Rupture: Forcible or traumatic tear or break of an organ or other soft part of the body.Splenic RuptureAortic Rupture: The tearing or bursting of the wall along any portion of the AORTA, such as thoracic or abdominal. It may result from the rupture of an aneurysm or it may be due to TRAUMA.Heart Rupture: Disease-related laceration or tearing of tissues of the heart, including the free-wall MYOCARDIUM; HEART SEPTUM; PAPILLARY MUSCLES; CHORDAE TENDINEAE; and any of the HEART VALVES. Pathological rupture usually results from myocardial infarction (HEART RUPTURE, POST-INFARCTION).Uterine Rupture: A complete separation or tear in the wall of the UTERUS with or without expulsion of the FETUS. It may be due to injuries, multiple pregnancies, large fetus, previous scarring, or obstruction.Heart Rupture, Post-Infarction: Laceration or tearing of cardiac tissues appearing after MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Fetal Membranes, Premature Rupture: Spontaneous tearing of the membranes surrounding the FETUS any time before the onset of OBSTETRIC LABOR. Preterm PROM is membrane rupture before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Aneurysm, Ruptured: The tearing or bursting of the weakened wall of the aneurysmal sac, usually heralded by sudden worsening pain. The great danger of a ruptured aneurysm is the large amount of blood spilling into the surrounding tissues and cavities, causing HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.Stomach Rupture: Bursting of the STOMACH.Tendon Injuries: Injuries to the fibrous cords of connective tissue which attach muscles to bones or other structures.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Hemoperitoneum: Accumulations of blood in the PERITONEAL CAVITY due to internal HEMORRHAGE.Achilles Tendon: A fibrous cord that connects the muscles in the back of the calf to the HEEL BONE.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Intracranial Aneurysm: Abnormal outpouching in the wall of intracranial blood vessels. Most common are the saccular (berry) aneurysms located at branch points in CIRCLE OF WILLIS at the base of the brain. Vessel rupture results in SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Giant aneurysms (>2.5 cm in diameter) may compress adjacent structures, including the OCULOMOTOR NERVE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p841)Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Aneurysm, False: Not an aneurysm but a well-defined collection of blood and CONNECTIVE TISSUE outside the wall of a blood vessel or the heart. It is the containment of a ruptured blood vessel or heart, such as sealing a rupture of the left ventricle. False aneurysm is formed by organized THROMBUS and HEMATOMA in surrounding tissue.Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Vaginal Birth after Cesarean: Delivery of an infant through the vagina in a female who has had a prior cesarean section.Chordae Tendineae: The tendinous cords that connect each cusp of the two atrioventricular HEART VALVES to appropriate PAPILLARY MUSCLES in the HEART VENTRICLES, preventing the valves from reversing themselves when the ventricles contract.Aneurysm: Pathological outpouching or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any blood vessel (ARTERIES or VEINS) or the heart (HEART ANEURYSM). It indicates a thin and weakened area in the wall which may later rupture. Aneurysms are classified by location, etiology, or other characteristics.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the posteromedial portion of the lateral condyle of the femur, passes anteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the depression in front of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the THORACIC AORTA. This proximal descending portion of aorta gives rise to the visceral and the parietal branches above the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Extraembryonic Membranes: The thin layers of tissue that surround the developing embryo. There are four extra-embryonic membranes commonly found in VERTEBRATES, such as REPTILES; BIRDS; and MAMMALS. They are the YOLK SAC, the ALLANTOIS, the AMNION, and the CHORION. These membranes provide protection and means to transport nutrients and wastes.Hematoma: A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.Plaque, Atherosclerotic: Lesions formed within the walls of ARTERIES.Hernia, Diaphragmatic, Traumatic: The type of DIAPHRAGMATIC HERNIA caused by TRAUMA or injury, usually to the ABDOMEN.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Aneurysm, Dissecting: Aneurysm caused by a tear in the TUNICA INTIMA of a blood vessel leading to interstitial HEMORRHAGE, and splitting (dissecting) of the vessel wall, often involving the AORTA. Dissection between the intima and media causes luminal occlusion. Dissection at the media, or between the media and the outer adventitia causes aneurismal dilation.Trial of Labor: Allowing a woman to be in LABOR, OBSTETRIC long enough to determine if vaginal birth may be anticipated.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Cardiac Tamponade: Compression of the heart by accumulated fluid (PERICARDIAL EFFUSION) or blood (HEMOPERICARDIUM) in the PERICARDIUM surrounding the heart. The affected cardiac functions and CARDIAC OUTPUT can range from minimal to total hemodynamic collapse.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Knee Injuries: Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Splenectomy: Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.Endovascular Procedures: Minimally invasive procedures, diagnostic or therapeutic, performed within the BLOOD VESSELS. They may be perfomed via ANGIOSCOPY; INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING; INTERVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY; or INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Chorioamnionitis: INFLAMMATION of the placental membranes (CHORION; AMNION) and connected tissues such as fetal BLOOD VESSELS and UMBILICAL CORD. It is often associated with intrauterine ascending infections during PREGNANCY.Abdominal Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Splenic DiseasesMyocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Esophageal Diseases: Pathological processes in the ESOPHAGUS.Heart Aneurysm: A localized bulging or dilatation in the muscle wall of a heart (MYOCARDIUM), usually in the LEFT VENTRICLE. Blood-filled aneurysms are dangerous because they may burst. Fibrous aneurysms interfere with the heart function through the loss of contractility. True aneurysm is bound by the vessel wall or cardiac wall. False aneurysms are HEMATOMA caused by myocardial rupture.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Abdominal Pain: Sensation of discomfort, distress, or agony in the abdominal region.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Hemothorax: Hemorrhage within the pleural cavity.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Aneurysm, Infected: Aneurysm due to growth of microorganisms in the arterial wall, or infection arising within preexisting arteriosclerotic aneurysms.Pericardial Effusion: Fluid accumulation within the PERICARDIUM. Serous effusions are associated with pericardial diseases. Hemopericardium is associated with trauma. Lipid-containing effusion (chylopericardium) results from leakage of THORACIC DUCT. Severe cases can lead to CARDIAC TAMPONADE.Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Amniotic Fluid: A clear, yellowish liquid that envelopes the FETUS inside the sac of AMNION. In the first trimester, it is likely a transudate of maternal or fetal plasma. In the second trimester, amniotic fluid derives primarily from fetal lung and kidney. Cells or substances in this fluid can be removed for prenatal diagnostic tests (AMNIOCENTESIS).Obstetric Labor, Premature: Onset of OBSTETRIC LABOR before term (TERM BIRTH) but usually after the FETUS has become viable. In humans, it occurs sometime during the 29th through 38th week of PREGNANCY. TOCOLYSIS inhibits premature labor and can prevent the BIRTH of premature infants (INFANT, PREMATURE).Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Posterior Capsular Rupture, Ocular: A breach in the continuity of the posterior chamber of the eyeball.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Urinary Bladder Diseases: Pathological processes of the URINARY BLADDER.Abdomen, Acute: A clinical syndrome with acute abdominal pain that is severe, localized, and rapid in onset. Acute abdomen may be caused by a variety of disorders, injuries, or diseases.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Labor, Induced: Artificially induced UTERINE CONTRACTION. Generally, LABOR, OBSTETRIC is induced with the intent to cause delivery of the fetus and termination of pregnancy.Amnion: The innermost membranous sac that surrounds and protects the developing embryo which is bathed in the AMNIOTIC FLUID. Amnion cells are secretory EPITHELIAL CELLS and contribute to the amniotic fluid.Uterine Myomectomy: Surgical removal of a LEIOMYOMA of the UTERUS.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Echinococcosis, Hepatic: Liver disease caused by infections with parasitic tapeworms of the genus ECHINOCOCCUS, such as Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis. Ingested Echinococcus ova burrow into the intestinal mucosa. The larval migration to the liver via the PORTAL VEIN leads to watery vesicles (HYDATID CYST).Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Tendons: Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Tendon Transfer: Surgical procedure by which a tendon is incised at its insertion and placed at an anatomical site distant from the original insertion. The tendon remains attached at the point of origin and takes over the function of a muscle inactivated by trauma or disease.Casts, Surgical: Dressings made of fiberglass, plastic, or bandage impregnated with plaster of paris used for immobilization of various parts of the body in cases of fractures, dislocations, and infected wounds. In comparison with plaster casts, casts made of fiberglass or plastic are lightweight, radiolucent, able to withstand moisture, and less rigid.Atherosclerosis: A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.Tendinopathy: Clinical syndrome describing overuse tendon injuries characterized by a combination of PAIN, diffuse or localized swelling, and impaired performance. Distinguishing tendinosis from tendinitis is clinically difficult and can be made only after histopathological examination.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Aortic Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.Ligaments, Articular: Fibrous cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE that attach bones to each other and hold together the many types of joints in the body. Articular ligaments are strong, elastic, and allow movement in only specific directions, depending on the individual joint.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Patellar Ligament: A band of fibrous tissue that attaches the apex of the PATELLA to the lower part of the tubercle of the TIBIA. The ligament is actually the caudal continuation of the common tendon of the QUADRICEPS FEMORIS. The patella is embedded in that tendon. As such, the patellar ligament can be thought of as connecting the quadriceps femoris tendon to the tibia, and therefore it is sometimes called the patellar tendon.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Labor, Obstetric: The repetitive uterine contraction during childbirth which is associated with the progressive dilation of the uterine cervix (CERVIX UTERI). Successful labor results in the expulsion of the FETUS and PLACENTA. Obstetric labor can be spontaneous or induced (LABOR, INDUCED).Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Arteriosclerosis: Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.Brachiocephalic Trunk: The first and largest artery branching from the aortic arch. It distributes blood to the right side of the head and neck and to the right arm.Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: A heterogeneous group of autosomally inherited COLLAGEN DISEASES caused by defects in the synthesis or structure of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are numerous subtypes: classical, hypermobility, vascular, and others. Common clinical features include hyperextensible skin and joints, skin fragility and reduced wound healing capability.Stifle: In horses, cattle, and other quadrupeds, the joint between the femur and the tibia, corresponding to the human knee.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Pectoralis Muscles: The pectoralis major and pectoralis minor muscles that make up the upper and fore part of the chest in front of the AXILLA.Laparotomy: Incision into the side of the abdomen between the ribs and pelvis.Oligohydramnios: A condition of abnormally low AMNIOTIC FLUID volume. Principal causes include malformations of fetal URINARY TRACT; FETAL GROWTH RETARDATION; GESTATIONAL HYPERTENSION; nicotine poisoning; and PROLONGED PREGNANCY.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Coronary Thrombosis: Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Arthroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Tissue Adhesives: Substances used to cause adherence of tissue to tissue or tissue to non-tissue surfaces, as for prostheses.Echocardiography, Transesophageal: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues using a transducer placed in the esophagus.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Mitral Valve Insufficiency: Backflow of blood from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the LEFT ATRIUM due to imperfect closure of the MITRAL VALVE. This can lead to mitral valve regurgitation.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Necrosis: The pathological process occurring in cells that are dying from irreparable injuries. It is caused by the progressive, uncontrolled action of degradative ENZYMES, leading to MITOCHONDRIAL SWELLING, nuclear flocculation, and cell lysis. It is distinct it from APOPTOSIS, which is a normal, regulated cellular process.Capillary Fragility: The susceptibility of CAPILLARIES, under conditions of increased stress, to leakage.Splenic Artery: The largest branch of the celiac trunk with distribution to the spleen, pancreas, stomach and greater omentum.Ovulation: The discharge of an OVUM from a rupturing follicle in the OVARY.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Ulcer: A lesion on the surface of the skin or a mucous surface, produced by the sloughing of inflammatory necrotic tissue.Matrix Metalloproteinase 9: An endopeptidase that is structurally similar to MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 2. It degrades GELATIN types I and V; COLLAGEN TYPE IV; and COLLAGEN TYPE V.Elasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Finite Element Analysis: A computer based method of simulating or analyzing the behavior of structures or components.Pneumoperitoneum: A condition with trapped gas or air in the PERITONEAL CAVITY, usually secondary to perforation of the internal organs such as the LUNG and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, or to recent surgery. Pneumoperitoneum may be purposely introduced to aid radiological examination.Iliac Aneurysm: Abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of any one of the iliac arteries including the common, the internal, or the external ILIAC ARTERY.Papillary Muscles: Conical muscular projections from the walls of the cardiac ventricles, attached to the cusps of the atrioventricular valves by the chordae tendineae.Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations: Congenital vascular anomalies in the brain characterized by direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. The locations and size of the shunts determine the symptoms including HEADACHES; SEIZURES; STROKE; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; mass effect; and vascular steal effect.Pericardium: A conical fibro-serous sac surrounding the HEART and the roots of the great vessels (AORTA; VENAE CAVAE; PULMONARY ARTERY). Pericardium consists of two sacs: the outer fibrous pericardium and the inner serous pericardium. The latter consists of an outer parietal layer facing the fibrous pericardium, and an inner visceral layer (epicardium) resting next to the heart, and a pericardial cavity between these two layers.Endoleak: Postoperative hemorrhage from an endovascular AORTIC ANEURYSM repaired with endoluminal placement of stent grafts (BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION). It is associated with pressurization, expansion, and eventual rupture of the aneurysm.Mice, Inbred C57BLThoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Extravasation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Materials: The escape of diagnostic or therapeutic material from the vessel into which it is introduced into the surrounding tissue or body cavity.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.Mitral Valve: The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.Lacerations: Torn, ragged, mangled wounds.Bursa, Synovial: A fluid-filled sac lined with SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE that provides a cushion between bones, tendons and/or muscles around a joint.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Sternotomy: Making an incision in the STERNUM.Shock: A pathological condition manifested by failure to perfuse or oxygenate vital organs.Sinus of Valsalva: The dilatation of the aortic wall behind each of the cusps of the aortic valve.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Arteriovenous Fistula: An abnormal direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. The locations and size of the shunts determine the degree of effects on the cardiovascular functions such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEART RATE.Cerebral Hemorrhage: Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES including the BASAL GANGLIA and the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is often associated with HYPERTENSION and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Dilatation, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being dilated beyond normal dimensions.Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Premature Birth: CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).Cardiac Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the heart.Hematemesis: Vomiting of blood that is either fresh bright red, or older "coffee-ground" in character. It generally indicates bleeding of the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Microscopy, Atomic Force: A type of scanning probe microscopy in which a probe systematically rides across the surface of a sample being scanned in a raster pattern. The vertical position is recorded as a spring attached to the probe rises and falls in response to peaks and valleys on the surface. These deflections produce a topographic map of the sample.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Angiography, Digital Subtraction: A method of delineating blood vessels by subtracting a tissue background image from an image of tissue plus intravascular contrast material that attenuates the X-ray photons. The background image is determined from a digitized image taken a few moments before injection of the contrast material. The resulting angiogram is a high-contrast image of the vessel. This subtraction technique allows extraction of a high-intensity signal from the superimposed background information. The image is thus the result of the differential absorption of X-rays by different tissues.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Complete ruptures require surgical repair and rehabilitation. Initial treatment of the injury, regardless of the severity of ...
However, rupture of ovarian tissue can occur in conjunction with other diseases. In the ovaries of sexually mature women, ... Then the follicle ruptures, releasing a mature egg (ovulation). The location from which the follicle emerges then forms a ... Therefore, a new pathology has been devised in which the condition is divided according to severity: mild, moderate and severe ... Ovarian apoplexy is a sudden rupture in the ovary, commonly at the site of a cyst, accompanied by hemorrhage in the ovarian ...
A splenic hematoma sometimes ruptures, usually in the first few days, although rupture can occur from hours to even months ... damages or ruptures the spleen. Treatment varies depending on severity, but often consists of embolism or splenectomy. Blunt ... The degree of injury ranges from subcapsular hematoma, to splenic rupture. The primary concern in any splenic trauma is ...
It provides authoritative estimates of the likelihood and severity of potentially damaging earthquake ruptures in the long- and ... rupture length, rupture width, rupture area, and surface displacement." (PDF), Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America ... The 2015 Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 3, or UCERF3, is the latest official earthquake rupture ... As the lengths and other properties of the segments are fixed, earthquakes that rupture the entire fault should have similar ...
It provides authoritative estimates of the likelihood and severity of potentially damaging earthquake ruptures in the long- and ... The 2015 Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 3, or UCERF3, is the latest official earthquake rupture ... so a rupture on one segment triggers rupturing on adjacent segments. One of the achievements of UCERF3 is to better handle such ... then considers ruptures of multiple segments regardless of which parent fault they belong to. After removing those ruptures ...
Treatment of a biceps tear depends on the severity of the injury. In most cases, the muscle will heal over time with no ... Acute rupture of the distal biceps tendon can be treated nonoperatively with acceptable results,[18] but because the injury can ... Proximal ruptures of the long head of the biceps tendon can be surgically addressed by two different techniques. Biceps ... "Rupture of the distal tendon of the biceps brachii. A biomechanical study". The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American ...
Due to the severity of the injury, he was unable to compete in either the 2008 Arnold Classic or 2008 Mr. Olympia contests. ... In January 2008, Martínez underwent surgery to repair his left patellar tendon which ruptured while he was performing warm-up ... Olympia, 2006 "Ronnie Responds", FlexOnline.com, 2005 Official Announcement of 2007 Arnold Classic Results Martínez ruptures ...
The maximum observed lengths of ruptures and mapped faults (which may break in a single rupture) are approximately 1,000 km ( ... The severity of the local effects depends on the complex combination of the earthquake magnitude, the distance from the ... Rupture dynamics. A tectonic earthquake begins by an initial rupture at a point on the fault surface, a process known as ... Rupture propagation is generally modeled using a fracture mechanics approach, likening the rupture to a propagating mixed mode ...
It may be the first manifestation of a renal angiomyolipoma (AML), or rupture of renal artery or intraparechymal aneurysm. ... Sometimes massive acute hemorrhage is seen when a hematoma ruptures Gerota's fascia and extends into the peritoneum. An ... Treatment varies according to severity, ranging from monitoring of the hematoma (in haemodynamic stability) to emergency ... "A Cough Deteriorating Gross Hematuria: A Clinical Sign of a Forthcoming Life-Threatening Rupture of an Intraparenchymal ...
... with no anomalies in the rupture area reported. Contributing to the severity of the accident was Colonial Pipeline Company's ... There were a total of 7 fires from 7 pipeline ruptures. 1981 A 12-inch diameter pipeline, near Ackerly, Texas, was hit by a ... The rupture was caused by pumping against a valve that had been closed for earlier pipeline maintenance. 1979 1979 A ruptured 2 ... There was a 4 foot long rupture in the pipeline, and some of the diesel entered Fish Creek, killing wildlife. The rupture was ...
... covering the rupture but also producing stenosis or closure of the lumen, or over time and after repeated ruptures, resulting ... developments in nuclear imaging techniques such as PET and SPECT have provided ways of estimating the severity of ... Repeated plaque ruptures, ones not resulting in total lumen closure, combined with the clot patch over the rupture and healing ... is usually weak and prone to rupture. Ruptures of the fibrous cap expose thrombogenic material, such as collagen, to the ...
... rupture is a partial or complete break in the tendon. Partial and full Achilles tendon ruptures are most likely ... Depending on the severity of the injury, recovery from an Achilles injury can take up to 12-16 months. To reduce the chances of ... The tendon can rupture and become inflamed. The oldest-known written record of the tendon being named for Achilles is in 1693 ... In a case where Achilles tendon rupture is concerned, there are three main types of treatment: the open and the percutaneous ...
Treatment of a biceps tear depends on the severity of the injury. In most cases, the muscle will heal over time with no ... Morrey BF, Askew LJ, An KN, Dobyns JH (March 1985). "Rupture of the distal tendon of the biceps brachii. A biomechanical study ... Sotereanos DG, Pierce TD, Varitimidis SE (May 2000). "A simplified method for repair of distal biceps tendon ruptures". Journal ... Bain GI, Prem H, Heptinstall RJ, Verhellen R, Paix D (March 2000). "Repair of distal biceps tendon rupture: a new technique ...
The severity of sprain ranges from a minor injury which resolves in a few days to a major rupture of one or more ligaments ... Pain Swelling Bruising Decreased ability to move the limb If a ligament ruptures, one may hear a cracking sound Difficulty ... Third degree sprain - is a complete rupture of the ligament, sometimes avulsing a piece of bone. Although any joint can ...
Acute rupture of the distal biceps tendon can be treated nonoperatively with acceptable results, but because the injury can ... Proximal ruptures of the long head of the biceps tendon can be surgically addressed by two different techniques. Biceps ... Treatment of a biceps tear depends on the severity of the injury. In most cases, the muscle will heal over time with no ... Morrey, B. F.; Askew, L. J.; An, K. N.; Dobyns, J. H. (March 1985). "Rupture of the distal tendon of the biceps brachii. A ...
Clinical features depend on the site of injury and severity of injury. Patients may have a history of loss of consciousness but ... Intracranial bleeding occurs when a blood vessel within the skull is ruptured or leaks. It can result from physical trauma (as ... can result either from trauma or from ruptures of aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations. Blood is seen layering into the ... Besides from head injury, it may occur spontaneously, usually from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm. Symptoms of SAH include a ...
The severity of sprain ranges from a minor injury which resolves in a few days to a major rupture of one or more ligaments ... "Nonoperative Treatment for Partial Ruptures of the Lateral Collateral Ligament Occurring in Combination With Complete Ruptures ... Third degree sprain (severe)- is a complete rupture of the ligament, sometimes avulsing a piece of bone. ...
The form of treatment is determined based on the severity of the tear on the ligament. Small tears in the ACL may require only ... The term for non-surgical treatment for ACL rupture is "conservative management", and it often includes physical therapy and ... have been hypothesized as causing predisposition of ACL ruptures. This is because they may increase joint laxity and ... This combination is said to indicate a 90% probability of rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament. An individual may ...
Severity is measured using various concussion grading systems.[citation needed] A slightly greater injury is associated with ... can result either from trauma or from ruptures of aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations. Blood is seen layering into the ... Symptoms(depend on severity) Lucid interval followed by unconsciousness. Gradually increasing headache and confusion ... In addition to this hearing, vision, balance, and reflexes may also be assessed as an indicator of the severity of the injury.[ ...
The bladder may rupture if overfilled and not emptied.[42] This can occur in the case of binge drinkers having consumed very ... A person is more likely to urinate while passed out before the bladder ruptures, as alcohol relaxes the muscles that normally ... Binge drinking is a more important factor rather than average alcohol intake, with regard to the severity of alcohol induced ...
Repeated ruptures at the same synapse may eventually fail to heal, leading to permanent hearing loss. Acoustic over-exposure ... Among young adults, the concept of severity is most crucial because it has been found that behavior change may not occur unless ... Usually, this sort of rupture heals within about five days, resulting in functional recovery of that synapse. While healing, an ... As harmful noise exposure continues, the commonly affected frequencies will broaden and worsen in severity. "NIHL usually ...
These frequency and severity statistics can then be brought together in a model such as a Compound Poisson Process. Provided ... A. Johansen and D. Sornette, Critical ruptures, Eur. Phys. J. B 18 (2000) 163-181. S.G. Sammis and D. Sornette, Positive ... material rupture, earthquakes, turbulence, financial crashes and human birth, Prof. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 99, SUPP1 (2002) 2522- ... the dynamic dragon kings must be reasoned about in terms of annual frequency and severity statistics. ...
... "the gas released from the ruptured pipeline ignited very soon after the rupture". The rupture of the pipeline was caused by ... "Fire ruptures WA gas supply". BusinessDay. Melbourne: The Age. 4 June 2008. Archived from the original on 4 June 2008. ... I think people in the east have not quite caught up with the severity of the impact which this is having across the WA economy ... At 1:40pm on Tuesday 3 June 2008, an export gas pipeline ruptured near the gas plant, causing a fire in a large section of the ...
The severity of the symptoms are related to the extent of the initial tear of the UCL (in the case of Skier's thumb), or how ... The Stener lesion is present in more than 80% of complete ruptures of the UCL of the thumb. When approaching this type of ... injury, the physician must first determine whether there is an incomplete rupture (or sprain) of the UCL, or a complete rupture ... or simply a complete rupture of the UCL with anatomic or near-anatomic position. Radiographs are helpful in determining the ...
Treatment for Achilles Tendon Rupture. Find Doctors Near You, Book Appointment, Consult Online, View Doctor Fees, Address, ... Both surgical and nonsurgical methods can be used for treating Achilles tendon rupture, depending on the severity of injury. ... Doctors for Achilles Tendon Ruptures Doctors for Achilles Tendon Rupture. Show doctors near me ... ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURE Achilles tendon rupture affects the back of the leg followed by a sharp pain in the back of the ankle ...
The decision of whether to proceed with surgery or non-surgical treatment is based on the severity of the rupture and the ... Non-surgical treatment, which is generally associated with a higher rate of re-rupture, is selected for minor ruptures, less ... What is an Achilles Tendon Rupture?. An Achilles tendon rupture is a complete or partial tear that occurs when the tendon is ... A person with a ruptured Achilles tendon may experience one or more of the following:. * Sudden pain (which feels like a kick ...
The severity of mitral obstruction can be quantified by measuring the mean velocity of diastolic flow through the mitral valve ... Abnormalities in the leaflets include thickening, fusion, perforations, restricted movements, and ruptured chordae with flail ... traumatic ruptures, and complications of interventional procedures. [8] ... The severity of mitral regurgitation should be assessed in a semiquantitative manner by evaluation of the area of the ...
... the symptoms of a ruptured spleen, and surgery to repair or remove this organ, which helps the body fight foreign bacteria. ... WebMD looks at why a spleen might rupture, ... Recovery depends on the severity of the rupture. In general, ... A CT scan with contrast may take awhile, and some people with spleen ruptures have died while waiting to have the test done. ... Symptoms of a Ruptured Spleen. A ruptured spleen causes abdominal pain, usually severe, but not always. The severity and even ...
In the rare event that a uterine scar ruptures, it can be dangerous to both the mother and her infant. ... Depending on severity, a rupture can:. *Be mild and harmless.. *Often be repaired. If it is not repairable, the uterus is ... rupture) during labor. Women who have a low transverse cesarean scar have a lower risk of rupturing than women who have a ... VBAC: Uterine Scar Rupture. Topic Overview. The most rare yet most serious risk of vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) is that ...
Complete ruptures require surgical repair and rehabilitation. Initial treatment of the injury, regardless of the severity of ...
Information from WebMD on tendon ruptures, a potentially serious problem that may result in excruciating pain and permanent ... In contrast, acute rupture, as occurs with trauma, may or may not be repaired surgically depending on the severity of the tear. ... Ruptures of the biceps are classified as proximal (close) or distal (far). Distal ruptures are extremely rare. The proximal ... patellar tendon rupture, Achilles tendon rupture, rotator cuff rupture, biceps tendon rupture, ruptured tendon. ...
Learn more about Ruptured Eardrum at Portsmouth Regional Hospital DefinitionCausesRisk ... People who have traumatic ruptures to the eardrum may be at an increased risk of an ear infection. Infection may occur because ... For those that have symptoms, a ruptured eardrum may cause:. *Earache, severe and increasing in its severity ... While many ruptured eardrums will heal on their own, many may also require treatment to heal properly. Options may include:. ...
Partial Achilles tendon ruptures associated with fluoroquinolone antibiotics: a case report and literature review. Foot Ankle ... A direct relationship exists between severity and the length of treatment; there is a predilection for the Achilles tendon, but ... The first case of a tendon rupture associated with ciprofloxacin was reported in 1987.9 A pefloxacin-related tendon rupture ... Levofloxacin-Induced Tendon Rupture: A Case Report and Review of the Literature. Liana Gold and Helena Igra ...
Ruptures of the proximal biceps tendon make up 90-97% of all biceps ruptures and almost exclusively involve the long head. ... Tendon ruptures of the biceps brachii, one of the dominant muscles of the arm, have been reported in the United States with ... Incidence and severity of biceps long head tendon lesion in patients with complete rotator cuff tears. J Trauma. June 2005. 58( ... encoded search term (Biceps Rupture) and Biceps Rupture What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and Diseases. * ...
A partial Achilles tendon rupture can occur in athletes from all sports but particularly in running, jumping, throwing and ... It may be as soon as a week after injury but it may be up to a month depending on severity. ... Very severe or complete ruptures may require surgery.. Expert interview. Please enable JavaScript. ... If the rupture is a complete Achilles tendon rupture then immediate surgery is usually indicated. ...
Recent asthma may be linked with abdominal aneurysm rupture. Updated screening policies could detect more abdominal aortic ... and usually causes no symptoms until it ruptures, which could prove fatal. ... psoriasis-severity-linked-to-rising-risk-of-abdominal-aortic-aneurysms?preview=. 48e046d199609592c123d6796600baca ... Psoriasis severity linked to rising risk of abdominal aortic aneurysms American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report ...
... or a ruptured eardrum, is a hole in the eardrum (tympanic membrane). The eardrum is a very thin membrane made of tissue that ... People who have traumatic ruptures to the eardrum may be at an increased risk of an ear infection. Infection may occur because ... For those that have symptoms, a ruptured eardrum may cause:. *Earache, severe and increasing in its severity ... Ruptured Eardrum. Definition. Tympanic membrane perforation, or a ruptured eardrum, is a hole in the eardrum (tympanic membrane ...
We report a case of secondary spontaneous traumatic left-sided diaphragmatic rupture in a child that was managed by delayed ... Traumatic diaphragmatic rupture (TDR) is very rare in the pediatric age group. Because of its rarity and its coexistence with ... In children, the severity of trauma may not be determined as easily as in adults. Hemidiaphragmatical rupture more commonly ... Acute ruptures are best approached transabdominally via a midline incision as this permits assessment of associated intra ...
Eagles tackle Jason Peters ruptured the Achilles tendon in his right leg and will have surgery next Tuesday, the team announced ... While the severity of the rupture is unknown, the injury typically takes six-nine months to recover from, if not longer. It ... Eagles tackle Jason Peters ruptured the Achilles tendon in his right leg and will have surgery next Tuesday, the team announced ... Eagles tackle Jason Peters ruptured his Achilles tendon and will have surgery next Tuesday. (Yong Kim/Staff File Photo) ...
Jeffery on treatment for peritonitis from ruptured ovarian cyst: Its rare for peritonitis to result from a ruptured cyst. ... Rupture - few days: If an ovarian cyst ruptures, the resulting pain should only last a day or few days at most. If an ovarian ... It varies: Some ruptured cysts resolve quickly, others can take a few months. Treatment depends on severity of symptoms. ... Rupture and torsion: Rupture and torsion are the major complications of ovarian cysts. Ovarian cyst rupture may be associated ...
A distal rupture only occurs approximately 3% of all biceps tendon ruptures. These are found near the elbow joint where the ... Perioperative evaluation - Severity of disease should be evaluated via history and physical. Patients should be instructed to ... Patients undergoing a repair of a ruptured biceps tendon are usually more or less healthy. Proximal ruptures are either the ... This type of rupture can also occur, albeit very rarely, in a younger patient involved in throwing sports or weight-lifting. ...
Rupture of the diaphragm after blunt trauma. Eur J Surg. 1994;160(9):479-83.. 9.. Meyers BF, McCabe CJ. Traumatic diaphragmatic ... In one case (7%) the operation was started laparoscopically, but it was converted to open surgery due to the severity of the ... Left-sided ruptures after blunt trauma seem to occur more often due to a so-called cushioning effect of the liver, increased ... Traumatic rupture of the diaphragm: experience with 65 patients. Injury. 2003;34(3):169-72. DOI: 10.1016/S0020-1383(02)00369-8 ...
Achilles tendon tear or rupture occurs at the back of your lower leg. Achilles tendon tear occurs more commonly in those ... Achilles Tendon Rupture Treatment. Treatment for Achilles tendon tear often depends on the severity of injury, besides your age ... Most ruptures occur in people in the age group between 30 and 50 years. Non surgical treatment is an effective surgical option ... In case the tendon is ruptured, no movement will be detected.. To further analyze the nature of your Achilles tendon rupture an ...
10 patients with ruptured uterus experience fatigue, depressed mood, pain, anxious mood, and insomnia and use Alprazolam and ... Find the most comprehensive real-world symptom and treatment data on ruptured uterus at PatientsLikeMe. ... Diphenhydramine to treat their ruptured uterus and its symptoms. ... The severity of Parkinsons Disease symptoms changes faster ... old C-section scar ruptures). ... What is ruptured uterus?. A ruptured uterus is a tear in the ...
Achilles ruptures showed increased PTGS2 and interleukin-8 expression. Tendinopathic and ruptured Achilles tissues expressed ... The VISA-A questionnaire: a valid and reliable index of the clinical severity of Achilles tendinopathy. Br J Sports Med 2001;35 ... While patients with Achilles rupture may have had pre-existing tendon disease prior to rupture, the timing of tissue collection ... and ruptured Achilles (P=0.0002) relative to healthy hamstring tendons. Ruptures showed increased CD31 expression relative to ...
for anyone whose your ruptures are severe and/or complete, obviously take my no ring thing with a big grain of salt in such ... whats vexing about this injury is its actual severity is difficult to non-surgically determine. a high-res digital x-ray can ... diagnosed it as a rupture as opposed to tenosynovitis? I thought it was an A2 rupture but began to question it due to the way ... If it is a partial rupture, you have to stay off it, slowly strengthen it, and over time it will heal. If it is a full rupture ...
A ruptured appendix can be life threatening. When the appendix ruptures, bacteria infect the organs inside the abdominal cavity ... Usually increases in severity as time passes. *May be worse with moving, taking deep breaths, being touched and coughing or ... Rupture (or perforation) occurs as holes develop in the walls of the appendix, allowing stool, mucus and other substances to ... If the appendix has ruptured, a small drainage tube may be placed to allow pus and other fluids that are in the abdomen to ...
83. Spleen Rupture: ,ul,,li,Most common abdominal solid organ injury ,/li,,/ul,,ul,,li,Preexisting disease  markedly increase ... li,,/ul,,ul,,li,Mal position, Mal union ,/li,,/ul,,ul,,li,Tendon Ruptures ,/li,,/ul,,ul,,li,Finger stiffness. ,/li,,/ul,,ul,,li ... the risks & severity of splenic injury. ,/li,,/ul,,ul,,li,Preexisting infections or Splenomegaly  fragile, large with thin ... li,,/ul,,/ul,,ul,,ul,,li,Pathology of splenic rupture ,/li,,/ul,,/ul,,ul,,li,Basic science - Core Learning Issues: ,/li,,/ul,, ...
What happens if the appendix ruptures?. On occasion, a person may not see their doctor until appendicitis with rupture has been ... Recovery from an appendectomy depends on the severity of the inflammation. If inflammation is mild, recovery can take a few ... Free rupture of the appendix into the peritoneal cavity (abdomen) may require even longer. Recovery has become much faster with ... The cause of such a rupture is unclear, but it may relate to changes that occur in the lymphatic tissue that lines the wall of ...
  • In contradiction to adulthood traumas, in children, the clinical picture does not reflect the severity of trauma and any delay in the diagnosis may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. (scirp.org)
  • I had my appointment with him yesterday and was given the sobering, though not surprising, diagnosis of a partially ruptured A2 pulley on my right ring finger. (allclimbing.com)
  • Since an infected appendix can rupture and be a life-threatening problem, please call your physician immediately if you think your child has appendicitis. (chw.org)
  • Since an infected appendix can rupture and be a life-threatening problem, please call your health care provider or go to the emergency room immediately if you think your child has appendicitis. (stlouischildrens.org)
  • In the clinical setting, ruptured plaque in the culprit lesion is usually treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and the natural course of ruptured plaque without PCI has not yet been reported. (onlinejacc.org)
  • While many ruptured eardrums will heal on their own, many may also require treatment to heal properly. (portsmouthhospital.com)
  • The injured leg is placed in a cast, with the foot and heel pointing downward, allowing the two ruptured ends of the tendon to come together and heal. (medindia.net)
  • Second-degree tears can take longer to heal based on severity. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Nevertheless, ruptured plaques in nonculprit lesions have not been well described as to whether they heal uneventfully with (or without) luminal narrowing or lead to an occurrence of acute coronary events in living patients. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) studies recently reported that a plaque rupture occurs not only in culprit lesions but also in other atherosclerotic plaques in patients with ACS, stable angina pectoris (SAP), and silent myocardial ischemia ( 6-9 ). (onlinejacc.org)
  • Morbidity and mortality of diaphragmatic ruptures are mainly determined by associated injuries or complications of diaphragmatic herniation like incarceration of viscera or lung failure. (egms.de)
  • Chest radiography revealed visceral herniation in the left hemi- thorax with no discernible left hemidiaphragm that was described as rupture of the diaphragm ( Figure 2 ). (scirp.org)
  • Complete left hemidiaphragm rupture was observed as well as the presence of visceral hemiation ( Figure 3 ). (scirp.org)
  • Atherosclerotic coronary plaque rupture (or erosion) and subsequent thrombus formation in the culprit lesion are recognized to be the major motivating factors in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) ( 1-5 ). (onlinejacc.org)
  • Serum C-reactive protein (CRP), a predictor of acute myocardial infarction (MI), is expressed in human atherosclerotic lesions, and most CRPs show an increased expression at sites of plaque rupture ( 12-14 ). (onlinejacc.org)
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