Serratia marcescens: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in soil, water, food, and clinical specimens. It is a prominent opportunistic pathogen for hospitalized patients.Serratia: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs in the natural environment (soil, water, and plant surfaces) or as an opportunistic human pathogen.Serratia Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus SERRATIA.Prodigiosin: 4-Methoxy-5-((5-methyl-4-pentyl-2H-pyrrol-2-ylidene)methyl)- 2,2'-bi-1H-pyrrole. A toxic, bright red tripyrrole pigment from Serratia marcescens and others. It has antibacterial, anticoccidial, antimalarial, and antifungal activities, but is used mainly as a biochemical tool.ChitinaseEnterobacteriaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family ENTEROBACTERIACEAE.Enterobacteriaceae: A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that do not form endospores. Its organisms are distributed worldwide with some being saprophytes and others being plant and animal parasites. Many species are of considerable economic importance due to their pathogenic effects on agriculture and livestock.Enterobacter: Gram-negative gas-producing rods found in feces of humans and other animals, sewage, soil, water, and dairy products.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Drug Resistance, Microbial: The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).Microbial Sensitivity Tests: Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).Chitin: A linear polysaccharide of beta-1->4 linked units of ACETYLGLUCOSAMINE. It is the second most abundant biopolymer on earth, found especially in INSECTS and FUNGI. When deacetylated it is called CHITOSAN.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Gram-Negative Bacteria: Bacteria which lose crystal violet stain but are stained pink when treated by Gram's method.Serratia liquefaciens: A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus SERRATIA found in plants and the DIGESTIVE TRACT of rodents. It is the most prevalent Serratia species in the natural environment.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Homoserine Dehydrogenase: An enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of aspartic beta-semialdehyde to homoserine, which is the branch point in biosynthesis of methionine, lysine, threonine and leucine from aspartic acid. EC 1.1.1.3.Amikacin: A broad-spectrum antibiotic derived from KANAMYCIN. It is reno- and oto-toxic like the other aminoglycoside antibiotics.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.beta-Lactamases: Enzymes found in many bacteria which catalyze the hydrolysis of the amide bond in the beta-lactam ring. Well known antibiotics destroyed by these enzymes are penicillins and cephalosporins.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Bacteriocins: Substances elaborated by specific strains of bacteria that are lethal against other strains of the same or related species. They are protein or lipopolysaccharide-protein complexes used in taxonomy studies of bacteria.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Pigments, Biological: Any normal or abnormal coloring matter in PLANTS; ANIMALS or micro-organisms.Aspartate Kinase: An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of beta-aspartyl phosphate from aspartic acid and ATP. Threonine serves as an allosteric regulator of this enzyme to control the biosynthetic pathway from aspartic acid to threonine. EC 2.7.2.4.Aminoglycosides: Glycosylated compounds in which there is an amino substituent on the glycoside. Some of them are clinically important ANTIBIOTICS.Cephalosporins: A group of broad-spectrum antibiotics first isolated from the Mediterranean fungus ACREMONIUM. They contain the beta-lactam moiety thia-azabicyclo-octenecarboxylic acid also called 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.Bacteriological Techniques: Techniques used in studying bacteria.Micropore Filters: A membrane or barrier with micrometer sized pores used for separation purification processes.Filtration: A process of separating particulate matter from a fluid, such as air or a liquid, by passing the fluid carrier through a medium that will not pass the particulates. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Hand Disinfection: The act of cleansing the hands with water or other liquid, with or without the inclusion of soap or other detergent, for the purpose of destroying infectious microorganisms.Containment of Biohazards: Provision of physical and biological barriers to the dissemination of potentially hazardous biologically active agents (bacteria, viruses, recombinant DNA, etc.). Physical containment involves the use of special equipment, facilities, and procedures to prevent the escape of the agent. Biological containment includes use of immune personnel and the selection of agents and hosts that will minimize the risk should the agent escape the containment facility.Agar: A complex sulfated polymer of galactose units, extracted from Gelidium cartilagineum, Gracilaria confervoides, and related red algae. It is used as a gel in the preparation of solid culture media for microorganisms, as a bulk laxative, in making emulsions, and as a supporting medium for immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis.North CarolinaAlgorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Lower Extremity Deformities, Congenital: Congenital structural abnormalities of the LOWER EXTREMITY.KentuckyUltrafiltration: The separation of particles from a suspension by passage through a filter with very fine pores. In ultrafiltration the separation is accomplished by convective transport; in DIALYSIS separation relies instead upon differential diffusion. Ultrafiltration occurs naturally and is a laboratory procedure. Artificial ultrafiltration of the blood is referred to as HEMOFILTRATION or HEMODIAFILTRATION (if combined with HEMODIALYSIS).Cytotoxins: Substances that are toxic to cells; they may be involved in immunity or may be contained in venoms. These are distinguished from CYTOSTATIC AGENTS in degree of effect. Some of them are used as CYTOTOXIC ANTIBIOTICS. The mechanism of action of many of these are as ALKYLATING AGENTS or MITOSIS MODULATORS.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Microscopy, Electron, Transmission: Electron microscopy in which the ELECTRONS or their reaction products that pass down through the specimen are imaged below the plane of the specimen.Urinary Tract Infections: Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.Vacuum: A space in which the pressure is far below atmospheric pressure so that the remaining gases do not affect processes being carried on in the space.Phleomycins: Water-soluble, copper-containing low molecular weight polypeptides obtained from the culture medium of Streptomyces verticillus. They are specific inhibitors of DNA synthesis in bacteria and have been found to act as antitumor agents. They have also been used against rust fungi of plants.Chromosome Fragile Sites: Specific loci that show up during KARYOTYPING as a gap (an uncondensed stretch in closer views) on a CHROMATID arm after culturing cells under specific conditions. These sites are associated with an increase in CHROMOSOME FRAGILITY. They are classified as common or rare, and by the specific culture conditions under which they develop. Fragile site loci are named by the letters "FRA" followed by a designation for the specific chromosome, and a letter which refers to which fragile site of that chromosome (e.g. FRAXA refers to fragile site A on the X chromosome. It is a rare, folic acid-sensitive fragile site associated with FRAGILE X SYNDROME.)Bleomycin: A complex of related glycopeptide antibiotics from Streptomyces verticillus consisting of bleomycin A2 and B2. It inhibits DNA metabolism and is used as an antineoplastic, especially for solid tumors.Catalase: An oxidoreductase that catalyzes the conversion of HYDROGEN PEROXIDE to water and oxygen. It is present in many animal cells. A deficiency of this enzyme results in ACATALASIA.

Fatal Serratia marcescens meningitis and myocarditis in a patient with an indwelling urinary catheter. (1/1084)

Serratia marcescens is commonly isolated from the urine of patients with an indwelling urinary catheter and in the absence of symptoms is often regarded as a contaminant. A case of fatal Serratia marcescens septicaemia with meningitis, brain abscesses, and myocarditis discovered at necropsy is described. The patient was an 83 year old man with an indwelling urinary catheter who suffered from several chronic medical conditions and from whose urine Serratia marcescens was isolated at the time of catheterisation. Serratia marcescens can be a virulent pathogen in particular groups of patients and when assessing its significance in catheter urine specimens, consideration should be given to recognised risk factors such as old age, previous antibiotic treatment, and underlying chronic or debilitating disease, even in the absence of clinical symptoms.  (+info)

Genetic analysis of the Serratia marcescens N28b O4 antigen gene cluster. (2/1084)

The Serratia marcescens N28b wbbL gene has been shown to complement the rfb-50 mutation of Escherichia coli K-12 derivatives, and a wbbL mutant has been shown to be impaired in O4-antigen biosynthesis (X. Rubires, F. Saigi, N. Pique, N. Climent, S. Merino, S. Alberti, J. M. Tomas, and M. Regue, J. Bacteriol. 179:7581-7586, 1997). We analyzed a recombinant cosmid containing the wbbL gene by subcloning and determination of O-antigen production phenotype in E. coli DH5alpha by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis and Western blot experiments with S. marcescens O4 antiserum. The results obtained showed that a recombinant plasmid (pSUB6) containing about 10 kb of DNA insert was enough to induce O4-antigen biosynthesis. The same results were obtained when an E. coli K-12 strain with a deletion of the wb cluster was used, suggesting that the O4 wb cluster is located in pSUB6. No O4 antigen was produced when plasmid pSUB6 was introduced in a wecA mutant E. coli strain, suggesting that O4-antigen production is wecA dependent. Nucleotide sequence determination of the whole insert in plasmid pSUB6 showed seven open reading frames (ORFs). On the basis of protein similarity analysis of the ORF-encoded proteins and analysis of the S. marcescens N28b wbbA insertion mutant and wzm-wzt deletion mutant, we suggest that the O4 wb cluster codes for two dTDP-rhamnose biosynthetic enzymes (RmlDC), a rhamnosyltransferase (WbbL), a two-component ATP-binding-cassette-type export system (Wzm Wzt), and a putative glycosyltransferase (WbbA). A sequence showing DNA homology to insertion element IS4 was found downstream from the last gene in the cluster (wbbA), suggesting that an IS4-like element could have been involved in the acquisition of the O4 wb cluster.  (+info)

Strain-dependent cytotoxic effects of endotoxin for mouse peritoneal macrophages. (3/1084)

The cytotoxic effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on mouse leukocytes have been examined in vivo and in vitro. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS into C57BL/6 mice greatly reduced the recovery of mononuclear cells; LPS was cytotoxic for macrophages, but had a mitogenic effect on lymphocytes. Similar effects of LPS on peritoneal leukocytes were observed in vitro. When monolayers of adherent peritoneal cells were studied in vitro, cytotoxicity was also observed, suggesting that the effect of LPS on macrophages is direct and does not require participation by lymphocytes. Entirely different results were obtained when peritoneal macrophages from LPS-resistant C3H/HeJ mice were studied. LPS failed to activate lymphocytes and was not cytotoxic for macrophages in vitro or in vivo. The effect of LPS on polymorphonuclear leukocytes appeared to be the same in all mouse stains studied. Lipid A was shown to be the most biologically active portion of the LPS molecule. Whereas polysaccharide-deficient endotoxins extracted from rough mutants of Salmonella typhimurium were cytotoxic for macrophages in vitro, polysaccharides that lacked esterified fatty acids did not exhibit this activity. Since LPS may mediate its effects through affinity for mammalian cell membranes, the cellular unresponsiveness of C3H/H3J mice to LPS may reflect an inability of cells from LPS-resistant strains to interact with LPS at the membrane level.  (+info)

NMR studies of the C-terminal secretion signal of the haem-binding protein, HasA. (4/1084)

HasA is a haem-binding protein which is secreted under iron-deficiency conditions by the gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens. It is a monomer of 19 kDa (187 residues) able to bind free haem as well as to capture it from haemoglobin. HasA delivers haem to a specific outer-membrane receptor HasR and allows the bacteria to grow in the absence of any other source of iron. It is secreted by a signal peptide-independent pathway which involves a C-terminal secretion signal and an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter. The C-terminal region of the secretion signal containing the essential secretion motif is cleaved during or after the secretion process by proteases secreted by the bacteria. In this work, we study by 1H NMR the conformation of the C-terminal extremity of HasA in the whole protein and that of the isolated secretion signal peptide in a zwitterionic micelle complex that mimicks the membrane environment. We identify a helical region followed by a random-coil C-terminus in the peptide-micelle complex and we show that in both the whole protein and the complex, the last 15 residues containing the motif essential for secretion are highly flexible and unstructured. This flexibility may be a prerequisite to the recognition of HasA by its ABC transporter. We determine the cleavage site of the C-terminal extremity of the protein and analyse the effect of the cleavage on the haem acquisition process.  (+info)

Use of microdilution panels with and without beta-lactamase inhibitors as a phenotypic test for beta-lactamase production among Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., Citrobacter freundii, and Serratia marcescens. (5/1084)

Over the past decade, a number of new beta-lactamases have appeared in clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae that, unlike their predecessors, do not confer beta-lactam resistance that is readily detected in routine antibiotic susceptibility tests. Because optimal methodologies are needed to detect these important new beta-lactamases, a study was designed to evaluate the ability of a panel of various beta-lactam antibiotics tested alone and in combination with beta-lactamase inhibitors to discriminate between the production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, AmpC beta-lactamases, high levels of K1 beta-lactamase, and other beta-lactamases in 141 isolates of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Citrobacter freundii, and Serratia marcescens possessing well-characterized beta-lactamases. The microdilution panels studied contained aztreonam, cefpodoxime, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone, with and without 1, 2, and 4 microg of clavulanate per ml or 8 microg of sulbactam per ml and cefoxitin and cefotetan with and without 8 microg of sulbactam per ml. The results indicated that a minimum panel of five tests would provide maximum separation of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase high AmpC, high K1, and other beta-lactamase production in Enterobacteriaceae. These included cefpodoxime, cefpodoxime plus 4 microg of clavulanate per ml, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, and ceftriaxone plus 8 microg of sulbactam per ml. Ceftriaxone plus 2 microg of clavulanate per ml could be substituted for cefpodoxime plus 4 microg of clavulanate per ml without altering the accuracy of the tests. This study indicated that tests with key beta-lactam drugs, alone and in combination with beta-lactamase inhibitors, could provide a convenient approach to the detection of a variety of beta-lactamases in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae.  (+info)

Dry-heat destruction of lipopolysaccharide: dry-heat destruction kinetics. (6/1084)

Dry-heat destruction kinetics of lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and Salmonella typhosa at 170 to 250 degrees C are described. The destruction rate seems to follow the second order and can be linearized by the equation, log y = a + b . -10cx. Because c is the slope, 1/c = D3. Both a and b are constant at a given temperature and are linear functions of temperature. The D(3)170, D(3)190, D(3)210, D(3)230, and D(3)250 values for E. coli lipopolysaccharide are 251, 99.4, 33.3, 12.3, and 4.99 min, respectively, with a z value of 46.4 min. The D values for lipopolysaccharides from S. marcescens and S. typhosa are not significantly different from those from E. coli lipopolysaccharide.  (+info)

The NucE and NucD lysis proteins are not essential for secretion of the Serratia marcescens extracellular nuclease. (7/1084)

The nuclease of Serratia marcescens is an extracellular protein encoded by the nucA gene. Pre-nuclease carries a typical 21-amino-acid N-terminal signal sequence that interacts with the Sec machinery to allow the translocation of nuclease to the periplasm. In Escherichia coli the nuclease remains in the periplasm; however, S. marcescens has the capacity to secrete nuclease extracellularly. The nucC operon carrying the nucEDC genes of S. marcescens has been identified previously. NucC is a transcriptional activator necessary for expression of nuclease as well as the extracellular bacteriocin 28b. NucE resembles and can act as a bacteriophage holin, whereas NucD has homology to bacteriophage lysozyme-like proteins. When present on a multicopy plasmid, the nucC operon, and specifically the nucED genes, appeared to allow extracellular secretion of nuclease from E. coli. Here experiments are reported which demonstrate that, when the nucC operon was placed in the E. coli chromosome in single copy, nuclease secretion was lost and nuclease remained periplasmic. The converse experiment, deletion of the nucE and nucD genes from the chromosome of S. marcescens, likewise had no effect on nuclease secretion by S. marcescens. It is concluded therefore that NucD and NucE are not necessary for nuclease secretion.  (+info)

Characterization of a dam mutant of Serratia marcescens and nucleotide sequence of the dam region. (8/1084)

The DNA of Serratia marcescens has N6-adenine methylation in GATC sequences. Among 2-aminopurine-sensitive mutants isolated from S. marcescens Sr41, one was identified which lacked GATC methylation. The mutant showed up to 30-fold increased spontaneous mutability and enhanced mutability after treatment with 2-aminopurine, ethyl methanesulfonate, or UV light. The gene (dam) coding for the adenine methyltransferase (Dam enzyme) of S. marcescens was identified on a gene bank plasmid which alleviated the 2-aminopurine sensitivity and the higher mutability of a dam-13::Tn9 mutant of Escherichia coli. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that the deduced amino acid sequence of Dam (270 amino acids; molecular mass, 31.3 kDa) has 72% identity to the Dam enzyme of E. coli. The dam gene is located between flanking genes which are similar to those found to the sides of the E. coli dam gene. The results of complementation studies indicated that like Dam of E. coli and unlike Dam of Vibrio cholerae, the Dam enzyme of S. marcescens plays an important role in mutation avoidance by allowing the mismatch repair enzymes to discriminate between the parental and newly synthesized strands during correction of replication errors.  (+info)

  • Law360, New York (January 23, 2008, 12:00 AM EST) -- North Carolina manufacturer AM2 Pat Inc. has recalled all lots and sizes of its syringes prefilled with Heparin or saline, after discovering that they may be contaminated with the bacteria Serratia marcescens. (law360.com)
  • Meropenem-resistant (MIC range, 16 to 32 μg/ml) S. marcescens isolates were recovered from nine patients in a tertiary hospital in Seoul, South Korea, from June to November 2005. (elsevier.com)
  • U56906 Serratia marcescens DNA gyrase (gyrA) gene, complete cds. (atcc.org)
  • The DNA is being destroyed by the release of the S. marcescens nuclease and it acts as the killer gene for the auto destruction of microorganisms. (prospecbio.com)
  • Serratia marcescens secretes an endonuclease that has exceptionally high specific activity to the medium that surrounds it. (prospecbio.com)
  • Culture of the bullous fluid grew Serratia marcescens, and antibiotics were switched to cefepime based on susceptibility. (elsevier.com)
  • Benzonase Nuclease Serratia Marcescens Recombinant produced in E.coli is a single, non-glycosylated polypeptide chain containing 245 amino acids and having a molecular mass of 30kDa with 2 essential disulfide bonds. (prospecbio.com)
  • abstract = "The cardiovascular and metabolic effects of an endotoxin derived from Serratia marcescens were examined in anaesthetized, spontaneously‐breathing cats. (elsevier.com)
  • CONCLUSION: Prior use of a second‐ or third‐generation cephalosporin was the most important risk factor for bacteremia with Serratia resistant to third‐generation cephalosporins, suggesting the need for antibiotic control. (edu.au)
  • Parratt, JR , Sharma, N & Zeitlin, IJ 1984, ' Prostaglandins and thromboxane in the delayed phase of shock induced by Serratia marcescens endotoxin ', British journal of pharmacology , vol. 82, no. 1, pp. 281-288. (elsevier.com)
  • Pithadia, DJ, Weathers, EN, Colombo, RE & Baer, SL 2019, ' Severe and Progressive Cellulitis Caused by Serratia marcescens Following a Dog Scratch ', Journal of Investigative Medicine High Impact Case Reports , vol. 7. (elsevier.com)
  • Most carbapenem-hydrolyzing activity has been due to molecular class B metalloenzymes, such as CcrA in Bacteriodes fragilis ( 23 ) and IMP-1 in organisms such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens ( 9 , 20 ). (asm.org)
  • lycopersici with Bacillus cereus energized the low activity and it was more significant with Serratia marcescens and Trichoderma harzianum for the 2nd day but with Pseudomonas fluorescens , it was for the 5th day. (scialert.net)
  • The cloning , expression and characterisation of bacterial chitin-binding proteins from pseudomonas aeruginosa , serratia marcescens, photorhabdus luminescens and photorhabdus asymbiotica. (dcu.ie)
  • Prokaryotic chitin-binding proteins from Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Photorhabdus asymbiotica and Photorhabdus luminescens were cloned, over-expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneity via (His)6 affinity tags. (dcu.ie)
  • The Effect of Serratia marcescens and Genetically Improved Pseudomonas fluorescens on Meloidogyne incognita', Egyptian Academic Journal of Biological Sciences, B. Zoology , 8(1), pp. 49-59. (ekb.eg)
  • Bartolomeo Bizio, a Venetian pharmacist, studied the mode of transmission of the red substance and named this microorganism Serratia in honor of Serafino Serrati, who ran the first steamboat on the Arno River in 1795, anticipating the discovery of Robert Fulton in 1807. (cdc.gov)
  • Serratia marcescens was later renamed Monas prodigiosus in 1846, then Bacillus prodigiosus , before the original name was restored in the 1920s in recognition of the work of Bizio. (cdc.gov)
  • Serratia was named in honor of an Italian physicist, Serafino Serrati, who Bizio thought had been slighted in favor of American inventors as to priority for the invention of the steamboat. (antimicrobe.org)
  • Marcescens is derived from the Latin word 'to decay' since Bizio observed that the pigment deteriorated quickly, dissolving from a light-pink material into a purplish-red, viscous form. (antimicrobe.org)
  • They can both oxidise arabinose, but only S. liquefaciens can ferment arabinose in peptone water S. marcescens was first documented as a red coloured putrefaction of polenta by Bartolomeo Bizio in Padua. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because of its red pigmentation, caused by expression of the pigment prodigiosin , and its ability to grow on bread, S. marcescens has been evoked as a naturalistic explanation of Medieval accounts of the "miraculous" appearance of blood on the Eucharist that led to Pope Urban IV instituting the Feast of Corpus Christi in 1264. (blogspot.com)
  • Our study showed that prodigiosin (500 μM) (extracted from Serratia marcescens culture) and a prodigiosin/copper(II) (100 μM each) complex have strong RNA and dsDNA cleaving properties while they have no pronounced effect on protein. (frontiersin.org)
  • Some biological properties of the cytotoxin were analyzed and compared with well-characterized toxins, such as VT1, VT2 and CNF from Escherichia coli and hemolysin produced by S. marcescens . (scielo.br)
  • A new type of hemophore-dependent heme acquisition system of Serratia marcescens reconstituted in Escherichia coli. (asm.org)
  • Während Klebsiella -Stämme Resistenz gegen Cefotaxim, Cefamandol und Cefuroxim auf Escherichia coli K-12-Empfängerstämme übertrugen, zeigte die genetische Analyse der Exkonjuganten nach Übertragung von Plasmiden von Serratia -Stämmen auf Proteus - oder Salmonella -Empfängerstämme, daß die Determinante für Cefoxitin-resistenz ebenfalls mit übertragen wurde. (springer.com)
  • About 40% of the amino acid sequence was identical among AmpC beta-lactamases resided in S. marcescens, Citrobacter freundii OS60, Escherichia coli K12 and Enterobacter cloacae P99. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Irradiation of aerosols of either Escherichia coli or Serratia marcescens with simulated solar xenon radiation caused a significant decrease in viability. (dtic.mil)
  • Killing does not depend on the secretion of S. marcescens chitinases, as mutants in which all three chitinase genes were deleted retained wild-type killing abilities. (nih.gov)
  • The production of different enzymes by S. marcescens as virulence factors has also been reported, including chitinase, lipase, chloroperoxidase and an extracellular protein, HasA. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • We identified a 92-kDa iron-regulated S. marcescens outer membrane protein, HasR, which alone enabled the E. coli hemA mutant to grow on heme or hemoglobin as a porphyrin source. (asm.org)
  • Dried Serratia marcescens (ATTC strain 14041) cells were exposed to various partial pressures of oxygen and nitrogen. (asm.org)
  • To our knowledge, we describe the first case of S. marcescens rhabdomyolysis, most probably related to acute cholecystitis and secondary bacteremia. (scirp.org)
  • From June 30, 1998, through March 21, 1999, several patients in the surgical intensive care unit of a hospital acquired Serratia marcescens bacteremia. (jasonandjarvis.com)
  • A case was defined as the occurrence of S. marcescens bacteremia in any patient in the surgical intensive care unit during the period of the epidemic. (jasonandjarvis.com)
  • To identify risk factors, we compared patients with S. marcescens bacteremia with randomly selected controls. (jasonandjarvis.com)
  • eight (31 percent) had polymicrobial bacteremia, and seven of these had Enterobacter cloacae and S. marcescens in the same culture. (jasonandjarvis.com)
  • An outbreak of S. marcescens and E. cloacae bacteremia in a surgical intensive care unit was traced to extrinsic contamination of the parenteral narcotic fentanyl by a health care worker. (jasonandjarvis.com)
  • Twenty-three pediatric patients who developed S. marcescens bacteremia within 2 weeks after general anesthesia between June 15 and September 22, 1999, were compared with 46 age-matched control-patients who had undergone procedures on the same clinical services of the hospital during the same period. (cambridge.org)
  • The timing of the procedures of patients who subsequently developed S. marcescens bacteremia was significantly associated with the shifts of one or more of five operating room technicians (OR, 2.9 to 6.8) who were responsible for preparing intravenous fluids used both to reconstitute perioperatively administered antibiotics and to prime central vascular catheter assemblies. (cambridge.org)
  • 400 mu M). Through detailed structure-activity study, we have identified 7-Cl and 7-CF3 substituted N-dodecylamino-4-aminoquinolines (5 and 10) as biofilm formation inhibitors with 50% biofilm inhibition at 69 mu M and 63 mu M in S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa, respectively. (ac.rs)
  • These two compounds, 5 and 10, are the first quinoline derivatives with anti-biofilm formation activity reported in S. marcescens. (ac.rs)
  • The S. marcescens toxin is extracellular and heat labile, and optimal culture conditions were incubation at temperatures ranging from 30 to 37ºC for 24 h under shaking in medium adjusted to pH 8.5 (6). (scielo.br)
  • Two proteases having similar molecular weights (44,000), estimated by gel filtration, and isoelectric points of approximately 5.0 and 5.3 were obtained free of detectable amounts of other known extracellular serratia enzymes. (arvojournals.org)
  • The results support the conclusion that extracellular proteases produced in vitro by S. marcescens can elicit rapid and extensive damage to the rabbit cornea. (arvojournals.org)
  • The utilization by Serratia marcescens of heme bound to hemoglobin requires HasA, an extracellular heme-binding protein. (asm.org)
  • Many other aspects of the pathogenicity and virulence of S. marcescens have been studied, including adherence and hydrophobicity, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and extracellular products. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Serratia marcescens cytotoxin was purified to homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography on a DEAE Sepharose Fast Flow column, followed by gel filtration chromatography on a Sephadex G100 column. (scielo.br)
  • In this study, a 15 kDa trialysin-like protein from the salivary gland of R. pedestris and a potent virulence factor of Serratia cells, a serralysin metalloprotease, from the culture medium of S. marcescens were successfully purified to homogeneity. (ovid.com)
Food Politics by Marion Nestle » Publications
Food Politics by Marion Nestle » Publications (foodpolitics.com)
Interaksjoner mellom kitooligosakkarider og kitinase B fra Serratia marcescens studert ved overflateplasmonresonans og...
Interaksjoner mellom kitooligosakkarider og kitinase B fra Serratia marcescens studert ved overflateplasmonresonans og... (brage.bibsys.no)
Benzonase Nuclease Recombinant Protein | ProSpec
Benzonase Nuclease Recombinant Protein | ProSpec (prospecbio.com)
Serratia marcescens
Serratia marcescens (washoecounty.us)
Medical Laboratory and Biomedical Science: Serratia marcescens
Medical Laboratory and Biomedical Science: Serratia marcescens (clinical-laboratory.blogspot.com.au)
Severe and Progressive Cellulitis Caused by Serratia marcescens Following a Dog Scratch<...
Severe and Progressive Cellulitis Caused by Serratia marcescens Following a Dog Scratch<... (augusta.pure.elsevier.com)
Serratia marcescens Biofilm, SEM - Stock Image C009/3517 - Science Photo Library
Serratia marcescens Biofilm, SEM - Stock Image C009/3517 - Science Photo Library (sciencephoto.com)
Caenorhabditis elegans, a Model Organism for Investigating Immunity | Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Caenorhabditis elegans, a Model Organism for Investigating Immunity | Applied and Environmental Microbiology (aem.asm.org)
Guidelines for Environmental Infection Control in Health-Care Facilities: Recommendations of CDC and the Healthcare Infection...
Guidelines for Environmental Infection Control in Health-Care Facilities: Recommendations of CDC and the Healthcare Infection... (cdc.gov)
RTECS:LP8925000 - Formaldehyde - The Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances | CDC/NIOSH
RTECS:LP8925000 - Formaldehyde - The Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances | CDC/NIOSH (cdc.gov)
Water | Background | Environmental Guidelines | Guidelines Library | Infection Control | CDC
Water | Background | Environmental Guidelines | Guidelines Library | Infection Control | CDC (cdc.gov)
Differential Diagnoses | SpringerLink
Differential Diagnoses | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Erik Bathoorn - Research database - University of Groningen
Erik Bathoorn - Research database - University of Groningen (rug.nl)
Healthcare Water System Repair|Natural Disasters and Severe Weather
Healthcare Water System Repair|Natural Disasters and Severe Weather (cdc.gov)
Reduce Risk from Water | HAI | CDC
Reduce Risk from Water | HAI | CDC (cdc.gov)
Differentiation of Serratia marcescens 274 into swimmer and swarmer cells. | Journal of Bacteriology
Differentiation of Serratia marcescens 274 into swimmer and swarmer cells. | Journal of Bacteriology (jb.asm.org)
February 2011 - Volume 117 - Issue 2 : Obstetrics & Gynecology
February 2011 - Volume 117 - Issue 2 : Obstetrics & Gynecology (journals.lww.com)
Floxin Tablets - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Floxin Tablets - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Rocephin (Ceftriaxone): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning
Rocephin (Ceftriaxone): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning (rxlist.com)
Floxin (Ofloxacin): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Floxin (Ofloxacin): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Cefotetan (Cefotetan for Injection): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Cefotetan (Cefotetan for Injection): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Effect and Safety of Meropenem-Vaborbactam versus Best-Available Therapy in Patients with Carbapenem-Resistant...
Effect and Safety of Meropenem-Vaborbactam versus Best-Available Therapy in Patients with Carbapenem-Resistant... (link.springer.com)
Avycaz (Ceftazidime-avibactam for Injection): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Avycaz (Ceftazidime-avibactam for Injection): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Kanamycin - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Kanamycin - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Zosyn (Piperacillin and Tazobactam Injection): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Zosyn (Piperacillin and Tazobactam Injection): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Noroxin (Norfloxacin): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Noroxin (Norfloxacin): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Dr. Alan L. Gillen Articles
	    
	    
	    
	     | Answers in Genesis
Dr. Alan L. Gillen Articles | Answers in Genesis (answersingenesis.org)
Cefepime - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Cefepime - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Ceftriaxone - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Ceftriaxone - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Marine Drugs  | Free Full-Text | Antibacterial Activity of Marine and Black Band Disease Cyanobacteria against Coral-Associated...
Marine Drugs | Free Full-Text | Antibacterial Activity of Marine and Black Band Disease Cyanobacteria against Coral-Associated... (mdpi.com)
Ciprofloxacin Tablets - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Ciprofloxacin Tablets - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Quorum Sensing Regulated Swarming Motility and Migratory Behavior in Bacteria | SpringerLink
Quorum Sensing Regulated Swarming Motility and Migratory Behavior in Bacteria | SpringerLink (link.springer.com)
Influenza virus infections in patients with malignancies -- characteristics and outcome of the season 2014/15. A survey...
Influenza virus infections in patients with malignancies -- characteristics and outcome of the season 2014/15. A survey... (link.springer.com)
Suprax (Cefixime): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Suprax (Cefixime): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Zerbaxa (Ceftolozane and Tazobactam for Injection): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning
Zerbaxa (Ceftolozane and Tazobactam for Injection): Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Interactions, Warning (rxlist.com)
Escherichia coli (E coli) Infections: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology
Escherichia coli (E coli) Infections: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology (emedicine.medscape.com)
Cipro XR (Ciprofloxacin Extended-Release): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Cipro XR (Ciprofloxacin Extended-Release): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Ciprofloxacin Oral Suspension - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Ciprofloxacin Oral Suspension - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Tygacil (Tigecycline): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses
Tygacil (Tigecycline): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses (rxlist.com)
Levofloxacin Injection Concentrate - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses
Levofloxacin Injection Concentrate - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses (drugs.com)
Ecthyma Gangrenosum: Background, Pathophysiology, Etiology
Ecthyma Gangrenosum: Background, Pathophysiology, Etiology (emedicine.medscape.com)