Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The property of antibodies which enables them to react with some ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS and not with others. Specificity is dependent on chemical composition, physical forces, and molecular structure at the binding site.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
The ability to detect sharp boundaries (stimuli) and to detect slight changes in luminance at regions without distinct contours. Psychophysical measurements of this visual function are used to evaluate visual acuity and to detect eye disease.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
Commercially prepared reagent sets, with accessory devices, containing all of the major components and literature necessary to perform one or more designated diagnostic tests or procedures. They may be for laboratory or personal use.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
Positive test results in subjects who do not possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of healthy persons as diseased when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
A technique using antibodies for identifying or quantifying a substance. Usually the substance being studied serves as antigen both in antibody production and in measurement of antibody by the test substance.
Studies determining the effectiveness or value of processes, personnel, and equipment, or the material on conducting such studies. For drugs and devices, CLINICAL TRIALS AS TOPIC; DRUG EVALUATION; and DRUG EVALUATION, PRECLINICAL are available.
A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.
Negative test results in subjects who possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of diseased persons as healthy when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
Characteristic restricted to a particular organ of the body, such as a cell type, metabolic response or expression of a particular protein or antigen.
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
Diminished effectiveness of INSULIN in lowering blood sugar levels: requiring the use of 200 units or more of insulin per day to prevent HYPERGLYCEMIA or KETOSIS.
The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.
An acquired disorder characterized by recurrent symptoms, referable to multiple organ systems, occurring in response to demonstrable exposure to many chemically unrelated compounds at doses below those established in the general population to cause harmful effects. (Cullen MR. The worker with multiple chemical sensitivities: an overview. Occup Med 1987;2(4):655-61)
The minimum amount of stimulus energy necessary to elicit a sensory response.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Techniques used in studying bacteria.
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
Serological reactions in which an antiserum against one antigen reacts with a non-identical but closely related antigen.
A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Diagnostic procedures involving immunoglobulin reactions.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY techniques used in the diagnosis of disease.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.
The properties of a pathogen that makes it capable of infecting one or more specific hosts. The pathogen can include PARASITES as well as VIRUSES; BACTERIA; FUNGI; or PLANTS.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The naturally occurring or experimentally induced replacement of one or more AMINO ACIDS in a protein with another. If a functionally equivalent amino acid is substituted, the protein may retain wild-type activity. Substitution may also diminish, enhance, or eliminate protein function. Experimentally induced substitution is often used to study enzyme activities and binding site properties.
Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
The interaction of two or more substrates or ligands with the same binding site. The displacement of one by the other is used in quantitative and selective affinity measurements.
The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.
Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
Diminished or failed response of an organism, disease or tissue to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should be differentiated from DRUG TOLERANCE which is the progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, as a result of continued administration.
A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
The region of an enzyme that interacts with its substrate to cause the enzymatic reaction.
Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.
The failure by the observer to measure or identify a phenomenon accurately, which results in an error. Sources for this may be due to the observer's missing an abnormality, or to faulty technique resulting in incorrect test measurement, or to misinterpretation of the data. Two varieties are inter-observer variation (the amount observers vary from one another when reporting on the same material) and intra-observer variation (the amount one observer varies between observations when reporting more than once on the same material).
The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.
Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.
Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.
Techniques used to carry out clinical investigative procedures in the diagnosis and therapy of disease.
Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).
Resistance or diminished response of a neoplasm to an antineoplastic agent in humans, animals, or cell or tissue cultures.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
The study of the structure, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of viruses, and VIRUS DISEASES.
Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
Glucose in blood.
A test to determine the ability of an individual to maintain HOMEOSTASIS of BLOOD GLUCOSE. It includes measuring blood glucose levels in a fasting state, and at prescribed intervals before and after oral glucose intake (75 or 100 g) or intravenous infusion (0.5 g/kg).
Structurally related forms of an enzyme. Each isoenzyme has the same mechanism and classification, but differs in its chemical, physical, or immunological characteristics.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
A class of immunoglobulin bearing mu chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN MU-CHAINS). IgM can fix COMPLEMENT. The name comes from its high molecular weight and originally being called a macroglobulin.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
A basis of value established for the measure of quantity, weight, extent or quality, e.g. weight standards, standard solutions, methods, techniques, and procedures used in diagnosis and therapy.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.
Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.
Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.
The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.
The study of parasites and PARASITIC DISEASES.
A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.
Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.
Procedures by which protein structure and function are changed or created in vitro by altering existing or synthesizing new structural genes that direct the synthesis of proteins with sought-after properties. Such procedures may include the design of MOLECULAR MODELS of proteins using COMPUTER GRAPHICS or other molecular modeling techniques; site-specific mutagenesis (MUTAGENESIS, SITE-SPECIFIC) of existing genes; and DIRECTED MOLECULAR EVOLUTION techniques to create new genes.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.
Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.
Maintenance of a constant blood glucose level by perfusion or infusion with glucose or insulin. It is used for the study of metabolic rates (e.g., in glucose, lipid, amino acid metabolism) at constant glucose concentration.
A statistical means of summarizing information from a series of measurements on one individual. It is frequently used in clinical pharmacology where the AUC from serum levels can be interpreted as the total uptake of whatever has been administered. As a plot of the concentration of a drug against time, after a single dose of medicine, producing a standard shape curve, it is a means of comparing the bioavailability of the same drug made by different companies. (From Winslade, Dictionary of Clinical Research, 1992)
A species of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that produces TUBERCULOSIS in humans, other primates, CATTLE; DOGS; and some other animals which have contact with humans. Growth tends to be in serpentine, cordlike masses in which the bacilli show a parallel orientation.
Compounds that are used in medicine as sources of radiation for radiotherapy and for diagnostic purposes. They have numerous uses in research and industry. (Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1161)
Laboratory techniques that involve the in-vitro synthesis of many copies of DNA or RNA from one original template.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.
Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.
The sequence of carbohydrates within POLYSACCHARIDES; GLYCOPROTEINS; and GLYCOLIPIDS.
Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
Any of a variety of procedures which use biomolecular probes to measure the presence or concentration of biological molecules, biological structures, microorganisms, etc., by translating a biochemical interaction at the probe surface into a quantifiable physical signal.
Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.
A collection of cloned peptides, or chemically synthesized peptides, frequently consisting of all possible combinations of amino acids making up an n-amino acid peptide.
Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
Diagnostic procedures, such as laboratory tests and x-rays, routinely performed on all individuals or specified categories of individuals in a specified situation, e.g., patients being admitted to the hospital. These include routine tests administered to neonates.
Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.
Immunologic techniques involved in diagnosis.
Immunologic method used for detecting or quantifying immunoreactive substances. The substance is identified by first immobilizing it by blotting onto a membrane and then tagging it with labeled antibodies.
The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.
Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.
Commonly observed structural components of proteins formed by simple combinations of adjacent secondary structures. A commonly observed structure may be composed of a CONSERVED SEQUENCE which can be represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE.
Narrow pieces of material impregnated or covered with a substance used to produce a chemical reaction. The strips are used in detecting, measuring, producing, etc., other substances. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.
Classic quantitative assay for detection of antigen-antibody reactions using a radioactively labeled substance (radioligand) either directly or indirectly to measure the binding of the unlabeled substance to a specific antibody or other receptor system. Non-immunogenic substances (e.g., haptens) can be measured if coupled to larger carrier proteins (e.g., bovine gamma-globulin or human serum albumin) capable of inducing antibody formation.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
Species- or subspecies-specific DNA (including COMPLEMENTARY DNA; conserved genes, whole chromosomes, or whole genomes) used in hybridization studies in order to identify microorganisms, to measure DNA-DNA homologies, to group subspecies, etc. The DNA probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the DNA probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin. The use of DNA probes provides a specific, sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive replacement for cell culture techniques for diagnosing infections.
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.
The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.
Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.
The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Substances used to allow enhanced visualization of tissues.
A response by the BARORECEPTORS to increased BLOOD PRESSURE. Increased pressure stretches BLOOD VESSELS which activates the baroreceptors in the vessel walls. The net response of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM is a reduction of central sympathetic outflow. This reduces blood pressure both by decreasing peripheral VASCULAR RESISTANCE and by lowering CARDIAC OUTPUT. Because the baroreceptors are tonically active, the baroreflex can compensate rapidly for both increases and decreases in blood pressure.
Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
A mutation caused by the substitution of one nucleotide for another. This results in the DNA molecule having a change in a single base pair.
Serum that contains antibodies. It is obtained from an animal that has been immunized either by ANTIGEN injection or infection with microorganisms containing the antigen.
The use of instrumentation and techniques for visualizing material and details that cannot be seen by the unaided eye. It is usually done by enlarging images, transmitted by light or electron beams, with optical or magnetic lenses that magnify the entire image field. With scanning microscopy, images are generated by collecting output from the specimen in a point-by-point fashion, on a magnified scale, as it is scanned by a narrow beam of light or electrons, a laser, a conductive probe, or a topographical probe.
An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.
The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.
The total area or space visible in a person's peripheral vision with the eye looking straightforward.
Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.
A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.
Method of measuring and mapping the scope of vision, from central to peripheral of each eye.
Sensitive tests to measure certain antigens, antibodies, or viruses, using their ability to agglutinate certain erythrocytes. (From Stedman, 26th ed)
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
An imaging technique using compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides (such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18) to measure cell metabolism. It has been useful in study of soft tissues such as CANCER; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and brain. SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION-COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY is closely related to positron emission tomography, but uses isotopes with longer half-lives and resolution is lower.
The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.
The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.
Laboratory and other services provided to patients at the bedside. These include diagnostic and laboratory testing using automated information entry.
Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.
The adjustment of the eye to variations in the intensity of light. Light adaptation is the adjustment of the eye when the light threshold is increased; DARK ADAPTATION when the light is greatly reduced. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
Passive agglutination tests in which antigen is adsorbed onto latex particles which then clump in the presence of antibody specific for the adsorbed antigen. (From Stedman, 26th ed)
Tests that are dependent on the clumping of cells, microorganisms, or particles when mixed with specific antiserum. (From Stedman, 26th ed)
A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.
Proteins that share the common characteristic of binding to carbohydrates. Some ANTIBODIES and carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. PLANT LECTINS are carbohydrate-binding proteins that have been primarily identified by their hemagglutinating activity (HEMAGGLUTININS). However, a variety of lectins occur in animal species where they serve diverse array of functions through specific carbohydrate recognition.

Analysis of gabapentin in serum and plasma by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for therapeutic drug monitoring. (1/50409)

A simple method for the determination of gabapentin (Neurontin) is described. The method uses solid-phase extraction by disk column and derivatization followed by gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis. The single-step derivatization with MTBSTFA produces a t-BDMS derivative of both the carboxylic and amine moieties of the molecule. Each step of the procedure was optimized to assure reliable performance of the method. The assay limit of detection was 0.1 microg/mL with a linear range from 1.0 to 35 microg/mL. Within-run (n = 3) and between-run (n = 40) coefficients of variation were less than 8.2 and 15.9%, respectively. The method has proven reliable in routine production for more than a year, producing clean chromatography with unique ion fragments, consistent ion mass ratios, and no interferences. Statistical analysis of the gabapentin concentrations measured in 1020 random specimens over a 2-month period showed a mean concentration of 6.07 microg/mL with a standard deviation of 5.28.  (+info)

Solid-phase microextraction for cannabinoids analysis in hair and its possible application to other drugs. (2/50409)

This paper describes the application of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) to cannabis testing in hair. Fifty milligrams of hair was washed with petroleum ether, hydrolyzed with NaOH, neutralized, deuterated internal standard was added and directly submitted to SPME. The SPME was analyzed by GC-MS. The limit of detection was 0.1 ng/mg for cannabinol (CBN) and delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 0.2 ng/mg for cannabidiol (CBD). THC was detected in a range spanning from 0.1 to 0.7 ng/mg. CBD concentrations ranged from 0.7 to 14.1 ng/mg, and CBN concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 ng/mg. The effectiveness of different decontamination procedures was also studied on passively contaminated hair. The proposed method is also suitable for the analysis of methadone in hair; cocaine and cocaethylene can be detected in hair with SPME extraction after enzymatic hydrolysis.  (+info)

Highly sensitive quantitation of methamphetamine by time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay using a new europium chelate as a label. (3/50409)

A simple and highly sensitive time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay of methamphetamine (MA) using a new fluorescent europium chelate (BHHCT-Eu3+) as a label is described. Two variations of competitive immunoassay were attempted. In the first (one-step) assay, microtiter plates coated with anti-MA were used, and the new label was bound to a conjugate of bovine serum albumin and N-(4-aminobutyl)-MA (MA-BSA). In the second (two-step) assay, instead of the labeled MA-BSA, biotinylated MA-BSA and BHHCT-Eu3+-labeled streptavidin-BSA were used. The lowest measurable concentrations of MA for the one-step and the two-step methods were 1 ng/mL (25 pg/assay) and 1 pg/mL (25 fg/assay), respectively. These were 10 to 1000 times superior to the detection limits of MA in any other immunoassay. Intra-assay coefficient of variation was approximately 2-8% at eight different concentrations (n = 4). Analysis of 34 urine samples with the new method and conventional gas chromatography showed a good correlation (r = 0.954). The high detectability of the present assay also enabled segmental hair analysis with a few centimeters of a hair.  (+info)

Semiautomated preparation of 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol in human urine using a Zymate XP laboratory robot with quantitative determination by gas chromatography-negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry. (4/50409)

A rapid and sensitive semiautomated method was developed for quantitation of the chlorpyrifos metabolite 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) in human urine. A Zymark Zymate XP laboratory robotics system was used to mix urine samples, transfer aliquots, add the stable-isotope-labeled TCP internal standard (13C2- or 13C2,15N-), and liberate conjugates of TCP from urine via acid hydrolysis. Samples were manually extracted into toluene, derivatized, and analyzed by gas chromatography-negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Determination of the metabolic TCP was performed by selected ion monitoring of the dichloropyridinol fragment ions: m/z 161 for TCP and m/z 165 for 13C2-TCP or m/z 168 for 13C2,15N-TCP. Interday precision and accuracy were demonstrated over 3 years of analyses using the 13C2-TCP internal standard, with an average recovery from fortified urine samples of 93+/-12% (N = 54, concentration range 1-140 ng/mL). The method was found to be linear over the range of 0.5 to 200 ng/mL, and the limit of detection for TCP in urine was estimated to be 0.2 ng/mL with a limit of quantitation of 1 ng/mL. The effect of solids distribution on the concentration of TCP in the thawed urine samples was examined, and the results indicated that homogeneous distribution is critical for quantitation. The precision and accuracy of the automated method with respect to the transfer of homgeneous urine aliquots and delivery of internal standard yielded equivalent or improved results over the manual techniques. Overall, this method is more simple than existing methodologies, and it yields results with improved precision, accuracy, and sensitivity over previously developed methods.  (+info)

Identification and quantification of cocaine N-oxide: a thermally labile metabolite of cocaine. (5/50409)

In this article, we report the identification and quantitation of cocaine N-oxide (CNO), a thermally labile oxidative metabolite, from both animal and human samples. The concentration of CNO is similar to the concentrations of cocaine in the samples analyzed. The technique used for the determination of CNO in this study is liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, which is necessary because CNO is converted to cocaine upon heating. This includes simple heating of aqueous solutions to temperatures in excess of 100 degrees C and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), in which CNO is converted to cocaine in the injection port. The thermal conversion of CNO to cocaine is estimated to cause an over-reporting of cocaine levels by 10-20% when using GC-MS.  (+info)

Hybrid capture II, a new sensitive test for human papillomavirus detection. Comparison with hybrid capture I and PCR results in cervical lesions. (6/50409)

AIM: To test a new assay for the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA, hybrid capture II (HC II), compared with the previous commercialized hybrid capture I (HC I) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results on cervical scrapes from fresh cone excision biopsy samples. METHODS: The three methods were used on cervical scrapes from 42 fresh cone excision biopsy samples. There were nine metaplastic and inflammatory lesions, five low grade lesions, and 28 high grade lesions. PCR was performed using the general primers GP5+/GP6+. The viral load of high risk HPV DNA was estimated by the ratio of relative light units to positive control values in the samples. RESULTS: The sensitivity of HC I for the detection of high grade lesions was 71.4%, while it was 92.8% for HC II and 96.4% for the PCR. Considering only the absence of detectable cervical in situ neoplasia, the specificity was 88.9% for HC I, 66.7% for HC II, and 66.7% for PCR. With HC II, for a ratio of cervical sample to normal control of > 200, the sensitivity for the detection of high grade lesion was only 34.6% with a specificity of 66.7%. CONCLUSIONS: HPV detection with the HC II assay is more sensitive than the previous HC I and represents a more convenient and easier test than PCR for routine use. Nevertheless the viral load estimated with this test cannot be a reliable predictive indicator of high grade lesions.  (+info)

Comparative efficacy of positron emission tomography with FDG and computed tomographic scanning in preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer. (7/50409)

OBJECTIVE: To determine the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of positron emission tomography with 2-fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (PET-FDG) in the preoperative staging (N and M staging) of patients with lung cancer. The authors wanted to compare the efficacy of PET scanning with currently used computed tomography (CT) scanning. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Results of whole-body PET-FDG imaging and CT scans were compared with histologic findings for the presence or absence of lymph node disease or metastatic sites. Sampling of mediastinal lymph nodes was performed using mediastinoscopy or thoracotomy. RESULTS: PET-FDG imaging was significantly more sensitive, specific, and accurate for detecting N disease than CT. PET changed N staging in 35% and M staging in 11% of patients. CT scans helped in accurate anatomic localization of 6/57 PET lymph node abnormalities. CONCLUSION: PET-FDG is a reliable method for preoperative staging of patients with lung cancer and would help to optimize management of these patients. Accurate lymph node staging of lung cancer may be ideally performed by simultaneous review of PET and CT scans.  (+info)

Screening for congenital heart malformation in child health centres. (8/50409)

BACKGROUND: Although screening for congenital heart malformations is part of the child health care programme in several countries, there are very few published evaluations of these activities. This report is concerned with the evaluation of this screening at the Dutch Child Health Centres (CHC). METHODS: All consecutive patients, aged between 32 days and 4 years, presented at the Sophia Children's Hospital Rotterdam throughout a period of 2 years, with a congenital heart malformation were included in this study. Paediatric cardiologists established whether or not these patients were diagnosed after haemodynamic complications had already developed (diagnosed 'too late'). Parents and CHC-physicians were interviewed in order to establish the screening and detection history. Test properties were established for all patients with a congenital heart malformation (n = 290), intended effects of screening were established in patients with clinically significant malformations (n = 82). RESULTS: The sensitivity of the actual screening programme was 0.57 (95% CI : 0.51-0.62), the specificity 0.985 (95% CI : 0.981-0.990) and the predictive value of a positive test result 0.13 (95% CI: 0.10-0.19). Sensitivity in a subpopulation of patients adequately screened was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.74-0.96). Adequately screened patients were less likely to be diagnosed 'too late' than inadequately screened patients (odds ratio [OR] = 0.20, 95% CI: 0.04-1.05). The actual risk of being diagnosed 'too late' in the study-population (48%) was only slightly less than the estimated risk for patients not exposed to CHC-screening (58%, 95% CI: 43%-72%). Adequately screened patients however were at considerably less risk (17%, 95% CI: 4%-48%). CONCLUSION: Screening for congenital heart malformations in CHC contributes to the timely detection of these disorders. The actual yield, however, is far from optimal, and the screening programme should be improved.  (+info)

There are several factors that can contribute to the development of insulin resistance, including:

1. Genetics: Insulin resistance can be inherited, and some people may be more prone to developing the condition based on their genetic makeup.
2. Obesity: Excess body fat, particularly around the abdominal area, can contribute to insulin resistance.
3. Physical inactivity: A sedentary lifestyle can lead to insulin resistance.
4. Poor diet: Consuming a diet high in refined carbohydrates and sugar can contribute to insulin resistance.
5. Other medical conditions: Certain medical conditions, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and Cushing's syndrome, can increase the risk of developing insulin resistance.
6. Medications: Certain medications, such as steroids and some antipsychotic drugs, can increase insulin resistance.
7. Hormonal imbalances: Hormonal changes during pregnancy or menopause can lead to insulin resistance.
8. Sleep apnea: Sleep apnea can contribute to insulin resistance.
9. Chronic stress: Chronic stress can lead to insulin resistance.
10. Aging: Insulin resistance tends to increase with age, particularly after the age of 45.

There are several ways to diagnose insulin resistance, including:

1. Fasting blood sugar test: This test measures the level of glucose in the blood after an overnight fast.
2. Glucose tolerance test: This test measures the body's ability to regulate blood sugar levels after consuming a sugary drink.
3. Insulin sensitivity test: This test measures the body's ability to respond to insulin.
4. Homeostatic model assessment (HOMA): This is a mathematical formula that uses the results of a fasting glucose and insulin test to estimate insulin resistance.
5. Adiponectin test: This test measures the level of adiponectin, a protein produced by fat cells that helps regulate blood sugar levels. Low levels of adiponectin are associated with insulin resistance.

There is no cure for insulin resistance, but it can be managed through lifestyle changes and medication. Lifestyle changes include:

1. Diet: A healthy diet that is low in processed carbohydrates and added sugars can help improve insulin sensitivity.
2. Exercise: Regular physical activity, such as aerobic exercise and strength training, can improve insulin sensitivity.
3. Weight loss: Losing weight, particularly around the abdominal area, can improve insulin sensitivity.
4. Stress management: Strategies to manage stress, such as meditation or yoga, can help improve insulin sensitivity.
5. Sleep: Getting adequate sleep is important for maintaining healthy insulin levels.

Medications that may be used to treat insulin resistance include:

1. Metformin: This is a commonly used medication to treat type 2 diabetes and improve insulin sensitivity.
2. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs): These medications, such as pioglitazone, improve insulin sensitivity by increasing the body's ability to use insulin.
3. Sulfonylureas: These medications stimulate the release of insulin from the pancreas, which can help improve insulin sensitivity.
4. DPP-4 inhibitors: These medications, such as sitagliptin, work by reducing the breakdown of the hormone incretin, which helps to increase insulin secretion and improve insulin sensitivity.
5. GLP-1 receptor agonists: These medications, such as exenatide, mimic the action of the hormone GLP-1 and help to improve insulin sensitivity.

It is important to note that these medications may have side effects, so it is important to discuss the potential benefits and risks with your healthcare provider before starting treatment. Additionally, lifestyle modifications such as diet and exercise can also be effective in improving insulin sensitivity and managing blood sugar levels.

The diagnosis of MCS is based on a combination of medical history, physical examination, and laboratory tests. There is no specific diagnostic test for MCS, and the condition can be difficult to diagnose because its symptoms are similar to those of other conditions. Treatment for MCS typically involves avoiding exposure to chemicals and managing symptoms through lifestyle changes, stress reduction techniques, and medication.

MCS is a controversial condition, and some researchers question whether it is a valid medical diagnosis. However, many health professionals recognize MCS as a legitimate condition that affects thousands of people worldwide.

There are several types of chemical sensitivity, including:

* Irritant-induced sensitivity: This type of sensitivity occurs when an individual becomes sensitive to a specific chemical after repeated exposure to it.
* Allergic contact sensitivity: This type of sensitivity occurs when an individual develops an allergic reaction to a specific chemical.
* Idiopathic environmental intolerance: This type of sensitivity occurs when an individual experiences adverse reactions to multiple chemicals, without any known cause.

There are several risk factors for developing MCS, including:

* Previous exposure to toxic chemicals
* Genetic predisposition
* Age (MCS is more common in younger adults)
* Gender (women are more likely to develop MCS than men)
* Stress and psychological factors

There are several ways to prevent or reduce the risk of developing MCS, including:

* Avoiding exposure to toxic chemicals
* Using protective gear and equipment when working with chemicals
* Properly disposing of chemical waste
* Following safety protocols when handling chemicals
* Reducing stress and managing psychological factors.

There are several ways to diagnose MCS, including:

* Medical history and physical examination
* Allergy testing (such as skin prick testing or blood tests)
* Environmental exposure assessment
* Physiological testing (such as heart rate and blood pressure monitoring)
* Neuropsychological testing (such as cognitive function and mood assessment).

There are several treatment options for MCS, including:

* Avoiding exposure to triggers
* Medications (such as antihistamines or antidepressants)
* Immunotherapy (such as allergy shots)
* Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)
* Alternative therapies (such as acupuncture or herbal supplements).

It is important to note that MCS is a complex and controversial condition, and there is ongoing debate about its cause and validity. However, for those who suffer from the condition, it can have a significant impact on their quality of life, and it is important to seek medical attention if symptoms persist or worsen over time.

There are different types of Breast Neoplasms such as:

1. Fibroadenomas: These are benign tumors that are made up of glandular and fibrous tissues. They are usually small and round, with a smooth surface, and can be moved easily under the skin.

2. Cysts: These are fluid-filled sacs that can develop in both breast tissue and milk ducts. They are usually benign and can disappear on their own or be drained surgically.

3. Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS): This is a precancerous condition where abnormal cells grow inside the milk ducts. If left untreated, it can progress to invasive breast cancer.

4. Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC): This is the most common type of breast cancer and starts in the milk ducts but grows out of them and invades surrounding tissue.

5. Invasive Lobular Carcinoma (ILC): It originates in the milk-producing glands (lobules) and grows out of them, invading nearby tissue.

Breast Neoplasms can cause various symptoms such as a lump or thickening in the breast or underarm area, skin changes like redness or dimpling, change in size or shape of one or both breasts, discharge from the nipple, and changes in the texture or color of the skin.

Treatment options for Breast Neoplasms may include surgery such as lumpectomy, mastectomy, or breast-conserving surgery, radiation therapy which uses high-energy beams to kill cancer cells, chemotherapy using drugs to kill cancer cells, targeted therapy which uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack cancer cells while minimizing harm to normal cells, hormone therapy, immunotherapy, and clinical trials.

It is important to note that not all Breast Neoplasms are cancerous; some are benign (non-cancerous) tumors that do not spread or grow.

Neoplasm refers to an abnormal growth of cells that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Neoplasms can occur in any part of the body and can affect various organs and tissues. The term "neoplasm" is often used interchangeably with "tumor," but while all tumors are neoplasms, not all neoplasms are tumors.

Types of Neoplasms

There are many different types of neoplasms, including:

1. Carcinomas: These are malignant tumors that arise in the epithelial cells lining organs and glands. Examples include breast cancer, lung cancer, and colon cancer.
2. Sarcomas: These are malignant tumors that arise in connective tissue, such as bone, cartilage, and fat. Examples include osteosarcoma (bone cancer) and soft tissue sarcoma.
3. Lymphomas: These are cancers of the immune system, specifically affecting the lymph nodes and other lymphoid tissues. Examples include Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
4. Leukemias: These are cancers of the blood and bone marrow that affect the white blood cells. Examples include acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).
5. Melanomas: These are malignant tumors that arise in the pigment-producing cells called melanocytes. Examples include skin melanoma and eye melanoma.

Causes and Risk Factors of Neoplasms

The exact causes of neoplasms are not fully understood, but there are several known risk factors that can increase the likelihood of developing a neoplasm. These include:

1. Genetic predisposition: Some people may be born with genetic mutations that increase their risk of developing certain types of neoplasms.
2. Environmental factors: Exposure to certain environmental toxins, such as radiation and certain chemicals, can increase the risk of developing a neoplasm.
3. Infection: Some neoplasms are caused by viruses or bacteria. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common cause of cervical cancer.
4. Lifestyle factors: Factors such as smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, and a poor diet can increase the risk of developing certain types of neoplasms.
5. Family history: A person's risk of developing a neoplasm may be higher if they have a family history of the condition.

Signs and Symptoms of Neoplasms

The signs and symptoms of neoplasms can vary depending on the type of cancer and where it is located in the body. Some common signs and symptoms include:

1. Unusual lumps or swelling
2. Pain
3. Fatigue
4. Weight loss
5. Change in bowel or bladder habits
6. Unexplained bleeding
7. Coughing up blood
8. Hoarseness or a persistent cough
9. Changes in appetite or digestion
10. Skin changes, such as a new mole or a change in the size or color of an existing mole.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Neoplasms

The diagnosis of a neoplasm usually involves a combination of physical examination, imaging tests (such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans), and biopsy. A biopsy involves removing a small sample of tissue from the suspected tumor and examining it under a microscope for cancer cells.

The treatment of neoplasms depends on the type, size, location, and stage of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health. Some common treatments include:

1. Surgery: Removing the tumor and surrounding tissue can be an effective way to treat many types of cancer.
2. Chemotherapy: Using drugs to kill cancer cells can be effective for some types of cancer, especially if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.
3. Radiation therapy: Using high-energy radiation to kill cancer cells can be effective for some types of cancer, especially if the cancer is located in a specific area of the body.
4. Immunotherapy: Boosting the body's immune system to fight cancer can be an effective treatment for some types of cancer.
5. Targeted therapy: Using drugs or other substances to target specific molecules on cancer cells can be an effective treatment for some types of cancer.

Prevention of Neoplasms

While it is not always possible to prevent neoplasms, there are several steps that can reduce the risk of developing cancer. These include:

1. Avoiding exposure to known carcinogens (such as tobacco smoke and radiation)
2. Maintaining a healthy diet and lifestyle
3. Getting regular exercise
4. Not smoking or using tobacco products
5. Limiting alcohol consumption
6. Getting vaccinated against certain viruses that are associated with cancer (such as human papillomavirus, or HPV)
7. Participating in screening programs for early detection of cancer (such as mammograms for breast cancer and colonoscopies for colon cancer)
8. Avoiding excessive exposure to sunlight and using protective measures such as sunscreen and hats to prevent skin cancer.

It's important to note that not all cancers can be prevented, and some may be caused by factors that are not yet understood or cannot be controlled. However, by taking these steps, individuals can reduce their risk of developing cancer and improve their overall health and well-being.

There are several types of lung neoplasms, including:

1. Adenocarcinoma: This is the most common type of lung cancer, accounting for approximately 40% of all lung cancers. It is a malignant tumor that originates in the glands of the respiratory tract and can be found in any part of the lung.
2. Squamous cell carcinoma: This type of lung cancer accounts for approximately 25% of all lung cancers and is more common in men than women. It is a malignant tumor that originates in the squamous cells lining the airways of the lungs.
3. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC): This is a highly aggressive form of lung cancer that accounts for approximately 15% of all lung cancers. It is often found in the central parts of the lungs and can spread quickly to other parts of the body.
4. Large cell carcinoma: This is a rare type of lung cancer that accounts for only about 5% of all lung cancers. It is a malignant tumor that originates in the large cells of the respiratory tract and can be found in any part of the lung.
5. Bronchioalveolar carcinoma (BAC): This is a rare type of lung cancer that originates in the cells lining the airways and alveoli of the lungs. It is more common in women than men and tends to affect older individuals.
6. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM): This is a rare, progressive, and often fatal lung disease that primarily affects women of childbearing age. It is characterized by the growth of smooth muscle-like cells in the lungs and can lead to cysts, lung collapse, and respiratory failure.
7. Hamartoma: This is a benign tumor that originates in the tissue of the lungs and is usually found in children. It is characterized by an overgrowth of normal lung tissue and can be treated with surgery.
8. Secondary lung cancer: This type of cancer occurs when cancer cells from another part of the body spread to the lungs through the bloodstream or lymphatic system. It is more common in people who have a history of smoking or exposure to other carcinogens.
9. Metastatic cancer: This type of cancer occurs when cancer cells from another part of the body spread to the lungs through the bloodstream or lymphatic system. It is more common in people who have a history of smoking or exposure to other carcinogens.
10. Mesothelioma: This is a rare and aggressive form of cancer that originates in the lining of the lungs or abdomen. It is caused by asbestos exposure and can be treated with surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy.

Lung diseases can also be classified based on their cause, such as:

1. Infectious diseases: These are caused by bacteria, viruses, or other microorganisms and can include pneumonia, tuberculosis, and bronchitis.
2. Autoimmune diseases: These are caused by an overactive immune system and can include conditions such as sarcoidosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.
3. Genetic diseases: These are caused by inherited mutations in genes that affect the lungs and can include cystic fibrosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia.
4. Environmental diseases: These are caused by exposure to harmful substances such as tobacco smoke, air pollution, and asbestos.
5. Radiological diseases: These are caused by exposure to ionizing radiation and can include conditions such as radiographic breast cancer and lung cancer.
6. Vascular diseases: These are caused by problems with the blood vessels in the lungs and can include conditions such as pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension.
7. Tumors: These can be benign or malignant and can include conditions such as lung metastases and lung cancer.
8. Trauma: This can include injuries to the chest or lungs caused by accidents or other forms of trauma.
9. Congenital diseases: These are present at birth and can include conditions such as bronchopulmonary foregut malformations and congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation.

Each type of lung disease has its own set of symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options. It is important to seek medical attention if you experience any persistent or severe respiratory symptoms, as early diagnosis and treatment can improve outcomes and quality of life.

1) They share similarities with humans: Many animal species share similar biological and physiological characteristics with humans, making them useful for studying human diseases. For example, mice and rats are often used to study diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer because they have similar metabolic and cardiovascular systems to humans.

2) They can be genetically manipulated: Animal disease models can be genetically engineered to develop specific diseases or to model human genetic disorders. This allows researchers to study the progression of the disease and test potential treatments in a controlled environment.

3) They can be used to test drugs and therapies: Before new drugs or therapies are tested in humans, they are often first tested in animal models of disease. This allows researchers to assess the safety and efficacy of the treatment before moving on to human clinical trials.

4) They can provide insights into disease mechanisms: Studying disease models in animals can provide valuable insights into the underlying mechanisms of a particular disease. This information can then be used to develop new treatments or improve existing ones.

5) Reduces the need for human testing: Using animal disease models reduces the need for human testing, which can be time-consuming, expensive, and ethically challenging. However, it is important to note that animal models are not perfect substitutes for human subjects, and results obtained from animal studies may not always translate to humans.

6) They can be used to study infectious diseases: Animal disease models can be used to study infectious diseases such as HIV, TB, and malaria. These models allow researchers to understand how the disease is transmitted, how it progresses, and how it responds to treatment.

7) They can be used to study complex diseases: Animal disease models can be used to study complex diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. These models allow researchers to understand the underlying mechanisms of the disease and test potential treatments.

8) They are cost-effective: Animal disease models are often less expensive than human clinical trials, making them a cost-effective way to conduct research.

9) They can be used to study drug delivery: Animal disease models can be used to study drug delivery and pharmacokinetics, which is important for developing new drugs and drug delivery systems.

10) They can be used to study aging: Animal disease models can be used to study the aging process and age-related diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. This allows researchers to understand how aging contributes to disease and develop potential treatments.

There are several different types of obesity, including:

1. Central obesity: This type of obesity is characterized by excess fat around the waistline, which can increase the risk of health problems such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
2. Peripheral obesity: This type of obesity is characterized by excess fat in the hips, thighs, and arms.
3. Visceral obesity: This type of obesity is characterized by excess fat around the internal organs in the abdominal cavity.
4. Mixed obesity: This type of obesity is characterized by both central and peripheral obesity.

Obesity can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, lack of physical activity, poor diet, sleep deprivation, and certain medications. Treatment for obesity typically involves a combination of lifestyle changes, such as increased physical activity and a healthy diet, and in some cases, medication or surgery may be necessary to achieve weight loss.

Preventing obesity is important for overall health and well-being, and can be achieved through a variety of strategies, including:

1. Eating a healthy, balanced diet that is low in added sugars, saturated fats, and refined carbohydrates.
2. Engaging in regular physical activity, such as walking, jogging, or swimming.
3. Getting enough sleep each night.
4. Managing stress levels through relaxation techniques, such as meditation or deep breathing.
5. Avoiding excessive alcohol consumption and quitting smoking.
6. Monitoring weight and body mass index (BMI) on a regular basis to identify any changes or potential health risks.
7. Seeking professional help from a healthcare provider or registered dietitian for personalized guidance on weight management and healthy lifestyle choices.

Benign ovarian neoplasms include:

1. Serous cystadenoma: A fluid-filled sac that develops on the surface of the ovary.
2. Mucinous cystadenoma: A tumor that is filled with mucin, a type of protein.
3. Endometrioid tumors: Tumors that are similar to endometrial tissue (the lining of the uterus).
4. Theca cell tumors: Tumors that develop in the supportive tissue of the ovary called theca cells.

Malignant ovarian neoplasms include:

1. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC): The most common type of ovarian cancer, which arises from the surface epithelium of the ovary.
2. Germ cell tumors: Tumors that develop from germ cells, which are the cells that give rise to eggs.
3. Stromal sarcomas: Tumors that develop in the supportive tissue of the ovary.

Ovarian neoplasms can cause symptoms such as pelvic pain, abnormal bleeding, and abdominal swelling. They can also be detected through pelvic examination, imaging tests such as ultrasound and CT scan, and biopsy. Treatment options for ovarian neoplasms depend on the type, stage, and location of the tumor, and may include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy.

Type 2 diabetes can be managed through a combination of diet, exercise, and medication. In some cases, lifestyle changes may be enough to control blood sugar levels, while in other cases, medication or insulin therapy may be necessary. Regular monitoring of blood sugar levels and follow-up with a healthcare provider are important for managing the condition and preventing complications.

Common symptoms of type 2 diabetes include:

* Increased thirst and urination
* Fatigue
* Blurred vision
* Cuts or bruises that are slow to heal
* Tingling or numbness in the hands and feet
* Recurring skin, gum, or bladder infections

If left untreated, type 2 diabetes can lead to a range of complications, including:

* Heart disease and stroke
* Kidney damage and failure
* Nerve damage and pain
* Eye damage and blindness
* Foot damage and amputation

The exact cause of type 2 diabetes is not known, but it is believed to be linked to a combination of genetic and lifestyle factors, such as:

* Obesity and excess body weight
* Lack of physical activity
* Poor diet and nutrition
* Age and family history
* Certain ethnicities (e.g., African American, Hispanic/Latino, Native American)
* History of gestational diabetes or delivering a baby over 9 lbs.

There is no cure for type 2 diabetes, but it can be managed and controlled through a combination of lifestyle changes and medication. With proper treatment and self-care, people with type 2 diabetes can lead long, healthy lives.

Examples of acute diseases include:

1. Common cold and flu
2. Pneumonia and bronchitis
3. Appendicitis and other abdominal emergencies
4. Heart attacks and strokes
5. Asthma attacks and allergic reactions
6. Skin infections and cellulitis
7. Urinary tract infections
8. Sinusitis and meningitis
9. Gastroenteritis and food poisoning
10. Sprains, strains, and fractures.

Acute diseases can be treated effectively with antibiotics, medications, or other therapies. However, if left untreated, they can lead to chronic conditions or complications that may require long-term care. Therefore, it is important to seek medical attention promptly if symptoms persist or worsen over time.

Some common types of vision disorders include:

1. Myopia (nearsightedness): A condition where close objects are seen clearly, but distant objects appear blurry.
2. Hyperopia (farsightedness): A condition where distant objects are seen clearly, but close objects appear blurry.
3. Astigmatism: A condition where the cornea or lens of the eye is irregularly shaped, causing blurred vision at all distances.
4. Presbyopia: A condition that occurs as people age, where the lens of the eye loses flexibility and makes it difficult to focus on close objects.
5. Amblyopia (lazy eye): A condition where one eye has reduced vision due to abnormal development or injury.
6. Strabismus (crossed eyes): A condition where the eyes are misaligned and point in different directions.
7. Color blindness: A condition where people have difficulty perceiving certain colors, usually red and green.
8. Retinal disorders: Conditions that affect the retina, such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, or retinal detachment.
9. Glaucoma: A group of conditions that damage the optic nerve, often due to increased pressure in the eye.
10. Cataracts: A clouding of the lens in the eye that can cause blurred vision and sensitivity to light.

Vision disorders can be diagnosed through a comprehensive eye exam, which includes a visual acuity test, refraction test, and dilated eye exam. Treatment options for vision disorders depend on the specific condition and may include glasses or contact lenses, medication, surgery, or a combination of these.

There are two main forms of TB:

1. Active TB: This is the form of the disease where the bacteria are actively growing and causing symptoms such as coughing, fever, chest pain, and fatigue. Active TB can be contagious and can spread to others if not treated properly.
2. Latent TB: This is the form of the disease where the bacteria are present in the body but are not actively growing or causing symptoms. People with latent TB do not feel sick and are not contagious, but they can still become sick with active TB if their immune system is weakened.

TB is a major public health concern, especially in developing countries where access to healthcare may be limited. The disease is diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, medical imaging, and laboratory tests such as skin tests or blood tests. Treatment for TB typically involves a course of antibiotics, which can be effective in curing the disease if taken properly. However, drug-resistant forms of TB have emerged in some parts of the world, making treatment more challenging.

Preventive measures against TB include:

1. Vaccination with BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) vaccine, which can provide some protection against severe forms of the disease but not against latent TB.
2. Avoiding close contact with people who have active TB, especially if they are coughing or sneezing.
3. Practicing good hygiene, such as covering one's mouth when coughing or sneezing and regularly washing hands.
4. Getting regular screenings for TB if you are in a high-risk group, such as healthcare workers or people with weakened immune systems.
5. Avoiding sharing personal items such as towels, utensils, or drinking glasses with people who have active TB.

Overall, while TB is a serious disease that can be challenging to treat and prevent, with the right measures in place, it is possible to reduce its impact on public health and improve outcomes for those affected by the disease.

There are several types of color vision defects, including:

1. Color blindness: This is a common condition where individuals have difficulty distinguishing between certain colors, such as red and green. It is usually inherited and affects males more frequently than females.
2. Achromatopsia: This is a rare condition where individuals have difficulty seeing any colors and only see shades of gray.
3. Tritanopia: This is a rare condition where individuals have difficulty seeing the color blue and only see yellow and red.
4. Deuteranomaly: This is a common condition where individuals have difficulty seeing red and green colors and see these colors as more yellow or orange.
5. Anomalous trichromacy: This is a rare condition where individuals have an extra type of cone in their retina, which can cause unusual color perception.

Color vision defects can be diagnosed with a series of tests, including the Ishihara test, the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue Test, and the Lantern Test. Treatment options vary depending on the type and severity of the condition, but may include glasses or contact lenses, color filters, or surgery.

In conclusion, color vision defects can significantly impact daily life, making it important to be aware of these conditions and seek medical attention if symptoms persist or worsen over time. With proper diagnosis and treatment, individuals with color vision defects can lead normal and fulfilling lives.

Pulmonary tuberculosis typically affects the lungs but can also spread to other parts of the body, such as the brain, kidneys, or spine. The symptoms of pulmonary TB include coughing for more than three weeks, chest pain, fatigue, fever, night sweats, and weight loss.

Pulmonary tuberculosis is diagnosed by a combination of physical examination, medical history, laboratory tests, and radiologic imaging, such as chest X-rays or computed tomography (CT) scans. Treatment for pulmonary TB usually involves a combination of antibiotics and medications to manage symptoms.

Preventive measures for pulmonary tuberculosis include screening for latent TB infection in high-risk populations, such as healthcare workers and individuals with HIV/AIDS, and vaccination with the bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine in countries where it is available.

Overall, pulmonary tuberculosis is a serious and potentially life-threatening disease that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment to prevent complications and death.

Body weight is an important health indicator, as it can affect an individual's risk for certain medical conditions, such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Maintaining a healthy body weight is essential for overall health and well-being, and there are many ways to do so, including a balanced diet, regular exercise, and other lifestyle changes.

There are several ways to measure body weight, including:

1. Scale: This is the most common method of measuring body weight, and it involves standing on a scale that displays the individual's weight in kg or lb.
2. Body fat calipers: These are used to measure body fat percentage by pinching the skin at specific points on the body.
3. Skinfold measurements: This method involves measuring the thickness of the skin folds at specific points on the body to estimate body fat percentage.
4. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA): This is a non-invasive method that uses electrical impulses to measure body fat percentage.
5. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA): This is a more accurate method of measuring body composition, including bone density and body fat percentage.

It's important to note that body weight can fluctuate throughout the day due to factors such as water retention, so it's best to measure body weight at the same time each day for the most accurate results. Additionally, it's important to use a reliable scale or measuring tool to ensure accurate measurements.

Malignant prostatic neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can be aggressive and spread to other parts of the body (metastasize). The most common type of malignant prostatic neoplasm is adenocarcinoma of the prostate, which accounts for approximately 95% of all prostate cancers. Other types of malignant prostatic neoplasms include sarcomas and small cell carcinomas.

Prostatic neoplasms can be diagnosed through a variety of tests such as digital rectal examination (DRE), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, imaging studies (ultrasound, CT scan or MRI), and biopsy. Treatment options for prostatic neoplasms depend on the type, stage, and grade of the tumor, as well as the patient's age and overall health. Treatment options can include active surveillance, surgery (robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy or open prostatectomy), radiation therapy (external beam radiation therapy or brachytherapy), and hormone therapy.

In summary, Prostatic Neoplasms are tumors that occur in the prostate gland, which can be benign or malignant. The most common types of malignant prostatic neoplasms are adenocarcinoma of the prostate, and other types include sarcomas and small cell carcinomas. Diagnosis is done through a variety of tests, and treatment options depend on the type, stage, and grade of the tumor, as well as the patient's age and overall health.

There are several types of melanoma, including:

1. Superficial spreading melanoma: This is the most common type of melanoma, accounting for about 70% of cases. It usually appears as a flat or slightly raised discolored patch on the skin.
2. Nodular melanoma: This type of melanoma is more aggressive and accounts for about 15% of cases. It typically appears as a raised bump on the skin, often with a darker color.
3. Acral lentiginous melanoma: This type of melanoma affects the palms of the hands, soles of the feet, or nail beds and accounts for about 5% of cases.
4. Lentigo maligna melanoma: This type of melanoma usually affects the face and is more common in older adults.

The risk factors for developing melanoma include:

1. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure from the sun or tanning beds
2. Fair skin, light hair, and light eyes
3. A history of sunburns
4. Weakened immune system
5. Family history of melanoma

The symptoms of melanoma can vary depending on the type and location of the cancer. Common symptoms include:

1. Changes in the size, shape, or color of a mole
2. A new mole or growth on the skin
3. A spot or sore that bleeds or crusts over
4. Itching or pain on the skin
5. Redness or swelling around a mole

If melanoma is suspected, a biopsy will be performed to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment options for melanoma depend on the stage and location of the cancer and may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or a combination of these. Early detection and treatment are key to successful outcomes in melanoma cases.

In conclusion, melanoma is a type of skin cancer that can be deadly if not detected early. It is important to practice sun safety, perform regular self-exams, and seek medical attention if any suspicious changes are noticed on the skin. By being aware of the risk factors, symptoms, and treatment options for melanoma, individuals can take steps to protect themselves from this potentially deadly disease.

Adenocarcinoma is a term used to describe a variety of different types of cancer that arise in glandular tissue, including:

1. Colorectal adenocarcinoma (cancer of the colon or rectum)
2. Breast adenocarcinoma (cancer of the breast)
3. Prostate adenocarcinoma (cancer of the prostate gland)
4. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (cancer of the pancreas)
5. Lung adenocarcinoma (cancer of the lung)
6. Thyroid adenocarcinoma (cancer of the thyroid gland)
7. Skin adenocarcinoma (cancer of the skin)

The symptoms of adenocarcinoma depend on the location of the cancer and can include:

1. Blood in the stool or urine
2. Abdominal pain or discomfort
3. Changes in bowel habits
4. Unusual vaginal bleeding (in the case of endometrial adenocarcinoma)
5. A lump or thickening in the breast or elsewhere
6. Weight loss
7. Fatigue
8. Coughing up blood (in the case of lung adenocarcinoma)

The diagnosis of adenocarcinoma is typically made through a combination of imaging tests, such as CT scans, MRI scans, and PET scans, and a biopsy, which involves removing a sample of tissue from the affected area and examining it under a microscope for cancer cells.

Treatment options for adenocarcinoma depend on the location of the cancer and can include:

1. Surgery to remove the tumor
2. Chemotherapy, which involves using drugs to kill cancer cells
3. Radiation therapy, which involves using high-energy X-rays or other particles to kill cancer cells
4. Targeted therapy, which involves using drugs that target specific molecules on cancer cells to kill them
5. Immunotherapy, which involves using drugs that stimulate the immune system to fight cancer cells.

The prognosis for adenocarcinoma is generally good if the cancer is detected and treated early, but it can be more challenging to treat if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.

The symptoms of chlamydia infections can vary depending on the location of the infection. In genital infections, symptoms may include:

* Discharge from the penis or vagina
* Painful urination
* Abnormal bleeding or spotting
* Painful sex
* Testicular pain in men
* Pelvic pain in women

In eye infections, symptoms can include:

* Redness and swelling of the eye
* Discharge from the eye
* Pain or sensitivity to light

In respiratory infections, symptoms may include:

* Cough
* Fever
* Shortness of breath or wheezing

If left untreated, chlamydia infections can lead to serious complications, such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in women and epididymitis in men. Chlamydia infections can also increase the risk of infertility and other long-term health problems.

Chlamydia infections are typically diagnosed through a physical examination, medical history, and laboratory tests such as a nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) or a culture test. Treatment for chlamydia infections typically involves antibiotics, which can effectively cure the infection. It is important to note that sexual partners of someone with a chlamydia infection should also be tested and treated, as they may also have the infection.

Prevention methods for chlamydia infections include safe sex practices such as using condoms and dental dams, as well as regular screening and testing for the infection. It is important to note that chlamydia infections can be asymptomatic, so regular testing is crucial for early detection and treatment.

In conclusion, chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted bacterial infection that can cause serious complications if left untreated. Early detection and treatment are key to preventing long-term health problems and the spread of the infection. Safe sex practices and regular screening are also important for preventing chlamydia infections.

Cattle diseases refer to any health issues that affect cattle, including bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections, as well as genetic disorders and environmental factors. These diseases can have a significant impact on the health and productivity of cattle, as well as the livelihoods of farmers and ranchers who rely on them for their livelihood.

Types of Cattle Diseases

There are many different types of cattle diseases, including:

1. Bacterial diseases, such as brucellosis, anthrax, and botulism.
2. Viral diseases, such as bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) and bluetongue.
3. Parasitic diseases, such as heartwater and gapeworm.
4. Genetic disorders, such as polledness and cleft palate.
5. Environmental factors, such as heat stress and nutritional deficiencies.

Symptoms of Cattle Diseases

The symptoms of cattle diseases can vary depending on the specific disease, but may include:

1. Fever and respiratory problems
2. Diarrhea and vomiting
3. Weight loss and depression
4. Swelling and pain in joints or limbs
5. Discharge from the eyes or nose
6. Coughing or difficulty breathing
7. Lameness or reluctance to move
8. Changes in behavior, such as aggression or lethargy

Diagnosis and Treatment of Cattle Diseases

Diagnosing cattle diseases can be challenging, as the symptoms may be similar for different conditions. However, veterinarians use a combination of physical examination, laboratory tests, and medical history to make a diagnosis. Treatment options vary depending on the specific disease and may include antibiotics, vaccines, anti-inflammatory drugs, and supportive care such as fluids and nutritional supplements.

Prevention of Cattle Diseases

Preventing cattle diseases is essential for maintaining the health and productivity of your herd. Some preventative measures include:

1. Proper nutrition and hydration
2. Regular vaccinations and parasite control
3. Sanitary living conditions and frequent cleaning
4. Monitoring for signs of illness and seeking prompt veterinary care if symptoms arise
5. Implementing biosecurity measures such as isolating sick animals and quarantining new animals before introduction to the herd.

It is important to work closely with a veterinarian to develop a comprehensive health plan for your cattle herd, as they can provide guidance on vaccination schedules, parasite control methods, and disease prevention strategies tailored to your specific needs.

Conclusion
Cattle diseases can have a significant impact on the productivity and profitability of your herd, as well as the overall health of your animals. It is essential to be aware of the common cattle diseases, their symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention methods to ensure the health and well-being of your herd.

By working closely with a veterinarian and implementing preventative measures such as proper nutrition and sanitary living conditions, you can help protect your cattle from disease and maintain a productive and profitable herd. Remember, prevention is key when it comes to managing cattle diseases.

HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection is a condition in which the body is infected with HIV, a type of retrovirus that attacks the body's immune system. HIV infection can lead to AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), a condition in which the immune system is severely damaged and the body is unable to fight off infections and diseases.

There are several ways that HIV can be transmitted, including:

1. Sexual contact with an infected person
2. Sharing of needles or other drug paraphernalia with an infected person
3. Mother-to-child transmission during pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding
4. Blood transfusions ( although this is rare in developed countries due to screening processes)
5. Organ transplantation (again, rare)

The symptoms of HIV infection can be mild at first and may not appear until several years after infection. These symptoms can include:

1. Fever
2. Fatigue
3. Swollen glands in the neck, armpits, and groin
4. Rash
5. Muscle aches and joint pain
6. Night sweats
7. Diarrhea
8. Weight loss

If left untreated, HIV infection can progress to AIDS, which is a life-threatening condition that can cause a wide range of symptoms, including:

1. Opportunistic infections (such as pneumocystis pneumonia)
2. Cancer (such as Kaposi's sarcoma)
3. Wasting syndrome
4. Neurological problems (such as dementia and seizures)

HIV infection is diagnosed through a combination of blood tests and physical examination. Treatment typically involves antiretroviral therapy (ART), which is a combination of medications that work together to suppress the virus and slow the progression of the disease.

Prevention methods for HIV infection include:

1. Safe sex practices, such as using condoms and dental dams
2. Avoiding sharing needles or other drug-injecting equipment
3. Avoiding mother-to-child transmission during pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding
4. Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), which is a short-term treatment that can prevent infection after potential exposure to the virus
5. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), which is a daily medication that can prevent infection in people who are at high risk of being exposed to the virus.

It's important to note that HIV infection is manageable with proper treatment and care, and that people living with HIV can lead long and healthy lives. However, it's important to be aware of the risks and take steps to prevent transmission.

1. Tooth decay: Bacteria that cause tooth decay can reach the dentin layer of the tooth, causing inflammation and sensitivity.
2. Gum recession: When the gums pull back from the teeth, exposing the roots, the dentin becomes exposed and sensitive.
3. Cracks in the teeth: Cracks in the enamel or dentin layers of the tooth can allow bacteria and sensitivity-causing substances to enter the tooth, causing pain and discomfort.
4. Grinding and clenching: Grinding and clenching teeth can cause wear on the enamel and expose the dentin, leading to sensitivity.
5. Acid erosion: Frequent exposure to acidic foods and drinks, such as citrus fruits and soda, can wear away the enamel and expose the dentin, causing sensitivity.

Dentin sensitivity can be treated with a variety of methods, including:

1. Desensitizing toothpaste: Using a toothpaste specifically designed for dentin sensitivity can help block the dentinal tubules and reduce pain.
2. Fluoride treatments: Applying fluoride varnish or gel to the teeth can help strengthen the enamel and reduce sensitivity.
3. Dental sealants: Sealing the teeth with a plastic resin can help prevent bacteria and sensitivity-causing substances from entering the dentin.
4. Fillings: Filling in cavities or cracks in the teeth can help prevent bacteria and sensitivity-causing substances from reaching the dentin.
5. Root canal therapy: In severe cases of dentin sensitivity, a root canal may be necessary to remove infected tissue from the pulp chamber.

It is important to address dentin sensitivity as soon as possible to prevent further damage and discomfort. If you are experiencing dentin sensitivity, it is recommended that you visit a dentist for proper evaluation and treatment.

The burden of chronic diseases is significant, with over 70% of deaths worldwide attributed to them, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). In addition to the physical and emotional toll they take on individuals and their families, chronic diseases also pose a significant economic burden, accounting for a large proportion of healthcare expenditure.

In this article, we will explore the definition and impact of chronic diseases, as well as strategies for managing and living with them. We will also discuss the importance of early detection and prevention, as well as the role of healthcare providers in addressing the needs of individuals with chronic diseases.

What is a Chronic Disease?

A chronic disease is a condition that lasts for an extended period of time, often affecting daily life and activities. Unlike acute diseases, which have a specific beginning and end, chronic diseases are long-term and persistent. Examples of chronic diseases include:

1. Diabetes
2. Heart disease
3. Arthritis
4. Asthma
5. Cancer
6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
7. Chronic kidney disease (CKD)
8. Hypertension
9. Osteoporosis
10. Stroke

Impact of Chronic Diseases

The burden of chronic diseases is significant, with over 70% of deaths worldwide attributed to them, according to the WHO. In addition to the physical and emotional toll they take on individuals and their families, chronic diseases also pose a significant economic burden, accounting for a large proportion of healthcare expenditure.

Chronic diseases can also have a significant impact on an individual's quality of life, limiting their ability to participate in activities they enjoy and affecting their relationships with family and friends. Moreover, the financial burden of chronic diseases can lead to poverty and reduce economic productivity, thus having a broader societal impact.

Addressing Chronic Diseases

Given the significant burden of chronic diseases, it is essential that we address them effectively. This requires a multi-faceted approach that includes:

1. Lifestyle modifications: Encouraging healthy behaviors such as regular physical activity, a balanced diet, and smoking cessation can help prevent and manage chronic diseases.
2. Early detection and diagnosis: Identifying risk factors and detecting diseases early can help prevent or delay their progression.
3. Medication management: Effective medication management is crucial for controlling symptoms and slowing disease progression.
4. Multi-disciplinary care: Collaboration between healthcare providers, patients, and families is essential for managing chronic diseases.
5. Health promotion and disease prevention: Educating individuals about the risks of chronic diseases and promoting healthy behaviors can help prevent their onset.
6. Addressing social determinants of health: Social determinants such as poverty, education, and employment can have a significant impact on health outcomes. Addressing these factors is essential for reducing health disparities and improving overall health.
7. Investing in healthcare infrastructure: Investing in healthcare infrastructure, technology, and research is necessary to improve disease detection, diagnosis, and treatment.
8. Encouraging policy change: Policy changes can help create supportive environments for healthy behaviors and reduce the burden of chronic diseases.
9. Increasing public awareness: Raising public awareness about the risks and consequences of chronic diseases can help individuals make informed decisions about their health.
10. Providing support for caregivers: Chronic diseases can have a significant impact on family members and caregivers, so providing them with support is essential for improving overall health outcomes.

Conclusion

Chronic diseases are a major public health burden that affect millions of people worldwide. Addressing these diseases requires a multi-faceted approach that includes lifestyle changes, addressing social determinants of health, investing in healthcare infrastructure, encouraging policy change, increasing public awareness, and providing support for caregivers. By taking a comprehensive approach to chronic disease prevention and management, we can improve the health and well-being of individuals and communities worldwide.

Precancerous changes in the uterine cervix are called dysplasias, and they can be detected by a Pap smear, which is a routine screening test for women. If dysplasia is found, it can be treated with cryotherapy (freezing), laser therapy, or cone biopsy, which removes the affected cells.

Cervical cancer is rare in developed countries where Pap screening is widely available, but it remains a common cancer in developing countries where access to healthcare and screening is limited. The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has been shown to be effective in preventing cervical precancerous changes and cancer.

Cervical cancer can be treated with surgery, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy, depending on the stage and location of the cancer. The prognosis for early-stage cervical cancer is good, but advanced-stage cancer can be difficult to treat and may have a poor prognosis.

The following are some types of uterine cervical neoplasms:

1. Adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS): This is a precancerous condition that occurs when glandular cells on the surface of the cervix become abnormal and grow out of control.
2. Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN): This is a precancerous condition that occurs when abnormal cells are found on the surface of the cervix. There are several types of CIN, ranging from mild to severe.
3. Squamous cell carcinoma: This is the most common type of cervical cancer and arises from the squamous cells that line the cervix.
4. Adnexal carcinoma: This is a rare type of cervical cancer that arises from the glands or ducts near the cervix.
5. Small cell carcinoma: This is a rare and aggressive type of cervical cancer that grows rapidly and can spread quickly to other parts of the body.
6. Micropapillary uterine carcinoma: This is a rare type of cervical cancer that grows in a finger-like shape and can be difficult to diagnose.
7. Clear cell carcinoma: This is a rare type of cervical cancer that arises from clear cells and can be more aggressive than other types of cervical cancer.
8. Adenocarcinoma: This is a type of cervical cancer that arises from glandular cells and can be less aggressive than squamous cell carcinoma.
9. Sarcoma: This is a rare type of cervical cancer that arises from the connective tissue of the cervix.

The treatment options for uterine cervical neoplasms depend on the stage and location of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health and preferences. The following are some common treatments for uterine cervical neoplasms:

1. Hysterectomy: This is a surgical procedure to remove the uterus and may be recommended for early-stage cancers or precancerous changes.
2. Cryotherapy: This is a minimally invasive procedure that uses liquid nitrogen to freeze and destroy abnormal cells in the cervix.
3. Laser therapy: This is a minimally invasive procedure that uses a laser to remove or destroy abnormal cells in the cervix.
4. Cone biopsy: This is a surgical procedure to remove a small cone-shaped sample of tissue from the cervix to diagnose and treat early-stage cancers or precancerous changes.
5. Radiation therapy: This is a non-surgical treatment that uses high-energy rays to kill cancer cells and may be recommended for more advanced cancers or when the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.
6. Chemotherapy: This is a non-surgical treatment that uses drugs to kill cancer cells and may be recommended for more advanced cancers or when the cancer has spread to other parts of the body.
7. Immunotherapy: This is a non-surgical treatment that uses drugs to stimulate the immune system to fight cancer cells and may be recommended for more advanced cancers or when other treatments have failed.
8. Targeted therapy: This is a non-surgical treatment that uses drugs to target specific genes or proteins that contribute to cancer growth and development and may be recommended for more advanced cancers or when other treatments have failed.

It is important to note that the choice of treatment will depend on the stage and location of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health and preferences. Patients should discuss their treatment options with their doctor and develop a personalized plan that is right for them.

There are several subtypes of carcinoma, including:

1. Adenocarcinoma: This type of carcinoma originates in glandular cells, which produce fluids or mucus. Examples include breast cancer, prostate cancer, and colon cancer.
2. Squamous cell carcinoma: This type of carcinoma originates in squamous cells, which are found on the surface layers of skin and mucous membranes. Examples include head and neck cancers, cervical cancer, and anal cancer.
3. Basal cell carcinoma: This type of carcinoma originates in the deepest layer of skin, called the basal layer. It is the most common type of skin cancer and tends to grow slowly.
4. Neuroendocrine carcinoma: This type of carcinoma originates in cells that produce hormones and neurotransmitters. Examples include lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, and thyroid cancer.
5. Small cell carcinoma: This type of carcinoma is a highly aggressive form of lung cancer that spreads quickly to other parts of the body.

The signs and symptoms of carcinoma depend on the location and stage of the cancer. Some common symptoms include:

* A lump or mass
* Pain
* Skin changes, such as a new mole or a change in the color or texture of the skin
* Changes in bowel or bladder habits
* Abnormal bleeding

The diagnosis of carcinoma typically involves a combination of imaging tests, such as X-rays, CT scans, MRI scans, and PET scans, and a biopsy, which involves removing a small sample of tissue for examination under a microscope. Treatment options for carcinoma depend on the location and stage of the cancer and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these.

In conclusion, carcinoma is a type of cancer that originates in epithelial cells and can occur in various parts of the body. Early detection and treatment are important for improving outcomes.

References:

1. American Cancer Society. (2022). Carcinoma. Retrieved from
2. Mayo Clinic. (2022). Carcinoma. Retrieved from
3. MedlinePlus. (2022). Carcinoma. Retrieved from

There are several different types of pain, including:

1. Acute pain: This type of pain is sudden and severe, and it usually lasts for a short period of time. It can be caused by injuries, surgery, or other forms of tissue damage.
2. Chronic pain: This type of pain persists over a long period of time, often lasting more than 3 months. It can be caused by conditions such as arthritis, fibromyalgia, or nerve damage.
3. Neuropathic pain: This type of pain results from damage to the nervous system, and it can be characterized by burning, shooting, or stabbing sensations.
4. Visceral pain: This type of pain originates in the internal organs, and it can be difficult to localize.
5. Psychogenic pain: This type of pain is caused by psychological factors such as stress, anxiety, or depression.

The medical field uses a range of methods to assess and manage pain, including:

1. Pain rating scales: These are numerical scales that patients use to rate the intensity of their pain.
2. Pain diaries: These are records that patients keep to track their pain over time.
3. Clinical interviews: Healthcare providers use these to gather information about the patient's pain experience and other relevant symptoms.
4. Physical examination: This can help healthcare providers identify any underlying causes of pain, such as injuries or inflammation.
5. Imaging studies: These can be used to visualize the body and identify any structural abnormalities that may be contributing to the patient's pain.
6. Medications: There are a wide range of medications available to treat pain, including analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and muscle relaxants.
7. Alternative therapies: These can include acupuncture, massage, and physical therapy.
8. Interventional procedures: These are minimally invasive procedures that can be used to treat pain, such as nerve blocks and spinal cord stimulation.

It is important for healthcare providers to approach pain management with a multi-modal approach, using a combination of these methods to address the physical, emotional, and social aspects of pain. By doing so, they can help improve the patient's quality of life and reduce their suffering.

1. Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT): This is a condition where the body has difficulty regulating blood sugar levels after consuming a meal.
2. Impaired fasting glucose (IFG): This is a condition where the body has difficulty regulating blood sugar levels when fasting (not eating for a period of time).
3. Gestational diabetes: This is a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy, usually in the second or third trimester.
4. Type 2 diabetes: This is a chronic condition where the body cannot effectively use insulin to regulate blood sugar levels.

The symptoms of glucose intolerance can vary depending on the type and severity of the condition. Some common symptoms include:

* High blood sugar levels
* Increased thirst and urination
* Fatigue
* Blurred vision
* Cuts or bruises that are slow to heal
* Tingling or numbness in the hands and feet

The diagnosis of glucose intolerance is typically made through a combination of physical examination, medical history, and laboratory tests such as:

* Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) test: This measures the level of glucose in the blood after an overnight fast.
* Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT): This measures the body's ability to regulate blood sugar levels after consuming a sugary drink.
* Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test: This measures the average blood sugar level over the past 2-3 months.

Treatment for glucose intolerance usually involves lifestyle changes such as:

* Eating a healthy, balanced diet that is low in added sugars and refined carbohydrates
* Increasing physical activity to help the body use insulin more effectively
* Losing weight if you are overweight or obese
* Monitoring blood sugar levels regularly

In some cases, medication may be prescribed to help manage blood sugar levels. These include:

* Metformin: This is a type of oral medication that helps the body use insulin more effectively.
* Sulfonylureas: These medications stimulate the release of insulin from the pancreas.
* Thiazolidinediones: These medications improve the body's sensitivity to insulin.

If left untreated, glucose intolerance can lead to a range of complications such as:

* Type 2 diabetes: This is a more severe form of glucose intolerance that can cause damage to the body's organs and tissues.
* Cardiovascular disease: High blood sugar levels can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke.
* Nerve damage: High blood sugar levels over an extended period can damage the nerves, leading to numbness, tingling, and pain in the hands and feet.
* Kidney damage: High blood sugar levels can damage the kidneys and lead to kidney disease.
* Eye damage: High blood sugar levels can damage the blood vessels in the eyes, leading to vision problems.

It is important to note that not everyone with glucose intolerance will develop these complications, but it is important to manage the condition to reduce the risk of these complications occurring.

There are several different types of glaucoma, including:

* Open-angle glaucoma: This is the most common form of glaucoma, and is caused by slowed drainage of fluid from the eye.
* Closed-angle glaucoma: This type of glaucoma is caused by a blockage in the drainage channels of the eye, leading to a sudden increase in pressure.
* Normal-tension glaucoma: This type of glaucoma is caused by damage to the optic nerve even though the pressure in the eye is within the normal range.
* Congenital glaucoma: This is a rare type of glaucoma that is present at birth, and is caused by a developmental defect in the eye's drainage system.

Symptoms of glaucoma can include:

* Blurred vision
* Loss of peripheral vision
* Eye pain or pressure
* Redness of the eye
* Seeing halos around lights

Glaucoma is typically diagnosed with a combination of visual acuity tests, dilated eye exams, and imaging tests such as ultrasound or MRI. Treatment for glaucoma usually involves medication to reduce pressure in the eye, but may also include surgery to improve drainage or laser therapy to prevent further damage to the optic nerve.

Early detection and treatment of glaucoma is important to prevent vision loss, so it is important to have regular eye exams, especially if you are at risk for the condition. Risk factors for glaucoma include:

* Age (over 60)
* Family history of glaucoma
* Diabetes
* High blood pressure
* African or Hispanic ancestry

Overall, glaucoma is a serious eye condition that can cause vision loss if left untreated. Early detection and treatment are key to preventing vision loss and maintaining good eye health.

Liver neoplasms, also known as liver tumors or hepatic tumors, are abnormal growths of tissue in the liver. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant liver tumors can be primary, meaning they originate in the liver, or metastatic, meaning they spread to the liver from another part of the body.

There are several types of liver neoplasms, including:

1. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): This is the most common type of primary liver cancer and arises from the main cells of the liver (hepatocytes). HCC is often associated with cirrhosis and can be caused by viral hepatitis or alcohol abuse.
2. Cholangiocarcinoma: This type of cancer arises from the cells lining the bile ducts within the liver (cholangiocytes). Cholangiocarcinoma is rare and often diagnosed at an advanced stage.
3. Hemangiosarcoma: This is a rare type of cancer that originates in the blood vessels of the liver. It is most commonly seen in dogs but can also occur in humans.
4. Fibromas: These are benign tumors that arise from the connective tissue of the liver (fibrocytes). Fibromas are usually small and do not spread to other parts of the body.
5. Adenomas: These are benign tumors that arise from the glandular cells of the liver (hepatocytes). Adenomas are usually small and do not spread to other parts of the body.

The symptoms of liver neoplasms vary depending on their size, location, and whether they are benign or malignant. Common symptoms include abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes). Diagnosis is typically made through a combination of imaging tests such as CT scans, MRI scans, and ultrasound, and a biopsy to confirm the presence of cancer cells.

Treatment options for liver neoplasms depend on the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health. Surgery may be an option for some patients with small, localized tumors, while others may require chemotherapy or radiation therapy to shrink the tumor before surgery can be performed. In some cases, liver transplantation may be necessary.

Prognosis for liver neoplasms varies depending on the type and stage of the cancer. In general, early detection and treatment improve the prognosis, while advanced-stage disease is associated with a poorer prognosis.

The causes of colorectal neoplasms are not fully understood, but factors such as age, genetics, diet, and lifestyle have been implicated. Symptoms of colorectal cancer can include changes in bowel habits, blood in the stool, abdominal pain, and weight loss. Screening for colorectal cancer is recommended for adults over the age of 50, as it can help detect early-stage tumors and improve survival rates.

There are several subtypes of colorectal neoplasms, including adenomas (which are precancerous polyps), carcinomas (which are malignant tumors), and lymphomas (which are cancers of the immune system). Treatment options for colorectal cancer depend on the stage and location of the tumor, but may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or a combination of these.

Research into the causes and treatment of colorectal neoplasms is ongoing, and there has been significant progress in recent years. Advances in screening and treatment have improved survival rates for patients with colorectal cancer, and there is hope that continued research will lead to even more effective treatments in the future.

There are two types of hypertension:

1. Primary Hypertension: This type of hypertension has no identifiable cause and is also known as essential hypertension. It accounts for about 90% of all cases of hypertension.
2. Secondary Hypertension: This type of hypertension is caused by an underlying medical condition or medication. It accounts for about 10% of all cases of hypertension.

Some common causes of secondary hypertension include:

* Kidney disease
* Adrenal gland disorders
* Hormonal imbalances
* Certain medications
* Sleep apnea
* Cocaine use

There are also several risk factors for hypertension, including:

* Age (the risk increases with age)
* Family history of hypertension
* Obesity
* Lack of exercise
* High sodium intake
* Low potassium intake
* Stress

Hypertension is often asymptomatic, and it can cause damage to the blood vessels and organs over time. Some potential complications of hypertension include:

* Heart disease (e.g., heart attacks, heart failure)
* Stroke
* Kidney disease (e.g., chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease)
* Vision loss (e.g., retinopathy)
* Peripheral artery disease

Hypertension is typically diagnosed through blood pressure readings taken over a period of time. Treatment for hypertension may include lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, stress management), medications, or a combination of both. The goal of treatment is to reduce the risk of complications and improve quality of life.

Disease progression can be classified into several types based on the pattern of worsening:

1. Chronic progressive disease: In this type, the disease worsens steadily over time, with a gradual increase in symptoms and decline in function. Examples include rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and Parkinson's disease.
2. Acute progressive disease: This type of disease worsens rapidly over a short period, often followed by periods of stability. Examples include sepsis, acute myocardial infarction (heart attack), and stroke.
3. Cyclical disease: In this type, the disease follows a cycle of worsening and improvement, with periodic exacerbations and remissions. Examples include multiple sclerosis, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Recurrent disease: This type is characterized by episodes of worsening followed by periods of recovery. Examples include migraine headaches, asthma, and appendicitis.
5. Catastrophic disease: In this type, the disease progresses rapidly and unpredictably, with a poor prognosis. Examples include cancer, AIDS, and organ failure.

Disease progression can be influenced by various factors, including:

1. Genetics: Some diseases are inherited and may have a predetermined course of progression.
2. Lifestyle: Factors such as smoking, lack of exercise, and poor diet can contribute to disease progression.
3. Environmental factors: Exposure to toxins, allergens, and other environmental stressors can influence disease progression.
4. Medical treatment: The effectiveness of medical treatment can impact disease progression, either by slowing or halting the disease process or by causing unintended side effects.
5. Co-morbidities: The presence of multiple diseases or conditions can interact and affect each other's progression.

Understanding the type and factors influencing disease progression is essential for developing effective treatment plans and improving patient outcomes.

In hyperinsulinism, the body produces too much insulin, leading to a range of symptoms including:

1. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar): Excessive insulin can cause blood sugar levels to drop too low, leading to hypoglycemic symptoms such as shakiness, dizziness, confusion, and rapid heartbeat.
2. Weight gain: Hyperinsulinism can lead to weight gain due to the body's inability to effectively use glucose for energy production.
3. Fatigue: Excessive insulin can cause fatigue, as the body's cells are not able to effectively use glucose for energy production.
4. Mood changes: Hyperinsulinism can lead to mood changes such as irritability, anxiety, and depression.
5. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS): Women with PCOS are at a higher risk of developing hyperinsulinism due to insulin resistance.
6. Gestational diabetes: Hyperinsulinism can occur during pregnancy, leading to gestational diabetes.
7. Acanthosis nigricans: A condition characterized by dark, velvety patches on the skin, often found in the armpits, neck, and groin area.
8. Cancer: Hyperinsulinism has been linked to an increased risk of certain types of cancer, such as breast, colon, and pancreatic cancer.
9. Cardiovascular disease: Excessive insulin can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, including high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.
10. Cognitive impairment: Hyperinsulinism has been linked to cognitive impairment and an increased risk of dementia.

There are several causes of hyperinsulinism, including:

1. Insulin-producing tumors: Tumors that produce excessive amounts of insulin can lead to hyperinsulinism.
2. Familial hyperinsulinism: A genetic disorder that affects the regulation of insulin secretion and action.
3. Pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction: Dysfunction in the pancreatic beta cells, which produce insulin, can lead to hyperinsulinism.
4. Medications: Certain medications such as steroids and certain psychiatric drugs can cause hyperinsulinism.
5. Pituitary tumors: Tumors in the pituitary gland can lead to excessive secretion of growth hormone, which can stimulate insulin production.
6. Maternal diabetes during pregnancy: Women with diabetes during pregnancy may experience hyperinsulinism due to increased insulin resistance and higher insulin levels.
7. Gestational diabetes: High blood sugar during pregnancy can lead to hyperinsulinism.
8. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS): Women with PCOS may experience hyperinsulinism due to insulin resistance and high insulin levels.
9. Cushing's syndrome: An endocrine disorder caused by excessive cortisol production can lead to hyperinsulinism.
10. Other medical conditions: Certain medical conditions such as thyroid disorders, adrenal gland disorders, and pituitary gland disorders can also cause hyperinsulinism.

It's important to note that some individuals with hyperinsulinism may not experience any symptoms, while others may experience a range of symptoms, including:

1. Weight gain
2. Fatigue
3. Headaches
4. Numbness or tingling in the hands and feet
5. Memory loss and difficulty concentrating
6. Mood changes, such as anxiety and depression
7. Skin problems, such as acne and thinning skin
8. Increased risk of heart disease and stroke
9. Growth retardation in children
10. Increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes

If you suspect that you or your child may have hyperinsulinism, it's important to consult with a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment. A doctor may perform a physical examination, take a medical history, and order blood tests to determine if hyperinsulinism is present and what may be causing it. Treatment options for hyperinsulinism will depend on the underlying cause of the condition. In some cases, medications such as metformin or other anti-diabetic drugs may be prescribed to help regulate blood sugar levels and reduce insulin production. In other cases, surgery or lifestyle changes may be necessary. With proper diagnosis and treatment, it is possible to manage hyperinsulinism and prevent or manage related health complications.

There are several types of colonic neoplasms, including:

1. Adenomas: These are benign growths that are usually precursors to colorectal cancer.
2. Carcinomas: These are malignant tumors that arise from the epithelial lining of the colon.
3. Sarcomas: These are rare malignant tumors that arise from the connective tissue of the colon.
4. Lymphomas: These are cancers of the immune system that can affect the colon.

Colonic neoplasms can cause a variety of symptoms, including bleeding, abdominal pain, and changes in bowel habits. They are often diagnosed through a combination of medical imaging tests (such as colonoscopy or CT scan) and biopsy. Treatment for colonic neoplasms depends on the type and stage of the tumor, and may include surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation therapy.

Overall, colonic neoplasms are a common condition that can have serious consequences if left untreated. It is important for individuals to be aware of their risk factors and to undergo regular screening for colon cancer to help detect and treat any abnormal growths or tumors in the colon.

The amblyopic eye may have reduced visual sharpness and/or abnormal ocular alignment (strabismus). The other eye is generally normal or has better vision. Amblyopia is often present at birth but may not be noticed until the child is a few years old. It can also result from various conditions, such as strabismus, cataracts, or differences in the refractive error of the two eyes (anisometropic amblyopia).

The most common form of amblyopia is anisometropic amblyopia, which occurs when there is a significant difference in the refractive power between the two eyes. This can cause the brain to favor one eye over the other, leading to reduced vision in the amblyopic eye. Amblyopia can be treated with glasses or contact lenses, patching the better eye to force the weaker eye to work harder, or surgery to correct strabismus or anisometropia.

Early detection and treatment are important to prevent long-term visual impairment. However, amblyopia can sometimes persist even after treatment, and it is a leading cause of monocular vision in adults.

Dermatitis, contact can be acute or chronic, depending on the severity and duration of the exposure. In acute cases, the symptoms may resolve within a few days after removing the offending substance. Chronic dermatitis, on the other hand, can persist for weeks or even months, and may require ongoing treatment to manage the symptoms.

The symptoms of contact dermatitis can vary depending on the individual and the severity of the exposure. Common symptoms include:

* Redness and inflammation of the skin
* Itching and burning sensations
* Swelling and blistering
* Cracks or fissures in the skin
* Difficulty healing or recurring infections

In severe cases, contact dermatitis can lead to complications such as:

* Infection with bacteria or fungi
* Scarring and disfigurement
* Emotional distress and anxiety

Diagnosis of contact dermatitis is typically made based on the patient's medical history and physical examination. Allergic patch testing may also be performed to identify specific allergens that are causing the condition.

Treatment for contact dermatitis usually involves avoiding the offending substance and using topical or oral medications to manage symptoms. In severe cases, systemic corticosteroids or immunosuppressants may be prescribed. Phototherapy and alternative therapies such as herbal remedies or acupuncture may also be considered.

Prevention of contact dermatitis involves identifying and avoiding substances that cause an allergic reaction or skin irritation. Individuals with a history of contact dermatitis should take precautions when handling new substances, and should be aware of the potential for cross-reactivity between different allergens.

SCC typically appears as a firm, flat, or raised bump on the skin, and may be pink, red, or scaly. The cancer cells are usually well-differentiated, meaning they resemble normal squamous cells, but they can grow rapidly and invade surrounding tissues if left untreated.

SCC is more common in fair-skinned individuals and those who spend a lot of time in the sun, as UV radiation can damage the skin cells and increase the risk of cancer. The cancer can also spread to other parts of the body, such as lymph nodes or organs, and can be life-threatening if not treated promptly and effectively.

Treatment for SCC usually involves surgery to remove the cancerous tissue, and may also include radiation therapy or chemotherapy to kill any remaining cancer cells. Early detection and treatment are important to improve outcomes for patients with SCC.

The term cough is used to describe a wide range of symptoms that can be caused by various conditions affecting the respiratory system. Coughs can be classified as either dry or productive, depending on whether they produce mucus or not. Dry coughs are often described as hacking, barking, or non-productive, while productive coughs are those that bring up mucus or other substances from the lungs or airways.

Causes of Cough:

There are many potential causes of cough, including:

* Upper respiratory tract infections such as the common cold and influenza
* Lower respiratory tract infections such as bronchitis and pneumonia
* Allergies, including hay fever and allergic rhinitis
* Asthma and other chronic lung conditions
* Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which can cause coughing due to stomach acid flowing back up into the throat
* Environmental factors such as smoke, dust, and pollution
* Medications such as ACE inhibitors and beta blockers.

Symptoms of Cough:

In addition to the characteristic forceful expulsion of air from the lungs, coughs can be accompanied by a range of other symptoms that may include:

* Chest tightness or discomfort
* Shortness of breath or wheezing
* Fatigue and exhaustion
* Headache
* Sore throat or hoarseness
* Coughing up mucus or other substances.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Cough:

The diagnosis and treatment of cough will depend on the underlying cause. In some cases, a cough may be a symptom of a more serious condition that requires medical attention, such as pneumonia or asthma. In other cases, a cough may be caused by a minor infection or allergy that can be treated with over-the-counter medications and self-care measures.

Some common treatments for cough include:

* Cough suppressants such as dextromethorphan or pholcodine to relieve the urge to cough
* Expectorants such as guaifenesin to help loosen and clear mucus from the airways
* Antihistamines to reduce the severity of allergic reactions and help relieve a cough.
* Antibiotics if the cough is caused by a bacterial infection
* Inhalers and nebulizers to deliver medication directly to the lungs.

It is important to note that while cough can be a symptom of a serious condition, it is not always necessary to see a doctor for a cough. However, if you experience any of the following, you should seek medical attention:

* A persistent and severe cough that lasts for more than a few days or weeks
* A cough that worsens at night or with exertion
* Coughing up blood or mucus that is thick and yellow or greenish in color
* Shortness of breath or chest pain
* Fever, chills, or body aches that are severe or persistent.

It is also important to note that while over-the-counter medications can provide relief from symptoms, they may not address the underlying cause of the cough. If you have a persistent or severe cough, it is important to see a doctor to determine the cause and receive proper treatment.

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the most common type of malignant pancreatic neoplasm and accounts for approximately 85% of all pancreatic cancers. It originates in the glandular tissue of the pancreas and has a poor prognosis, with a five-year survival rate of less than 10%.

Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are less common but more treatable than pancreatic adenocarcinoma. These tumors originate in the hormone-producing cells of the pancreas and can produce excess hormones that cause a variety of symptoms, such as diabetes or high blood sugar. PNETs are classified into two main types: functional and non-functional. Functional PNETs produce excess hormones and are more aggressive than non-functional tumors.

Other rare types of pancreatic neoplasms include acinar cell carcinoma, ampullary cancer, and oncocytic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. These tumors are less common than pancreatic adenocarcinoma and PNETs but can be equally aggressive and difficult to treat.

The symptoms of pancreatic neoplasms vary depending on the type and location of the tumor, but they often include abdominal pain, weight loss, jaundice, and fatigue. Diagnosis is typically made through a combination of imaging tests such as CT scans, endoscopic ultrasound, and biopsy. Treatment options for pancreatic neoplasms depend on the type and stage of the tumor but may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or a combination of these.

Prognosis for patients with pancreatic neoplasms is generally poor, especially for those with advanced stages of disease. However, early detection and treatment can improve survival rates. Research into the causes and mechanisms of pancreatic neoplasms is ongoing, with a focus on developing new and more effective treatments for these devastating diseases.




Types of experimental neoplasms include:

* Xenografts: tumors that are transplanted into animals from another species, often humans.
* Transgenic tumors: tumors that are created by introducing cancer-causing genes into an animal's genome.
* Chemically-induced tumors: tumors that are caused by exposure to certain chemicals or drugs.

The use of experimental neoplasms in research has led to significant advances in our understanding of cancer biology and the development of new treatments for the disease. However, the use of animals in cancer research is a controversial topic and alternatives to animal models are being developed and implemented.

There are several different types of drug hypersensitivity reactions, including:

1. Maculopapular exanthema (MPE): This is a type of allergic reaction that causes a red, itchy rash to appear on the skin. It can be caused by a variety of medications, including antibiotics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
2. Exfoliative dermatitis: This is a more severe form of MPE that can cause widespread scaling and peeling of the skin. It is often associated with reactions to antibiotics and other medications.
3. Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS): This is a rare but potentially life-threatening condition that can be caused by certain medications, including antibiotics and NSAIDs. SJS can cause blisters to form on the skin and mucous membranes, as well as fever and fatigue.
4. Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN): This is a severe and potentially life-threatening condition that can be caused by certain medications, including antibiotics and NSAIDs. TEN can cause widespread peeling of the skin, as well as fever and fatigue.
5. Anaphylaxis: This is a severe allergic reaction that can be caused by a variety of medications, including antibiotics and NSAIDs. It can cause symptoms such as hives, itching, swelling, and difficulty breathing.

Drug hypersensitivity reactions can be diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, medical history, and laboratory tests. Treatment typically involves discontinuing the medication that is causing the reaction, as well as providing supportive care to manage symptoms such as fever, itching, and pain. In severe cases, hospitalization may be necessary to monitor and treat the reaction.

Prevention of drug hypersensitivity reactions can be challenging, but there are several strategies that can help reduce the risk. These include:

1. Gradual dose escalation: When starting a new medication, it is important to gradually increase the dose over time to allow the body to adjust.
2. Monitoring for signs of a reaction: Patients should be monitored closely for signs of a reaction, such as hives, itching, or difficulty breathing.
3. Avoiding certain medications: In some cases, it may be necessary to avoid certain medications that are known to cause hypersensitivity reactions.
4. Skin testing: Skin testing can be used to determine whether a patient is allergic to a particular medication before starting treatment.
5. Desensitization: In some cases, desensitization therapy may be used to gradually expose the patient to the medication that is causing the reaction, with the goal of reducing the risk of an adverse event.

There are several risk factors for developing HCC, including:

* Cirrhosis, which can be caused by heavy alcohol consumption, viral hepatitis (such as hepatitis B and C), or fatty liver disease
* Family history of liver disease
* Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
* Diabetes
* Obesity

HCC can be challenging to diagnose, as the symptoms are non-specific and can be similar to those of other conditions. However, some common symptoms of HCC include:

* Yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice)
* Fatigue
* Loss of appetite
* Abdominal pain or discomfort
* Weight loss

If HCC is suspected, a doctor may perform several tests to confirm the diagnosis, including:

* Imaging tests, such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI, to look for tumors in the liver
* Blood tests to check for liver function and detect certain substances that are produced by the liver
* Biopsy, which involves removing a small sample of tissue from the liver to examine under a microscope

Once HCC is diagnosed, treatment options will depend on several factors, including the stage and location of the cancer, the patient's overall health, and their personal preferences. Treatment options may include:

* Surgery to remove the tumor or parts of the liver
* Ablation, which involves destroying the cancer cells using heat or cold
* Chemoembolization, which involves injecting chemotherapy drugs into the hepatic artery to reach the cancer cells
* Targeted therapy, which uses drugs or other substances to target specific molecules that are involved in the growth and spread of the cancer

Overall, the prognosis for HCC is poor, with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 20%. However, early detection and treatment can improve outcomes. It is important for individuals at high risk for HCC to be monitored regularly by a healthcare provider, and to seek medical attention if they experience any symptoms.

Symptoms of gonorrhea in men include:

* A burning sensation when urinating
* Discharge from the penis
* Painful or swollen testicles
* Painful urination

Symptoms of gonorrhea in women include:

* Increased vaginal discharge
* Painful urination
* Painful intercourse
* Abnormal vaginal bleeding

Gonorrhea can be diagnosed through a physical exam and laboratory tests, such as a urine test or a swab of the affected area. It is typically treated with antibiotics.

If left untreated, gonorrhea can cause serious complications, including:

* Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in women
* Epididymitis (inflammation of the tube that carries sperm) in men
* Infertility
* Chronic pain
* Increased risk of HIV transmission

Gonorrhea is a reportable disease, meaning that healthcare providers are required by law to report cases to public health authorities. This helps to track and prevent the spread of the infection.

Prevention methods for gonorrhea include:

* Safe sex practices, such as using condoms or dental dams
* Avoiding sexual contact with someone who has gonorrhea
* Getting regularly tested for STIs
* Using pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention

It is important to note that gonorrhea can be asymptomatic, meaning that individuals may not experience any symptoms even if they have the infection. Therefore, regular testing is important for early detection and treatment.

The symptoms of malignant pleural effusion can vary depending on the location and size of the tumor and the amount of fluid accumulated. Common symptoms include:

* Chest pain or discomfort
* Shortness of breath (dyspnea)
* Coughing up blood or pink, frothy liquid (hemoptysis)
* Fatigue
* Weight loss
* Night sweats
* Fevers

A diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion is typically made based on a combination of physical examination findings, medical imaging studies such as chest X-rays or CT scans, and laboratory tests to evaluate the fluid drained from the pleural space.

Treatment for malignant pleural effusion depends on the underlying cause and may include:

* Chemotherapy to shrink the tumor and reduce fluid buildup
* Radiation therapy to target cancer cells in the chest
* Surgery to remove the cancerous tissue or drain the fluid
* Pain management medications to relieve chest pain and discomfort.

The symptoms of visceral leishmaniasis can vary depending on the severity of the infection, but may include:

* Fever
* Fatigue
* Loss of appetite
* Weight loss
* Enlargement of the liver and spleen
* Pain in the abdomen
* Anemia
* Low blood platelet count
* Low white blood cell count

If left untreated, visceral leishmaniasis can be fatal. Treatment is typically with antiparasitic drugs, such as miltefosine or amphotericin B, and supportive care to manage symptoms and prevent complications.

It is important to note that visceral leishmaniasis is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition, and prompt medical attention is necessary for effective treatment and management.

Lymphatic metastasis occurs when cancer cells enter the lymphatic vessels and are carried through the lymphatic system to other parts of the body. This can happen through several mechanisms, including:

1. Direct invasion: Cancer cells can invade the nearby lymphatic vessels and spread through them.
2. Lymphatic vessel embolization: Cancer cells can block the flow of lymphatic fluid and cause the formation of a clot-like structure, which can trap cancer cells and allow them to grow.
3. Lymphatic vessel invasion: Cancer cells can infiltrate the walls of lymphatic vessels and spread through them.

Lymphatic metastasis is a common mechanism for the spread of cancer, particularly in the breast, melanoma, and other cancers that have a high risk of lymphatic invasion. The presence of lymphatic metastasis in a patient's body can indicate a more aggressive cancer and a poorer prognosis.

Treatment for lymphatic metastasis typically involves a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Surgery may be used to remove any affected lymph nodes or other tumors that have spread through the lymphatic system. Chemotherapy may be used to kill any remaining cancer cells, while radiation therapy may be used to shrink the tumors and relieve symptoms.

In summary, lymphatic metastasis is a common mechanism for the spread of cancer through the body, particularly in cancers that originate in organs with a high lymphatic drainage. Treatment typically involves a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy to remove or shrink the tumors and relieve symptoms.

Treatment involves administration of anti-TB drugs, usually in combination with supportive care to manage symptoms and prevent complications such as seizures and brain damage. Treatment can take several months and must be completed even if symptoms improve before finishing treatment.

Prevention is difficult because TB bacteria are often resistant to standard antibiotics, so it's important for individuals with HIV or other conditions that weaken the immune system to avoid exposure to TB bacteria whenever possible and receive regular screening tests.

There are several types of lymphoma, including:

1. Hodgkin lymphoma: This is a type of lymphoma that originates in the white blood cells called Reed-Sternberg cells. It is characterized by the presence of giant cells with multiple nucleoli.
2. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL): This is a type of lymphoma that does not meet the criteria for Hodgkin lymphoma. There are many subtypes of NHL, each with its own unique characteristics and behaviors.
3. Cutaneous lymphoma: This type of lymphoma affects the skin and can take several forms, including cutaneous B-cell lymphoma and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
4. Primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma: This is a rare type of lymphoma that develops in the brain or spinal cord.
5. Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD): This is a type of lymphoma that develops in people who have undergone an organ transplant, often as a result of immunosuppressive therapy.

The symptoms of lymphoma can vary depending on the type and location of the cancer. Some common symptoms include:

* Swollen lymph nodes
* Fever
* Fatigue
* Weight loss
* Night sweats
* Itching

Lymphoma is diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, imaging tests (such as CT scans or PET scans), and biopsies. Treatment options for lymphoma depend on the type and stage of the cancer, and may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunotherapy, or stem cell transplantation.

Overall, lymphoma is a complex and diverse group of cancers that can affect people of all ages and backgrounds. While it can be challenging to diagnose and treat, advances in medical technology and research have improved the outlook for many patients with lymphoma.

Some common examples of bacterial infections include:

1. Urinary tract infections (UTIs)
2. Respiratory infections such as pneumonia and bronchitis
3. Skin infections such as cellulitis and abscesses
4. Bone and joint infections such as osteomyelitis
5. Infected wounds or burns
6. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as chlamydia and gonorrhea
7. Food poisoning caused by bacteria such as salmonella and E. coli.

In severe cases, bacterial infections can lead to life-threatening complications such as sepsis or blood poisoning. It is important to seek medical attention if symptoms persist or worsen over time. Proper diagnosis and treatment can help prevent these complications and ensure a full recovery.

Falciparum malaria can cause a range of symptoms, including fever, chills, headache, muscle and joint pain, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. In severe cases, the disease can lead to anemia, organ failure, and death.

Diagnosis of falciparum malaria typically involves a physical examination, medical history, and laboratory tests to detect the presence of parasites in the blood or other bodily fluids. Treatment usually involves the use of antimalarial drugs, such as artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) or quinine, which can effectively cure the disease if administered promptly.

Prevention of falciparum malaria is critical to reducing the risk of infection, and this includes the use of insecticide-treated bed nets, indoor residual spraying (IRS), and preventive medications for travelers to high-risk areas. Eliminating standing water around homes and communities can also help reduce the number of mosquitoes and the spread of the disease.

In summary, falciparum malaria is a severe and life-threatening form of malaria caused by the Plasmodium falciparum parasite, which is responsible for the majority of malaria-related deaths worldwide. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent complications and death from this disease. Prevention measures include the use of bed nets, indoor spraying, and preventive medications, as well as reducing standing water around homes and communities.

There are several key features of inflammation:

1. Increased blood flow: Blood vessels in the affected area dilate, allowing more blood to flow into the tissue and bringing with it immune cells, nutrients, and other signaling molecules.
2. Leukocyte migration: White blood cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes, migrate towards the site of inflammation in response to chemical signals.
3. Release of mediators: Inflammatory mediators, such as cytokines and chemokines, are released by immune cells and other cells in the affected tissue. These molecules help to coordinate the immune response and attract more immune cells to the site of inflammation.
4. Activation of immune cells: Immune cells, such as macrophages and T cells, become activated and start to phagocytose (engulf) pathogens or damaged tissue.
5. Increased heat production: Inflammation can cause an increase in metabolic activity in the affected tissue, leading to increased heat production.
6. Redness and swelling: Increased blood flow and leakiness of blood vessels can cause redness and swelling in the affected area.
7. Pain: Inflammation can cause pain through the activation of nociceptors (pain-sensing neurons) and the release of pro-inflammatory mediators.

Inflammation can be acute or chronic. Acute inflammation is a short-term response to injury or infection, which helps to resolve the issue quickly. Chronic inflammation is a long-term response that can cause ongoing damage and diseases such as arthritis, asthma, and cancer.

There are several types of inflammation, including:

1. Acute inflammation: A short-term response to injury or infection.
2. Chronic inflammation: A long-term response that can cause ongoing damage and diseases.
3. Autoimmune inflammation: An inappropriate immune response against the body's own tissues.
4. Allergic inflammation: An immune response to a harmless substance, such as pollen or dust mites.
5. Parasitic inflammation: An immune response to parasites, such as worms or fungi.
6. Bacterial inflammation: An immune response to bacteria.
7. Viral inflammation: An immune response to viruses.
8. Fungal inflammation: An immune response to fungi.

There are several ways to reduce inflammation, including:

1. Medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs).
2. Lifestyle changes, such as a healthy diet, regular exercise, stress management, and getting enough sleep.
3. Alternative therapies, such as acupuncture, herbal supplements, and mind-body practices.
4. Addressing underlying conditions, such as hormonal imbalances, gut health issues, and chronic infections.
5. Using anti-inflammatory compounds found in certain foods, such as omega-3 fatty acids, turmeric, and ginger.

It's important to note that chronic inflammation can lead to a range of health problems, including:

1. Arthritis
2. Diabetes
3. Heart disease
4. Cancer
5. Alzheimer's disease
6. Parkinson's disease
7. Autoimmune disorders, such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis.

Therefore, it's important to manage inflammation effectively to prevent these complications and improve overall health and well-being.

1. Parvovirus (Parvo): A highly contagious viral disease that affects dogs of all ages and breeds, causing symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, and severe dehydration.
2. Distemper: A serious viral disease that can affect dogs of all ages and breeds, causing symptoms such as fever, coughing, and seizures.
3. Rabies: A deadly viral disease that affects dogs and other animals, transmitted through the saliva of infected animals, and causing symptoms such as aggression, confusion, and paralysis.
4. Heartworms: A common condition caused by a parasitic worm that infects the heart and lungs of dogs, leading to symptoms such as coughing, fatigue, and difficulty breathing.
5. Ticks and fleas: These external parasites can cause skin irritation, infection, and disease in dogs, including Lyme disease and tick-borne encephalitis.
6. Canine hip dysplasia (CHD): A genetic condition that affects the hip joint of dogs, causing symptoms such as arthritis, pain, and mobility issues.
7. Osteosarcoma: A type of bone cancer that affects dogs, often diagnosed in older dogs and causing symptoms such as lameness, swelling, and pain.
8. Allergies: Dog allergies can cause skin irritation, ear infections, and other health issues, and may be triggered by environmental factors or specific ingredients in their diet.
9. Gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV): A life-threatening condition that occurs when a dog's stomach twists and fills with gas, causing symptoms such as vomiting, pain, and difficulty breathing.
10. Cruciate ligament injuries: Common in active dogs, these injuries can cause joint instability, pain, and mobility issues.

It is important to monitor your dog's health regularly and seek veterinary care if you notice any changes or abnormalities in their behavior, appetite, or physical condition.

The severity of coronary stenosis can range from mild to severe, with blockages ranging from 15% to over 90%. In mild cases, lifestyle changes and medication may be enough to manage symptoms. However, more severe cases typically require interventional procedures such as angioplasty or bypass surgery to improve blood flow to the heart.

Symptoms of pleural TB may include:

* Chest pain
* Coughing up blood or mucus
* Shortness of breath
* Fatigue
* Weight loss
* Night sweats
* Fever

Pleural TB can be difficult to diagnose because the symptoms are often similar to those of other conditions, such as pneumonia or cancer. A diagnosis is typically made through a combination of physical examination, imaging tests (such as chest X-rays or CT scans), and laboratory tests (such as sputum smears or cultures).

Treatment of pleural TB usually involves a combination of antibiotics and surgery. Antibiotics are used to kill the TB bacteria, and surgery may be necessary to remove infected tissue or repair any damage to the lungs or chest cavity. In some cases, hospitalization may be required to ensure proper treatment and monitoring.

Pleural TB is more common in developing countries and in areas with high rates of TB infection. It can also be a complication of latent TB infection, which is a condition in which the TB bacteria are present in the body but not actively causing disease.

Prevention of pleural TB includes vaccination against TB, proper ventilation and air filtration to reduce exposure to the bacteria, and early detection and treatment of latent TB infection.

There are several symptoms of RA, including:

1. Joint pain and stiffness, especially in the hands and feet
2. Swollen and warm joints
3. Redness and tenderness in the affected areas
4. Fatigue, fever, and loss of appetite
5. Loss of range of motion in the affected joints
6. Firm bumps of tissue under the skin (rheumatoid nodules)

RA can be diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, medical history, blood tests, and imaging studies such as X-rays or ultrasound. Treatment typically involves a combination of medications, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and biologic agents. Lifestyle modifications such as exercise and physical therapy can also be helpful in managing symptoms and improving quality of life.

There is no cure for RA, but early diagnosis and aggressive treatment can help to slow the progression of the disease and reduce symptoms. With proper management, many people with RA are able to lead active and fulfilling lives.

There are different types of fever, including:

1. Pyrexia: This is the medical term for fever. It is used to describe a body temperature that is above normal, usually above 38°C (100.4°F).
2. Hyperthermia: This is a more severe form of fever, where the body temperature rises significantly above normal levels.
3. Febrile seizure: This is a seizure that occurs in children who have a high fever.
4. Remittent fever: This is a type of fever that comes and goes over a period of time.
5. Intermittent fever: This is a type of fever that recurs at regular intervals.
6. Chronic fever: This is a type of fever that persists for an extended period of time, often more than 3 weeks.

The symptoms of fever can vary depending on the underlying cause, but common symptoms include:

* Elevated body temperature
* Chills
* Sweating
* Headache
* Muscle aches
* Fatigue
* Loss of appetite

In some cases, fever can be a sign of a serious underlying condition, such as pneumonia, meningitis, or sepsis. It is important to seek medical attention if you or someone in your care has a fever, especially if it is accompanied by other symptoms such as difficulty breathing, confusion, or chest pain.

Treatment for fever depends on the underlying cause and the severity of the symptoms. In some cases, medication such as acetaminophen (paracetamol) or ibuprofen may be prescribed to help reduce the fever. It is important to follow the recommended dosage instructions carefully and to consult with a healthcare professional before giving medication to children.

In addition to medication, there are other ways to help manage fever symptoms at home. These include:

* Drinking plenty of fluids to stay hydrated
* Taking cool baths or using a cool compress to reduce body temperature
* Resting and avoiding strenuous activities
* Using over-the-counter pain relievers, such as acetaminophen (paracetamol) or ibuprofen, to help manage headache and muscle aches.

Preventive measures for fever include:

* Practicing good hygiene, such as washing your hands frequently and avoiding close contact with people who are sick
* Staying up to date on vaccinations, which can help prevent certain infections that can cause fever.

High sensitivity and low specificity Low sensitivity and high specificity A graphical illustration of sensitivity and ... Sensitivity and specificity values alone may be highly misleading. The 'worst-case' sensitivity or specificity must be ... there is usually a trade-off between sensitivity and specificity, such that higher sensitivities will mean lower specificities ... sensitivity / (1 − specificity) ≈ 0.67 / (1 − 0.91) ≈ 7.4 Negative likelihood ratio = (1 − sensitivity) / specificity ≈ (1 − ...
... specificity = 96%. Discoid rash (red, scaly patches on skin that cause scarring); sensitivity = 18%; specificity = 99%. ... sensitivity = 56%; specificity = 86% (pleural is more sensitive; cardiac is more specific). Oral ulcers (includes oral or ... sensitivity = 86%; specificity = 37%. Photosensitivity (exposure to ultraviolet light causes rash, or other symptoms of SLE ... diagnostic sensitivity and 86% specificity in differentiating diagnosed SLE from other autoimmune connective tissue diseases. ...
When it comes to sensitivity and specificity it is important to have a balance between the two values ,so if we can decrease ... For example, A low sensitivity with high specificity could indicate the classification model built from the decision tree does ... "Sensitivity vs Specificity". Analysis & Separations from Technology Networks. Retrieved 10 December 2021. Wikimedia Commons has ... The main metrics used are accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, precision, miss rate, false discovery rate, and false omission ...
"Sensitivity and Specificity". www.med.emory.edu. "B12 Deficiency and Dizziness". www.dizziness-and-balance.com. Gomes, Ana P.; ... It has lower specificity as 20-25% of patients over the age of 70 have elevated levels of MMA, but 25-33% of them do not have ...
Multiple studies have performed sensitivity and specificity analyses on Pap smears. Sensitivity analysis captures the ability ... "Specificity, sensitivity and cost". Nature Reviews Cancer. 7 (12): 893. December 2007. doi:10.1038/nrc2287. ISSN 1474-1768. ... Various studies have revealed the sensitivity of Pap smears to be between 47.19 - 55.5%. Specificity analysis captures the ... Various studies have revealed the specificity of Pap smears to be between 64.79 - 96.8%. While Pap smears may not be entirely ...
A study of sensitivity and specificity". Annals of Internal Medicine. 102 (5): 576-80. doi:10.7326/0003-4819-102-5-576. PMID ... Other modalities including the abdominal x-ray lack sensitivity and are not recommended. An important caveat is that imaging ...
Smith D, Collins BD, Heil J, Koch TH (January 2003). "Sensitivity and specificity of photoaptamer probes". Molecular & Cellular ... specificity, and sensitivity. In addition, aptamers contribute to reduction of research animal use. While antibodies often rely ... specificity and sensitivity, cost, ease of generation, amplification, and characterization, and familiarity to users. Typically ... Hall BG (July 1981). "Changes in the substrate specificities of an enzyme during directed evolution of new functions". ...
The following table illustrates the sensitivity and specificity of ENA antibodies at detecting SLE with the ELISA technique. In ... assay sensitivity and disease sensitivity. Assay sensitivity is the ability to recognize when an antibody is present, while ... Sensitivity and specificity of these tests depends on the type of assay employed, and will therefore vary by lab. ... specificity, sensitivity and comparison of methods". Clinical and Experimental Immunology. 112 (1): 152-158. doi:10.1046/j.1365 ...
The absence of the inferior labial (100% sensitivity; 99.4% specificity) and lingual frenulum (71.4% sensitivity; 100% ... specificity) was found to be associated with classical and hypermobility types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Traumatic lesions on ...
The algorithms used can be adjusted to balance between sensitivity and specificity to limit the number of false alarms and ... However, this directly trades sensitivity for specificity. Use centralized alarms. In this approach, alarms don't fire at the ...
Various procedures can improve sensitivity and specificity. Iron oxide metal extraction (IOME) uses the natural metal affinity ...
Jahromi, AS; Cinà, CS; Liu, Y; Clase, CM (June 2005). "Sensitivity and specificity of color duplex ultrasound measurement in ... This test has good sensitivity and specificity. Typically duplex ultrasound scan is the only investigation required for ...
However both tests lack sensitivity and specificity. The Widal test is losing its value as it is labor-intensive and time- ...
The sensitivity and specificity measurements are around 90%. The ultrasound equipment must be of sufficiently high quality in ... displaying data Rapid technical advancements in transmission tomography made possible the very good specificity and sensitivity ...
The sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 75%. For patients at similar risk to those in this study, this leads to a positive ... Allen GC, Larach MG, Kunselman AR (March 1998). "The sensitivity and specificity of the caffeine-halothane contracture test: a ... the sensitivity is 97% and the specificity 78%. Negative biopsies are not definitive, so any patient who is suspected of MH by ... Muscle from these mice also shows increased K+ -induced depolarization and an increased caffeine sensitivity. The earliest ...
Thijs C, Leffers P (January 1989). "Sensitivity and specificity of Rinne tuning fork test". BMJ. 298 (6668): 255. doi:10.1136/ ...
They have a sensitivity and specificity approaching 100%. However, they tend to be more expensive and require more complex ... Because of its sensitivity, PCR can also often detect asymptomatic carriers and may remain positive even days after an ... The sensitivity of DFA testing depends on an adequate specimen. Molecular assays, such as nucleic acid amplification tests ( ...
"What are the sensitivity and specificity of serologic tests for celiac disease? Do sensitivity and specificity vary in ... type can detect coeliac disease with a sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 99%, respectively. Serology for anti- ... transglutaminase antibodies (anti-tTG) was initially reported to have a higher sensitivity (99%) and specificity (>90%). ... Its sensitivity correlates with the degree of histological lesions. People who present with minor damage to the small intestine ...
... we must be cognizant of its sensitivity and specificity. The screening test has sensitivity P ( + , V ) {\displaystyle \mathbb ... The base rate is assumed to be 0.01%. With these base rates and the hypothetical values of sensitivity and specificity, we may ... The sensitivity and specificity can be analyzed using concepts from the standard theory of statistical hypothesis testing: ... Suppose that we have developed a test with sensitivity and specificity of 99%, which is likely to be higher than most real- ...
The sensitivity=84%-89% and specificity=71%-80%. They also found significant correlation between the PWT, all 3 widths, and ...
Chest X-ray is known to be unreliable in diagnosing diaphragmatic rupture; it has low sensitivity and specificity for the ...
Blanchard R, Klassen P, Dickey R, Kuban ME, Blak T (March 2001). "Sensitivity and specificity of the phallometric test for ... Freund, K.; Watson, R. J. (1991). "Assessment of the sensitivity and specificity of a phallometric test: An update of ... Cantor, James; McPhail, Ian (2015). "Sensitivity and specificity of the phallometric test for hebephilia". Journal of Sexual ... In terms of specificity of these tests for pedophilia, research has estimated the specificity as 92%, 82%, 76%, and 92% in ...
The fundamental prevalence-independent statistics are sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity or True Positive Rate (TPR), ... specificity}})(1-{\text{prevalence}})}}} If the prevalence, sensitivity, and specificity are known, the negative predictive ... specificity}})(1-{\text{prevalence}})}{({\text{specificity}})(1-{\text{prevalence}})+(1-{\text{sensitivity}})({\text{prevalence ... sensitivity ) ( prevalence ) + ( 1 − specificity ) ( 1 − prevalence ) {\displaystyle {\text{PPV}}={\frac {({\text{sensitivity ...
90% diagnostic sensitivity and 85% specificity have been reported. The system's diagnostic algorithm triages patients into ...
"Sensitivity and Specificity of Echocardiographic Diagnosis of Pericardial Effusion". Circulation. 50 (2): 239-247. doi:10.1161/ ...
One study found 97% sensitivity. Accuracy is measured in terms of specificity and selectivity. Test errors can come false ... The company claimed 100% sensitivity and 99.6% specificity for patients tested 14 days after symptoms began. Another review ... Also in April, Abbott's ID NOW test was reported to have sensitivity of 85.2%. A later study found sensitivity of only 52%, ... Specificity indicates how well-targeted the test is to the virus in question. Highly specific tests pick up only the virus in ...
In medicine, the sensitivity and specificity are conventionally used. In the field of defect detection testing, the ...
MRI has high sensitivity but low specificity for IMNCT. High signal intensity may suggest accumulation of axonal transportation ... Diagnostic performance characteristics such as sensitivity and specificity are reported, but difficult to interpret because of ... EDX cannot fully exclude the diagnosis of CTS due to the lack of sensitivity. A joint report published by the American ... increases sensitivity of the nerve to compression in the wrist. There is little evidence to support this theory and some ...
CT scan has a sensitivity of 94%, specificity of 95%. Ultrasonography had an overall sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 81%. ... Due to its low sensitivity and specificity, on its own, WBC is not seen as a good indicator of appendicitis. A urinalysis ... Although some concerns about interpretation are identified, a 2019 Cochrane review found that sensitivity and specificity of CT ... while indirect features can either increase or decrease sensitivity and specificity. A size of over 6 mm is both 95% sensitive ...
The combination is what determines analysis time, sensitivity and specificity. The major families of probe methods are: nucleic ... ROC curves are commonly drawn to show sensitivity as a function of false positive rate for a given detection confidence and ... These parameters are sensitivity, probability of correct detection, false positive rate and response time. Ideally, the device ...
... but lack specificity and sensitivity. After infection, immunity to the same strain of the virus - the genotype - protects ...
Lievens, Filip; Peeters, Helga (January 2008). "Interviewers' Sensitivity to Impression Management Tactics in Structured ... Comprehensive meta-analysis into reaction generalization versus situational specificity: Applicant Reactions Meta-Analysis". ...
Gorczyca W, Traganos F, Jesionowska H, Darzynkiewicz Z (1993). "Presence of DNA strand breaks and increased sensitivity of DNA ... "Importance of DNA fragmentation in apoptosis with regard to TUNEL specificity". Biomed Pharmacother. 52 (6): 252-8. doi:10.1016 ...
... could distinguish between atrial fibrillation and a normal heart rhythm with 93 percent sensitivity and 94 percent specificity ... sensitivity increased to 99 percent with physician review of the reading. In 2017, the company was conducting research with ...
... has poor sensitivity and specificity. Zinc deficiency can be classified as acute, as may occur during prolonged inappropriate ...
Investigation of deconjugating enzyme substrate specificity in comparison with alternative UBL-AMC substrates (e.g. NEDD8-AMC) ... It is a particularly useful reagent for the study of deubiquitinating activity where detection sensitivity or continuous ... and is particularly useful for studying deubiquitinylating activity where detection sensitivity or continuous monitoring of ...
... sensitivity and 93.8% and 96.1% specificity for ≤7 and ≤14 days, respectively. A second peer-reviewed, published study by this ... The specificities were 95%, 72%, and 73% for PAMG-1, fFN and CL, respectively. The NPVs were 96%, 87%, and 89% for PAMG-1, fFN ... lthough the PPV and the sensitivity of PAMG-1 are the highest, the main utility of this test [PartoSure], as is the measurement ... the sensitivities for PartoSure (PAMG-1, n=203), fetal fibronectin (fFN, n=66), and cervical length measurement via ...
This sensitivity may be explained by the high concentration of H-FABP in myocardium compared to other tissues, the stability ... and its relative tissue specificity. Similarly this study showed that measuring H-FABP in combination with troponin increased ... H-FABP measured with troponin shows increased sensitivity of 20.6% over troponin at 3-6 hours following chest pain onset. ...
Any attempt to remove that specificity is a form of denial and distortion." Labour responded by saying that "this was a cross- ... lacked an element of sensitivity.' "Mr Dalyell's career includes a close alliance with the late Richard Crossman, a passionate ...
However, the sensitivity of the DRE for injuries of the spinal cord, pelvis, and bowel is poor, and false positive and negative ... The DRE has a 50% specificity for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Vigorous examination of the prostate in suspected acute ... is not an adequate screen due to low sensitivity for advanced tumor and colorectal cancer. Screening for colon cancer this way ...
The REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Single-Question Screen offers diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in the absence of ... Antipsychotic sensitivity "The most fraught decision in the management of DLB relates to the use of antipsychotic medications ... Extreme caution is required in the use of antipsychotic medication in people with DLB because of their sensitivity to these ... Despite the difficulty in diagnosis, a prompt diagnosis is important because of the serious risks of sensitivity to ...
An ELISA test for antigen and Immunoglobulin M antibodies give 88% sensitivity and 90% specificity for the presence of the ... presence of excess protein in the urine and fever can indicate Lassa fever with higher specificity. In cases in which death ...
When used as a prognostic factor for the development of ventricular tachycardia, they have a sensitivity of 72% and a ... specificity of 75%, yielding a positive predictive value of 20% and a negative predictive value of 20%. PMID 8522703 - American ...
... is used to calculate the sensitivity and specificity of the measurements. There is direct correlation between luminescence ... Chris Riley, "Glowing plants reveal touch sensitivity", BBC 17 May 2000. Halverson, Nic (15 August 2013). "Bacteria-Powered ... symbiont specificity and codivergence in bioluminescent symbioses". Cladistics. 23 (5): 507-532. doi:10.1111/j.1096-0031.2007. ... of many species moved into deeper and darker waters natural selection favored the development of increased eye sensitivity and ...
According to Zamboni, CCSVI had a high sensitivity and specificity differentiating healthy individuals from those with multiple ...
The sensitivity to motion coherence is assessed by measuring the ratio of 'signal' to 'noise' dots required to determine the ... Briggman KL, Helmstaedter M, Denk W (March 2011). "Wiring specificity in the direction-selectivity circuit of the retina". ... Hadad BS, Maurer D, Lewis TL (November 2011). "Long trajectory for the development of sensitivity to global and biological ...
4-6 details various features of the traveler's motions with more specificity. At any given moment, her space axis is formed by ... Provided that the spaceship is sufficiently small so that tidal effects are non-measurable (given the sensitivity of current ...
It has higher sensitivity and specificity for imaging dense breast tissue. It does not require contrast agent unlike MRI. ... Additionally, the sensitivity of CTLM is equal to mammography, but has much greater specificity. Imaging Diagnostic Systems is ... Mammography has low specificity and this can lead to false positives, which detect abnormalities that never progress to cause ... The sensitivity of mammography, CTLM and mammography+CTLM was 34.4%, 74.4% and 81.57% respectively among extremely dense ...
The specificity of a receptor is determined by its spatial geometry and the way it binds to the ligand through non-covalent ... with greater sensitivity, luminescence. The indicator may be attached to the sensor via a spacer, in the ISR arrangement, or it ... because the ligands used do not have high specificity relative to calcium. For example, EDTA may be administered as a calcium ... stomach ulcer drug cimetidine was developed as an H2 antagonist by chemically engineering the molecule for maximum specificity ...
24). However, 10-month-old infants succeed both at the 2:1 and the 3:2 ratio, suggesting an increased sensitivity to numerosity ... Piazza, M.; Eger, E. (2016). "Neural foundations and functional specificity of number representations". Neuropsychologia. 83: ...
PI-RADS version 2 scoring has shown a specificity and sensitivity of 73% and 95%, respectively, for detection of prostate ...
... biothesiometry and fine microfilaments were shown to be the only diagnostic methods with high sensitivity and specificity. ...
Sensitivity is how likely the DNA marker will be present in the sampled water, and can be increased simply by taking more ... utilising the Cas12a enzyme and allowing greater specificity when detecting sympatric taxa. Passive eDNA surveys employ ... This method is effective as pH of the water does not affect the DNA as much as previously thought, and sensitivity can be ... Other than ancient studies, this approach can be used to understand current animal diversity with relatively high sensitivity. ...
When working with small concentrations of target DNA, the CPT protocol can be modified to increase specificity and efficiency. ... high sensitivity and ease of separation". Nucleosides & Nucleotides. 18 (6-7): 1297-9. doi:10.1080/07328319908044696. PMID ... and use of a probe that isn't prone to inter-probe and intra-probe interactions has been show to increase specificity. Because ...
tRNA-intron lyase requires a level of specificity to the splice site on the pre tRNA. Having a mutation to the splice site on ... but it is thought to be the result of neuronal sensitivity to changes in tRNA levels. Many neuronal diseases result from ...
Over 10 studies have confirmed that the sensitivity and specificity of this test is 97% and 93% respectively; however, there is ... One of the first favorable imaging modalities was 18F-FDOPA, which demonstrated a high sensitivity in detecting head and neck ... In comparison to the specificity of elevated catecholamines in the pheochromocytoma patient, chromogranin A is a non-specific ... FDG outperformed MIBG in detecting soft-tissue and bone metastases with higher specificity in patients with biochemically ...
They inhibit protein synthesis, damage macrophage systems, inhibit particle clearance of the lung, and increase sensitivity to ... weakened immune systems without specificity to a toxin, and as allergens or irritants. Some mycotoxins are harmful to other ... and the subject's sensitivities. The concentrations experienced in a normal home, office, or school are often too low to ...
Compression ultrasonography has both high sensitivity and specificity for detecting DVT in symptomatic patients. Results are ...
Săndulescu's view: "The author willingly ignored his own sensitivity and artistic taste, his humor, punctuated here and there ... Cioculescu also shared the belief that Orthodoxy could not support national specificity, since it was closely related to the ...
... generally has what is known as sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity is the fraction of tested subjects who truly have some ... Specificity is the fraction of tested subjects who truly do not have some characteristic that the test will say they do not ... then sensitivity is and specificity is Incidence is .. The sliders do not have a linear response since it is often important to ... generally has what is known as sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity is the fraction of tested subjects who truly have some ...
Sensitivity and specificity analyses of the SHC using fingerstick specimens at the Florida Department of Health in Escambia ... Sensitivity and specificity were calculated comparing the results of the Syphilis Health Check against the reference treponemal ... Evaluation of the Sensitivity and Specificity of a Commercially Available Rapid Syphilis Test - Escambia County, Florida, 2016 ... Sensitivity, specificity, and overall laboratory test agreement were determined using the Trep-Sure qualitative enzyme ...
Assessing Sensitivity and Specificity of Surveillance Case Definitions for Zika Virus Disease On This Page ... Assessing Sensitivity and Specificity of Surveillance Case Definitions for Zika Virus Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases. ... Assessing Sensitivity and Specificity of Surveillance Case Definitions for Zika Virus Disease. Volume 23, Number 4-April 2017 ... Chow A, Ho HJ, Win M, Leo Y. Assessing Sensitivity and Specificity of Surveillance Case Definitions for Zika Virus Disease. ...
Society of Thoracic Radiology - All Rights Reserved. ...
The sensitivity of exon 19 IHC for E746-A750 was 100%, specificity 98.0%, positive predictive value 63.6% and negative ... sensitivity 85.7%, specificity 98.5%, positive predictive value 66.7%, negative predictive value 99.5%). All seven E746-A750 ... Mutant-specific EGFR IHC has good specificity and sensitivity for identifying targeted activating EGFR mutations. Although ... The sensitivity of exon 19 IHC for E746-A750 was 100%, specificity 98.0%, positive predictive value 63.6% and negative ...
Sensitivity and specificity of the INECO frontal screening (IFS) in the detection of patients with traumatic brain injury ... Our results indicated that with a cutoff score of 26.25 points, the IFS showed good sensitivity and specificity in the ...
Sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis ... The overall specificity and sensitivity were found to be 84.8% and 83.3% respectively, which showed that ultrasound has a ... Sensitivity and specificity were higher in males (95.7% and 88.2% respectively) than females (84.6% and 71.4% respectively). ... ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute ...
Another Salivary Bioscience Breakthrough: Research Study Obtains 100% Sensitivity and Specificity for COVID-19 Serology with ... sensitivity and specificity using non-invasive oral fluid sampling for detecting prior SARS-CoV-2 infection. "This is highly ... scalable surveillance with uncompromised sensitivity and specificity through practical, non-invasive sampling. A hurdle for ...
SENSITIVITY AND SPECIFICITY OF TRIAGE. It has been argued that nurses should be given the authority to turn patients away from ... the overlap in characteristics and consultation process measures suggests either limitations in the sensitivity and specificity ... which the assessment of the primary care content of presentations can be measured means that the sensitivity and specificity of ... This may reflect limitations in the sensitivity of triage practice or a clinical approach of junior medical staff that includes ...
Sensitivity. The anti-Tg Accubind™ ELISA has a sensitivity of 5 IU/ml. ... Specificity. Interferences from ANA, DNA, thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and rheumatoid antibodies were found to be insignificant in ... Sensitivity. The anti-Tg Accubind™ ELISA has a sensitivity of 5 IU/ml. ... Specificity. Interferences from ANA, DNA, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and rheumatoid antibodies were found to be insignificant in ...
Sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of more than 90% for the identification of atrial level abnormalities ... MRI, especially cine MRI, has a sensitivity and specificity of over 90% in delineating septal defects; however, greater ... Instrumentation must be used that provides high sensitivity with respect to count-rate acquisition. ...
Specificity / Sensitivity. For Antibody Pair specificity and sensitivity, please refer to the corresponding PathScan® Sandwich ...
Lucariello, R. J., Sun, Y., Doganay, G., & Chiaramida, S. A. (1997). Sensitivity and specificity of left ventricular ejection ... Sensitivity and specificity of left ventricular ejection fraction by echocardiographic automated border detection: Comparison ... Sensitivity and specificity of left ventricular ejection fraction by echocardiographic automated border detection: Comparison ... Sensitivity and specificity of left ventricular ejection fraction by echocardiographic automated border detection: Comparison ...
Diagnostic Sensitivity and Specificity for Clinical Laboratory Testing. This job aid reviews basic information about diagnostic ...
Sensitivity and Specificity of Diagnostic Algorithms of Preoperative Anemia. Sensitivity and Specificity of Diagnostic ... We performed a prospective diagnostic study to detect the types of anemia present and compare the specificity and sensitivity ...
7. Test sensitivity and specificity. The estimates provided in Sections 2 to 6 are for the percentage of the private- ... While we do not know the true sensitivity and specificity of the test, our data and related studies provide an indication of ... You can find more information on sensitivity and specificity in our methods article. You can find more information on the data ... In particular, the data suggest that the false-positive rate is very low, under 0.005%. We do not know the sensitivity of the ...
... specificity = 0.8, and prevalence = 0.2, then what is the accuracy? ... specificity and prevalence.. What is the sensitivity and specificity of a model which randomly assigns a score between 0 and 1 ... For every specificity, as we vary the threshold, the sensitivity of model 1 is at least as high as model 2. Which of the ... What is the sensitivity and specificity of a pneumonia model that always outputs positive? In other words, the models says that ...
Results of search for su:{Sensitivity and specificity.} Refine your search. *. Availability. * Limit to currently available ...
Analytical sensitivity/specificity:. Variant Class. Analytical Sensitivity (PPA) Estimatea (%). and 95% Credibility Region (%) ... bVariants greater than 10 bp may be detected, but the analytical sensitivity may be reduced. ... Sensitivity/Specificity. Clinical sensitivity: 95-97% ...
AI algorithm for detecting prostate cancer shows more than 98% sensitivity, 97% specificity in study. 12 Mrz, 2022 ...
Explore our authenticated materials for evaluating analytical sensitivity and specificity. Develop your assay ...
SPECIFICITY AND SENSITIVITY. The specificity for detection of an EITCL in comparison with coeliac disease and with refractory ... Sensitivity for detection of an EITCL was 85% (table 2). With a cut off at 25% of positive IELs for CD8 and TCR-β, specificity ... We first questioned the specificity and sensitivity of clonality and of the loss of T cell antigens in IELs of duodenal ... Sensitivity was 62% for staining with CD8 and clonality investigation, while sensitivity reached 100% for TCR-β staining in all ...
Sensitivity (%). Specificity (%). PPV. NPV. Ref.. Norén et al. (2011). Illumigene Clostridium difficile (LAMP technology, ... Table 2. Sensitivity and specificity median values for Clostridium difficile toxin A/B detection by commercial immunoenzymatic ...
Sensitivity and clinical (diagnostic) specificity are two different parameters. Diagnostic sensitivity is the proportion of ... Sensitivity:. Specificity:. Sample Size. Time (min). AccuBioTech Co. Ltd.. Accu-Tell COVID-19 IgG/IgM Rapid Test Cassette. IgG ... Clinical Sensitivity. Clinical Specificity. Limit of Detection LOD. (Copies/Reaction). altona Diagnostics. RealStar® SARS-CoV-2 ... A sensitivity ratio of 100% implies that all the sick people have been identified. The specificity of a test is the proportion ...
SENSITIVITY AND SPECIFICITY OF AN ANTIGEN DETECTION ELISA FOR MALARIA DIAGNOSIS HARALD NOEDL ...
Functional sensitivity. 0.42 nmol/L (0.12 ng/mL). The functional sensitivity is the lowest analyte concentration that can be ... SPECIFICITY (CROSS REACTIVITY. The following compounds were tested for cross-reactivity with the Direct 3a Diol G ELISA kit ... Functional sensitivity. 44 pmol/L (12 pg/mL). The functional sensitivity is the lowest analyte concentration that can be ... Analytical sensitivity (lower detection limit). 18.4 pmol/L (5.0 pg/mL). The detection limit represents the lowest analyte ...
Sensitivity and Specificity * Statistics as Topic * Subtraction Technique* Grant support * R01 NS033576-11/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ ...
Sensitivity was 35.6%; specificity was 99.9%. Concordance between the 2 methods was moderate. Surveillance based on ICD-10 ... The sensitivity and specificity of surveillance for Clostridium difficile infections according to International Classification ...
Figure 1: Benchmarking sensitivity and specificity of Acacia.. References. *. Balzer, S., Malde, K., Lanzen, A., Sharma, A. & ...
  • ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis at Al-Shefa hospital, Gaza Strip, Palestine. (who.int)
  • Sensitivity and specificity of using ABD-EF for diagnosing LV dysfunction in routine clinical situations have not been previously studied: Hypothesis: Analysis of ABD-EF data based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) should provide useful information about sensitivity and specificity for clinical diagnosis of LV function based on ABD-EF. (elsevier.com)
  • b Variants greater than 10 bp may be detected, but the analytical sensitivity may be reduced. (arupconsult.com)
  • This job aid reviews basic information about diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for clinical laboratory testing. (cdc.gov)
  • Sensitivity and Specificity of Diagnostic Algorithms of Preoperative Anemia. (bvsalud.org)
  • We performed a prospective diagnostic study to detect the types of anemia present and compare the specificity and sensitivity of three diagnostic algorithms for preoperative anemia in patients scheduled to undergo major abdominal surgery . (bvsalud.org)
  • With the optimized threshold, ABD-EF provided 89% sensitivity and 89% specificity (85% overall diagnostic accuracy) for diagnosing abnormal LV function. (elsevier.com)
  • Selected studies described the use of the ROC curve as a procedure for analyzing sensitivity and specificity, with the aim of reducing diagnostic biases. (bvsalud.org)
  • The overall sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound, using surgical outcome as the gold standard, were 84.8% and 83.3% respectively, and the positive and negative predictive values were 93.3% and 66.7% respectively. (who.int)
  • Determination of sensitivity and specificity of a novel gene dosage assay for prenatal screening of trisomy 21 syndrome. (archives-ouvertes.fr)
  • Clinical criteria for disease surveillance are a balancing act for satisfying 2 potentially conflicting needs: sensitivity and specificity. (cdc.gov)
  • This may reflect limitations in the sensitivity of triage practice or a clinical approach of junior medical staff that includes a propensity to intervene. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusion: This study explored the limitations of on-line echocardiographic measurement of EF in a clinical setting and provided useful data for assessing interbeat variability, sensitivity, and specificity. (elsevier.com)
  • Chronic HCV, Liver ultrasound based Transient Elastography at cutoff 0.26 has sensitivity 81 % and fibrosis, Non-invasive in chronic HCV Egyptian patients. (who.int)
  • Sensitivity and specificity of the INECO frontal screening (IFS) in the detection of patients with traumatic brain injury presenting executive deficits. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Our results indicated that with a cutoff score of 26.25 points, the IFS showed good sensitivity and specificity in the detection of executive impairments in TBI patients. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • Specificity for detection of an EITCL using immunohistology was 77% for CD8 and for TCR-β staining, and 100% for detection of a clonal TCR-γ gene rearrangement. (bmj.com)
  • This constellation is also found in duodenal biopsies from patients with an overt EITCL and is not related to other sprue syndromes, resulting in a high specificity for detection of an EITCL or refractory sprue evolving into EITCL. (bmj.com)
  • In the remaining knees, adding either a lateral or a skyline view to an anteroposterior view yielded roughly equal and high sensitivity (94-97%) when compared with the gold standard of a positive X-ray on any of the three views. (nih.gov)
  • Sensitivity is the fraction of tested subjects who truly have some characteristic that the test will say they have. (wolfram.com)
  • The sensitivity of SHC was 71.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 41.9%-95.1%) when compared with the Trep-Sure (EIA) reference treponemal test ( Table ). (cdc.gov)
  • Sensitivity means how well a test can identify a disease or condition. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Results of search for 'su:{Sensitivity and specificity. (who.int)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Mutant-specific EGFR IHC has good specificity and sensitivity for identifying targeted activating EGFR mutations. (garvan.org.au)
  • This Demonstration shows how the number of true positives, false positives, false negatives, and true negatives can be calculated by using data regarding sensitivity, specificity, and the incidence in the tested population of a particular characteristic. (wolfram.com)
  • Methods: Using data from the Iowa Trauma Registry, we determined the sensitivity and specificity of the use of workers' compensation as a payer source to ascertain work-related inju ries requiring acute care comparing agricul ture with other rural industries. (cdc.gov)
  • Further evaluation of the sensitivity and specificity of the SHC in additional health care settings is needed to determine whether SHC might be beneficial in identifying patients who might have syphilis, especially in settings where phlebotomy is unavailable. (cdc.gov)
  • Sensitivity was 62% for staining with CD8 and clonality investigation, while sensitivity reached 100% for TCR-β staining in all investigated patients with EITCL. (bmj.com)
  • Sensitivity and specificity were higher in males (95.7% and 88.2% respectively) than females (84.6% and 71.4% respectively). (who.int)
  • The sliders do not have a linear response since it is often important to control fine levels of detail at the upper levels of sensitivity and specificity and at the lower levels of incidence. (wolfram.com)
  • Lower sensitivity than lab tests. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Like other rapid tests, the rapid COVID-19 tests have lower sensitivity than standard lab tests. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Results: The sensitivity of workers' compensation as a payer source to identify work-related agricul tural inju ries was 18.5%, suggesting that the large majority of occupational agricul tural inju ries would not be accurately identified through workers' compensation records. (cdc.gov)
  • The low index of publications regarding the sensitivity and specificity of instruments in psychological assessments for ADHD was found, despite the large number of studies related to the disorder in the last five years. (bvsalud.org)
  • Testing, whether done in the medical field or elsewhere, generally has what is known as sensitivity and specificity. (wolfram.com)
  • In the study, " COVID-19 serology at population scale: SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody responses in saliva ", researchers obtained 100% sensitivity and specificity using non-invasive oral fluid sampling for detecting prior SARS-CoV-2 infection. (salimetrics.com)