Salivation: The discharge of saliva from the SALIVARY GLANDS that keeps the mouth tissues moist and aids in digestion.Sensation: The process in which specialized SENSORY RECEPTOR CELLS transduce peripheral stimuli (physical or chemical) into NERVE IMPULSES which are then transmitted to the various sensory centers in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Sialorrhea: Increased salivary flow.Submandibular Gland: One of two salivary glands in the neck, located in the space bound by the two bellies of the digastric muscle and the angle of the mandible. It discharges through the submandibular duct. The secretory units are predominantly serous although a few mucous alveoli, some with serous demilunes, occur. (Stedman, 25th ed)Saliva: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SALIVARY GLANDS and mucous glands of the mouth. It contains MUCINS, water, organic salts, and ptylin.Amish: An ethnic group with shared religious beliefs. Originating in Switzerland in the late 1600s, and first migrating to the mid-Atlantic, they now live throughout Eastern and Mid-Western United States and elsewhere. Communities are usually close-knit and marriage is within the community.Tropicamide: One of the MUSCARINIC ANTAGONISTS with pharmacologic action similar to ATROPINE and used mainly as an ophthalmic parasympatholytic or mydriatic.Salivary Glands: Glands that secrete SALIVA in the MOUTH. There are three pairs of salivary glands (PAROTID GLAND; SUBLINGUAL GLAND; SUBMANDIBULAR GLAND).Parasympathetic Nervous System: The craniosacral division of the autonomic nervous system. The cell bodies of the parasympathetic preganglionic fibers are in brain stem nuclei and in the sacral spinal cord. They synapse in cranial autonomic ganglia or in terminal ganglia near target organs. The parasympathetic nervous system generally acts to conserve resources and restore homeostasis, often with effects reciprocal to the sympathetic nervous system.Ageusia: Complete or severe loss of the subjective sense of taste, frequently accompanied by OLFACTION DISORDERS.Muscarinic Agonists: Drugs that bind to and activate muscarinic cholinergic receptors (RECEPTORS, MUSCARINIC). Muscarinic agonists are most commonly used when it is desirable to increase smooth muscle tone, especially in the GI tract, urinary bladder and the eye. They may also be used to reduce heart rate.Drinking Behavior: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of water and other liquids; includes rhythmic patterns of drinking (time intervals - onset and duration), frequency and satiety.Parotid Gland: The largest of the three pairs of SALIVARY GLANDS. They lie on the sides of the FACE immediately below and in front of the EAR.QuinuclidinesLingual Nerve: A sensory branch of the MANDIBULAR NERVE, which is part of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The lingual nerve carries general afferent fibers from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue, the floor of the mouth, and the mandibular gingivae.Sensation Disorders: Disorders of the special senses (i.e., VISION; HEARING; TASTE; and SMELL) or somatosensory system (i.e., afferent components of the PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM).Aphids: A family (Aphididae) of small insects, in the suborder Sternorrhyncha, that suck the juices of plants. Important genera include Schizaphis and Myzus. The latter is known to carry more than 100 virus diseases between plants.Oxotremorine: A non-hydrolyzed muscarinic agonist used as a research tool.Ethacrynic Acid: A compound that inhibits symport of sodium, potassium, and chloride primarily in the ascending limb of Henle, but also in the proximal and distal tubules. This pharmacological action results in excretion of these ions, increased urinary output, and reduction in extracellular fluid. This compound has been classified as a loop or high ceiling diuretic.Diamines: Organic chemicals which have two amino groups in an aliphatic chain.Secretory Rate: The amount of a substance secreted by cells or by a specific organ or organism over a given period of time; usually applies to those substances which are formed by glandular tissues and are released by them into biological fluids, e.g., secretory rate of corticosteroids by the adrenal cortex, secretory rate of gastric acid by the gastric mucosa.Thermosensing: The sensation of cold, heat, coolness, and warmth as detected by THERMORECEPTORS.Xerostomia: Decreased salivary flow.Parasympathomimetics: Drugs that mimic the effects of parasympathetic nervous system activity. Included here are drugs that directly stimulate muscarinic receptors and drugs that potentiate cholinergic activity, usually by slowing the breakdown of acetylcholine (CHOLINESTERASE INHIBITORS). Drugs that stimulate both sympathetic and parasympathetic postganglionic neurons (GANGLIONIC STIMULANTS) are not included here.N-Methylscopolamine: A muscarinic antagonist used to study binding characteristics of muscarinic cholinergic receptors.Tremor: Cyclical movement of a body part that can represent either a physiologic process or a manifestation of disease. Intention or action tremor, a common manifestation of CEREBELLAR DISEASES, is aggravated by movement. In contrast, resting tremor is maximal when there is no attempt at voluntary movement, and occurs as a relatively frequent manifestation of PARKINSON DISEASE.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Atropine: An alkaloid, originally from Atropa belladonna, but found in other plants, mainly SOLANACEAE. Hyoscyamine is the 3(S)-endo isomer of atropine.Cockroaches: Insects of the order Dictyoptera comprising several families including Blaberidae, BLATTELLIDAE, Blattidae (containing the American cockroach PERIPLANETA americana), Cryptocercidae, and Polyphagidae.Cholinergic Agonists: Drugs that bind to and activate cholinergic receptors.Receptor, Muscarinic M3: A subclass of muscarinic receptor that mediates cholinergic-induced contraction in a variety of SMOOTH MUSCLES.Hypesthesia: Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.Receptors, Muscarinic: One of the two major classes of cholinergic receptors. Muscarinic receptors were originally defined by their preference for MUSCARINE over NICOTINE. There are several subtypes (usually M1, M2, M3....) that are characterized by their cellular actions, pharmacology, and molecular biology.Somatosensory Disorders: Disorders of sensory information received from superficial and deep regions of the body. The somatosensory system conveys neural impulses which pertain to proprioception, tactile sensation, thermal sensation, pressure sensation, and pain. PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; and BRAIN DISEASES may be associated with impaired or abnormal somatic sensation.Substance P: An eleven-amino acid neurotransmitter that appears in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is involved in transmission of PAIN, causes rapid contractions of the gastrointestinal smooth muscle, and modulates inflammatory and immune responses.Touch: Sensation of making physical contact with objects, animate or inanimate. Tactile stimuli are detected by MECHANORECEPTORS in the skin and mucous membranes.Cranial Nerves: Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.Trochlear Nerve: The 4th cranial nerve. The trochlear nerve carries the motor innervation of the superior oblique muscles of the eye.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Cranial Nerve Diseases: Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.Olfactory Nerve: The 1st cranial nerve. The olfactory nerve conveys the sense of smell. It is formed by the axons of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS which project from the olfactory epithelium (in the nasal epithelium) to the OLFACTORY BULB.Trochlear Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the fourth cranial (trochlear) nerve or its nucleus in the midbrain. The nerve crosses as it exits the midbrain dorsally and may be injured along its course through the intracranial space, cavernous sinus, superior orbital fissure, or orbit. Clinical manifestations include weakness of the superior oblique muscle which causes vertical DIPLOPIA that is maximal when the affected eye is adducted and directed inferiorly. Head tilt may be seen as a compensatory mechanism for diplopia and rotation of the visual axis. Common etiologies include CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Facial Nerve: The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Food: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Entrepreneurship: The organization, management, and assumption of risks of a business or enterprise, usually implying an element of change or challenge and a new opportunity.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Torture: The intentional infliction of physical or mental suffering upon an individual or individuals, including the torture of animals.Autistic Disorder: A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)Swallows: The family Hirundinidae, comprised of small BIRDS that hunt flying INSECTS while in sustained flight.Puberty: A period in the human life in which the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal system takes place and reaches full maturity. The onset of synchronized endocrine events in puberty lead to the capacity for reproduction (FERTILITY), development of secondary SEX CHARACTERISTICS, and other changes seen in ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT.Deglutition: The act of taking solids and liquids into the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT through the mouth and throat.Esophagus: The muscular membranous segment between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH in the UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Deglutition Disorders: Difficulty in SWALLOWING which may result from neuromuscular disorder or mechanical obstruction. Dysphagia is classified into two distinct types: oropharyngeal dysphagia due to malfunction of the PHARYNX and UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; and esophageal dysphagia due to malfunction of the ESOPHAGUS.
Oral sensation, taste, and salivation (IX)[edit]. Deviating uvula due to cranial nerve IX lesion ... The sensation of the face is tested, and patients are asked to perform different facial movements, such as puffing out of the ... Combined, these nerves provide sensation to the skin of the face and also controls the muscles of mastication (chewing).[1] ... When damaged, the vestibular nerve may give rise to the sensation of spinning and dizziness. Function of the vestibular nerve ...
Nausea may be defined as an unpleasant sensation of the need to vomit. It may be accompanied by symptoms such salivation, ... In humans, the vomiting response may be preceded by an unpleasant sensation termed nausea, but nausea may also occur without ... and skin and are responsible for many of the prodromal signs such as salivation and skin pallor. Nausea and vomiting may be ...
Irritability to sound or touch, abnormal facial sensation, sensation of prickling, tingling or creeping on skin, numbness. ... Headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive salivation, fatigue. In severe cases: fluid in the lungs and muscle ...
Autonomic effects involve increased salivation and the sensation of feeling faint that often occurs with nausea and vomiting. ... Nausea is a sensation of unease and discomfort in the upper stomach with an involuntary urge to vomit. It may precede vomiting ... There are four general pathways that are activated by specific triggers in the human body that go on to create the sensation of ...
... which are designed to mimic labored breathing sensations. Dyspnea, or difficulty breathing, is a commonly felt sensation ... After rounds of pairing the two, salivation occurred without presenting food once the pelvis was distended. Interoceptive ... Castele, R. J.; Connors, A. F.; Altose, M. D. (December 1985). "Effects of changes in CO2 partial pressure on the sensation of ... Common interoceptive sensations related to the gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems are hunger and fullness. These are ...
The gastrointestinal effects can consist of nausea, abdominal pain, and vomiting, as well as higher salivation and diarrhea ( ... Also, xanthopsia (yellow vision), a burning sensation of the mucous membranes of the eyes, and gastrointestinal tract and ...
The flower bud has a grassy taste followed by a strong tingling or numbing sensation and often excessive salivation, with a ... Thus, as described, the flavor use of jambu extract includes the ability induce a mouth-watering sensation in the oral cavity ... Spilanthol, the major constituent of jambu extract, is responsible for the perception of a mouth-watering flavor sensation, as ... which is responsible for its ability to induce a mouth-watering sensation when used as a flavor (and associated with the ...
Human volunteers given dermal doses of 130 μg/cm2 on the earlobe experienced local tingling and burning sensations. One man ... It may cause allergic skin reactions in humans.[5] Excessive exposure can cause nausea, headache, muscle weakness, salivation, ... Symptoms of dermal exposure include numbness, tingling, itching, burning sensation, loss of bladder control, incoordination, ...
Facial sweating during salivation has also been described in diabetes mellitus, cluster headache, following chorda tympani ... Phantom sweating is a sensation that one is sweating, while the skin remains dry. Sufferers can not distinguish whether it is ... real sweating or just a sensation. The phenomena is experienced in the anhidriotic, denervated area of the body, presenting an ...
... has a mild but lasting aftertaste associated with salivation and a sensation of furriness on the tongue, stimulating the ... mouthwatering and coating sensation over the tongue. The sensation of umami is due to the detection of the carboxylate anion of ... Uneyama H, Kawai M, Sekine-Hayakawa Y, Torii K (August 2009). "Contribution of umami taste substances in human salivation ...
... sensations of intensity and finish are strengthened and better controlled by the experiencer. According to the original concept ... thin layer is made of an acidic preparation to trigger salivation and prepare the taste buds to receive other tastes The ...
Signs and symptoms of pyrethroid toxicity include abnormal skin sensation (e.g., burning, itching, tingling, and numbness), ... dizziness, salivation, headache, fatigue, vomiting, diarrhea, seizure, irritability to sound and touch, and other central ...
... "a burning sensation in the mouth, salivation, gastrointestinal cramps, and vomiting and bloody diarrhea," and that depending ...
After eight years of taking the drug, he developed a loss of taste sensation and numbness in his tongue. When he ran out of his ... Diagnosis of dysgeusia begins with the patient being questioned about salivation, swallowing, chewing, oral pain, previous ear ... Within three weeks, she began experiencing a metallic taste and a burning sensation in her mouth that ceased when she stopped ... It is based on the induction of gustatory sensations by means of an anodal electrical direct current. Patients usually report ...
Weight gain Fever Roaring sensation in the head Weight loss Malaise Depersonalisation Noise intolerance Euphoria Akathisia ... Hypertension Redness and itching of the eyes Altered taste Conjunctivitis Flatulence Anorexia Increased appetite Salivation ...
Between attacks of pain there is sometimes numbness or other alterred sensations (anesthesia or paresthesia). This is sometimes ... thinks about or talks about certain kinds of food which produce strong salivation.[citation needed] Observing sweating in the ...
The poison on the outside of the plant will cause irritation and burning sensations on the skin. When collecting seeds from ... Symptoms of ingestion will include: burning of the mouth and throat, salivation, vomiting, abdominal cramping, diarrhea, ...
Atropine sulfate tablets are used in some circumstances to reduce salivation. The same for anticholinergic drugs which can be ... "The Relationship Between Oral Sensation and Drooling in Persons With Cerebral Palsy". Retrieved 2013-10-02. Kalf J. G. " ... a benefit because they decrease the activity of the Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptors and can result in decreased salivation. ...
Like neurokinin A, neuropeptide K has been localized to sensory neurons and likely plays a role in regulating sensation. While ... "Neuropeptide K potently stimulates salivary gland secretion and potentiates substance P-induced salivation". Proc Natl Acad Sci ...
Subjective sensations Bitter taste, excessive thirst, burning at cardia Lack of desire for fluids Mucoid salivation, sleepiness ...
Damage to the glossopharyngeal nerve can result in loss of taste sensation to the posterior one third of the tongue, and ... Examples include: 1) dry mouth in response to fear (mediated by the hypothalamus); 2) salivation in response to smelling food ( ... Visceral afferent (special visceral afferent) - provides taste sensation from the posterior one-third of the tongue, including ... The integrity of the glossopharyngeal nerve may be evaluated by testing the patient's general sensation and that of taste on ...
There may be also discomfort or a prickling or itching sensation at the site of bite, progressing within days to symptoms of ... thus allowing it to be further transmitted due to projectile salivation. Fatality can occur from two days to five years from ...
The sailors presented with neurologic compromises: tremor, paralysis, and excessive salivation as well as tooth loss, skin ... or even a sensation that resembles small insects crawling on or under the skin (formication); skin discoloration (pink cheeks, ... increased salivation, and hypertension (high blood pressure). Affected children may show red cheeks, nose and lips, loss of ...
... and peripheral nerve abnormalities such as burning and tingling sensations. Loprazolam has a low risk of physical dependence ... amnesia headache vertigo hypotension salivation changes gastro-intestinal disturbances visual disturbances dysarthria tremor ... and panic attacks sweating nightmares insomnia headache tremor nausea and vomiting feelings of unreality abnormal sensation of ... clinical depression poor memory and concentration aggression excitability Somatic Symptoms numbness altered sensations of the ...
Elizabeth pleaded not guilty and the trial in Adelaide was a sensation with crowds filling Gouger Street outside the Supreme ... Finally Dr Herbert treated him for a sore throat with excessive salivation. Dr Herbert's treatment worked and Woolcock was ...
In dogs doses in excess of 300 mg/kg led to vomiting, salivation, ataxia, and drowsiness. ... Hot flushes/cold sensation. *Photopsia. *Dyspnoea. *Visual disturbances. *Increased hepatic enzymes without associated clinical ...
List of 36 causes for Decreased salivation and Face burning sensation, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, ... Decreased salivation OR Face burning sensation - Causes of Any Symptom Decreased salivation:*Causes: Decreased salivation * ... Decreased salivation AND Face burning sensation: Causes of All Symptoms. *Decreased salivation OR Face burning sensation: ... Decreased salivation and Face burning sensation. *Decreased salivation AND Face burning sensation - Causes of All Symptoms * ...
List of 36 causes for Decreased salivation and Face burning sensation, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, ... Decreased salivation AND Face burning sensation: Causes of All Symptoms. *Decreased salivation OR Face burning sensation: ... More Searches: Decreased salivation. *Decreased salivation: Add a 3rd symptom *Decreased salivation: Remove a symptom *Start ... Results: Causes of Decreased salivation AND Face burning sensation 1. Bells Palsy. Show causes with descriptions ». , Start ...
Oral sensation, taste, and salivation (IX)[edit]. Deviating uvula due to cranial nerve IX lesion ... The sensation of the face is tested, and patients are asked to perform different facial movements, such as puffing out of the ... Combined, these nerves provide sensation to the skin of the face and also controls the muscles of mastication (chewing).[1] ... When damaged, the vestibular nerve may give rise to the sensation of spinning and dizziness. Function of the vestibular nerve ...
Transient nausea and vomiting (emesis) are seen first, followed by painful sensations in the arms/hands and legs/feet within 1 ... excessive salivation; inflammation of the mouth, lips, and gums; possible green discoloration of urine shortly after exposure; ... or burning sensations; muscle aches and weakness; headache; seizures, delirium, and coma; loss of appetite; ...
At 5 mg/kg, the effects may include nausea; vomiting; headache; burning sensation of the lips, mouth, throat, and eyes; ... lacrimation; rhinorrhea; salivation; muscle aches; burning and tingling in the extremities; tooth pain; diaphoresis; chest pain ...
... burning sensation of the lips, mouth, throat, and eyes; lacrimation; rhinorrhea; salivation; muscle aches; burning and tingling ... A metallic taste, salivation, dysphagia, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and nausea have been reported following inhalation of ... heavy salivation), enteritis, and renal damage; there can also be chronic CNS effects, which develop as a result of the ability ...
... burning sensation of the lips, mouth, throat, and eyes; lacrimation; rhinorrhea; salivation; muscle aches; burning and tingling ... A metallic taste, salivation, dysphagia, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, and nausea have been reported following inhalation of ... heavy salivation), enteritis, and renal damage; there can also be chronic CNS effects, which develop as a result of the ability ...
At 5 mg/kg, the effects may include nausea; vomiting; headache; burning sensation of the lips, mouth, throat, and eyes; ... lacrimation; rhinorrhea; salivation; muscle aches; burning and tingling in the extremities; tooth pain; diaphoresis; chest pain ...
spinning sensation (vertigo). *low or high blood pressure. *fever. *excessive salivation. *headache ...
Abdominal pain or discomfort; agitation; anxiety; back pain; burning, tingling, or prickly sensation; change in appetite; ... increased salivation; gas, bloating, flatulence; increased watering of mouth; joint pain; muscle pain or spasm; nosebleeds; ... pain and/or burning sensation at place of injection; pale skin; redness, pain, or swelling of eye; ringing or buzzing in ears; ...
Spontaneous bodily sensations. *Muscle twitches *Vocalizations (screaming, crying, laughing, singing). *Salivation or drooling ...
Teeth; sensation of elongated teeth. looseness. Saliva. Salivation. ≡ show all authors .... ▲ THROAT. Throat. Mucus; pulled ...
Sensation as if water collected in it. ► Salivation. ► Metallic taste, with loss of appetite (Nux v.) ; M. at root of tongue ... Sensation as if a warm were moving in it. ► Sensation as if he had not eaten for a long time and the hunger had passed away. ► ... salivation ; on eating ; with headache and bruised sensation in abdomen ; as from overloading stomach. ► Vomiting ; during the ... Forearm asleep and sensation as if the hand were swollen (Rhus t.), constrictive pain in muscles and cold fingers. ► Trembling ...
Sensations in throat and air passages (either from coughing, or causing coughing); sensation of foreign body in throat; in ... Salivation. night. while lying. Tongue. Tongue coated white or yellow; feels rough, swollen ...
Sensation as if fibres were in mouth. ► Salivation ; with pain in lower teeth ; at noon ; metallic-tasting. ► Taste bitter ; T ... Sensation as if bound with a tight cord (Iod.).. ► Pain in temples and jaws. ► Throbbing from right side of vertex down to nose ... Sensation of a lump, with disposition to hawk it out all day, hawked up a hard greenish lump. ► Soreness, agg. empty swallowing ... Sensation in urethra as if urine were hot in morning during normal stool. ► Urine increased. ► Urine red. ► U. thick and dark. ...
Salivation. Tongue. Sensation of coldness. tongue. tongue; near flap of skin between tongue and floor of mouth ...
Salivation with metallic taste in mouth. θ Diphtheria.. Sensation of dryness in mouth with cough.. Roof of mouth sore ; profuse ... Drawing sensation about root of nose.. Sensation in nostril as if tickled with a stiff feather.. Feeling in nose and eyes as if ... Sensation of a lump in throat, causing a continuous desire to swallow ; like a plug in throat ; , left side.. Sensation of ... 43] Sensations.. [44] Tissues.. [45] Touch. Injuries... [46] Skin.. [47] Stage of life, constitution.. [48] Relations.. ...
of forehead over eyes; , walking.─Sensation as if head hollow.─Rush of blood to head.─Headache , in open air , in warm room.─ ... Salivation. Threadworms. Vomiting. Worms.. Characteristics.─Sin. alb., like Sin. nig., is indigenous in Great Britain. Its ... sprained sensation, as though anus were drawn up into rectum, with sticking, itching, burning and biting in anus.─Sensation as ... Stool and Anus.─Sensation as though a hard substance were lying in anus and could not be evacuated; not , by stool.─Burning in ...
4. Loss of sensation.. 5. Reduced digestion capacity or agni.. 6. Excess salivation.. 7. Increased sleep.. 8. Cold feeling of ... sensation etc in balance. Regulation of excretory functions like urination, bowel movement, semen ejaculation, contraction of ...
The foods which are pungent to taste can cause burning sensation in cheeks. ... The irritation caused by katu rasa makes tears flow, increases salivation and stimulates nasal secretion. ... The irritation caused by katu rasa makes tears flow, increases salivation and stimulates nasal secretion. The foods which are ... pungent to taste can cause burning sensation in cheeks.. Herbs which have this taste can cure diseases of throat, skin rashes, ...
burning sensation in your penis;. *red or watery eyes, twitching eyelids;. *runny nose, increased salivation; or ... burning sensation in your mouth and throat;. * ...
front; back; oral sensations, taste, salivation 10 supertasters have > # of _______ fungiform papillae ...
tremor, dizziness, spinning sensation;. *headache, drowsiness;. *nausea, constipation;. *dry mouth, or increased salivation; ...
Salivation - produces excessive saliva.. *Blepharospasm - uncontrollable winking caused by involuntary contraction of eyelid ... Burning, pricking, peppery sensation in the eyes, nose, mouth, throat, and skin. ...
Drooling or excessive salivation can be a sign of a serious disease. Find more about cause, diagnosis and homeopathic treatment ... Salivation. Taste Lost. Burning blisters in mouth and on tongue. Chronic sore throat, with sensation of being compelled to ... Burning water-brash and profuse salivation, day and night. Increased Salivation from the gastric complaints. Intense burning ... Obstinate salivation with ulcers on the tongue, angles of lips and inner walls of the mouth with a constant and copious ...
  • The clinical features of OSMF includes progressive inability to open the mouth ( Trismus ) due to oral fibrosis and scarring, pain and burning sensation upon consumption of spicy food stuffs, increased salivation, change of gustatory sensation, hearing loss due to stenosis of the eustachian tubes, dryness of the mouth, nasal tone to the voice, dysphagia (if esophagus is involved). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Symmetrical disturbance of touch and pain sensation and signs suggesting autonomic dysfunction including frequent urination, impotence, constipation, and orthostatic hypotension were noted with mild distal muscle weakness. (deepdyve.com)
  • Sensory innervation of the periodontal ligaments provides proprioceptive information about pressure on the teeth and oral stereognosis (perceiving the form of an object) as well as jaw opening and salivation reflexes. (medscape.com)
  • With TN2, facial pain is a constant dull or burning sensation and tends to affect a more widespread portion of the face than TN1. (rarediseases.org)
  • Sin embargo, el término "laqve" sólo se acepta como tal, en la mayoría de los textos históricos, cuando se refiere a la parálisis facial. (isciii.es)
  • Probiotics can ease the burning sensation, pain and uncomfortable feeling associated with acidity and digestive system problems. (top10homeremedies.com)
  • This review highlights these recent developments and discusses the critical role of Na v 1.7 in pain sensation in humans. (jci.org)
  • hi yes there is a burning sensation when eating spicy foods also my stomach burns all the blood tests i have done till today are fine do you think am over stressed? (healthcaremagic.com)
  • As a bush plant used for treating toothache, the analgesic effect of the Spilanthes plant has been attributed to the presence of constituents containing an N-isobutylamide moiety, such as spilanthol, a substance that has been found to be an effective sialogogue, an agent that promotes salivation. (wikipedia.org)