Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S.): A component of the Department of Health and Human Services to oversee and direct the Medicare and Medicaid programs and related Federal medical care quality control staffs. Name was changed effective June 14, 2001.Medicare Part B: The voluntary portion of Medicare, known as the Supplementary Medical Insurance (SMI) Program, that includes physician's services, home health care, medical services, outpatient hospital services, and laboratory, pathology, and radiology services. All persons entitled to Medicare Part A may enroll in Medicare Part B on a monthly premium basis.United StatesMedicare Part A: The compulsory portion of Medicare that is known as the Hospital Insurance Program. All persons 65 years and older who are entitled to benefits under the Old Age, Survivors, Disability and Health Insurance Program or railroad retirement, persons under the age of 65 who have been eligible for disability for more than two years, and insured workers (and their dependents) requiring renal dialysis or kidney transplantation are automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Eligibility Determination: Criteria to determine eligibility of patients for medical care programs and services.Reimbursement Mechanisms: Processes or methods of reimbursement for services rendered or equipment.Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services: Insurance providing for payment of services rendered by the pharmacist. Services include the preparation and distribution of medical products.Insurance Claim Review: Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Fee-for-Service Plans: Method of charging whereby a physician or other practitioner bills for each encounter or service rendered. In addition to physicians, other health care professionals are reimbursed via this mechanism. Fee-for-service plans contrast with salary, per capita, and prepayment systems, where the payment does not change with the number of services actually used or if none are used. (From Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Insurance Benefits: Payments or services provided under stated circumstances under the terms of an insurance policy. In prepayment programs, benefits are the services the programs will provide at defined locations and to the extent needed.Rate Setting and Review: A method of examining and setting levels of payments.Prospective Payment System: A system wherein reimbursement rates are set, for a given period of time, prior to the circumstances giving rise to actual reimbursement claims.Capitation Fee: A method of payment for health services in which an individual or institutional provider is paid a fixed, per capita amount without regard to the actual number or nature of services provided to each patient.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: An Act prohibiting a health plan from establishing lifetime limits or annual limits on the dollar value of benefits for any participant or beneficiary after January 1, 2014. It permits a restricted annual limit for plan years beginning prior to January 1, 2014. It provides that a health plan shall not be prevented from placing annual or lifetime per-beneficiary limits on covered benefits. The Act sets up a competitive health insurance market.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Insurance Claim Reporting: The design, completion, and filing of forms with the insurer.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Economics, Hospital: Economic aspects related to the management and operation of a hospital.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Cost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Cost Sharing: Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Fee Schedules: A listing of established professional service charges, for specified dental and medical procedures.Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.Fees, Medical: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for medical services.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Fraud: Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.Insurance, Medigap: A supplemental health insurance policy sold by private insurance companies and designed to pay for health care costs and services that are not paid for either by Medicare alone or by a combination of Medicare and existing private health insurance benefits. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Skilled Nursing Facilities: Extended care facilities which provide skilled nursing care or rehabilitation services for inpatients on a daily basis.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Reimbursement, Incentive: A scheme which provides reimbursement for the health services rendered, generally by an institution, and which provides added financial rewards if certain conditions are met. Such a scheme is intended to promote and reward increased efficiency and cost containment, with better care, or at least without adverse effect on the quality of the care rendered.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Medicare Payment Advisory Commission: The Commission was created by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 under Title XVIII. It is specifically charged to review the effect of Medicare+Choice under Medicare Part C and to review payment policies under Parts A and B. It is also generally charged to evaluate the effect of prospective payment policies and their impact on health care delivery in the US. The former Prospective Payment Assessment Commission (ProPAC) and the Physician Payment Review Commission (PPRC) were merged to form MEDPAC.Budgets: Detailed financial plans for carrying out specific activities for a certain period of time. They include proposed income and expenditures.Risk Sharing, Financial: Any system which allows payors to share some of the financial risk associated with a particular patient population with providers. Providers agree to adhere to fixed fee schedules in exchange for an increase in their payor base and a chance to benefit from cost containment measures. Common risk-sharing methods are prospective payment schedules (PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM), capitation (CAPITATION FEES), diagnosis-related fees (DIAGNOSIS-RELATED GROUPS), and pre-negotiated fees.Diagnosis-Related Groups: A system for classifying patient care by relating common characteristics such as diagnosis, treatment, and age to an expected consumption of hospital resources and length of stay. Its purpose is to provide a framework for specifying case mix and to reduce hospital costs and reimbursements and it forms the cornerstone of the prospective payment system.Formularies as Topic: Works about lists of drugs or collections of recipes, formulas, and prescriptions for the compounding of medicinal preparations. Formularies differ from PHARMACOPOEIAS in that they are less complete, lacking full descriptions of the drugs, their formulations, analytic composition, chemical properties, etc. In hospitals, formularies list all drugs commonly stocked in the hospital pharmacy.Competitive Bidding: Pricing statements presented by more than one party for the purpose of securing a contract.Prescription Fees: The charge levied on the consumer for drugs or therapy prescribed under written order of a physician or other health professional.Insurance Selection Bias: Adverse or favorable selection bias exhibited by insurers or enrollees resulting in disproportionate enrollment of certain groups of people.Cost Allocation: The assignment, to each of several particular cost-centers, of an equitable proportion of the costs of activities that serve all of them. Cost-center usually refers to institutional departments or services.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.Personal Health Services: Health care provided to individuals.Contract Services: Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Drug Prescriptions: Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.Risk Adjustment: The use of severity-of-illness measures, such as age, to estimate the risk (measurable or predictable chance of loss, injury or death) to which a patient is subject before receiving some health care intervention. This adjustment allows comparison of performance and quality across organizations, practitioners, and communities. (from JCAHO, Lexikon, 1994)Uncompensated Care: Medical services for which no payment is received. Uncompensated care includes charity care and bad debts.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Inflation, Economic: An increase in the volume of money and credit relative to available goods resulting in a substantial and continuing rise in the general price level.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Economic Competition: The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Long-Term Care: Care over an extended period, usually for a chronic condition or disability, requiring periodic, intermittent, or continuous care.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.FloridaHealth Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Models, Econometric: The application of mathematical formulas and statistical techniques to the testing and quantifying of economic theories and the solution of economic problems.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Reimbursement, Disproportionate Share: Payments that include adjustments to reflect the costs of uncompensated care and higher costs for inpatient care for certain populations receiving mandated services. MEDICARE and MEDICAID include provisions for this type of reimbursement.Relative Value Scales: Coded listings of physician or other professional services using units that indicate the relative value of the various services they perform. They take into account time, skill, and overhead cost required for each service, but generally do not consider the relative cost-effectiveness. Appropriate conversion factors can be used to translate the abstract units of the relative value scales into dollar fees for each service based on work expended, practice costs, and training costs.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Federal Government: The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.Surgicenters: Facilities designed to serve patients who require surgical treatment exceeding the capabilities of usual physician's office yet not of such proportion as to require hospitalization.Utilization Review: An organized procedure carried out through committees to review admissions, duration of stay, professional services furnished, and to evaluate the medical necessity of those services and promote their most efficient use.Prescription Drugs: Drugs that cannot be sold legally without a prescription.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Fees, Pharmaceutical: Amounts charged to the patient or third-party payer for medication. It includes the pharmacist's professional fee and cost of ingredients, containers, etc.CaliforniaCurrent Procedural Terminology: Descriptive terms and identifying codes for reporting medical services and procedures performed by PHYSICIANS. It is produced by the AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION and used in insurance claim reporting for MEDICARE; MEDICAID; and private health insurance programs (From CPT 2002).Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.OregonDrug Utilization Review: Formal programs for assessing drug prescription against some standard. Drug utilization review may consider clinical appropriateness, cost effectiveness, and, in some cases, outcomes. Review is usually retrospective, but some analysis may be done before drugs are dispensed (as in computer systems which advise physicians when prescriptions are entered). Drug utilization review is mandated for Medicaid programs beginning in 1993.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Ownership: The legal relation between an entity (individual, group, corporation, or-profit, secular, government) and an object. The object may be corporeal, such as equipment, or completely a creature of law, such as a patent; it may be movable, such as an animal, or immovable, such as a building.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Drug Utilization: The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.New YorkHospital Costs: The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).Hospice Care: Specialized health care, supportive in nature, provided to a dying person. A holistic approach is often taken, providing patients and their families with legal, financial, emotional, or spiritual counseling in addition to meeting patients' immediate physical needs. Care may be provided in the home, in the hospital, in specialized facilities (HOSPICES), or in specially designated areas of long-term care facilities. The concept also includes bereavement care for the family. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)TennesseeFees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)New JerseyPhysician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Privatization: Process of shifting publicly controlled services and/or facilities to the private sector.Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Physician Self-Referral: Referral by physicians to testing or treatment facilities in which they have financial interest. The practice is regulated by the Ethics in Patient Referrals Act of 1989.Medical Assistance: Financing of medical care provided to public assistance recipients.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.ArkansasModels, Economic: Statistical models of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, as well as of financial considerations. For the application of statistics to the testing and quantifying of economic theories MODELS, ECONOMETRIC is available.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.MichiganMarylandPatient Readmission: Subsequent admissions of a patient to a hospital or other health care institution for treatment.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Legislation, Drug: Laws concerned with manufacturing, dispensing, and marketing of drugs.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Drugs, Generic: Drugs whose drug name is not protected by a trademark. They may be manufactured by several companies.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Accountable Care Organizations: Organizations of health care providers that agree to be accountable for the quality, cost, and overall care of Medicare beneficiaries who are enrolled in the traditional fee-for-service program who are assigned to it. Assigned means those beneficiaries for whom the professionals in the organization provide the bulk of primary care services. (www.cms.gov/OfficeofLegislation/Downloads/Accountable CareOrganization.pdf accessed 03/16/2011)North CarolinaEducation, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Deductibles and Coinsurance: Cost-sharing mechanisms that provide for payment by the insured of some portion of covered expenses. Deductibles are the amounts paid by the insured under a health insurance contract before benefits become payable; coinsurance is the provision under which the insured pays part of the medical bill, usually according to a fixed percentage, when benefits become payable.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.SEER Program: A cancer registry mandated under the National Cancer Act of 1971 to operate and maintain a population-based cancer reporting system, reporting periodically estimates of cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program is a continuing project of the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Among its goals, in addition to assembling and reporting cancer statistics, are the monitoring of annual cancer incident trends and the promoting of studies designed to identify factors amenable to cancer control interventions. (From National Cancer Institute, NIH Publication No. 91-3074, October 1990)Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Hospices: Facilities or services which are especially devoted to providing palliative and supportive care to the patient with a terminal illness and to the patient's family.Outliers, DRG: In health care reimbursement, especially in the prospective payment system, those patients who require an unusually long hospital stay or whose stay generates unusually high costs.Senior Centers: Community centers for older adults and providers of resources for the community. In addition to providing services and activities for older adults that reflect the community's diversity, they link participants with resources offered by other agencies.Medicare Assignment: Concept referring to the standardized fees for services rendered by health care providers, e.g., laboratories and physicians, and reimbursement for those services under Medicare Part B. It includes acceptance by the physician.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Social Security: Government sponsored social insurance programs.MaineConsumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Case Management: A traditional term for all the activities which a physician or other health care professional normally performs to insure the coordination of the medical services required by a patient. It also, when used in connection with managed care, covers all the activities of evaluating the patient, planning treatment, referral, and follow-up so that care is continuous and comprehensive and payment for the care is obtained. (From Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2nd ed)Patient Discharge: The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.WashingtonAfrican Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Social Welfare: Organized institutions which provide services to ameliorate conditions of need or social pathology in the community.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Nurse Anesthetists: Professional nurses who have completed postgraduate training in the administration of anesthetics and who function under the responsibility of the operating surgeon.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Managed Competition: A strategy for purchasing health care in a manner which will obtain maximum value for the price for the purchasers of the health care and the recipients. The concept was developed primarily by Alain Enthoven of Stanford University and promulgated by the Jackson Hole Group. The strategy depends on sponsors for groups of the population to be insured. The sponsor, in some cases a health alliance, acts as an intermediary between the group and competing provider groups (accountable health plans). The competition is price-based among annual premiums for a defined, standardized benefit package. (From Slee and Slee, Health Care Reform Terms, 1993)Continuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Practice Management, Medical: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a physician's practice.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Professional Review Organizations: Organizations representing designated geographic areas which have contracts under the PRO program to review the medical necessity, appropriateness, quality, and cost-effectiveness of care received by Medicare beneficiaries. Peer Review Improvement Act, PL 97-248, 1982.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Dental Care for Children: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Hospitals, Rural: Hospitals located in a rural area.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Health Services Misuse: Excessive, under or unnecessary utilization of health services by patients or physicians.South CarolinaHome Care Agencies: Public or private organizations that provide, either directly or through arrangements with other organizations, home health services in the patient's home. (Hospital Administration Terminology, 2d ed)Episode of Care: An interval of care by a health care facility or provider for a specific medical problem or condition. It may be continuous or it may consist of a series of intervals marked by one or more brief separations from care, and can also identify the sequence of care (e.g., emergency, inpatient, outpatient), thus serving as one measure of health care provided.United States Department of Veterans Affairs: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to VETERANS. It was established March 15, 1989 as a Cabinet-level position.Office Visits: Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.Insurance, Long-Term Care: Health insurance to provide full or partial coverage for long-term home care services or for long-term nursing care provided in a residential facility such as a nursing home.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Financial Management, Hospital: The obtaining and management of funds for hospital needs and responsibility for fiscal affairs.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.MassachusettsHealth Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.OhioEfficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Certificate of Need: A certificate issued by a governmental body to an individual or organization proposing to construct or modify a health facility, or to offer a new or different service. The process of issuing the certificate is also included.Inpatients: Persons admitted to health facilities which provide board and room, for the purpose of observation, care, diagnosis or treatment.Government Programs: Programs and activities sponsored or administered by local, state, or national governments.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Forms and Records Control: A management function in which standards and guidelines are developed for the development, maintenance, and handling of forms and records.Health Facility Size: The physical space or dimensions of a facility. Size may be indicated by bed capacity.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.KentuckyHospital Charges: The prices a hospital sets for its services. HOSPITAL COSTS (the direct and indirect expenses incurred by the hospital in providing the services) are one factor in the determination of hospital charges. Other factors may include, for example, profits, competition, and the necessity of recouping the costs of uncompensated care.Homes for the Aged: Geriatric long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Legislation, Medical: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Personnel Staffing and Scheduling: The selection, appointing, and scheduling of personnel.Subacute Care: Medical and skilled nursing services provided to patients who are not in an acute phase of an illness but who require a level of care higher than that provided in a long-term care setting. (JCAHO, Lexikon, 1994)Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Medicare Part D: A stand-alone drug plan offered by insurers and other private companies to beneficiaries that receive their Medicare Part A and/or B benefits through the Original Medicare Plan. It includes Medicare Private Fee-for-Service Plans that do not offer prescription drug coverage and Medicare Cost Plans offering Medicare prescription drug coverage. The plan was enacted as the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003 with coverage beginning January 1, 2006.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Least-Squares Analysis: A principle of estimation in which the estimates of a set of parameters in a statistical model are those quantities minimizing the sum of squared differences between the observed values of a dependent variable and the values predicted by the model.
... the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; National Federation to End Senior Hunger; the National Institute for ... Data from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Cognition: Percentage of adults aged 65 and older who report having a ... America's Health Rankings Senior Report started in 2013 and used 34 Core Measures as well as five Supplemental Measures. In ... Prescription Drug Plan With Gap: Percentage of prescription drug plans with a Medicare Part D coverage gap ("donut hole"). Data ...
For example, in the US, Medicare HRAs ask seniors about their ability to perform daily activities. Medicaid assessments ask ... Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. "Core Set of Children's Health Care Quality ... 1998 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. "Preventive visit & yearly wellness exams". [permanent dead link] ... HRAs used as part of the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit help identify issues important to a senior's health and well-being. ...
Medicaid is a federal-state program for the needy and the main source seniors use to pay their long-term care.[50] ... although in the United States many people retire before they become eligible for Medicare at age 65. In 2006, Medicare Part D ... A poll made in Washington said many people were unaware that "medicare doesn't pay for the most common types of long-term care ... Most countries provide universal health insurance coverage for seniors, ...
On April 19, 2010, Berwick was nominated to be Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, which oversees the two ... In March 2012 he joined the Center for American Progress as a Senior Fellow. Berwick grew up in Moodus, Connecticut. His father ... Donald M. Berwick (born September 9, 1946) is a former Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). ... Milligan S. "Kerry comes to defense of nominee to run Medicare, Medicaid programs", The Boston Globe. May 14, 2010. Newt ...
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) "Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR)" (United Nations) Medicare (The ... With Lyndon Johnson's Great Society, the U.S. established public health insurance for both senior citizens and the ... Known as Medicare and Medicaid, these two healthcare programs granted certain groups of Americans access to adequate healthcare ... Medicare and Medicaid), and lastly, the patients themselves. The ethical and/or moral premises of healthcare are complex and ...
The reduced fare is available for seniors, children, disabled persons and people on Medicare. Passengers who purchase a one- ... Riders must qualify through Medicaid, Developmental Disabilities or the Transportation Disadvantaged program for transportation ...
Elder Law Clinic represents seniors over 60 in a range of matters including Medicare/Medicaid, durable powers of attorney, ...
... some scribe programs limit the positions to seniors of undergraduate programs. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services All ... The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid recognized certified and credentialed Certified Medical Scribe Specialists (CMSS) teams ...
... seniors in the U.S. The Helpline serves as a resource to help AAPI seniors with inquiries on topics ranging from Medicare Part ... NAPCA offers assistance with federal programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security and provides a multilingual ... Senior Service America. "The Agriculture Conservation Experienced Services Program". ACES Program. Senior Service America, Inc ... NAPCA works at the local, state, and national levels to educate AAPI seniors and the general public on the specific needs of ...
Senior Fellow John R. Graham has lamented the widespread indifference to the Medicare Trustees report's warnings of Medicare's ... a credit equal to the cost of new enrollees in Medicaid. Other major proposals include converting all medical savings accounts ... He has, however, defended Medicare Advantage for giving seniors more choices than traditional Medicare. John C. Goodman has ... Senior Fellow Robert Higgs has argued that the FDA's regulation of healthcare products is "hazardous to our health". Senior ...
... seniors, and people with disabilities. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is the component of the U.S. Department ... that oversees Medicare and Medicaid. A large portion of Medicare and Medicaid dollars is used each year to cover nursing home ... Medicare and Medicaid began to make up much of the money that would filter through the homes and the 1965 amendment laws ... Congress established minimum requirements for nursing homes that want to provide services under Medicare and Medicaid. These ...
The Medicare and Medicaid programs were estimated to soon account for 50 percent of all national health spending. These factors ... The primary public programs are Medicare, a federal social insurance program for seniors and certain disabled individuals; and ... Together, Medicare and Medicaid accounted for approximately 63 percent of the national inpatient hospital costs in 2011. SCHIP ... "Medicare Levy Surcharge". www.privatehealth.gov.au. "Parlininfoweb.aph.gov.au" (PDF). aph.gov.au. "Medicare levy surcharge ...
2008 average cost per senior was reported as $14,780 (in addition to Medicare), and a state by state listing was provided.[ ... "About Medicare". www.medicare.gov. U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services in Baltimore. Retrieved October 25, 2017.. ... Medicaid covers a wider range of health care services than Medicare. Some people are eligible for both Medicaid and Medicare ... Comparisons with Medicare[edit]. Unlike Medicaid, Medicare is a social insurance program funded at the federal level[46] and ...
Medicaid may pay for drugs not covered by Part D of Medicare. Most of this aid to lower-income seniors was available to them ... Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. *^ a b c d e "Medicare 2017 costs at a glance". Medicare, U.S. Centers for Medicare ... "About Medicare". Medicare.gov. U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Baltimore. Retrieved October 25, 2017.. .mw- ... Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Retrieved December 5, 2018.. *^ New Medicare Card Project Frequently Asked ...
It included reform to Medicare and Medicaid entitlement programs, which the Democrats criticized as an attempt to leave seniors ... There are exemptions-across the board cuts would apply to Medicare, but not to Social Security, Medicaid, civil and military ... Medicare, or Medicaid (Some Democratic lawmakers suggested that the President could declare that the debt ceiling violates the ... Michael Stern, Senior Counsel to the US House of Representatives from 1996 to 2004, stated that Garrett Epps "had adopted an ...
... senior scholar and researcher at the Health Policy Institute at Georgetown University where he focused on Medicare and Medicaid ...
Medicare would provide a premium payment to either pay for or offset the premium of the plan chosen by the senior. This was ... To secure Medicaid benefits, the budget proposed converting the federal share of Medicaid spending into a block grant indexed ... Among seniors, 74 percent opposed the plan. In the same month a Pew Research poll surveyed support for changing Medicare and ... Among seniors, 62 percent wanted to maintain Medicare while 30 percent favored turning it into a voucher program. The proposal ...
... consisting of regular Medicare plans and Special Needs Plans for dual eligible beneficiaries with both Medicare and Medicaid. ... Seniors and People with Disabilities (S/PD) A managed health care product designed for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) ... Medicare Advantage Medicare health plans focusing on low-income Medicare beneficiaries, ... "Medicaid, CHIP and FamilyCare Eligibles". AGP-10k. Retrieved 22 February 2013. "Medicare Advantage (Part C)". The Official US ...
... particularly through Medicare and Medicaid spending (Medicaid provides long-term care for the elderly poor). Maintaining the ... and Senior Medicare Patrols-volunteers trained to identify and report fraud. In 2007, the Department of Justice and Health and ... The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation was created to fund pilot programs which may reduce costs; the experiments ... 2000 The Medicare, Medicaid, and SCHIP Benefits Improvement and Protection Act (BIPA) effectively reversed some of the cuts to ...
The "Roadmap" claims to solve the problem of the unfunded liabilities of Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security, and provides ... with respect to Medicare, the CBO has said the average senior would pay nearly twice what they currently contribute for the ... With respect to Medicaid, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has estimated that the plan would increase costs for States or ... The bill also proposes to absorb Medicaid programs into the exchange system. The Patients' Choice Act was incorporated into A ...
Reduced fare rides are offered to youth (ages 6 to 18), individuals with Medicare or Medicaid cards, active duty military ... Seniors must show government issued photo identification or a senior card available from the Borough Administrative Center, ... Free fare rides are offered to seniors, children (ages 0-5), and University of Alaska Fairbanks faculty, staff and students. ...
Isabella is a Medicare and Medicaid Certified Nursing Home. The main campus, located at 515 Audubon Avenue (190th Street) ... Isabella's Senior Resource Center is located at 4026 Broadway (169th Street), New York, NY. Seniors can visit the center with ... In addition to a 705-bed nursing home, Isabella offers independent senior housing, adult day health care, home care, short- and ... Hoffman, Jan (18 December 2007). "Doggedly Persistent, Untying Medicare Knots for the Elderly". The New York Times. Retrieved 1 ...
Additionally he has been a member of the Coverage and Analysis Group at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in ... "AHIP Welcomes Steven Pearson, MD, MSc as a Senior Fellow". www.prnewswire.com. Retrieved 2016-09-27. Pearson, Steven D.; Sabin ... In 2010, he co-authored an article in Health Affairs with Memorial Sloan Kettering's Peter Bach that stated "Medicare must find ... Pearson, Steven D.; Bach, Peter B. (2010-10-01). "How Medicare Could Use Comparative Effectiveness Research In Deciding On New ...
In 1965 Congress created Medicare, a government administered health insurance program for senior citizens. In the 10 years ... In FY 2014, Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid were the largest individual mandatory expenditures, together accounting for ... "The Evolution of Medicare ... from idea to law". Social Security Administration. Retrieved 9 October 2012. "Updated Budget ... The two largest mandatory spending programs are Medicare and Social Security, which together account for nearly 40 percent of ...
DeParle was Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services under President Bill Clinton and also served as the ... Before joining the White House, DeParle was a Senior Advisor and Managing Director at J. P. Morgan Partners from 2001 to 2009, ...
Ronald Lee Wyden (/ˈwaɪdən/; born May 3, 1949) is an American politician serving as the senior United States Senator for Oregon ... In 2003 Wyden joined with Senators Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Trent Lott (R-MS) to help pass the Bush Administration's Medicare ... although his Healthy Americans Act would eliminate many of these programs including Medicaid and SCHIP and replace them with ... "MEDICARE DEBATE TURNS TO PRICING OF DRUG BENEFITS". The New York Times.. ...
Just over three-quarters (77%) of elderly Medicare-Medicaid enrollees are women. Among Medicare-Medicaid enrollees age 85 and ... The Roles of Medicare and Medicaid in Financing Health and Long-Term Care for Low-Income Seniors. September 1, 2001. Authors. ... The Roles of Medicare and Medicaid in Financing Health and Long-Term Care for Low-Income Seniors, a new Commonwealth Fund chart ... The Roles of Medicare and Medicaid in Financing Health and Long-Term Care for Low-Income Seniors, Harriet L. Komisar, Judith ...
Medicare vs Medicaid. Medicare is a federal program for seniors and disabled individuals that paid into the system via payroll ... Medicaid provides benefits to nearly five million seniors, most of whom also receive Medicare benefits. Low-income seniors ... Medicare Part A. Some seniors refer to Medicare Part A as their "hospital insurance." Medicare covers hospital care, a short- ... Medicaid provides details regarding income limits for each Medicaid program for seniors. Recent significant cuts to Medicaid ...
... helps Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries understand and stop healthcare waste, fraud and abuse. Through specialized training, ... Missoula Aging Services - Medicare, Medicaid, Fraud, Waste, Abuse, Scams, Missoula Aging Services, Senior Medicare Patrol *Our ... What is Montana Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)?. Montana SMP: Preventing Medicare Fraud, Waste and Abuse. Montana SMP staff and ... The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act, passed in 2015, requires the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to ...
Newly released 2010 Census figures show that seniors make up a larger share of the American population than ever before. The ... Census report: More Americans relying on Medicare, Medicaid (VIDEO) * Record-low percentage of Americans moved between 2010 and ... Senior citizens now represent a larger share of the US population than they have at any point in the nations history, and with ... Geographically, seniors are most heavily concentrated in the South, where 14.9 million people 65 and older live. The Midwest, ...
Medicaid is required to provide dental benefits for children covered by the insurance; however, each state is able to decide ... What are the Medicare rules concerning insurance coverage while working?. * Q: Where can you find floor plans for underground ... What does Medicaid for dental cover?. A: Medicaid dental coverage for adults and children is different. States have much more ... How is Medicaid eligibility determined in Pennsylvania?. A: Since the state of Pennsylvania has accepted federal Medicaid ...
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) rates the relative quality of the private plans that are offered to ... This comprehensive survey of seniors about the Medicare drug benefit finds that many seniors remain uncertain about how the new ... Pulling it Together: Seniors and Health Reform. It is widely believed that seniors are antsy about the new health reform law. ... Views of the New Medicare Drug Law - Chartpack on People with Disabilities. This comprehensive survey of people on Medicare, ...
Medicaids Role for Medicare Beneficiaries. This brief outlines Medicaids role for Medicare beneficiaries. It describes the ... Health Affairs Blog: Medicare Premium Support Proposals Could Increase Costs for Todays Seniors, Despite Assurances. In a ... Medicare and End-of-Life Care in California. This infographic provides a snapshot of Medicare and end-of-life care in ... Medicare Part D: A First Look at Prescription Drug Plans in 2017. This issue brief provides an overview of the 2017 Medicare ...
Seniors to Join the Growing Ranks of the Under-Insured. Ryan would change Medicare from a guaranteed benefit program to a ... Medicaid and Medicare costs are actually rising more slowly than our private sector costs. For more on this, see this summary ... Seniors to Join the Growing Ranks of the Under-Insured. Ryan would change Medicare from a guaranteed benefit program to a ... Medicaid and Medicare costs are actually rising more slowly than our private sector costs. For more on this, see this summary ...
Medicare And Medigap Insurance Policies: Maximizing The Benefits. by David Goldfarb * New York State Medicaid Law. by David ... Medicaid Application Services Are NOT Medicaid Planning. by David Goldfarb * Social Security Administration Issues Warning ... How Medicare Recipients Can Prepare for the Termination of Certain Supplemental Medicare Policies (Medigap). by David Goldfarb ... Coerces a senior into signing legal documents to the detriment of the senior ...
Medicare, Medicaid, and Social. Security have traditionally been the prime targets of ... Physicians Group: Debt Deal Threatens Health of Seniors and Disabled. August 7, 2011 ...
Constitutional scholar and patient advocate Betsy McCaughey tells Newsmax.TV that more seniors will lose their lives under ... "Medicare cant do it. Medicaid cant do it. Employers cant do it when they provide health insurance. Only a very, very small ... "Seniors pay for more than half of the cost of this entire law because of cuts in Medicare. This law is deadly for seniors.". ... seniors treated with that kind of low-cost care, dont survive," she said. "Whereas, other seniors treated with higher-cost, ...
Seniors Coalition. - 2. Service Employees International Union. - 2. Silipos Inc. - 2. Sisters of Providence Health System. - 2 ...
... nearly 11 million seniors age 65 and older have diabetes and an additional 20 million have pre-diabetes, a condition in which ... you may be able to get help through Medicare Savings Programs. Call your local Medicaid office for eligibility information. ... 4 Seniors: How Medicare covers diabetes. Posted 5:34 pm, April 5, 2013, by KFOR-TV and Ashton Edwards ... Doctors services: If youre a Medicare beneficiary, Medicare Part B will pay 80 percent of the cost of all doctors office ...
On Medicare and Medicaids 55th birthday, lets expand benefits-not cut them. ... History will not judge this kindly: DNC Platform Committee votes down Medicare for All.... Jake Johnson - August 1, 2020. ... Popes senior adviser charged with multiple counts of sexual assault. Numerous victims have come forward in the past few years ... Serving as a senior Vatican official and top aide to Pope Francis, Cardinal George Pell was charged this week with several ...
Learn about the 5 differences between Medicare and Medicaid. Find out if you are eligible for either program. ... Federal Medicare and state Medicaid can lift the burden of payment off of families, caregivers and seniors who might already ... Medicare vs Medicaid. Learn the 5 differences between Medicare and Medicaid. Last Updated 11/29/2018 ... Medicare and Medicaid can help.. Medicare covers over 55 million people, and Medicaid covers over 69 million people, making ...
Medicaid may pay for drugs not covered by Part D of Medicare. Most of this aid to lower-income seniors was available to them ... Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. *^ a b c d e "Medicare 2017 costs at a glance". Medicare, U.S. Centers for Medicare ... "About Medicare". Medicare.gov. U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Baltimore. Retrieved October 25, 2017.. .mw- ... Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Retrieved December 5, 2018.. *^ New Medicare Card Project Frequently Asked ...
S. 861, Preventing and Reducing Improper Medicare and Medicaid Expenditures Act of 2015. ... S. 704, Community Based Independence for Seniors Act. Cost Estimate. July 10, 2015. As ordered reported by the Senate Committee ...
What is Medicare / Medicaid?. Medicaid / Medicare are different governmental programs that provide medical and health-related ... National Insurance - Health insurance Policy for Senior Citizens. This policy has been designed to cater to the needs of Senior ... Although most Medicare beneficiaries have good access to health care, the ease of finding providers who accept Medicare ... and managed by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. ... For example, Medicare should support policies that enable all ...
Vincent Senior Services represents geriatric primary care, memory assessments; The Center for Healthy Aging experts help ... Medicare Supplement Insurance. *Medicare Managed Care Plans. *Medicaid. *Long-Term Care Insurance ... The Qualified Medicare Beneficiary/Specified Low-Income Medicare Beneficiary Program (QMB/SLMB) helps seniors who struggle with ... Senior services and treatments are covered by Medicare and most secondary commercial insurance health plans. Normal deductibles ...
The mission of the ARCH National Respite Network and Resource Center is to assist and promote the development of quality respite and crisis care programs in the United States; to help families locate respite and crisis care services in their communities; and to serve as a strong voice for respite in all forums. The ARCH National Respite Network includes the National Respite Locator, a service to help caregivers and professionals locate respite services in their community, the National Respite Coalition, a service that advocates for preserving and promoting respite in policy and programs at the national, state, and local levels, and the Lifespan Respite Training and Technical Assistance Center which is funded by the Administration on Aging (AoA) in the US Department of Health and Human Services.
... raising some premiums for all seniors; and increasing funding for investigating fraud and abuse. ... "Medicare and Medicaid consume one in five federal tax dollars," according to Coburn, who adds, "Taxpayers lose an estimated $ ... Coburn, a doctor, has some strong ideas about Medicare and Medicaid, which, he said, provide "health-care coverage for ... Another big saving could come from increasing oversight of both Medicare and Medicaid, where losses from fraud are estimated by ...
Use of Hospice Care by Medicare Patients Associated With Lower Rate of Hospitalization, ICU Admission, Invasive Procedures and ...
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). HANCE, Mary Beth. Senior Policy Advisor. Division of Quality, Evaluations and ... Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Baltimore, MD ... Senior Vice President. Public Policy and Government Affairs. March of Dimes. Washington, DC. Term: 07/01/2013-06/30/2017 ... Senior Advisor to the Director. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center for Immunization & Respiratory ...
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). HANCE, Mary Beth. Senior Policy Advisor. Division of Quality, Evaluations and ... Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Baltimore, MD ... Senior Vice President. Public Policy and Government Affairs. March of Dimes. Washington, DC. Term: 07/01/2013-06/30/2017 ... Senior Director, Clinical and Health Affairs. American Academy of Physician Assistants. Alexandria, VA ...
Senior Living offers compassionate care to residents in Matawan, New Jersey with the support they need. ... Contact Atrium Senior Living directly from Assisted Living Directory! Atrium Health & ... Medicaid & Medicare: Find out which facilities accept these programs. *Important Advice for Anyone Searching For Assisted ... Matawan, NJ - Atrium Health & Senior Living Its the same care youd give, if you could! With more time, youd do everything ...
  • While attending the World Economic Forum's summit of global elites in the Swiss mountaintop retreat of Davos on Wednesday, President Donald Trump openly admitted he would-if reelected in 2020-consider cutting back funding for key social programs including Social Security, Medicaid, and Medicare. (commondreams.org)
  • This Issue Brief describes the Medicare Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP), which penalizes hospitals that have relatively higher readmission rates, analyzes the impact of this program on Medicare patients and hospitals, and discusses several issues that have been raised regarding its implementation. (kff.org)
  • A new report released by the Institute of Medicine reveals that following the recommendation of its earlier report, which said that Medicare payments should be adjusted in order to account for regional variations in healthcare costs, could lead to increase in payments for some hospitals and decrease in payments for others. (medindia.net)
  • Using a series of statistical simulations and analyses in the second phase of the study, the committee concluded that its recommendations, if adopted by the Medicare program, would improve the technical accuracy of payments, and these payments would increase or decrease by less than 5 percent on average for the majority of hospitals and most physicians. (medindia.net)
  • Constitutional scholar and patient advocate Betsy McCaughey tells Newsmax.TV that more seniors will lose their lives under Obamacare because they will be treated at substandard hospitals. (newsmax.com)
  • It outlines the updated standards-known as "conditions of participation"-that hospitals must meet in order to participate in U.S. Medicare and Medicaid programs. (pewtrusts.org)
  • Hospitals that treat more poor seniors who are on both Medicaid and Medicare tend to have higher rates of readmissions, triggering costly penalties, finds a new study in Health Services Research . (cfah.org)
  • Like the GOP plan, Clinton wanted to take a big chunk of savings from Medicare providers--doctors and hospitals--by cutting back payments to them. (slate.com)
  • And their Medicare Advantage plan isn't even accepted by most local doctors or hospitals. (mycentraljersey.com)
  • May 2, 2016 - Six new quality measures have been added to the Nursing Home Compare website and three are the first to be based on Medicare-claims data from hospitals, rather than data self-reported by nursing homes. (seniorjournal.com)
  • These new measures, which are based primarily on Medicare claims data submitted by hospitals, measure the rate of rehospitalization, emergency room use, and community discharge among nursing home residents. (seniorjournal.com)
  • In Arkansas, where low-income residents can use Medicaid dollars to shop for insurance on its exchange, hospitals report a drop in emergency room visits (2%) and a major decline in uninsured patients (30%), according to Arkansas Hospital Association vice president Jodiane Tritt. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, the Republican chairman of the U.S. House Budget Committee, unveiled two proposals this week which if enacted would constitute a mortal threat to our nation's health - particularly to the health of our seniors and our most vulnerable populations. (truth-out.org)
  • The Bipartisan Policy Center's Senior Health and Housing Task Force aims to advance policy reforms to better position communities to support the increasing and diverse health and housing needs of our nation's seniors. (bipartisanpolicy.org)
  • The Center for Medicare Advocacy understood three years ago that a guiding principle for CMS in revising the Requirements of Participation (RoPs) was removing regulatory burdens from providers. (medicareadvocacy.org)
  • WASHINGTON - Under the direction of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, FEMA will coordinate two shipments totaling a 14-day supply of personal protective equipment (PPE) to more than 15,400 Medicare and Medicaid-certified nursing homes across the Nation, including all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam. (fema.gov)
  • He notes that when Medicare was passed in 1965, the average U.S. life span was 70.2 years, and today it is 77.9 years. (washingtonpost.com)
  • 2 years Medicaid experience. (indeed.com)
  • Three years ago Clinton himself proposed basically the same package of reforms for Medicare--a fact everyone seems to have forgotten since it was embedded in his massive, ill-fated Health Security Act. (slate.com)
  • Jack Kemp: "The president himself suggested that the reduction in the growth of Medicare over the next five or six years ought to be held to 6 percent. (slate.com)
  • The typical senior with dementia lived for about five years after diagnosis before succumbing either to that disease or another medical problem. (eurekalert.org)
  • The Center for Disease Control (CDC) says that more than one in four seniors will fall each year, with 2.8 million emergency room visits occurring as a result . (visitingangels.com)
  • COLUMBUS - Ohio Republican Party Chairman Bob Bennett today named Bob McEwen, Senior Advisor for Coalition Outreach. (blogspot.com)
  • I look forward to working with Bob in his role as the Ohio Republican Party's Senior Advisor for Coalition Outreach to connect Ohioans in rural counties and college campuses to advance our Party's core mission of growing our ranks and retiring Barack Obama in November. (blogspot.com)