recognize the Lewisb (Leb) blood group antigen. This binding property and ...
... polyps with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. The large pedunculated colonic polyps showed hamartomatous polyps with ... A Case of Cronkhite-Canada Syndrome Showing Resolution with Helicobactor pylori Eradication and Omeprazole. ... Helicobacter pylori Humans Hyperpigmentation/pathology Middle Aged Nails, Malformed/pathology Omeprazole/therapeutic use Polyps ... Helicobacter pylori Omeprazole MeSH Terms expand_less. expand_more. Anti-Ulcer Agents/therapeutic use Colonic Polyps/ ...
Goshuyuto, Rabeprazole Shown to Treat Refractory H. pylori by Physicians Weekly , Sep 5, 2017 , 0 comments ... 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) - Refractory Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection can be successfully treated with goshuyuto and ...
Helicobacter pylori eradication failure may have confounded the recent large-scale health database study that showed proton ... Helicobacter pylori eradication failure may have confounded the recent large-scale health database study that showed proton ... pylori eradication showed that the long-term use of PPIs increased the risk of gastric cancer by 2.4-fold. Moreover, the risk ... The fact that long-term PPI administration increases the risk of gastric cancer even after H. pylori eradication is unexpected ...
Helicobacter pylori eradication failure may have confounded the recent large-scale health database study that showed proton ... Helicobacter pylori eradication failure may have confounded the recent large-scale health database study that showed proton ... Helicobacter pylori: Helicobacter pylori gastritis-a novel distinct disease entity. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol 2015;12:556-7 ... pylori eradication showed that the long-term use of PPIs increased the risk of gastric cancer by 2.4-fold. Moreover, the risk ...
Any treatment?. Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for H pylori infection, Ask a Gastroenterologist ... Blood test showed H Pylori infection in stomach. ... Blood test showed H Pylori infection in stomach. Any treatment? ... If it was a simple case of H pylori infection, then it must be cleared after taking the medications you were taking. So, now on ... Uric Acid was borderline and there was H Pylori infection in stomach. Doctor gave me Amoxcil 500 g * 2 to be taken after every ...
Change region shown. Whole sequence (abbreviated view). Selected region. from: to: Update View. ... Helicobacter pylori Hp P-4c HpP_4c.contig.4, whole genome shotgun sequence Helicobacter pylori Hp P-4c HpP_4c.contig.4, whole ... Helicobacter pylori Hp P-4c HpP_4c.contig.4, whole genome shotgun sequence. NCBI Reference Sequence: NZ_AKQD01000005.1 ...
PubMed journal article Immune responses to Helicobacter pylori infection in children with intellectual disabilitie were found ... Authors+Show Affiliations. Douraghi M Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical ... Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in coronary artery disease: influence of H. pylori eradication on coronary artery ... Infection with Helicobacter pylori was assessed through serum H. pylori IgG antibody in children with intellectual disabilities ...
PubMed journal article A 3-day anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy is a good alternative for bleeding peptic ulcer patients with ... Helicobacter pylori infectio were found in PRIME PubMed. Download Prime PubMed App to iPhone or iPad. ... Authors+Show Affiliations. Hsieh YH , Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, VGH-Taipei, Shih-Pai Rd, Sec 2, ... A 3-day anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy is a good alternative for bleeding peptic ulcer patients with Helicobacter pylori ...
... as shown in this paper. The recent discovery that H. pylori eradication in patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis ... In this report, we show that sulforaphane is bactericidal to both extracellular and intracellular forms of H. pylori, by ... The relation of H. pylori to gastric pathology was first described 20 years ago (8). H. pylori is a Gram-negative, bacilliform ... pylori prevalence and stomach cancer (13-15), as well as involvement of H. pylori in iron deficiency anemia (16, 17), a serious ...
No H. pylori could be recovered 48 h p.i. (data not shown), possibly because of the return of the infants to their mothers and ... H. pylori recovered from the stomach and intestine over 24 h. Inoculating dose was 1.3 × 108 cfu. Results shown are the ... We show that infant mice are permissive for colonization by all H. pylori strains tested, including lab-passaged strains, which ... Several H. pylori Strains Colonize the Infant Mouse Stomach.. We inoculated ICR infant mice intragastrically with H. pylori ...
... pylori infection and gastric cancer, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and other cancers. ... For example, a large case-control study in Sweden showed that the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma in H. pylori-infected ... What is Helicobacter pylori?. Helicobacter pylori, or H. pylori, is a spiral-shaped bacterium that grows in the mucus layer ... Is H. pylori infection associated with any other cancer? * Can treatment to eradicate H. pylori infection reduce gastric cancer ...
Abdominal Bloating and Discomfort - H Pylori Yams917 I recently underwent an endoscopy as a result of having to have an upper ... You should have a breath test done to make sure the H. pylori is gone - the doc can tell you what the proper interval is after ... You should have a breath test done to make sure the H. pylori is gone - the doc can tell you what the proper interval is after ... I have the same bloating symptoms as Yams917 and I took meds for H.Pylori, its been 2 mths since I finished the course of meds ...
h.pylori +loose stole from 6 years. i had used dexamethasone for 3 months about 7 year before after then i suffered wid UTI and ... after 6 years dyspepsia or gerd is more svere stool is loose and any treatment could not controle my UTI last days my H.Pylori ... after 6 years dyspepsia or gerd is more svere stool is loose and any treatment could not controle my UTI last days my H.Pylori ...
Many studies have shown that H. pylori is an important causal factor of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer ... Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common chronic bacterial infection in humans. The prevalence of H. pylori is about ... 20 participants receive intraluminal eradication of H. pylori. Patients fail to achieve intraluminal eradication of H. pylori ... Intraluminal Clarithromycin Powder Monotherapy for Helicobacter Pylori Infection. The safety and scientific validity of this ...
The patients who had shown the evidence of persistent H. pylori infection after the 1st eradication were enrolled for this ... In this study, the investigators evaluated the efficacy of H. pylori eradication between a personalized therapy for H. pylori ... the efficacy of H. pylori eradication between a personalized therapy for H. pylori infection based on the results of ... the efficacy of H. pylori eradication between a personalized therapy for H. pylori infection based on the results of ...
Show more. Academic Editor: Spiros D. Ladas. Received25 Mar 2016. Accepted08 Jun 2016 ... is preferable to a 7-day regimen as first-line therapy for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. In his Letter, Talebi ... D. Y. Graham and L. Fischbach, "Helicobacter pylori treatment in the era of increasing antibiotic resistance," Gut, vol. 59, no ... R. M. Zagari, M. Romano, V. Ojetti et al., "Guidelines for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection in Italy: the III ...
And recent antimicrobial susceptibility tests showed us that the clarithromycin was increasingly resisted while furazolidone ... A Comparison of Clarithromycin-based and Furazolidone-based Bismuth-containing Regimens for H. Pylori Eradication. The safety ... Helicobacter pylori plays a pivotal role in many diseases such as peptic ulcer disease and MALT lymphomas. And the prevalence ... The H. pylori infection is confirmed by the positive rapid urease test or 13C-breath test. ...
... and its Analogues Derived from Helicobacter pylori, as Determined by 1H NMR Spectroscopy ... Show All Chains. Macromolecule Entities Toggle Protein Feature View. Show All Entities. Show First Few Entities. ... Helicobacter pylori Fragment: N-terminal residues 2-20 Mutation: D18W Gene Name(s): rplA HP_1201 ... Structure of Antimicrobial Peptide, HP (2-20) and its Analogues Derived from Helicobacter pylori, as Determined by 1H NMR ...
Our studies have shown a declining rate of H. pylori eradication with conventional triple therapy over time (Fig2). ... Helicobacter pylori eradication [ Time Frame: Eradication ]. The rate of eradication of H. pylori using the proposed regimen ... pylori infection is promising. In addition, we have recently shown in 2 separate randomized controlled trials that the reduced ... pylori. The total dose of drugs is shown in Figure 3. ... pylori. The primary end point is H. pylori eradication rate on ...
p>This subsection of the Entry information section shows the date of integration of the entry into UniProtKB, the date of the ... Helicobacter pylori (Campylobacter pylori). Helicobacter pylori SS1. Helicobacter pylori Hp H-36. Helicobacter pylori (strain ... Helicobacter pylori (Campylobacter pylori). Helicobacter pylori SS1. Helicobacter pylori (strain PeCan4). Helicobacter pylori ... Helicobacter pylori FD423. Helicobacter pylori FD703. Helicobacter pylori Hp P-25. Helicobacter pylori GAM254Ai. And more. 86. ...
  • Some studies have shown that elevated serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) events [ 7 - 11 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • In one study, after eight weeks of treatment to eradicate H. pylori infection, high C-reactive protein levels decreased and low HDL ("good" cholesterol) levels increased in the 78 patients who were treated. (smart-publications.com)
  • An important virulence factor produced by some H. pylori strains but not others is the CagA protein ( 7, 8 ). (aacrjournals.org)
  • Treatment of COX-2 -methylated cells with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine had a modest effect on COX-2 expression, but when 5-azacytidine-treated cells were subsequently stimulated with H. pylori , there was a significant, 5-10-fold enhancement of both COX-2 mRNA and protein expression and release of the COX-2 product, prostaglandin E 2 . (aacrjournals.org)
  • Furthermore, we found that response regulator HP166 activates transcription of genes encoding a protein family with an unknown function present in H. pylori 26695, as well as an operon composed of five H. pylori- specific genes. (asm.org)
  • The H. pylori Fur protein is involved in iron-dependent regulation of transcription ( 6 , 7 ), and the HspR repressor negatively regulates expression of the operons encoding the major chaperones of H. pylori ( 41 ). (asm.org)
  • A, Jurkat T cells were incubated with medium, viable H. pylori 26695, or its supernatant (as described in Fig. 1 ) before FasL protein was detected by FACS. (jimmunol.org)
  • Methods: Control (uninfected) or H. pylori-infected AGS cells were co-cultured with THP-1 macrophages in the presence or absence of serum or serum free conditions + C1q protein (40-80 μg/mL). (harvard.edu)
  • H. pylori possesses five major outer membrane protein families. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, the data showed that the C terminus of BabA, which is predicted to encode an outer membrane β-barrel domain, plays an essential role in the biogenesis of this protein. (asm.org)
  • To elucidate the role of the cagA PAI in H. pylori -mediated killing, the JAM assay was used to compare the cell death induced by the cag PAI-positive strain 26695 or its isogenic knockout strain 8-1. (jimmunol.org)
  • We previously developed a novel PCR system for H. pylori detection with high specificity and sensitivity using primer sets constructed based on the complete genome information for 48 H. pylori strains. (springer.com)
  • Nested PCR system was constructed using primer sets designed from the complete genome information of 48 H. pylori strains. (springer.com)
  • Genetic susceptibility appears to play a role in Helicobacter pylori infection, a genome-wide association in two large studies showed. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The H. pylori genome contains only four open reading frames (ORFs) with homology to two-component histidine kinases and six genes encoding response regulators. (asm.org)
  • The H. pylori genome encodes a large number of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) ( 6 ). (asm.org)
  • To a greater or lesser degree, all of these animal models exhibit progression to a disease that mimics human H. pylori -associated pathology and thus are useful for studying chronic infection, gastric inflammation and injury, and host immune responses. (pnas.org)
  • Blood Test - Can detect the antibodies that your immune system develops in response to H Pylori. (hubpages.com)
  • The team suggests that future studies address whether H. pylori modulates immune responses to ingested gluten. (celiac.com)
  • H. pylori also defends itself from another immediate threat - the human immune system. (nutritionreview.org)
  • Safely ensconced behind its mucus and antacid barriers, H. pylori is protected from attack by the immune system which cannot penetrate the mucus lining. (nutritionreview.org)
  • particularly those included in the international consensus, and discusses guidelines for the management of H. pylori infection, such as iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, and immune thrombocytopenia. (intechopen.com)
  • The test means you have produced an immune reaction to h.Pylori. (healthtap.com)
  • For example, understanding genetic susceptibility may aid development of a vaccine to boost the immune system's ability to eliminate H. pylori , he noted. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The spiral shape of H. pylori allows them to penetrate your stomach lining, where they're protected by mucus and your body's immune cells are not able to reach them. (healthline.com)
  • In the human stomach, H. pylori is exposed to selective pressures such as immune and inflammatory responses, and this is reflected by changes in mucosal glycosylation patterns. (diva-portal.org)
  • 16. What determines the vigour of the immune response to Helicobacter pylori? (textbookx.com)
  • Collectively, these results suggest that H. pylori activates NF-κB through an intracellular signaling pathway that involves IκB kinase and NF-κB-inducing kinase, leading to CCL20 gene transcription, and that Hsp90 is a crucial regulator of H. pylori -induced CCL20 expression, presumably contributing to the immune response in H. pylori . (asm.org)
  • The risks for developing gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma are 3 to 6 times higher among carriers of H. pylori infections than in uninfected subjects ( 7 , 11 , 12 ). (pnas.org)
  • 20yrs), H. pylori infections were not associated with housing characteristics. (epa.gov)
  • Conclusions: The associations between well water use and other environmental factors with T. gondii and H. pylori infections warrant further research. (epa.gov)
  • Cohort and case-crossover studies were conducted to evaluate whether new Helicobacter pylori infections are followed by increased diarrhea. (aappublications.org)
  • H pylori incidence was 12% per year (36 H pylori infections in 109 866 seronegative days). (aappublications.org)
  • Acute H pylori infections often cause transient hypochlorhydria beginning as soon as 2 weeks after infection. (aappublications.org)
  • 23 Although there are several potential mechanisms by which H pylori could lead to increased enteric infections, hypochlorhydria is a documented risk factor for a number of enteric infections, notably cholera and salmonellosis. (aappublications.org)
  • What causes H. pylori infections? (healthline.com)
  • It's still not known exactly how H. pylori infections spread. (healthline.com)
  • How are H. pylori infections diagnosed? (healthline.com)
  • Such adaptive selection contributes to the remarkable diversity in binding modes and to the extraordinary chronicity of H. pylori infections worldwide. (diva-portal.org)
  • Helicobacter pylori infections affect almost 50% of the world population, constituting a risk factor for benign and malignant gastrointestinal diseases. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The most widely known species of the genus is H. pylori , which infects up to 50% of the human population. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Peru, diarrhea is a major cause of childhood morbidity, and H pylori infects up to 50% of children and 90% of older adults. (aappublications.org)
  • In his Letter, Talebi Bezmin Abadi concluded that "Certainly, preantibiotic susceptibility tests are inevitable approach in H. pylori therapy. (hindawi.com)
  • C13-Urea breath test (UBT) will be used to assess the existence of H. pylori 6 weeks after the intraluminal therapy. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • We enrolled 158 subjects who visited a clinic located in an urban area to be tested for H. pylori infection, using the 13 C-urea breath test, and who were found to be infected and subsequently received eradication. (hindawi.com)
  • Serology and 13 C-urea breath test have been widely used as noninvasive tests to detect Helicobacter pylori infection. (aappublications.org)
  • Analyzes of the modeled H. pylori OMPLA 3D structure indicate that the niche-adaption likely is urea-influx and ammonium-efflux. (uio.no)
  • The researchers analysed all randomised controlled trials that compared at least one week of H pylori therapy with placebo or no treatment in healthy, asymptomatic people who had H pylori infection. (bmj.com)
  • The current first-line treatment option for H. pylori infection includes two antibiotics and a proton pump inhibitor, but is ineffective in roughly 20 percent of patients. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Roughly 15-30 percent of patients relapse quickly, she says, noting that after treatment, H. pylori may be resupplied to the stomach from a reservoir in the mouth. (bio-medicine.org)
  • After the treatment with H. pylori eradication and omeprazole, the gastric polyposis, hypoalbuminemia and anemia regressed, and endoscopic polypectomy of gastric polyps were performed. (koreamed.org)
  • The experience of this case suggests that eradication of H. pylori and proton pump inhibitor treatment might be considered in patients with gastric polyposis combined with Cronkhite-Canada syndome. (koreamed.org)
  • You should have a breath test done to make sure the H. pylori is gone - the doc can tell you what the proper interval is after finishing the treatment. (medhelp.org)
  • i had used dexamethasone for 3 months about 7 year before after then i suffered wid UTI and becoming week day by day and asvere dyspepsia is also started now after 6 years dyspepsia or gerd is more svere stool is loose and any treatment could not controle my UTI last days my H.Pylori test become positive. (medhelp.org)
  • 5 A new treatment regimen that would achieve the eradication rates of 90% or greater seen at the advent of H pylori treatment is urgently needed. (bmj.com)
  • Update on Helicobacter pylori treatment. (aafp.org)
  • This letter was sent to the authors of "Update on Helicobacter pylori Treatment," who declined to reply. (aafp.org)
  • Wide-spectrum antibiotics such as amoxicillin and metronidazole are used for the treatment for H. pylori infectious diseases. (intechopen.com)
  • These findings will contribute to the development of new antibacterial medicines specialized to the treatment for H. pylori infectious diseases. (intechopen.com)
  • Treatment of H. pylori is by a so-called 'triple therapy. (healthtap.com)
  • I was tested positive for Helicobacter Pylori about one year ago and was prescribed the first line Triple therapy treatment(HP- Pac) for 14 days. (topix.com)
  • Compare all 49 medications used in the treatment of Helicobacter Pylori Infection . (drugs.com)
  • I began my treatment of H Pylori 3 days ago. (drugs.com)
  • Assessment of the use of vitamin C and E supplements concomitantly to antibiotic treatment against Helicobacter pylori: A systematic review and meta-analysis. (bioportfolio.com)
  • ii) associations of H. pylori infection with epidemiological factors (age, sex, transit through refugee camps, comorbidities and treatment interventions). (mja.com.au)
  • Domain antibody 25 inhibitor may have potential for prophylactic use and, in combination with Leb glycoconjugates, therapeutic use in treatment of drug-resistant H. pylori infection. (ebscohost.com)
  • No decrease in cpm was observed after treatment with CH11, H. pylori, or H. pylori supernatant indicating that Fas-mediated killing was impaired in BR-6 cells ( B ) (mean ± SEM from three replicates in a single experiment that is representative of five separate experiments). (jimmunol.org)
  • Treatment with an inhibitor of Hsp90 suppressed H. pylori -induced CCL20 mRNA due to deactivation of NF-κB. (asm.org)
  • The researchers have now discovered that H. pylori secretes an enzyme, a protease called HtrA, which it uses much like a weapon to penetrate this protective layer. (innovations-report.com)
  • For adherence, H. pylori expresses surface-located attachment proteins (adhesins) that bind to specific receptors in the gastric mucosa. (diva-portal.org)
  • Therefore, the eradication of H. pylori from human stomach is aggressively carried out around the world. (intechopen.com)
  • Functional testing of F2 was performed by semiquantitative in situ adhesion assay on sections of human gastric mucosa and by quantitative in vitro adhesion assay with FITC-labled H. pylori strain J99 and human stomach AGS cells. (diva-portal.org)
  • Furthermore, we also showed that H. pylori could switch from specialist to generalist binding modes by chromosomal integration of foreign babA gene fragments. (diva-portal.org)
  • We have isolated a human domain antibody specific for BabA that inhibits binding of BabA to Lewis and prevents adhesion of H. pylori to human gastric epithelium. (ebscohost.com)
  • I-125-radiolabeled F2 served for binding studies to H. pylori and interaction experiments with BabA and SabA. (diva-portal.org)
  • By transformations of the nonbinding strain with a babA gene amplified from the binding strain, H. pylori strains with mosaic babA genes were generated. (asm.org)
  • In addition, the helical shape of H. pylori allows it to burrow into the mucus layer, which is less acidic than the inside space, or lumen, of the stomach. (cancer.gov)
  • First, H. pylori uses its spiral shape and several whip-like tails (flagellae) to drill into the gastric mucosa -the mucus lining that protects the stomach and keeps it from being dissolved by its own gastric juices. (nutritionreview.org)
  • Conventional wisdom held that corkscrew-shaped H. pylori relies on its shape to twist and bore its way through mucus. (nsf.gov)
  • Interestingly, H. pylori rates were significantly lower in patients with celiac disease than in those without celiac disease. (celiac.com)
  • It has been demonstrated that in infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, NOS activity of the pylorus is significantly reduced ( 44 ). (physiology.org)
  • 1 However, a large meta-analysis has shown that the 14-day regimen was significantly better than the seven-day therapy. (aafp.org)