Sensation Disorders: Disorders of the special senses (i.e., VISION; HEARING; TASTE; and SMELL) or somatosensory system (i.e., afferent components of the PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM).Sensation: The process in which specialized SENSORY RECEPTOR CELLS transduce peripheral stimuli (physical or chemical) into NERVE IMPULSES which are then transmitted to the various sensory centers in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Thermosensing: The sensation of cold, heat, coolness, and warmth as detected by THERMORECEPTORS.Hypesthesia: Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.Somatosensory Disorders: Disorders of sensory information received from superficial and deep regions of the body. The somatosensory system conveys neural impulses which pertain to proprioception, tactile sensation, thermal sensation, pressure sensation, and pain. PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; and BRAIN DISEASES may be associated with impaired or abnormal somatic sensation.Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Touch: Sensation of making physical contact with objects, animate or inanimate. Tactile stimuli are detected by MECHANORECEPTORS in the skin and mucous membranes.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Mucuna: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is the source of mucuna gum.Sensory Thresholds: The minimum amount of stimulus energy necessary to elicit a sensory response.Pruritus: An intense itching sensation that produces the urge to rub or scratch the skin to obtain relief.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Physical Stimulation: Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.Nociceptors: Peripheral AFFERENT NEURONS which are sensitive to injuries or pain, usually caused by extreme thermal exposures, mechanical forces, or other noxious stimuli. Their cell bodies reside in the DORSAL ROOT GANGLIA. Their peripheral terminals (NERVE ENDINGS) innervate target tissues and transduce noxious stimuli via axons to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Paresthesia: Subjective cutaneous sensations (e.g., cold, warmth, tingling, pressure, etc.) that are experienced spontaneously in the absence of stimulation.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Skin Temperature: The TEMPERATURE at the outer surface of the body.Phantom Limb: Perception of painful and nonpainful phantom sensations that occur following the complete or partial loss of a limb. The majority of individuals with an amputated extremity will experience the impression that the limb is still present, and in many cases, painful. (From Neurol Clin 1998 Nov;16(4):919-36; Brain 1998 Sep;121(Pt 9):1603-30)Pain Threshold: Amount of stimulation required before the sensation of pain is experienced.Impulsive Behavior: An act performed without delay, reflection, voluntary direction or obvious control in response to a stimulus.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Exploratory Behavior: The tendency to explore or investigate a novel environment. It is considered a motivation not clearly distinguishable from curiosity.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Boredom: A psychological state resulting from any activity that lacks motivation, or from enforced continuance in an uninteresting situation.Cold Temperature: An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Taste: The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.Touch Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of tactile stimuli are recognized and interpreted by the brain, such as realizing the characteristics or name of an object being touched.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Vibration: A continuing periodic change in displacement with respect to a fixed reference. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Taste Disorders: Conditions characterized by an alteration in gustatory function or perception. Taste disorders are frequently associated with OLFACTION DISORDERS. Additional potential etiologies include METABOLIC DISEASES; DRUG TOXICITY; and taste pathway disorders (e.g., TASTE BUD diseases; FACIAL NERVE DISEASES; GLOSSOPHARYNGEAL NERVE DISEASES; and BRAIN STEM diseases).Kinesthesis: Sense of movement of a part of the body, such as movement of fingers, elbows, knees, limbs, or weights.Ophthalmic Nerve: A sensory branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The ophthalmic nerve carries general afferents from the superficial division of the face including the eyeball, conjunctiva, upper eyelid, upper nose, nasal mucosa, and scalp.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Thermoreceptors: Cellular receptors which mediate the sense of temperature. Thermoreceptors in vertebrates are mostly located under the skin. In mammals there are separate types of thermoreceptors for cold and for warmth and NOCICEPTORS which detect cold or heat extreme enough to cause pain.Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.Personality Tests: Standardized objective tests designed to facilitate the evaluation of personality.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Autistic Disorder: A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)Burning Mouth Syndrome: A group of painful oral symptoms associated with a burning or similar sensation. There is usually a significant organic component with a degree of functional overlay; it is not limited to the psychophysiologic group of disorders.Mechanoreceptors: Cells specialized to transduce mechanical stimuli and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Mechanoreceptor cells include the INNER EAR hair cells, which mediate hearing and balance, and the various somatosensory receptors, often with non-neural accessory structures.Pain Perception: The process by which PAIN is recognized and interpreted by the brain.Phobic Disorders: Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.Sensory Receptor Cells: Specialized afferent neurons capable of transducing sensory stimuli into NERVE IMPULSES to be transmitted to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Sometimes sensory receptors for external stimuli are called exteroceptors; for internal stimuli are called interoceptors and proprioceptors.Capsaicin: An alkylamide found in CAPSICUM that acts at TRPV CATION CHANNELS.Child Development Disorders, Pervasive: Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.Menthol: An alcohol produced from mint oils or prepared synthetically.Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Rectum: The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Skin Physiological Phenomena: The functions of the skin in the human and animal body. It includes the pigmentation of the skin.Tongue: A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.Afferent Pathways: Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a peripheral part toward a nerve center.Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Anal Canal: The terminal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, beginning from the ampulla of the RECTUM and ending at the anus.Neurons, Afferent: Neurons which conduct NERVE IMPULSES to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Manometry: Measurement of the pressure or tension of liquids or gases with a manometer.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Nerve Fibers, Unmyelinated: A class of nerve fibers as defined by their nerve sheath arrangement. The AXONS of the unmyelinated nerve fibers are small in diameter and usually several are surrounded by a single MYELIN SHEATH. They conduct low-velocity impulses, and represent the majority of peripheral sensory and autonomic fibers, but are also found in the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD.Personality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Sialorrhea: Increased salivary flow.Dyspnea: Difficult or labored breathing.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Acupuncture Points: Designated locations along nerves or organ meridians for inserting acupuncture needles.Gastric Dilatation: Abnormal distention of the STOMACH due to accumulation of gastric contents that may reach 10 to 15 liters. Gastric dilatation may be the result of GASTRIC OUTLET OBSTRUCTION; ILEUS; GASTROPARESIS; or denervation.Facial Pain: Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, facial, and glossopharyngeal nerves. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL PAIN SYNDROMES.Spinothalamic Tracts: A bundle of NERVE FIBERS connecting each posterior horn of the spinal cord to the opposite side of the THALAMUS, carrying information about pain, temperature, and touch. It is one of two major routes by which afferent spinal NERVE FIBERS carrying sensations of somaesthesis are transmitted to the THALAMUS.Psychophysiology: The study of the physiological basis of human and animal behavior.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Transient Receptor Potential Channels: A broad group of eukaryotic six-transmembrane cation channels that are classified by sequence homology because their functional involvement with SENSATION is varied. They have only weak voltage sensitivity and ion selectivity. They are named after a DROSOPHILA mutant that displayed transient receptor potentials in response to light. A 25-amino-acid motif containing a TRP box (EWKFAR) just C-terminal to S6 is found in TRPC, TRPV and TRPM subgroups. ANKYRIN repeats are found in TRPC, TRPV & TRPN subgroups. Some are functionally associated with TYROSINE KINASE or TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES.Tic Disorders: Disorders characterized by recurrent TICS that may interfere with speech and other activities. Tics are sudden, rapid, nonrhythmic, stereotyped motor movements or vocalizations which may be exacerbated by stress and are generally attenuated during absorbing activities. Tic disorders are distinguished from conditions which feature other types of abnormal movements that may accompany another another condition. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Visceral Afferents: The sensory fibers innervating the viscera.TRPV Cation Channels: A subgroup of TRP cation channels named after vanilloid receptor. They are very sensitive to TEMPERATURE and hot spicy food and CAPSAICIN. They have the TRP domain and ANKYRIN repeats. Selectivity for CALCIUM over SODIUM ranges from 3 to 100 fold.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Appetite: Natural recurring desire for food. Alterations may be induced by APPETITE DEPRESSANTS or APPETITE STIMULANTS.Illusions: The misinterpretation of a real external, sensory experience.Taste Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of gustatory stimuli are recognized and interpreted by the brain. The four basic classes of taste perception are salty, sweet, bitter, and sour.Smiling: A facial expression which may denote feelings of pleasure, affection, amusement, etc.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Movement Disorders: Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.Proprioception: Sensory functions that transduce stimuli received by proprioceptive receptors in joints, tendons, muscles, and the INNER EAR into neural impulses to be transmitted to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Proprioception provides sense of stationary positions and movements of one's body parts, and is important in maintaining KINESTHESIA and POSTURAL BALANCE.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Amputation Stumps: The part of a limb or tail following amputation that is proximal to the amputated section.Drive: A state of internal activity of an organism that is a necessary condition before a given stimulus will elicit a class of responses; e.g., a certain level of hunger (drive) must be present before food will elicit an eating response.Nerve Fibers: Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Neurologic Examination: Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.Borderline Personality Disorder: A personality disorder marked by a pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affects, and marked impulsivity beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts. (DSM-IV)Somatosensory Cortex: Area of the parietal lobe concerned with receiving sensations such as movement, pain, pressure, position, temperature, touch, and vibration. It lies posterior to the central sulcus.Chin: The anatomical frontal portion of the mandible, also known as the mentum, that contains the line of fusion of the two separate halves of the mandible (symphysis menti). This line of fusion divides inferiorly to enclose a triangular area called the mental protuberance. On each side, inferior to the second premolar tooth, is the mental foramen for the passage of blood vessels and a nerve.Somatoform Disorders: Disorders having the presence of physical symptoms that suggest a general medical condition but that are not fully explained by a another medical condition, by the direct effects of a substance, or by another mental disorder. The symptoms must cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning. In contrast to FACTITIOUS DISORDERS and MALINGERING, the physical symptoms are not under voluntary control. (APA, DSM-V)Pain Insensitivity, Congenital: A syndrome characterized by indifference to PAIN despite the ability to distinguish noxious from non-noxious stimuli. Absent corneal reflexes and INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY may be associated. Familial forms with autosomal recessive and autosomal dominant patterns of inheritance have been described. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1343)Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Oral Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.
18) A sensation of a lump in the throat or difficulty with swallowing.. Other non-specific symptoms. (19) Exaggerated response ... 14) Numbness or tingling sensations.. Symptoms of tension. (15) Muscle tension or aches and pains.. (16) Restlessness and ... and stressor-related disorders, personality disorders, substance-related and addictive disorders, neurocognitive disorders". ... bipolar disorders, schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, trauma- ...
Such luminal distension may induce pain, a sensation of bloating, abdominal distension and motility disorders. Therapeutic ... It is this 'stretching' that triggers the sensations of pain and discomfort that are commonly experienced by IBS sufferers. The ... Cann, PA; Read, NW; Brown, C; Hobson, N; Holdsworth, CD (1983). "Irritable bowel syndrome: relationship of disorders in the ... and other functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). Prior to the formation of the FODMAP concept, diet was seldom used as ...
In both of these disorders, fluid accumulates in the abdomen and creates a sensation of fullness. Abdominal distension can also ... individuals who develop distension may have either poor motility of their intestines or may be hypersensitive to gut sensations ... The pressure sensation is often relieved, or at least lessened, by burping (belching) or passing gas (flatulence). Medications ... People suffering from this condition often describe it as "feeling bloated". Sufferers often experience a sensation of fullness ...
A PERIPHERAL MONONEUROPATHY IN RAT THAT PRODUCES DISORDERS OF PAIN SENSATION LIKE THOSE SEEN IN MAN. Pain, 33(1). Djouhri, L., ... Dysesthesia can include sensations in any bodily tissue, including most often the mouth, scalp, skin, or legs. It is sometimes ... In the case of an evoked dysesthetic sensation, such as by the touch of clothing, the sensation is characterized not simply by ... Some researchers believe the disorder is a psychological one, while others believe it to be a psychosomatic disorder. Joseph ...
There is also a disorder that generally leads to a cape-like bilateral loss of pain and temperature sensation along the back ... Patients may experience severe chronic pain, abnormal sensations and loss of sensation particularly in the hands. Some patients ... Syringomyelia is a generic term referring to a disorder in which a cyst or cavity forms within the spinal cord. This cyst, ... Signs of the disorder tend to develop slowly, although sudden onset may occur with coughing, straining, or myelopathy. ...
... probably related to disordered genital sensation. Spasticity is characterised by increased stiffness and slowness in limb ... Dysesthesias are disagreeable sensations produced by ordinary stimuli. The abnormal sensations are caused by lesions of the ... A related symptom is a pleasant, yet unsettling sensation which has no normal explanation (such as sensation of gentle warmth ... Lhermitte's sign is an electrical sensation that runs down the back and into the limbs and is produced by bending the neck ...
Dyschiria is a disorder in the localization of sensation due to various degrees of dissociation and cause impairment in one ... The sensory component refers to a stimulus applied to the affected part evokes two simultaneous sensations which are referred ... The stimulus is presented to the side of the body that the person with the disorder has no notion. For the motor component, if ... Hammond goes on to say that if another unilateral lesion supervened at a different level from the first, the sensation that was ...
The main features of the disorder are lack of pain sensation, painless injuries of the arms, legs, and oral structures, ... or any real nerve-related sensations (including feeling the need to urinate); however, patients can still feel pressure. CIPA ... is an extremely rare inherited disorder of the nervous system which prevents the sensation of pain, heat, cold, ... Adrian is suffering from CIPA and is bullied for being homosexual as well as having the disorder. As a result of the disorder, ...
... that these internal sensations do not need to be feared and becomes less sensitized or desensitized to the internal sensation. ... major depressive disorder (80%), dysthymic disorder (40%), generalized anxiety disorder (40%), somatoform disorders (40%), ... The Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) is a questionnaire for measuring the severity of panic disorder. Panic disorder is a ... major depressive disorder, and conduct disorders. Eassau et al. (1999) also found a high number of comorbid disorders in a ...
However, other studies have shown that panic disorder patients feel heartbeat sensations more intensely when the state of the ... which are designed to mimic labored breathing sensations. Dyspnea, or difficulty breathing, is a commonly felt sensation ... obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), autism spectrum disorders, somatic symptom disorder, and illness anxiety disorder. The ... Studies have shown that panic disorder patients report a heightened experience of interoceptive sensations, but these studies ...
Tactile sensation is tested with a cotton wisp or light touch with a finger. Pain is assessed by pinprick or pinwheel ( ... An aura involving thermal and painful sensations is a phenomenon known to precede the onset of an epileptic seizure or focal ... This sensation may progress along a limb or to adjacent cutaneous body areas, reflecting abnormal neuronal firing in the ... A somatosensory disorder is an impairment of the somatosensory system. Patients may experience numbness, prickling or tingling ...
... impulse control disorders, and physical addiction. Sensation-seeking has been studied[by whom?] as having a strong relationship ... upon which the range of sensations produced by the euphoric event in the brain changes the brain's immediate behavior, causing ... Other disorders that go hand in hand include mood disorders, depression, and anxiety. Like people with other addictions, people ... This sensation is what possibly drives tanners to continue tanning regardless of the health risks. More research needs to be ...
Some affected individuals do not lose sensation, but instead feel shooting pains in their legs and feet. As the disorder ... which transmit information about sensations such as pain, temperature, and touch. These sensations are impaired in people with ... Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IV (HSN4) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by the loss of sensation (sensory loss), ... Familial dysautonomia is a genetic disorder that affects the development and survival of certain nerve cells. The disorder ...
Sensation avoiding: low threshold and active response. Individuals actively limit their exposure to sensations and are ... Sensory processing disorders are classified into three categories: sensory modulation disorder, sensory-based motor disorders ... Postural disorder. Sensory discrimination disorder (SDD)[edit]. Sensory discrimination disorder involves the incorrect ... Sensory processing disorder is a common comorbidity with autism spectrum disorders[59][60][61][62][63][64][65] and is now ...
Such nerves supply muscular control and sensations to the skull and arms while correspondingly providing our bodies with ... and sensation of the arms and legs are normal. The spine is examined for its range of motion and any pain that may arise from ... Cervical spine disorders are illnesses that affect the cervical spine, which is made up of the upper first seven vertebrae, ... Weakness An individual becomes weak due to the compression of nerves encompassing cervical spine disorders, thus resulting in ...
The sensation of itch can be reduced by many painful sensations. Studies done in the last decade have shown that itch can be ... an unusually large amount of flaking is associated with this sensation Punctate palmoplantar keratoderma, a group of disorders ... who may scratch affected spots until they no longer produce a pleasant or painful sensation, instead of when the itch sensation ... The sensation of pain can also be induced in a similar fashion, often by listening to a description of an injury, or viewing an ...
... urges or bodily sensations that precede or accompany repetitive behaviors associated with Tourette syndrome and tic disorders. ... "Individuals with tics may have either a generalized or a localized sensation of tension that is relieved by movement, ie, the ... Sensory phenomena in obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette's disorder. J Clin Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;61(2):150-6. PMID ... Sensory phenomena in obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette's disorder. J Clin Psychiatry. 2000 Feb;61(2):150-6. PMID ...
Disorders like Sjögren's syndrome, where one does not make tears, can cause a dry eye sensation which feels very unpleasant. ... Sometimes, an anti histamine has to be used to prevent the chronic itching sensations. There are also many individuals who have ... Another common irritation disorder in females is intertrigo. This disorder is associated with chronic irritation under folds of ... There are many disorders that can cause chronic irritation, the majority involves the skin, vagina, eyes and lungs. In higher ...
Those with affective disorders may also demonstrate differences in affective sensation as a result of mood-dependent ... "Heightened central affective response to visceral sensations of pain and discomfort in IBS". Neurogastroenterology and Motility ... Affective sensation is a sensation accompanied with a strong compulsion to act on it. Most often in neuroscience, it refers to ... Affective sensation deals with response-emotionality and is distinct from presentative, or neutral, sensation. This is due to ...
She writes, "When the flow of sensations is disorganized, life can be like a rush-hour traffic jam" (p. 289). The following ... Sometimes movement for a person can result in a soothing sensation or cause stress, depending on how that individual perceives ... Sensory dysfunction disorder is a reported neurological disorder of information processing, characterized by difficulty in ... and countless other disorders, rather than as its own disorder. Eide, M.D., M.A., Brock, and Fernette Eide, M.D. The Mislabeled ...
... carries some taste sensations from the back of the oral cavity.[citation needed] In general, gustatory disorders are ... After eight years of taking the drug, he developed a loss of taste sensation and numbness in his tongue. When he ran out of his ... National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, "Taste Disorders," 25 June 2008, 23 Oct. 2009 The University ... Because taste disorders can have detrimental effects on a patient's quality of life, more research needs to be conducted ...
... sensation) Hallucinogen persisting perception disorder Human spirit Nina Searl Out-of-body experience Post-traumatic stress ... Individuals who experience depersonalization feel divorced from their own personal self by sensing their body sensations, ... such as anxiety disorders, clinical depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, schizoid personality disorder, hypothyroidism ... or endocrine disorders, schizotypal personality disorder, borderline personality disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, ...
General somatic sensations[edit]. General somatic sensations of a hallucinatory nature are experienced when an individual feels ... Another typical disorder where auditory hallucinations are very common is dissociative identity disorder. In schizophrenia ... One subtype of tactile hallucination, formication, is the sensation of insects crawling underneath the skin and is frequently ... bipolar disorder, intoxication or withdrawal from drugs and alcohol, or psychotic disorders (e.g., schizophrenia).[23] The ...
... disturbance of auditory sensation and perception, disturbance of selective attention of auditory and visual input, disorders of ... Damage in the somatic sensory cortex results in loss of perception of bodily sensations, namely sense of touch. The occipital ... Most disorders that are associated with damage to these areas of the brain involve some type of motor dysfunction, as well as ... Many studies of different disease and disorders that have symptoms of memory loss have provided reinforcing evidence to the ...
... and provides the cooling sensation associated with menthol and icillin Phantom limb syndrome - a sensory system disorder where ... The nervous system codes the differences among the sensations in terms of which cells are active. A sensory receptor's adequate ... the cold sensation experienced after ingesting a chemical such as menthol or icillin, as well as the common sensation of pain ... Problems with sensory neurons associated with the auditory system leads to disorders such as: Auditory processing disorder - ...
A study conducted in Japan reports fatigue sensation shown in subjects who listened to a metronome for six minutes.[10] A ... As with any type of hearing-related disorder, the related physiology is within the ear and central auditory system. With ... Brondel, L.; Cabanac, M. (2007). "Alliesthesia in visual and auditory sensations from environmental signals". Physiology & ... This overstimulation can result in general fatigue and loss of sensation in the ear. The associated mechanisms are explained in ...
... is a debilitating disorder consisting of persistent and painful oral burning sensations of the mouth, particularly on the READ ... Burning mouth syndrome: An intense burning sensation on the tongue, often at the tip of the tongue. The burning mouth syndrome ... Tongue disorders. Votes:16. Comments:0. The tongue performs a number of other functions besides tasting, such as talking, ... Burning mouth syndrome - Oral dysaesthesia This is a group of problems that include a burning or altered sensation in the ...
I wondered if someone could help me?? Is a burning sensation (as if , being touched by a lighter,ON FIRE) a symptom of thyroid ... Digestive Disorders. 0. 02-06-2010 07:55 PM. Burning/Wet sensation after foot surgery? ColorMeYellow. Foot & Ankle Problems. 2 ... burning sensations apriltones. Fibromyalgia. 9. 04-12-2005 07:05 AM. burning sensations in hands? apriltones. Fibromyalgia. 3. ... burning sensations Hi all.. I wondered if someone could help me??. Is a burning sensation (as if , being touched by a lighter, ...
As for my dripping sensations and the stomach spasms and lurching I previously had, this is mostly gone and I feel a great deal ... I have also started to feel burning sensation around my left hand. I did a cholestrol test and one thing I noticed is that my ... I guess the liquid dripping sensation can be called a leaky gut. If there is something I come across I will definitely keep you ... After some meals i have burning sensation coming all the way to my throat. The bowel movement that I have been having is ...
List of 45 causes for Gait disorder and Shooting sensations, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories ... AND Neurological causes of muscle weakness with tingling or loss of sensation (2 matches) ... Gait disorder OR Shooting sensations - Causes of Any Symptom Gait disorder:*Causes: Gait disorder *Introduction: Gait disorder ... Gait disorder and Shooting sensations and Sensations (4 causes). *Gait disorder and Shooting sensations and Sensory symptoms (4 ...
List of 47 causes for Gait disorder and Knee burning sensation, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient ... AND Sensations (4 matches). *AND Sensory symptoms (4 matches). *AND Skin symptoms (4 matches) ... Gait disorder and Knee burning sensation. *Gait disorder AND Knee burning sensation - Causes of All Symptoms *Gait disorder OR ... Gait disorder:*Causes: Gait disorder *Introduction: Gait disorder *Gait disorder: Add a 3rd symptom *Gait disorder: Remove a ...
For about a year now since ive turned 19 years old i have been having this horrible sensation in the back of my throat which ... Food stopping near tonsils/trachea and strange sensations! Lump next to uvula in throat Lump in throat sensation and swollen ... Sensation of Something Stuck in Throat Constant Mucas in Throat, PLEASE help. uvula issuse after tonsils Help regarding throat. ... Slight Gagging sensation in throat. Tonsillectomy recover uncomfortable feeling in back of throat not going away ...
Definition Somatization disorder is a psychiatric condition marked by multiple medically unexplained physical, or somatic, ... HEIGHTENED SENSITIVITY TO PHYSICAL SENSATIONS. An alternative theory suggests that somatization disorder arises from a ... For example, the DSM-IV-TR notes that the sensation of worms in the head or ants crawling under the skin are sometimes reported ... It is included in the category of somatoform disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR ...
Sensation and perception have different roles in how we understand our world. The sensation is the process of sensing our ... Without sensation, the perception will not be possible and without perception, our sensations would remain to be unfamiliar. ... The Neurotransmitter Of A Motor Disorder. 1026 Words , 5 Pages. There are many different neurotransmitters that can be ... Sensation and perception have different roles in how we understand our world. The sensation is the process of sensing our ...
VISCERAL SENSATION IN FUNCTIONAL GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS. The sensory disorder associated with functional gastrointestinal ... Although the intensity of perception is stimulus related, the same type of sensations are induced by distensions that ... It has been shown that patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders may have altered visceral sensation but it is ... Symptoms in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders may be related to abnormal sensation but three key aspects of ...
Sensory processing disorder-also known as SPD or sensory integration disorder-is a term describing a collection of challenges ... He may have sensory processing disorder, the most common form of which is over-responsivity to sensations. Over-responsive ... Sensation-Seeking Diagnosis. * Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Adult * Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, ... Is sensory processing disorder a real disorder? Created with Sketch.. psychologytoday.com
List of 76 causes for Cachexia and Left iliac fossa disorders causing abdominal pain and Stomach burning sensation, alternative ... Sensations (6520 causes) *Digestive symptoms (5299 causes) *Muscle weakness (4300 causes) *Brain symptoms (2787 causes) * ... Stomach burning sensation:*Causes: Stomach burning sensation *Introduction: Stomach burning sensation *Stomach burning ... Stomach burning sensation: Remove a symptom Results: Causes of Cachexia AND Left iliac fossa disorders causing abdominal pain ...
Sensation avoiding: low threshold and active response. Individuals actively limit their exposure to sensations and are ... Sensory processing disorders are classified into three categories: sensory modulation disorder, sensory-based motor disorders ... Postural disorder. Sensory discrimination disorder (SDD)[edit]. Sensory discrimination disorder involves the incorrect ... Sensory processing disorder is a common comorbidity with autism spectrum disorders[59][60][61][62][63][64][65] and is now ...
Testing of chemo-sensation (i.e., taste and smell) *Assessment of laryngeal sensations (dryness, tickling, burning, pain, etc ... See the Assessment section of the Voice Disorders evidence map for pertinent scientific evidence, expert opinion, and client/ ... Screening may be conducted if a voice disorder is suspected. It may be triggered by concerns from individuals, parents, ... All patients/clients with voice disorders are examined by a physician, preferably in a discipline appropriate to the presenting ...
Restless legs syndrome is a tingling or burning sensation that occurs as you are resting or about to fall asleep. Learn more ... Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder characterized by unpleasant sensations in the legs, and an ... Some people describe it as a creeping, crawling, tingling or burning sensation. Moving makes your legs feel better, but not for ... The sensations range in severity from irritating to painful.. What are the causes of restless legs syndrome?. In most cases ...
Sensation Disorders / etiology, physiopathology. Spinal Stenosis / complications, physiopathology, radiography, therapy*. ... dermatomal sensations, motor functions and neurogenic claudication distances were assessed at admission and were compared after ...
premonitory awareness of an approaching physical or mental disorder; sensation that precedes seizures. aura. ... inability to comprehend auditory, visual, spatial, olfactory, or other sensations even though the sensory sphere is intact. ... eating disorder, binge (overeat) purge (vomit/lax). bulimia nervosa. sadness, despair, discouragement, feelings of low self- ... chemical, microscopic, and microbial test to diagnose CNS disorders. CSF analysis. radiography of blood vessels after contrast ...
The chest pain/sensations, the prevalence of panic disorder and STOMACH/DIGESTIVE issues among others. Suddenly, all the ... Right now as I am sitting here, I dont have that sensation. I havent felt it for the whole week. But I did have it for about ... Anxiety & Panic Disorders Bipolar Disorder Breast Cancer Chronic Pain Crohns Disease Depression Diabetes Fibromyalgia GERD & ... I do have panic disorder and have had it all my life. Very recently in doing some research toward panic disorder I ran across ...
Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center discusses anxiety disorders--the most common mental health problems that occur in ... choking sensation; chest discomfort or pain; nausea or abdominal distress; feeling dizzy, lightheaded, faint or unsteady; ... numbness or tingling sensations; chills or hot flashes. ... Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)Show In this disorder, a ... Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)Show Children or adolescents with generalized anxiety disorder often worry a lot about things ...
Premenstrual dysphoric disorder or PMDD is a condition that is similar to premenstrual syndrome (PMS), but it is more severe ... Is pain all in the brain? Take the Pain Quiz to learn everything youve ever wanted to know about the unpleasant sensation we ... Dizziness is a symptom that often applies to a variety of sensations including lightheadedness and vertigo. Causes of dizziness ... home/ womens health center/womens health a-z list/premenstrual dysphoric disorder pmdd center/premenstrual dysphoric disorder ...
... risk of developing bipolar disorder; (2) bipolar disorder diagnosis; (3) relevant clinical and functional outcomes including ... Research involving individuals with diagnosed mood disorders as well as non-clinical populations is reviewed. The hypotheses ... Research involving individuals with diagnosed mood disorders as well as non-clinical populations is reviewed. The hypotheses ... supported and several consistent findings were not accounted for by alternative psychological models of bipolar disorder. The ...
Read the full list of frequently asked questions and answers for swallowing disorders provided by our experts at the UPMC ... These ulcerations can cause burning sensations, especially when they come in contact with spicy or acidic foods and drinks. ... This may include a tightening sensation due to swelling and a narrowing of the passageway where food travels (esophagus). ... Allergy, Sinus, Nose and Sleep Disorders Skull Base Tumors and Head & Neck Surgery Facial Nerves and Plastic Surgery ...
Theorists believe that people with panic disorder may experience panic reactions because they mistake their bodily sensations ... Breath holding - creates sensation of being out of breath. *Running in place - creates increased heart rate, respiration, ... Panic disorder is notably excluded from this list. References[edit]. *^ a b c d e f g "Anxiety Disorders". NIMH. March 2016. ... major depressive disorder (80%), dysthymic disorder (40%), generalized anxiety disorder (40%), somatoform disorders (40%), ...
Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders, Volume 206 - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN 9780444633644, 9780444633873 ... 3 Alices Odd Sensations of Body Image and Surroundings. 4 Physiology of Migraines May Explain Alices Metamorphopsias and ... 8 A Medical sensation: Language but no words. 9 Presentations. Acknowledgments. References ... Literature, Neurology, and Neuroscience: Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders, Volume 206 1st Edition. 0 star rating Write a ...
... burning or stabbing sensations. Lhermittes sign -- an electrical shock sensation that radiates down the spine with bending the ... People with neuropathic pain often experience a combination of pain sensations. Several neurological disorders can give rise to ... Neurological Disorders That Have Symptoms of Electrical Shock Feelings by DR. TINA M. ST. JOHN Aug. 14, 2017. ... Sensations associated with neuropathic pain typically include aching, burning, stabbing or an electrical shock feeling. ...
Often, children will not report symptoms and may be incapable of verbalizing the abnormal sensations that they are experiencing ... Vertigo (dizziness involving an illusory sensation of spinning, swaying, or motion) *Visual disturbances ... Signs and symptoms of balance system disorders vary due to a wide range of underlying causes. Signs and symptoms may be ... Identifying children with balance disorders, vestibular deficits, or dizziness can be a challenge. ...
  • Clinical parameters such as pain on motion, lumbar range of motion, straight leg raising test, deep tendon reflexes, dermatomal sensations, motor functions and neurogenic claudication distances were assessed at admission and were compared after a conservative treatment program was completed. (biomedsearch.com)
  • It has been well established that sensory dysfunction in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders exclusively affects the visceral territory but the extent of the dysfunction in the different clinical syndromes remains controversial. (bmj.com)
  • For example, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder of the intestines. (google.com)
  • CBT for difficulties such as post-traumatic stress disorder and panic disorder seeks to directly address the specific cognitions and appraisals hypothesized to maintain distress as part of a vicious cycle of thoughts, feelings and behavior [negative appraisals of traumatic events and their sequalae ( Ehlers and Clark, 2000 ) and catastrophic misinterpretations of bodily states ( Clark, 1986 ), respectively]. (frontiersin.org)
  • Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection (PANDAS) are a group of disorders that are believed to be the result of an autoimmune response to streptococcal infections. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • The loss of sensation in any particular dermatome can indicate a spinal cord disorder and allows doctors to locate the specific area where the spinal cord may be damaged. (pennmedicine.org)
  • Panic disorder affects about 2.5% of people at some point in their life. (rug.nl)
  • The Willis-Ekbom (RLS) Foundation describes this disease as a disruptive neurologic disorder that seriously affects 2-3% of the population and may affect up to 10% of the U.S. population [ 4 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Somatization disorder can be dangerous, since patients may end up taking several different medications, thereby risking harmful drug interactions. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Many patients described by Sigmund Freud would be diagnosed today with somatization disorder. (encyclopedia.com)
  • All patients/clients with voice disorders are examined by a physician, preferably in a discipline appropriate to the presenting complaint. (asha.org)
  • See the Assessment section of the Voice Disorders evidence map for pertinent scientific evidence, expert opinion, and client/caregiver perspective. (asha.org)
  • A comprehensive assessment is conducted for individuals suspected of having a voice disorder, using both standardized and nonstandardized measures (see ASHA resource on assessment tools, techniques, and data sources ). (asha.org)