A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs in the natural environment (soil, water, and plant surfaces) or as an opportunistic human pathogen.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in soil, water, food, and clinical specimens. It is a prominent opportunistic pathogen for hospitalized patients.
Infections with bacteria of the genus SERRATIA.
4-Methoxy-5-((5-methyl-4-pentyl-2H-pyrrol-2-ylidene)methyl)- 2,2'-bi-1H-pyrrole. A toxic, bright red tripyrrole pigment from Serratia marcescens and others. It has antibacterial, anticoccidial, antimalarial, and antifungal activities, but is used mainly as a biochemical tool.
A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus SERRATIA found in plants and the DIGESTIVE TRACT of rodents. It is the most prevalent Serratia species in the natural environment.
A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that do not form endospores. Its organisms are distributed worldwide with some being saprophytes and others being plant and animal parasites. Many species are of considerable economic importance due to their pathogenic effects on agriculture and livestock.
Infections with bacteria of the family ENTEROBACTERIACEAE.
Gram-negative gas-producing rods found in feces of humans and other animals, sewage, soil, water, and dairy products.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped enterobacteria that can use citrate as the sole source of carbon.
Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).
The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
Bacteria which lose crystal violet stain but are stained pink when treated by Gram's method.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
A linear polysaccharide of beta-1->4 linked units of ACETYLGLUCOSAMINE. It is the second most abundant biopolymer on earth, found especially in INSECTS and FUNGI. When deacetylated it is called CHITOSAN.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms arrange singly, in pairs, or short chains. This genus is commonly found in the intestinal tract and is an opportunistic pathogen that can give rise to bacteremia, pneumonia, urinary tract and several other types of human infection.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
A broad-spectrum antibiotic derived from KANAMYCIN. It is reno- and oto-toxic like the other aminoglycoside antibiotics.
Enzymes found in many bacteria which catalyze the hydrolysis of the amide bond in the beta-lactam ring. Well known antibiotics destroyed by these enzymes are penicillins and cephalosporins.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs in the intestines of humans and a wide variety of animals, as well as in manure, soil, and polluted waters. Its species are pathogenic, causing urinary tract infections and are also considered secondary invaders, causing septic lesions at other sites of the body.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.
Substances elaborated by specific strains of bacteria that are lethal against other strains of the same or related species. They are protein or lipopolysaccharide-protein complexes used in taxonomy studies of bacteria.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
A complex of closely related aminoglycosides obtained from MICROMONOSPORA purpurea and related species. They are broad-spectrum antibiotics, but may cause ear and kidney damage. They act to inhibit PROTEIN BIOSYNTHESIS.
An enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of aspartic beta-semialdehyde to homoserine, which is the branch point in biosynthesis of methionine, lysine, threonine and leucine from aspartic acid. EC 1.1.1.3.
A group of broad-spectrum antibiotics first isolated from the Mediterranean fungus ACREMONIUM. They contain the beta-lactam moiety thia-azabicyclo-octenecarboxylic acid also called 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.
Techniques used in studying bacteria.
Broad-spectrum semisynthetic penicillin derivative used parenterally. It is susceptible to gastric juice and penicillinase and may damage platelet function.
Four-membered cyclic AMIDES, best known for the PENICILLINS based on a bicyclo-thiazolidine, as well as the CEPHALOSPORINS based on a bicyclo-thiazine, and including monocyclic MONOBACTAMS. The BETA-LACTAMASES hydrolyze the beta lactam ring, accounting for BETA-LACTAM RESISTANCE of infective bacteria.

Flagellar determinants of bacterial sensitivity to chi-phage. (1/272)

Bacteriophage chi is known to infect motile strains of enteric bacteria by adsorbing randomly along the length of a flagellar filament and then injecting its DNA into the bacterial cell at the filament base. Here, we provide evidence for a "nut and bolt" model for translocation of phage along the filament: the tail fiber of chi fits the grooves formed by helical rows of flagellin monomers, and active flagellar rotation forces the phage to follow the grooves as a nut follows the threads of a bolt.  (+info)

The phylogenetic position of Serratia, Buttiauxella and some other genera of the family Enterobacteriaceae. (2/272)

The phylogenetic relationships of the type strains of 38 species from 15 genera of the family Enterobacteriaceae were investigated by comparative 16S rDNA analysis. Several sequences of strains from the genera Citrobacter, Erwinia, Pantoea, Proteus, Rahnella and Serratia, analysed in this study, have been analysed previously. However, as the sequences of this study differ slightly from the published ones, they were included in the analysis. Of the 23 enterobacterial genera included in an overview dendrogram of relatedness, members of the genera Xenorhabdus, Photorhabdus, Proteus and Plesiomonas were used as a root. The other genera formed two groups which could be separated, although not exclusively, by signature nucleotides at positions 590-649 and 600-638. Group A contains species of Brenneria, Buttiauxella, Citrobacter, Escherichia, Erwinia, Klebsiella, Pantoea, Pectobacterium and Salmonella. All seven type strains of Buttiauxella share 16S rDNA similarities greater than 99%. Group B embraces two phylogenetically separate Serratia clusters, a lineage containing Yersinia species, Rahnella aquatica, Ewingella americana, and also the highly related pair Hafnia alvei and Obesumbacterium proteus.  (+info)

Simultaneous enhancement of thermostability and catalytic activity of phospholipase A(1) by evolutionary molecular engineering. (3/272)

The thermal stability and catalytic activity of phospholipase A(1) from Serratia sp. strain MK1 were improved by evolutionary molecular engineering. Two thermostable mutants were isolated after sequential rounds of error-prone PCR performed to introduce random mutations and filter-based screening of the resultant mutant library; we determined that these mutants had six (mutant TA3) and seven (mutant TA13) amino acid substitutions. Different types of substitutions were found in the two mutants, and these substitutions resulted in an increase in nonpolar residues (mutant TA3) or in differences between side chains for polar or charged residues (mutant TA13). The wild-type and mutant enzymes were purified, and the effect of temperature on the stability and catalytic activity of the enzymes was investigated. The melting temperatures of the TA3 and TA13 enzymes were increased by 7 and 11 degrees C, respectively, compared with the melting temperature of the wild-type enzyme. Thus, we found that evolutionary molecular engineering was an effective and efficient approach for increasing thermostability without compromising enzyme activity.  (+info)

Identification of environmental Serratia plymuthica strains with the new combo panels type 1S. (4/272)

Automated systems are required when numerous samples need to be processed, offering both high through put and test of a multiple simultaneously. This study was performed to compare the MicroScan WalkAway automated identification system in conjunction with the new MicroScan Combo Neg Panels Type 1S with conventional biochemical methods for identifying ten environmental Serratia plymuthica strains. High correlation between both methods were observed for all the 21 tests evaluated, and the MicroScan system was found capable of correctly identifying all S. plymuthica strains tested. In all tests, the percentage of correlation was 100%, except in raffinose test (91%).  (+info)

Expression of the antifeeding gene anfA1 in Serratia entomophila requires rpoS. (5/272)

The rpoS gene of Serratia entomophila BC4B was cloned and used to create rpoS-mutant strain BC4BRS. Larvae of the New Zealand grass grub Costelytra zealandica infected with BC4BRS became amber colored but continued to feed, albeit to a lesser extent than infected larvae. Subsequently, we found that expression of the antifeeding gene anfA1 in trans was substantially reduced in BC4BRS relative to that in the parental strain BC4B. Our data show that a functional rpoS gene is vital for full expression of anfA1 and for development of the antifeeding component of amber disease.  (+info)

Assessment of flhDC mRNA levels in Serratia liquefaciens swarm cells. (6/272)

We reported previously that artificial overexpression of the flhDC operon in liquid-grown Serratia liquefaciens resulted in the formation of filamentous, multinucleated, and hyperflagellated cells that were indistinguishable from surface-induced swarm cells (L. Eberl, G. Christiansen, S. Molin, and M. Givskov, J. Bacteriol. 178:554-559, 1996). In the present report we show by means of reporter gene measurements, Northern analysis, and in situ reverse transcription-PCR that the amount of flhDC mRNA in surface-grown swarm cells does not exceed the maximum level found in nondifferentiated, vegetative cells. This suggests that surface-induced S. liquefaciens swarm cell differentiation, although dependent on flhDC gene expression, does not occur through elevated flhDC mRNA levels.  (+info)

Plants secrete substances that mimic bacterial N-acyl homoserine lactone signal activities and affect population density-dependent behaviors in associated bacteria. (7/272)

In gram-negative bacteria, many important changes in gene expression and behavior are regulated in a population density-dependent fashion by N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules. Exudates from pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings were found to contain several separable activities that mimicked AHL signals in well-characterized bacterial reporter strains, stimulating AHL-regulated behaviors in some strains while inhibiting such behaviors in others. The chemical nature of the active mimic compounds is currently unknown, but all extracted differently into organic solvents than common bacterial AHLs. Various species of higher plants in addition to pea were found to secrete AHL mimic activities. The AHL signal-mimic compounds could prove to be important in determining the outcome of interactions between higher plants and a diversity of pathogenic, symbiotic, and saprophytic bacteria.  (+info)

Antigen 43 from Escherichia coli induces inter- and intraspecies cell aggregation and changes in colony morphology of Pseudomonas fluorescens. (8/272)

Antigen 43 (Ag43) is a surface-displayed autotransporter protein of Escherichia coli. By virtue of its self-association characteristics, this protein is able to mediate autoaggregation and flocculation of E. coli cells in static cultures. Additionally, surface display of Ag43 is associated with a distinct frizzy colony morphology in E. coli. Here we show that Ag43 can be expressed in a functional form on the surface of the environmentally important Pseudomonas fluorescens strain SBW25 with ensuing cell aggregation and frizzy colony types. Using green fluorescence protein-tagged cells, we demonstrate that Ag43 can be used as a tool to provide interspecies cell aggregation between E. coli and P. fluorescens. Furthermore, Ag43 expression enhances biofilm formation in P. fluorescens to glass surfaces. The versatility of this protein was also reflected in Ag43 surface display in a variety of other gram-negative bacteria. Display of heterologous Ag43 in selected bacteria might offer opportunities for rational design of multispecies consortia where the concerted action of several bacterial species is required, e.g., waste treatment and degradation of pollutants.  (+info)

Some common types of Serratia infections include:

1. Urinary tract infections (UTIs): Serratia bacteria can infect the urinary tract and cause symptoms such as burning during urination, frequent urination, and abdominal pain.
2. Skin infections: Serratia bacteria can cause skin infections, including cellulitis and abscesses, which can lead to redness, swelling, and pain in the affected area.
3. Respiratory tract infections: Serratia bacteria can infect the lungs and cause pneumonia, which can lead to symptoms such as coughing, fever, and difficulty breathing.
4. Bloodstream infections (sepsis): Serratia bacteria can enter the bloodstream and cause sepsis, a serious condition that can lead to organ failure and death if left untreated.
5. Endocarditis: Serratia bacteria can infect the heart valves and cause endocarditis, which can lead to symptoms such as fever, fatigue, and difficulty swallowing.

Serratia infections are typically diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, medical history, and laboratory tests, such as blood cultures and urinalysis. Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics to eliminate the bacteria, and in severe cases, hospitalization may be necessary to monitor and treat the infection.

Preventive measures to reduce the risk of Serratia infections include practicing good hygiene, such as washing hands regularly, avoiding close contact with individuals who are sick, and maintaining proper cleanliness and sterilization practices in healthcare settings. Vaccines are not available for Serratia infections, but research is ongoing to develop new antimicrobial therapies and vaccines to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria like Serratia.

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In medicine, cross-infection refers to the transmission of an infectious agent from one individual or source to another, often through direct contact or indirect exposure. This type of transmission can occur in various settings, such as hospitals, clinics, and long-term care facilities, where patients with compromised immune systems are more susceptible to infection.

Cross-infection can occur through a variety of means, including:

1. Person-to-person contact: Direct contact with an infected individual, such as touching, hugging, or shaking hands.
2. Contaminated surfaces and objects: Touching contaminated surfaces or objects that have been touched by an infected individual, such as doorknobs, furniture, or medical equipment.
3. Airborne transmission: Inhaling droplets or aerosolized particles that contain the infectious agent, such as during coughing or sneezing.
4. Contaminated food and water: Consuming food or drinks that have been handled by an infected individual or contaminated with the infectious agent.
5. Insect vectors: Mosquitoes, ticks, or other insects can transmit infections through their bites.

Cross-infection is a significant concern in healthcare settings, as it can lead to outbreaks of nosocomial infections (infections acquired in hospitals) and can spread rapidly among patients, healthcare workers, and visitors. To prevent cross-infection, healthcare providers use strict infection control measures, such as wearing personal protective equipment (PPE), thoroughly cleaning and disinfecting surfaces, and implementing isolation precautions for infected individuals.

In summary, cross-infection refers to the transmission of an infectious agent from one individual or source to another, often through direct contact or indirect exposure in healthcare settings. Preventing cross-infection is essential to maintaining a safe and healthy environment for patients, healthcare workers, and visitors.

... liquefaciens, Serratia rubidaea, Serratia odorifera, and Serratia fonticola. S. marcescens is thought to be ... Biosurfactants have been isolated from Serratia marcescens, Serratia rubidaea and Serratia surfactantfaciens for their range of ... Several species related to Serratia have also been identified on Smyrna figs and its fig wasps. Only one species of Serratia, S ... S. aquatilis is a novel species of Serratia found in drinking water. The plant types with highest Serratia prevalence are ...
Type strain of Serratia marcescens at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase Media related to Serratia marcescens at ... Serratia at eMedicine Williamson NR, Fineran PC, Gristwood T, Leeper FJ, Salmond GP (2006). "The biosynthesis and regulation of ... "Serratia has dark history in region". SFGate. 31 October 2004. Retrieved 14 July 2016. Cole, Leonard A. (1988). Clouds of ... Serratia marcescens (/səˈreɪʃiə mɑːrˈsɛsɪnz/)[failed verification] is a species of rod-shaped, Gram-negative bacteria in the ...
... is a species of bacteria that like its cogenerate species uses itaconate. It was first isolated from the ... Its type strain is A1T (ATCC 43705T). Grimont, P. A. D.; Jackson, T. A.; Ageron, E.; Noonan, M. J. (1988). "Serratia ... "Cloning Serratia entomophila antifeeding genes-a putative defective prophage active against the grass grub Costelytra ... LPSN Type strain of Serratia entomophila at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short ...
... is a Gram-negative and rod-shaped bacteria from the genus of Serratia, which has been isolated from drinking ... Type strain of Serratia aquatilis at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short description, ... LPSN lpsn.dsmz.de UniProt Kämpfer, P; Glaeser, SP (January 2016). "Serratia aquatilis sp. nov., isolated from drinking water ... Kämpfer, P; Glaeser, SP (January 2016). "Serratia aquatilis sp. nov., isolated from drinking water systems". International ...
Type strain of Serratia proteamaculans at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short description ... Serratia proteamaculans is a Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium. S. proteamaculans HY-3 isolated from ...
... is a species of bacteria that lives as a symbiont of aphids. In the aphid Cinara cedri, it coexists with ... Type strain of Serratia symbiotica at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short description, ... Genome analysis: Burke, G. R.; Moran, N. A. (2011). "Massive Genomic Decay in Serratia symbiotica, a Recently Evolved Symbiont ... "Serratia symbiotica from the Aphid Cinara cedri: A Missing Link from Facultative to Obligate Insect Endosymbiont". PLOS ...
Serratia+marcescens+nuclease at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Serratia marcescens ... Serratia marcescens nuclease (EC 3.1.30.2, endonuclease (Serratia marcescens), barley nuclease, plant nuclease I, nucleate ...
... (Serratia E-15 protease, also known as serralysin, serrapeptase, serratiapeptase, serratia peptidase, ... The enzyme was also described by Miyata K, Maejima K, Tomoda K, Isono M (1970). "Serratia protease. Part I. Purification and ... Serratiopeptase is produced by purification from culture of Serratia E-15 bacteria. It is a member of the Peptitase M10B ( ... E-15, now known as Serratia marcescens ATCC 21074. This microorganism was originally isolated in the late 1960s from silkworm ( ...
In enterobacterium; Serratia sp. strain ATCC39006, gas vesicle is produced only when there is sufficient concentration of a ... In certain organism such as enterobacterium Serratia sp. flagella-based motility and gas vesicle production are regulated ...
Serratia sp., Yersinia sp., and Rhizobium sp. The Indole test is one of the four tests of the IMViC series, which tests for ...
Serratia tests were continued until at least 1969. Also in 1950, Dr. Joseph Stokes of the University of Pennsylvania ... ISBN 978-0-19-514205-1. Tansey, Bernadette (October 31, 2004). "Serratia has dark history in region: Army test in 1950 may have ... Anía BJ (October 1, 2008). "Serratia: Overview". eMedicine. WebMD. Retrieved November 23, 2011. Cole, 1996: p. 17 Melnick, Alan ... Navy sprayed large quantities of the bacteria Serratia marcescens - considered harmless at the time - over the city of San ...
Serratia marcescens. Listeria species. E. coli. Klebsiella species. Pseudomonas cepacia, a.k.a. Burkholderia cepacia. Nocardia ...
See Serratia marcescens.) Mathews-Roth, Micheline M.; Pathak, Madhu A.; Fitzpatrick, Thomas B.; Harber, Leonard C.; Kass, ... Wilfert, James N.; Barrett, Fred F.; Kass, Edward H. (1968). "Bacteremia Due to Serratia marcescens". New England Journal of ...
S: Serratia spp. C: Citrobacter freundii H: Hafnia spp. A: Aeromonas spp.[citation needed] P: Proteus spp. (excluding P. ...
and Serratia sp., showing a sympatric lifestyle. Nevertheless, open pangenome is not exclusive to free living microorganisms, a ... Basharat Z, Yasmin A (2016). "Pan-genome Analysis of the Genus Serratia". arXiv:1610.04160 [q-bio.GN]. Gupta VK, Chaudhari NM, ...
Xu, Y. (October 2, 2017). "Cyanase from Serratia proteamaculans". To be Published (RCSB PDB). doi:10.2210/pdb6b6m/pdb. ... from Serratia proteamaculans". Acta Crystallographica Section F. 71 (Pt 4): 471-6. doi:10.1107/S2053230X15004902. PMC 4388186. ...
cremoris and Serratia marcescens. Clausenol is active against a number of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi, ...
The H. defensa is significantly smaller (at 1.84-Mpb) than its bacteria relatives; Yersinia and Serratia species. It is also ...
Serratia, by Bizio (1823); and Spirillum, Spirochaeta and Bacterium, by Ehrenberg (1838). The term Bacterium, introduced as a ... Serratia, Bacterium, and Spirillum. Cohn recognized four tribes: Spherobacteria, Microbacteria, Desmobacteria, and ...
An antibiogram of Serratia marcescens. Each disk is labelled with the antibiotic it contains (e.g. AMC30, 30µg amoxicillin/ ...
These include Serratia and Citrobacter. Some organisms, especially Klebsiella and Enterobacter, produce mucoid colonies which ...
... and possibly Serratia spp. Brucella Staphylococcus saprophyticus Staphylococcus aureus A wide range of urease inhibitors of ...
... was first reported by Jorgen Henrichsen and has been mostly studied in genus Serratia, Salmonella, Aeromonas ... Eberl, L; Molin, S; Givskov, M (1999). "Surface Motility of Serratia liquefaciens MG1". Journal of Bacteriology. 181 (6): 1703- ... Alberti, L; Harshey, RM (1990). "Differentiation of Serratia marcescens 274 into swimmer and swarmer cells". Journal of ...
Angerer A, Klupp B, Braun V (1992). "Iron transport systems of Serratia marcescens". J. Bacteriol. 174 (4): 1378-87. PMC 206435 ...
Morganella morganii Providencia rettgeri Serratia spp. Pseudomonas spp. Listeria Cefazolin is pregnancy category B, indicating ...
eds.). Escherichia, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Serratia, Citrobacter, and Proteus. In: Baron's Medical Microbiology (4th ed.). ...
... is the red dyestuff produced by many strains of the bacterium Serratia marcescens, as well as other Gram-negative, ... The ability of pigmented strains of Serratia marcescens to grow on bread has led to a possible explanation of Medieval ... Potential pharmaceutical uses of prodigiosin, or its use as a dyestuff, have led to studies of its production from Serratia ... Role of prodigiosin in phosphate-starved Serratia marcescens. Abstract of the Annual Meeting, American Society for Microbiology ...
eds.). Escherichia, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Serratia, Citrobacter, and Proteus. In: Barron's Medical Microbiology (4th ed.). ...
Serratia symbiotica" Moran et al. 2005 "Ca. Similichlamydia latridicola" Stride et al. 2013 "Ca. Snodgrassella alvi" Martinson ...
White pox disease, caused by Serratia marcescens. Black necrosing syndrome, or Dark spots disease, probably fungal.[citation ...
Serratia are widespread in the environment, but are not a common component of the human fecal flora. ... Serratia species are opportunistic gram-negative bacteria classified in the tribe Klebsielleae and the large family ... 3] Serratia liquefaciens, [4] Serratia rubidaea, [5] Serratia odorifera, and Serratia fonticola. [6] ... Serratia marcescens is the primary pathogenic species of Serratia. [2] Rare reports have described disease resulting from ...
We aimed to present our experience regarding infections caused by Serratia spp. in a region with relatively high antimicrobial ... Serratia infections in a general hospital: characteristics and outcomes Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2011 May;30(5):653-60. ... We aimed to present our experience regarding infections caused by Serratia spp. in a region with relatively high antimicrobial ... Sixty-five (84.4%) of the 77 included patients had a Serratia marcescens isolate; the remaining 12 patients had a non- ...
Timeline for Species Serratia marcescens [TaxId:615] from b.2.2.3 Bacterial chitobiase, n-terminal domain: *Species Serratia ... PDB entries in Species: Serratia marcescens:. *Domain(s) for 1c7s: *. Domain d1c7sa2: 1c7s A:28-200 [22408]. Other proteins in ... Species Serratia marcescens [TaxId:615] from b.2.2.3 Bacterial chitobiase, n-terminal domain appears in SCOP 1.59. *Species ... Lineage for Species: Serratia marcescens. *Root: SCOP 1.57 *. Class b: All beta proteins [48724] (104 folds). ...
Serratia marcescens). Find diseases associated with this biological target and compounds tested against it in bioassay ...
Serratia marcescens: an Italian story. Int J Dermatol. 2017;56:795-6. DOIPubMedGoogle Scholar ... Skin ulcers caused by Serratia marcescens: three cases and a review of the literature. Eur J Dermatol. 2016;26:373-6. DOIGoogle ... Etymologia: Serratia marcescens. Volume 25, Number 11-November 2019. Article Views: 13484. Data is collected weekly and does ... Serratia marcescens was later renamed Monas prodigiosus in 1846, then Bacillus prodigiosus, before the original name was ...
Serratia phage Serratianator. Taxonomy ID: 2901355 (for references in articles please use NCBI:txid2901355). current name. ...
Two cases of transfusion-related Serratia marcescens bacteremia prompted extensive epidemiologic investigations in three ... Adherence of Serratia marcescens, Serratia liquefaciens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis to blood ... Nosocomial epidemic of Serratia marcescens septicemia ascribed to contaminated blood transfusion bags O Heltberg 1 , F Skov, P ... Serratia]. Hirakata Y. Hirakata Y. Nihon Rinsho. 2002 Nov;60(11):2156-60. Nihon Rinsho. 2002. PMID: 12440122 Review. Japanese. ...
... Serratia marcescens is an important clinical pathogen in human medicine today. ... 1. Serratia marcescens was named by a pharmacist. The first description of S. marcescens is from a man named Bartolomeo Bizio ... 5. Serratia marcescens is the "S" in the "SPACE" organisms. The "SPACE" organisms are a group of bacteria that harbor genes ... Serratia marcescens is a rod-shaped Gram negative bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae family that was first described in 1819. ...
Ixodidae Rhipicephalus Animais Feminino Rhipicephalus/genética Serratia marcescens/genética Ixodidae/genética Filogenia Cumafos ... Histometric and morphological damage caused by Serratia marcescens to the tick Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).. ... The EC-35 strain was genetically related to Serratia marcescens, concluding that these bacteria caused high mortality, ...
Two IMP-producing Providencia rettgeri and one VIM-producing Serratia marcescens from Minnesota are included in both the CDC ...
Serratia marcescens protein. MetQ/NlpA family lipoprotein. UPI00066CA5DB. Haemophilus parainfluenzae protein. MetQ/NlpA family ...
Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction due to dysregulated host response to infection. In septic shock, there is critical reduction in circulatory function, while acute failure of other organs may also occur.
Crystal structure of a GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase: Serratia marcescens aminoglycoside 3-N-acetyltransferase. Cell 94, 439 ...
Lyerly, D.; Gray, L.; Kreger, A. Characterization of rabbit corneal damage produced by Serratia keratitis and by a Serratia ... which was similar to those animals with acute Serratia pneumonia [68]. Yet, despite its animal virulence factors, Serratia has ... Shanks, R.M.Q.; Stella, N.A.; Kalivoda, E.J.; Doe, M.R.; ODee, D.A.; Lathrop, K.L.; Guo, F.L.; Nau, G.J. A Serratia marcescens ... Serratia marcescens is a human pathogen commonly found in the respiratory and urinary tracts of humans, and is responsible for ...
The objectives were to prove the robustness of a Serratia biofilm as a support for biogenic Pd-nanoparticles and to fabricate ... The objectives were to prove the robustness of a Serratia biofilm as a support for biogenic Pd-nanoparticles and to fabricate ... The objectives were to prove the robustness of a Serratia biofilm as a support for biogenic Pd-nanoparticles and to fabricate ... The objectives were to prove the robustness of a Serratia biofilm as a support for biogenic Pd-nanoparticles and to fabricate ...
Serratia liquifaciens, Serratia marcescens. Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM or Environmental Mycobacteria). M. abscessus clade ...
nonselective for Serratia spp.. nonselective for Staphylococcus spp.. nonselective for Streptococcus spp.. nonselective for ...
Bone and Joint Infections caused by Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. ... Urinary Tract Infections caused by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens, Proteus ...
Serratia marcescens Other microorganisms Chlamydophila pneumoniae. Mycoplasma pneumoniae The following in vitro data are ... Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli,Klebsiella pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, or Streptococcus pneumoniae. Adjunctive ...
Serratia marcescens Yersinia pestis The following in vitro data are available, but their clinical significance is unknown. At ... Serratia marcescens, Proteus mirabilis, Providencia rettgeri, Morganella morganii, Citrobacter koseri, Citrobacter freundii, ...
Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reactions rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.. Adult Patients: During clinical investigations, 2,904 immunocompetent adult patients were treated for non-CNS infections with meropenem (500 mg or 1 gram every 8 hours). Deaths in 5 patients were assessed as possibly related to meropenem; 36 (1.2%) patients had meropenem discontinued because of adverse events. Many patients in these trials were severely ill and had multiple background diseases, physiological impairments and were receiving multiple other drug therapies. In the seriously ill patient population, it was not possible to determine the relationship between observed adverse events and therapy with meropenem.. The following adverse reaction frequencies were derived from the clinical trials in the 2,904 patients treated with ...
Serratia marcescens. Gram-negative meningitis is more common in infants than adults. But it can also occur in adults, ...
and Serratia marcescens (Enterobacteriales: Enterobacteriaceae) to plants by Lygus hesperus (Hemiptera: Miridae) Author. Cooper ... and Serratia marcescens (Enterobacteriales: Enterobacteriaceae) to plants by Lygus hesperus (Hemiptera: Miridae). Journal of ... In a recent study, proteins from Pantoea ananatis and Serratia marcescens (Enterobacteriales: Enterobacteriaceae) were ... Pantoea ananatis and Serratia spp. in artificial diet that was fed upon by lygus bugs. However, it was not clear from the ...
39] Yersiniaenterocolitica is the most common bacterial contaminant of PRBC; other pathogens include Serratiamarcescens, ...
cloacae GN2616 (identity: 56%, 439-1106 aa), Serratia sp. Ag2 (identity: 38%, 439-1106 aa), and E. kobei GN02266 (identity: 36 ... The above-mentioned heterogeneous gene structure is reasonable for phage function, as corresponding genes in Serratia sp. Ag2 ...
  • Serratia marcescens is the primary pathogenic species of Serratia . (medscape.com)
  • Bizio named Serratia in honor of an Italian physicist named Serrati, who invented the steamboat, and Bizio chose marcescens (from the Latin word for decaying) because the bloody pigment was found to deteriorate quickly. (medscape.com)
  • Culture plate containing the bacterium Serratia marcescens . (cdc.gov)
  • Serratia marcescens, which can cause nosocomial outbreaks,and urinary tract and wound infections, is abundant in damp environments ( Figure ). (cdc.gov)
  • Serratia marcescens was later renamed Monas prodigiosus in 1846, then Bacillus prodigiosus , before the original name was restored in the 1920s in recognition of the work of Bizio. (cdc.gov)
  • Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of a carbapenem-resistant Serratia marcescens cohort and outbreak: describing an opportunistic pathogen. (bvsalud.org)
  • Serratia marcescens is an emerging opportunistic pathogen with high genetic diversity . (bvsalud.org)
  • In a recent study, proteins from Pantoea ananatis and Serratia marcescens (Enterobacteriales: Enterobacteriaceae) were identified in diet that was stylet-probed and fed upon by L. hesperus adults. (usda.gov)
  • So Coley changed course and crafted a vaccine with two dead bacteria, S. pyogenes and Serratia marcescens. (discovermagazine.com)
  • The Serratia marcescens hemolysin is secreted but not activated by stable protoplast-type L-forms of Proteus mirabilis. (nih.gov)
  • Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterobacter sp. (nih.gov)
  • The carrot powder was evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Bacillus cereus, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli . (news-medical.net)
  • People with CGD are highly susceptible to infections, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Serratia marcescens, Burkholderia cepacia , Nocardia species, and Aspergillus species. (nih.gov)
  • After researching the bioremediation capability of a combination of vetiver plant, Serratia marcescens , and Burkholderia cepacia at Tech and working as a microbiology intern at (believe it or not) a circuit board company, I made my way east to study infectious disease at Drexel. (drexel.edu)
  • To support the development of rapid diagnostics capable of identifying specific bacterial strains and drug resistant phenotypes for the following healthcare-associated pathogens: Clostridium difficile, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Serratia, Proteus, and Stenotrophomonas (Pseudomonas) maltophilia. (nih.gov)
  • The NIAID invites applications for research that will lead to (1) the development of rapid diagnostics capable of identifying specific strains and drug resistant phenotypes, or (2) therapeutics to prevent or treat infections in at-risk patients for the following healthcare-associated pathogens: Clostridium difficile, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Serratia, Proteus, or Stenotrophomonas (Pseudomonas) maltophilia. (nih.gov)
  • 12. Prodigiosin derived from chromium-resistant Serratia sp. (nih.gov)
  • Serratia species are opportunistic gram-negative bacteria in the large family, Enterobacteriaceae. (medscape.com)
  • The prevalence of Serratia species as a cause of nosocomial infections is diminishing, but these bacteria are still able to cause hospital outbreaks, especially in intensive care units. (medscape.com)
  • Sehdev PS , Donnenberg MS . Arcanum: the 19th-century Italian pharmacist pictured here was the first to characterize what are now known to be bacteria of the genus Serratia. (cdc.gov)
  • In this study, the scientists isolated bacterial colonies from artificial diet that was fed upon by lygus, and identified the bacteria as Pantoea ananatis and Serratia spp. (usda.gov)
  • The high-resolution X-ray data enabled sequencing directly from the electron-density maps, allowing the source of contamination to be placed within the Serratia genus. (nih.gov)
  • [ 14 ] In the hospital, Serratia species tend to colonize the respiratory and urinary tracts, rather than the gastrointestinal tract, in adults. (medscape.com)
  • Serratia species are responsible for 1.4% of nosocomial bloodstream infections. (medscape.com)
  • the remaining 12 patients had infection with a nonmarcescens Serratia species. (medscape.com)
  • Serratia species cause less than 6% of cases of hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia. (medscape.com)
  • Serratia infection is responsible for about 2% of nosocomial infections of the bloodstream, lower respiratory tract, urinary tract, surgical wounds, and skin and soft tissues in adult patients. (medscape.com)
  • Bartolomeo Bizio, a Venetian pharmacist, studied the mode of transmission of the red substance and named this microorganism Serratia in honor of Serafino Serrati, who ran the first steamboat on the Arno River in 1795, anticipating the discovery of Robert Fulton in 1807. (cdc.gov)
  • Serratia was discovered in Italy in 1819 when it affected polenta in a small town near Padua. (cdc.gov)
  • Serratia meningitis and Serratia endocarditis carry a high mortality rate. (medscape.com)
  • Scientists at the USDA-ARS laboratories in Shafter, CA and Stillwater, OK previously identified numerous proteins from two bacterial plant pathogens, Pantoea ananatis and Serratia spp. (usda.gov)
  • Results of this study confirm the previous findings that lygus bugs transmit the plant pathogens, Pantoea ananatis and Serratia spp. (usda.gov)
  • Serratia infection has caused endocarditis and osteomyelitis in people addicted to heroin. (medscape.com)
  • [ 7 ] Serratia are capable of thriving in diverse environments, including water, soil, and the digestive tracts of various animals. (medscape.com)
  • Serratia are widespread in the environment, but are not a common component of the human fecal flora. (medscape.com)
  • Cases of Serratia septic arthritis have been reported in patients receiving intra-articular injections, individuals with joint trauma, and patients with intravascular devices or who are undergoing intravascular procedures. (medscape.com)
  • In a population-based study of Serratia bacteremia, the 7-day and 6-month mortality rates were 5% and 37%, respectively. (medscape.com)
  • The objectives were to prove the robustness of a Serratia biofilm as a support for biogenic Pd-nanoparticles and to fabricate effective catalyst from precious metal waste. (birmingham.ac.uk)
  • Conclusion: A 'one pot' conversion of precious metal waste into new catalyst for waste decontamination was shown in a continuous flow system based on the use of Serratia biofilm to manufacture and support catalytic Pd-nanoparticles. (birmingham.ac.uk)
  • [ 35 ] International data on antimicrobial susceptibility of Serratia and other nosocomial isolates have been published. (medscape.com)
  • Interaction of macrophages with a cytotoxic Serratia liquefaciens human isolate. (medscape.com)
  • A review of the mechanisms that drive Serratia towards diverse lifestyles. (medscape.com)