Selectins: Transmembrane proteins consisting of a lectin-like domain, an epidermal growth factor-like domain, and a variable number of domains that are homologous to complement regulatory proteins. They are important cell adhesion molecules which help LEUKOCYTES attach to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIUM.P-Selectin: Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that mediates the adhesion of neutrophils and monocytes to activated platelets and endothelial cells.E-Selectin: Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that mediates neutrophil, monocyte, and memory T-cell adhesion to cytokine-activated endothelial cells. E-selectin recognizes sialylated carbohydrate groups related to the Lewis X or Lewis A family.L-Selectin: Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that serves as a homing receptor for lymphocytes to lymph node high endothelial venules.Fucosyltransferases: Enzymes catalyzing the transfer of fucose from a nucleoside diphosphate fucose to an acceptor molecule which is frequently another carbohydrate, a glycoprotein, or a glycolipid molecule. Elevated activity of some fucosyltransferases in human serum may serve as an indicator of malignancy. The class includes EC 2.4.1.65; EC 2.4.1.68; EC 2.4.1.69; EC 2.4.1.89.Leukocyte Rolling: Movement of tethered, spherical LEUKOCYTES along the endothelial surface of the microvasculature. The tethering and rolling involves interaction with SELECTINS and other adhesion molecules in both the ENDOTHELIUM and leukocyte. The rolling leukocyte then becomes activated by CHEMOKINES, flattens out, and firmly adheres to the endothelial surface in preparation for transmigration through the interendothelial cell junction. (From Abbas, Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 3rd ed)Oligosaccharides: Carbohydrates consisting of between two (DISACCHARIDES) and ten MONOSACCHARIDES connected by either an alpha- or beta-glycosidic link. They are found throughout nature in both the free and bound form.Antigens, CD15: A trisaccharide antigen expressed on glycolipids and many cell-surface glycoproteins. In the blood the antigen is found on the surface of NEUTROPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and MONOCYTES. In addition, CD15 antigen is a stage-specific embryonic antigen.Ligands: A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)FucoseCell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Sialomucins: A subcategory of mucins that contain SIALIC ACID.Leukocytes: White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).Cell Adhesion Molecules: Surface ligands, usually glycoproteins, that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Their functions include the assembly and interconnection of various vertebrate systems, as well as maintenance of tissue integration, wound healing, morphogenic movements, cellular migrations, and metastasis.PolysaccharidesPlatelet Membrane Glycoproteins: Surface glycoproteins on platelets which have a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis such as platelet adhesion and aggregation. Many of these are receptors.Neutrophils: Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.Leukocyte-Adhesion Deficiency Syndrome: Rare, autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the beta 2 integrin receptors (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE-ADHESION) comprising the CD11/CD18 family of glycoproteins. The syndrome is characterized by abnormal adhesion-dependent functions, especially defective tissue emigration of neutrophils, leading to recurrent infection.N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferases: Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of N-acetylglucosamine from a nucleoside diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine to an acceptor molecule which is frequently another carbohydrate. EC 2.4.1.-.Mannosides: Glycosides formed by the reaction of the hydroxyl group on the anomeric carbon atom of mannose with an alcohol to form an acetal. They include both alpha- and beta-mannosides.Mucins: High molecular weight mucoproteins that protect the surface of EPITHELIAL CELLS by providing a barrier to particulate matter and microorganisms. Membrane-anchored mucins may have additional roles concerned with protein interactions at the cell surface.Sialyltransferases: A group of enzymes with the general formula CMP-N-acetylneuraminate:acceptor N-acetylneuraminyl transferase. They catalyze the transfer of N-acetylneuraminic acid from CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid to an acceptor, which is usually the terminal sugar residue of an oligosaccharide, a glycoprotein, or a glycolipid. EC 2.4.99.-.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Membrane Glycoproteins: Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.Sulfoglycosphingolipids: GLYCOSPHINGOLIPIDS with a sulfate group esterified to one of the sugar groups.Carbohydrate Sequence: The sequence of carbohydrates within POLYSACCHARIDES; GLYCOPROTEINS; and GLYCOLIPIDS.HL-60 Cells: A promyelocytic cell line derived from a patient with ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA. HL-60 cells lack specific markers for LYMPHOID CELLS but express surface receptors for FC FRAGMENTS and COMPLEMENT SYSTEM PROTEINS. They also exhibit phagocytic activity and responsiveness to chemotactic stimuli. (From Hay et al., American Type Culture Collection, 7th ed, pp127-8)Venules: The minute vessels that collect blood from the capillary plexuses and join together to form veins.Lewis Blood-Group System: A group of dominantly and independently inherited antigens associated with the ABO blood factors. They are glycolipids present in plasma and secretions that may adhere to the erythrocytes. The phenotype Le(b) is the result of the interaction of the Le gene Le(a) with the genes for the ABO blood groups.Thioglycolates: Organic esters of thioglycolic acid (HS-CH2COOH).Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1: A cell-surface ligand involved in leukocyte adhesion and inflammation. Its production is induced by gamma-interferon and it is required for neutrophil migration into inflamed tissue.Antigens, CD18: Cell-surface glycoprotein beta-chains that are non-covalently linked to specific alpha-chains of the CD11 family of leukocyte-adhesion molecules (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE-ADHESION). A defect in the gene encoding CD18 causes LEUKOCYTE-ADHESION DEFICIENCY SYNDROME.Glycosyltransferases: Enzymes that catalyze the transfer of glycosyl groups to an acceptor. Most often another carbohydrate molecule acts as an acceptor, but inorganic phosphate can also act as an acceptor, such as in the case of PHOSPHORYLASES. Some of the enzymes in this group also catalyze hydrolysis, which can be regarded as transfer of a glycosyl group from the donor to water. Subclasses include the HEXOSYLTRANSFERASES; PENTOSYLTRANSFERASES; SIALYLTRANSFERASES; and those transferring other glycosyl groups. EC 2.4.Receptors, Lymphocyte Homing: Cell surface glycoproteins on lymphocytes and other leukocytes that mediate adhesion to specialized blood vessels called high endothelial venules. Several different classes of lymphocyte homing receptors have been identified, and they appear to target different surface molecules (addressins) on high endothelial venules in different tissues. The adhesion plays a crucial role in the trafficking of lymphocytes.Dermatitis: Any inflammation of the skin.Integrin alpha4: An integrin alpha subunit that is unique in that it does not contain an I domain, and its proteolytic cleavage site is near the middle of the extracellular portion of the polypeptide rather than close to the membrane as in other integrin alpha subunits.Chemotaxis, Leukocyte: The movement of leukocytes in response to a chemical concentration gradient or to products formed in an immunologic reaction.N-Acetylneuraminic Acid: An N-acyl derivative of neuraminic acid. N-acetylneuraminic acid occurs in many polysaccharides, glycoproteins, and glycolipids in animals and bacteria. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1518)Leukocytosis: A transient increase in the number of leukocytes in a body fluid.Carbohydrate Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a carbohydrate.Amino Sugars: SUGARS containing an amino group. GLYCOSYLATION of other compounds with these amino sugars results in AMINOGLYCOSIDES.Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1: Cytokine-induced cell adhesion molecule present on activated endothelial cells, tissue macrophages, dendritic cells, bone marrow fibroblasts, myoblasts, and myotubes. It is important for the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. (From Pigott & Power, The Adhesion Molecule FactsBook, 1993, p154)Antigens, CD44: Acidic sulfated integral membrane glycoproteins expressed in several alternatively spliced and variable glycosylated forms on a wide variety of cell types including mature T-cells, B-cells, medullary thymocytes, granulocytes, macrophages, erythrocytes, and fibroblasts. CD44 antigens are the principle cell surface receptors for hyaluronate and this interaction mediates binding of lymphocytes to high endothelial venules. (From Abbas et al., Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 2d ed, p156)Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Shear Strength: The internal resistance of a material to moving some parts of it parallel to a fixed plane, in contrast to stretching (TENSILE STRENGTH) or compression (COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH). Ionic crystals are brittle because, when subjected to shear, ions of the same charge are brought next to each other, which causes repulsion.Integrin alpha4beta1: Integrin alpha4beta1 is a FIBRONECTIN and VCAM-1 receptor present on LYMPHOCYTES; MONOCYTES; EOSINOPHILS; NK CELLS and thymocytes. It is involved in both cell-cell and cell- EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX adhesion and plays a role in INFLAMMATION, hematopoietic cell homing and immune function, and has been implicated in skeletal MYOGENESIS; NEURAL CREST migration and proliferation, lymphocyte maturation and morphogenesis of the PLACENTA and HEART.CHO Cells: CELL LINE derived from the ovary of the Chinese hamster, Cricetulus griseus (CRICETULUS). The species is a favorite for cytogenetic studies because of its small chromosome number. The cell line has provided model systems for the study of genetic alterations in cultured mammalian cells.Mice, Inbred C57BLMice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Mannose: A hexose or fermentable monosaccharide and isomer of glucose from manna, the ash Fraxinus ornus and related plants. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Disaccharides: Oligosaccharides containing two monosaccharide units linked by a glycosidic bond.Carbohydrate Metabolism: Cellular processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of CARBOHYDRATES.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Neutrophil Infiltration: The diffusion or accumulation of neutrophils in tissues or cells in response to a wide variety of substances released at the sites of inflammatory reactions.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Glycosylation: The chemical or biochemical addition of carbohydrate or glycosyl groups to other chemicals, especially peptides or proteins. Glycosyl transferases are used in this biochemical reaction.Integrins: A family of transmembrane glycoproteins (MEMBRANE GLYCOPROTEINS) consisting of noncovalent heterodimers. They interact with a wide variety of ligands including EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS; COMPLEMENT, and other cells, while their intracellular domains interact with the CYTOSKELETON. The integrins consist of at least three identified families: the cytoadhesin receptors(RECEPTORS, CYTOADHESIN), the leukocyte adhesion receptors (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE ADHESION), and the VERY LATE ANTIGEN RECEPTORS. Each family contains a common beta-subunit (INTEGRIN BETA CHAINS) combined with one or more distinct alpha-subunits (INTEGRIN ALPHA CHAINS). These receptors participate in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion in many physiologically important processes, including embryological development; HEMOSTASIS; THROMBOSIS; WOUND HEALING; immune and nonimmune defense mechanisms; and oncogenic transformation.Acetylglucosamine: The N-acetyl derivative of glucosamine.Cell Communication: Any of several ways in which living cells of an organism communicate with one another, whether by direct contact between cells or by means of chemical signals carried by neurotransmitter substances, hormones, and cyclic AMP.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Peritonitis: INFLAMMATION of the PERITONEUM lining the ABDOMINAL CAVITY as the result of infectious, autoimmune, or chemical processes. Primary peritonitis is due to infection of the PERITONEAL CAVITY via hematogenous or lymphatic spread and without intra-abdominal source. Secondary peritonitis arises from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY itself through RUPTURE or ABSCESS of intra-abdominal organs.Microspheres: Small uniformly-sized spherical particles, of micrometer dimensions, frequently labeled with radioisotopes or various reagents acting as tags or markers.Lectins: Proteins that share the common characteristic of binding to carbohydrates. Some ANTIBODIES and carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. PLANT LECTINS are carbohydrate-binding proteins that have been primarily identified by their hemagglutinating activity (HEMAGGLUTININS). However, a variety of lectins occur in animal species where they serve diverse array of functions through specific carbohydrate recognition.Endothelium: A layer of epithelium that lines the heart, blood vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, VASCULAR), lymph vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, LYMPHATIC), and the serous cavities of the body.Gangliosides: A subclass of ACIDIC GLYCOSPHINGOLIPIDS. They contain one or more sialic acid (N-ACETYLNEURAMINIC ACID) residues. Using the Svennerholm system of abbrevations, gangliosides are designated G for ganglioside, plus subscript M, D, or T for mono-, di-, or trisialo, respectively, the subscript letter being followed by a subscript arabic numeral to indicated sequence of migration in thin-layer chromatograms. (From Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1997)T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Blood Platelets: Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.Mice, Inbred BALB CHypersensitivity, Delayed: An increased reactivity to specific antigens mediated not by antibodies but by cells.Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte: Antigens expressed on the cell membrane of T-lymphocytes during differentiation, activation, and normal and neoplastic transformation. Their phenotypic characterization is important in differential diagnosis and studies of thymic ontogeny and T-cell function.Th1 Cells: Subset of helper-inducer T-lymphocytes which synthesize and secrete interleukin-2, gamma-interferon, and interleukin-12. Due to their ability to kill antigen-presenting cells and their lymphokine-mediated effector activity, Th1 cells are associated with vigorous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Peroxidase: A hemeprotein from leukocytes. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to a hereditary disorder coupled with disseminated moniliasis. It catalyzes the conversion of a donor and peroxide to an oxidized donor and water. EC 1.11.1.7.Cricetulus: A genus of the family Muridae consisting of eleven species. C. migratorius, the grey or Armenian hamster, and C. griseus, the Chinese hamster, are the two species used in biomedical research.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Microcirculation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the MICROVASCULAR NETWORK.Reperfusion Injury: Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Monocytes: Large, phagocytic mononuclear leukocytes produced in the vertebrate BONE MARROW and released into the BLOOD; contain a large, oval or somewhat indented nucleus surrounded by voluminous cytoplasm and numerous organelles.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Up-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Glycoproteins: Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.Endothelial Cells: Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Metalloendopeptidases: ENDOPEPTIDASES which use a metal such as ZINC in the catalytic mechanism.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Antigens, Neoplasm: Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Mutagenesis: Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.Lipopolysaccharides: Lipid-containing polysaccharides which are endotoxins and important group-specific antigens. They are often derived from the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria and induce immunoglobulin secretion. The lipopolysaccharide molecule consists of three parts: LIPID A, core polysaccharide, and O-specific chains (O ANTIGENS). When derived from Escherichia coli, lipopolysaccharides serve as polyclonal B-cell mitogens commonly used in laboratory immunology. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Epitopes: Sites on an antigen that interact with specific antibodies.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
The selectins (cluster of differentiation 62 or CD62) are a family of cell adhesion molecules (or CAMs). All selectins are single-chain transmembrane glycoproteins that share similar properties to C-type lectins due to a related amino terminus and calcium-dependent binding. Selectins bind to sugar moieties and so are considered to be a type of lectin, cell adhesion proteins that bind sugar polymers. All three known members of the selectin family (L-, E-, and P-selectin) share a similar cassette structure: an N-terminal, calcium-dependent lectin domain, an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain, a variable number of consensus repeat units (2, 6, and 9 for L-, E-, and P-selectin, respectively), a transmembrane domain (TM) and an intracellular cytoplasmic tail (cyto). The transmembrane and cytoplasmic parts are not conserved across the selectins being responsible for their targeting to ...
Selectin P ligand, also known as SELPLG or CD162 (cluster of differentiation 162), is a human gene. SELPLG codes for PSGL-1, the high affinity counter-receptor for P-selectin on myeloid cells and stimulated T lymphocytes. As such, it plays a critical role in the tethering of these cells to activated platelets or endothelia expressing P-selectin. The organization of the SELPLG gene closely resembles that of CD43 and the human platelet glycoprotein GpIb-alpha both of which have an intron in the 5-prime-noncoding region, a long second exon containing the complete coding region, and TATA-less promoters. P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) is a glycoprotein found on white blood cells and endothelial cells that binds to P-selectin (P stands for platelet), which is one of a family of selectins that includes E-selectin (endothelial) and L-selectin (leukocyte). ...
... s (CAMs) are proteins located on the cell surface involved in binding with other cells or with the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the process called cell adhesion. In essence, cell adhesion molecules help cells stick to each other and to their surroundings. These proteins are typically transmembrane receptors and are composed of three domains: an intracellular domain that interacts with the cytoskeleton, a transmembrane domain, and an extracellular domain that interacts either with other CAMs of the same kind (homophilic binding) or with other CAMs or the extracellular matrix (heterophilic binding). Most of the CAMs belong to four protein families: Ig (immunoglobulin) superfamily (IgSF CAMs), the integrins, the cadherins, and the selectins. One classification system involves the distinction between calcium-independent CAMs and calcium-dependent CAMs. Integrins and the Ig-superfamily CAMs do not depend on Ca2+ while cadherins and selectins depend on Ca2+. In addition, ...
In 1976, SEM images showed that there were homing receptors on microvilli-like tips on leukocytes that would allow white blood cells to get out of the blood vessel and get into tissue.[5] Since the 1990s the identity of ligands involved in leukocyte extravasation have been studied heavily. This topic was finally able to be studied thoroughly under physiological shear stress conditions using a typical flow chamber.[6] Since the first experiments, a strange phenomenon was observed. Binding interactions between the white blood cells and the vessel walls were observed to become stronger under higher force. Selectins (E-selection, L-selection, and P-selectin) were found to be involved in this phenomenon. The shear threshold requirement seems counterintuitive because increasing shear elevates the force applied to adhesive bonds and it would seem that this should increase the dislodging ability. Nevertheless, cells roll more slowly and more regularly until an optimal shear is ...
Dysfunction of cell adhesion occurs during cancer metastasis. Loss of cell-cell adhesion in metastatic tumour cells allows them to escape their site of origin and spread through the circulatory system.[5] One example of CAMs deregulated in cancer are cadherins, which are inactivated either by genetic mutations or by other oncogenic signalling molecules, allowing cancer cells to migrate and be more invasive.[6] Other CAMs, like selectins and integrins, can facilitate metastasis by mediating cell-cell interactions between migrating metastatic tumour cells in the circulatory system with endothelial cells of other distant tissues.[35] Due to the link between CAMs and cancer metastasis, these molecules could be potential therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. There are also other human genetic diseases caused by an inability to express specific adhesion molecules. An example is leukocyte adhesion deficiency-I (LAD-I), where expression of the β2 integrin subunit is reduced or lost.[36] This ...
... has a functional role in metastasis of tumor similar to E-selectin.[20] P-selectin is expressed on the surface of both stimulated endothelial cell and activated platelet and helps cancer cells invade into bloodstream for metastasis and provided locally with multiple growth factors respectively.[21] Moreover, it has been known that platelet facilitates tumor metastasis by forming complexes with tumor cells and leukocytes in the vasculature thus preventing recognition by macrophage, this is thought to contribute to the seeding of tumor microemboli to distant organs.[22] In vivo mice experiment showed that reduction in circulating platelets could reduce cancer metastasis.[23] The oligosaccharide sialylated Lewis x (sLe(x)) is expressed on the surface of tumor cells and can be recognized by E-selectin and P-selectin, playing on a key role in metastasis of the tumor. However, in the 4T1 breast cancer cell line, E-selectin ...
Selectin P ligand, also known as SELPLG or CD162 (cluster of differentiation 162), is a human gene. SELPLG codes for PSGL-1, the high affinity counter-receptor for P-selectin on myeloid cells and stimulated T lymphocytes. As such, it plays a critical role in the tethering of these cells to activated platelets or endothelia expressing P-selectin. The organization of the SELPLG gene closely resembles that of CD43 and the human platelet glycoprotein GpIb-alpha both of which have an intron in the 5-prime-noncoding region, a long second exon containing the complete coding region, and TATA-less promoters. P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) is a glycoprotein found on white blood cells and endothelial cells that binds to P-selectin (P stands for platelet), which is one of a family of selectins that includes E-selectin (endothelial) and L-selectin (leukocyte). ...
The selectins (cluster of differentiation 62 or CD62) are a family of cell adhesion molecules (or CAMs). All selectins are single-chain transmembrane glycoproteins that share similar properties to C-type lectins due to a related amino terminus and calcium-dependent binding. Selectins bind to sugar moieties and so are considered to be a type of lectin, cell adhesion proteins that bind sugar polymers. All three known members of the selectin family (L-, E-, and P-selectin) share a similar cassette structure: an N-terminal, calcium-dependent lectin domain, an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain, a variable number of consensus repeat units (2, 6, and 9 for L-, E-, and P-selectin, respectively), a transmembrane domain (TM) and an intracellular cytoplasmic tail (cyto). The transmembrane and cytoplasmic parts are not conserved across the selectins being responsible for their targeting to ...
... s are the fat-laden M2 macrophages that serve as the hallmark of early stage atherosclerotic lesion formation. They are an indication of plaque build-up, or atherosclerosis, which is commonly associated with increased risk of heart attack and stroke as a result of arterial narrowing and hardening. Foam cell formation is triggered by a number of factors including the uncontrolled uptake of modified low density lipoproteins (LDL), the upregulation of cholesterol esterification and the impairment of mechanisms associated with cholesterol release. Foam cells are formed when circulating monocyte-derived cells are recruited to the atherosclerotic lesion site or fat deposits in the blood vessel walls. Recruitment is facilitated by the molecules P-selectin and E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). Monocytes are then able to penetrate the arterial wall as a result of impaired endothelial integrity which increases ...
... (sCAMs) are a class of cell adhesion molecule (CAMs - cell surface binding proteins) that may represent important biomarkers for inflammatory processes involving activation or damage to cells such as platelets and the endothelium. They include soluble forms of the cell adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin and P-selectin (distinguished as sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin and sP-selectin). The cellular expression of CAMs is difficult to assess clinically, but these soluble forms are present in the circulation and may serve as markers for CAMs. Research has focused on their role in cardiovascular (particularly atherosclerosis), connective tissue and neoplastic diseases, where blood plasma levels may be a marker of the disease severity or prognosis, and they may be useful in evaluating progress of some treatments. Many studies have postulated that increased production of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) on the vascular endothelium ...
Parnaparin is an antithrombotic and belongs to the group of low molecular weight heparins. parnaparin at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Maugeri N, Di Fabio G, Barbanti M, de Gaetano G, Donati MB, Cerletti C (2007). "Parnaparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin, prevents P-selectin-dependent formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in human whole blood". Thromb. Haemost. 97 (6): 965-73. doi:10.1160/th06-12-0680. PMID 17549299 ...
In 1976, SEM images showed that there were homing receptors on microvilli-like tips on leukocytes that would allow white blood cells to get out of the blood vessel and get into tissue.[5] Since the 1990s the identity of ligands involved in leukocyte extravasation have been studied heavily. This topic was finally able to be studied thoroughly under physiological shear stress conditions using a typical flow chamber.[6] Since the first experiments, a strange phenomenon was observed. Binding interactions between the white blood cells and the vessel walls were observed to become stronger under higher force. Selectins (E-selection, L-selection, and P-selectin) were found to be involved in this phenomenon. The shear threshold requirement seems counterintuitive because increasing shear elevates the force applied to adhesive bonds and it would seem that this should increase the dislodging ability. Nevertheless, cells roll more slowly and more regularly until an optimal shear is ...
... (sCAMs) are a class of cell adhesion molecule (CAMs - cell surface binding proteins) that may represent important biomarkers for inflammatory processes involving activation or damage to cells such as platelets and the endothelium. They include soluble forms of the cell adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin and P-selectin (distinguished as sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin and sP-selectin). The cellular expression of CAMs is difficult to assess clinically, but these soluble forms are present in the circulation and may serve as markers for CAMs. Research has focused on their role in cardiovascular (particularly atherosclerosis), connective tissue and neoplastic diseases, where blood plasma levels may be a marker of the disease severity or prognosis, and they may be useful in evaluating progress of some treatments. Many studies have postulated that increased production of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) on the vascular endothelium ...
In human, P-selectin has nine repeats while E-selectin contains six and L-selectin has only two. P-selectin is anchored in ... P-selectin has a functional role in metastasis of tumor similar to E-selectin.[20] P-selectin is expressed on the surface of ... "Comparison of human eosinophil and neutrophil ligands for P-selectin: ligands for P-selectin differ from those for E-selectin ... clearly different than those reported for E-selectin, and suggest disparate roles for P-selectin and E-selectin during ...
There are three subsets of selectins: E-selectin (in endothelial cells) L-selectin (in lymphocytes) P-selectin (in platelets ... In addition to E-selectin, the role of P-selectin (expressed on platelets) and L-selectin (on leukocytes) in cancer ... E-selectin to the plasma membrane, and L-selectin to the tips of microfolds on leukocytes. The name selectin comes from the ... "Comparison of human eosinophil and neutrophil ligands for P-selectin: ligands for P-selectin differ from those for E-selectin ...
Structure and function of L-selectin.. APMIS 100 287-93 1992. GO terms. Biological Process. GO:0007155 cell adhesion GO:0050900 ... L-selectin is an adhesion receptor in leukocytic cells that mediates the capture of leukocytes from the blood stream and the ... L-Selectin is a type I transmembrane protein comprising an N-terminal lectin domain, an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like ... L-selectin--a dynamic regulator of leukocyte migration.. Eur. J. Cell Biol. 91 257-64 2012 ...
... Mark Haynes Mark.Haynes at mail.tju.edu Wed Feb 19 14:05:51 EST 1997 *Previous message: ...
... Mark Haynes Mark.Haynes at mail.tju.edu Thu Feb 20 19:07:59 EST 1997 *Previous message: ...
... plural selectins) 1. (biochemistry) Any of a group of transmembrane glycoproteins important in cell adhesion ... ... How would you define selectin? Add your definition here.. Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.. ...
Ligands for L-selectin: homing, inflammation, and beyond.. Rosen SD1.. Author information. 1. Department of Anatomy and Program ... The discovery of selectins and their ligands has validated the long-predicted hypothesis that carbohydrate-directed cell ... Going beyond its first discovered role in homing to lymph nodes, the L-selectin system is implicated in such diverse processes ... This review focuses on the ligands for L-selectin that are found on vascular endothelium, leukocytes, carcinoma cells, and at ...
L-selectin synonyms, L-selectin pronunciation, L-selectin translation, English dictionary definition of L-selectin. v. sold , ... Endothelial cells display E-selectin and P-selectin, platelets express P-selectin, and leukocytes present L-selectin (72, 73). ... redirected from L-selectin). Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.. Related to L-selectin: E-selectin ... L-selectin is an adhesion receptor expressed in leukocytes.. Germany-Tailoring the tail of L-selectin Project ...
It was also reported that patients with untreated Graves disease (GD) had high serum level of soluble form of E-selectin (sE- ... The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether the common variants in E-selectin gene (SELE) were associated with the ... quantitative trait analysis showed a significant association of SELE haplotype with sE-selectin levels (P=0.0438). This study ... selectin), the concentration of which correlated with the activity of the disease. ...
CLECT_selectins_like (cd03592). Accession cd03592 Integration. Selectin, C-type lectin-like domain (IPR033991) Member database ...
E-, L- and P-selectin proteins are the primary units responsible for the tethering and rolling of these leukocytes. P-selectin ... The interaction between P-selectin and PSGL-1 mediates the The following is a series of images of the crystalline structure of ... It binds to the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1(PSGL-1), a homodimeric protein of molecular weight 240K, expressed on ...
E) Left: Neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood of P-selectin−/−, WT, or P-selectinΔCT/ΔCT mice were double stained with ... Considering that P-selectin induces prothrombotic and proinflammatory signaling, we studied the role of this selectin in NET ... We isolated neutrophils from mice engineered to overproduce soluble P-selectin (P-selectin(ΔCT/ΔCT) mice). Although the levels ... Neutrophils of P-selectinΔCT/ΔCT mice are primed to release NETs in vitro. Neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood of WT and ...
Selectins are a family of carbohydrate-binding transmembrane molecules found on the surface of endothelial cells, leukocytes ... Three type-I-cell surface glycoproteins make up the selectin family, namely L-selectin, P-selectin and E-selectin. L-selectin ... P-selectin is the largest selectin and is found on the surface of activated endothelial cells and platelets. The expression of ... L-selectin. L-selectin is a 74 to 100 kDa glycoprotein involved in lymphocyte homing and adhesion to endothelial cells in ...
IPR016348. L-selectin. IPR002396. Selectin_superfamily. IPR035976. Sushi/SCR/CCP_sf. IPR000436. Sushi_SCR_CCP_dom. ... IPR016348. L-selectin. IPR002396. Selectin_superfamily. IPR035976. Sushi/SCR/CCP_sf. IPR000436. Sushi_SCR_CCP_dom. ... L-selectinUniRule annotation. ,p>Information which has been generated by the UniProtKB automatic annotation system, without ... L-selectinSequence analysis. ,p>Information which has been generated by the UniProtKB automatic annotation system, without ...
... Agnieszka Żebrowska,1 Anna Sysa-Jędrzejowska,1 Małgorzata ... L. DAuria, P. Cordiali Fei, M. Pietravalle et al., "The serum levels of sE-selectin are increased in patients with bullous ...
Mice deficient either in E-selectin or in E-selectin and P-selectin (E/P-selectin mutant) also exhibit accelerated development ... Mice deficient either in E-selectin or in E- selectin and P-selectin (E/P-selectin mutant) also exhibit accelerated development ... The selectin family includes L-selectin (CD62L), P-selectin (CD62P), and E-selectin (CD62E). Cadherins are major cell-cell ... L-selectin), platelets (P-selectin), and vascular endothelium (E- and P-selectin). Structural identity of a selectins resides ...
P-selectin found in platelets.. Relevance Selectins are involved in inflammation processes. The L-selectins on the surface of ... E-selectin levels correlate with disease activity in psoriasis patients[3]. L-selectin levels correlate with disease activity ... Selectin or CD62 are cell adhesion molecules which bind sugar moieties and thus are regarded as lectins. The structure of ... Structure of P-selectin EGF domain complex with tetrasaccharide and Ca+2 ion (green) (PDB entry 1g1r) ...
IPR016348 L-selectin. IPR002396 Selectin_superfamily. IPR035976 Sushi/SCR/CCP_sf. IPR000436 Sushi_SCR_CCP_dom. ... IPR016348 L-selectin. IPR002396 Selectin_superfamily. IPR035976 Sushi/SCR/CCP_sf. IPR000436 Sushi_SCR_CCP_dom. ... Belongs to the selectin/LECAM family.Curated. Keywords - Domaini. EGF-like domain, Repeat, Signal, Sushi, Transmembrane, ... Sulfation on Tyr-51 of SELPLG is important for L-selectin binding.By similarity. Manual assertion inferred from sequence ...
L-selectin, also known as CD62L, is a cell adhesion molecule found on leukocytes and the preimplantation embryo. It belongs to ... Ivetic A, Ridley AJ (2005). "The telling tail of L-selectin". Biochem. Soc. Trans. 32 (Pt 6): 1118-21. doi:10.1042/BST0321118. ... L-selectin is also present on the surface of human embryo trophoblasts prior to implantation into the uterus. Similar to its ... Nicholson IC (2003). "CD62L (L-selectin)". J. Biol. Regul. Homeost. Agents. 16 (2): 144-6. PMID 12144128.. ...
The three selectins (P-selectin, L-selectin, and E-selectin) have related and sometimes overlapping functions in cell adhesion ... Of these three C-type lectins, the target ligand of P-selectin, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1), is the best ... The glycans on the main target for P-selectin, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1), were analyzed. ... Regulation of P-selectin expression was analyzed under multiple conditions. Knockout mouse lines The phenotype of PSGL-1 ...
The three selectins (P-selectin, L-selectin, and E-selectin) have related and sometimes overlapping functions in cell adhesion ... L-selectin (CFG data)and E-selectin (CFG data). References *↑ Leppanen A, White SP, Helin J, McEver RP, Cummings RD (2000) ... Of the ligands for these three C-type lectins, the target ligand of P-selectin, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1), is ... The glycans on the main target for P-selectin, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1), were analyzed.[13] ...
The tertiary goals are to determine the presence or absence of antibody to human E-selectin, P- selectin, and L-selectin and ... E-Selectin Nasal Instillation to Prevent Secondary Stroke. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... E-selectin causes white blood cells called lymphocytes to change so that they prevent clots from forming in the vessels that ... Participants will be randomly assigned to receive E-selectin at a dose level of 5, 15, or 50 micrograms or a placebo (nasal ...
Browse our P-Selectin/CD62P Lysate catalog backed by our Guarantee+. ... P-Selectin/CD62P Lysates available through Novus Biologicals. ... P-Selectin/CD62P Lysates. We offer P-Selectin/CD62P Lysates for ... Our P-Selectin/CD62P Lysates can be used in a variety of model species: Human. Use the list below to choose the P-Selectin/ ... P-Selectin/CD62P lysate, SELP lysate, CD62P antigen lysate, FLJ45155 lysate, PADGEMantigen CD62) lysate, selectin P (granule ...
L selectin explanation free. What is L selectin? Meaning of L selectin medical term. What does L selectin mean? ... Looking for online definition of L selectin in the Medical Dictionary? ... L selectin. L selectin. cell surface receptor produced by leukocytes.. L se·lec·tin. (sĕ-lektin) Cell surface receptor ... L selectin , definition of L selectin by Medical dictionary https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/L+selectin ...
One unique feature that distinguishes L-selectin from other adhesion molecules is that it is rapidly cleaved from th ... L-selectin mediates lymphocyte migration to peripheral lymph nodes and leukocyte rolling on vascular endothelium during ... Blocking homeostatic L-selectin cleavage also resulted in a constitutive 2-fold increase in overall L-selectin expression by ... 7475158 - P-selectin expression in myocardium of children undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass.. 9163568 - The effect of 5,8,11,14 ...
  • TNF and IL-6 bioactivity are not decreased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after treatment with anti-E-selectin antibody as compare to controls suggesting that the anti-E-selectin does not affect the magnitude of the LPS-initiated cytokine cascade. (elsevier.com)
  • Intratracheal injection of LPS induces pulmonary E-selectin mRNA expression at 2-4 h. (elsevier.com)
  • High expression of L-selectin on human bone marrow progenitor cells is an early sign of cells becoming committed to lymphoid differentiation. (wikidoc.org)
  • Soluble P-selectin is a potentially important molecule that may provide more detailed insight into pathological situations. (biovendor.com)
  • Methods and Results- We measured plasma levels of von Willebrand factor (vWF, a marker of endothelial damage/dysfunction) and soluble P-selectin (sP-sel, a marker of platelet activation) by ELISA in 1321 participants in the Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation (SPAF) III study and related these indices to the presence of stroke risk factors and cardiovascular disease. (ahajournals.org)
  • To examine further the relations of plasma von Willebrand factor (vWf, an index of endothelial damage and dysfunction) and soluble P-selectin (sP-sel, an index of platelet activation) concentrations to the presence and onset of clinical congestive heart failure (CHF) and the degree of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in patients taking part in the SPAF (stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation) study. (bmj.com)
  • 131210). E-selectin S128R polymorphism can functionally affect tumor-endothelial interactions as well as motility and signaling properties of neoplastic cells that may modulate the metastatic phenotype (Alessandro et al, 2007). (atlasgeneticsoncology.org)
  • As a first step in elucidating the molecular basis of the strong interactions with the selectins, we have performed conformational studies of the sulphated Le(a) in comparison with the non-sulphated analogue which is less strongly bound by E-selectin and not at all by L-selectin. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Thus, the enhanced selectin binding to the sulphated Le(a) is most likely due to favourable electrostatic interactions between the charged sulphate group and corresponding charged groups on the selectin protein. (biomedsearch.com)
  • These two controls encourage the idea that the interactions be- tween the cells and the synthetic lipid bilayer are due to the specific binding of P-selectin to its ligand. (coursehero.com)
  • If tethering depended on a pair of interactions, for example, the number of tethering events would be expected to increase as the square of the density of P-selectin in the bilayer. (coursehero.com)
  • Heparin is also a potent inhibitor of selectin-mediated interactions. (uzh.ch)
  • L-selectin presented on adherent cells is also capable of supporting tethering and rolling interactions in physiologic shear flow. (rupress.org)
  • Removal of MUC-1 exposes the oligosaccharide ligands of the uterine epithelium, thus allowing binding by the L-selectin receptor of the trophopblast cell, followed by embryo adhesion and invasion. (wikidoc.org)
  • The biological significance of L-selectin endoproteolytic release was determined by generating gene-targeted mice expressing a modified receptor that was not cleaved from the cell surface. (biomedsearch.com)
  • This ligand-receptor system was functional, because beads coated with the selectin ligand 6-sulfo sLe x bound to trophoblasts, and trophoblasts bound to ligand-expressing uterine luminal epithelium in tissue sections. (sciencemag.org)
  • Thus, P-selectin is sorted from LDL receptor in early endosomes, driving P-selectin rapidly into late endosomes. (rupress.org)
  • Trafficking of internalized LDL receptor in PC12 cells, and models for trafficking of internalized P-selectin. (rupress.org)
  • can be accounted for either by sorting of P-selectin from LDL receptor only in early sorting endosomes (B), or by sorting of P-selectin from LDL receptor only in late endosomes (C). Large arrows indicate the selective step in each model. (rupress.org)
  • The AT 1 -receptor antagonist DUP 753 significantly reduced E-selectin-dependent adhesion, whereas the AT 2 -receptor antagonist PD 123177 had no inhibitory effect. (ahajournals.org)
  • Cellular uptake of micelles confirmed that Esbp-HA-PTX micelles could be specifically and efficiently internalized into E-selectin expressing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and 4T1 breast cancer cells via receptor-meditated endocytosis. (ovid.com)
  • P-selectin has a functional role in metastasis of tumor similar to E-selectin. (wikipedia.org)
  • P-selectin is expressed on the surface of both stimulated endothelial cell and activated platelet and helps cancer cells invade into bloodstream for metastasis and provided locally with multiple growth factors respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • While P- and L-selectin facilitation of cellular contacts during hematogenous metastasis is being accepted as a potential target of heparin, here we propose that heparin may also interfere with integrin activity and thereby affect cancer progression. (hindawi.com)
  • Similarly, intravenous administration of anti-E-selectin aptamer (ESTA) resulted in a significant reduction in CD45 + immune cell density in DOX-treated residual tumors, which coincided with a delay in tumor growth and lung metastasis in MMTV-pyMT mice. (mdpi.com)
  • This study suggests that DOX treatment instigates de novo intratumoral infiltration of immune cells through E-selectin, and functional blockade of E-selectin may reduce residual tumor burden as well as metastasis through suppression of T H 2 shift. (mdpi.com)
  • We're essentially hacking into a mechanism of metastasis, using P-selectin on the vasculature to attract therapeutic nanoparticles instead of circulating tumor cells," Heller says. (aacrjournals.org)
  • In this hypothesis and theory article, we explore the potential roles of these mechanisms on the dynamic regulation of selectin ligands mediating CTC trafficking during metastasis. (frontiersin.org)
  • P- and L-selectin were shown to contribute to the early stages of metastasis, which is associated with platelet-tumor cell thrombi formation. (uzh.ch)
  • Selectin inhibition is a clear component of heparin inhibition of metastasis. (uzh.ch)
  • The development of accurate techniques for detection of selectin ligands may contribute to better diagnostic and better understanding of the molecular basis of tumor progression and metastasis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • One unique feature that distinguishes L-selectin from other adhesion molecules is that it is rapidly cleaved from the cell surface after cellular activation. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The finding that P-selectin is expressed by metastatic pancreatic tumor cells demonstrates that the range of cell types that express these adhesion molecules is broader than believed previously. (aacrjournals.org)
  • 1 3 Leukocyte adhesion to ECs is regulated though a variety of cell surface adhesion molecules, including the selectins and members of the immunoglobulin superfamily. (ahajournals.org)
  • Researches of atherosclerosis try to explain cardiovascular context of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), including the role of adhesion molecules.The aim of the study was to analyze leukocyte expression and plasma concentration of L-selectin in different stage-OSA patients. (ersjournals.com)
  • P-selectin belongs to the selectin family of adhesion molecules. (biovendor.com)
  • Background Soluble forms of adhesion molecules may be found in the circulation, and increased levels of selectins have been reported in some connective tissue diseases. (bmj.com)
  • Thrombin is one trigger which can stimulate endothelial-cell release of P-selectin and recent studies suggest an additional Ca 2+ -independent pathway involved in release of P-selectin. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is mediated by endothelial cell-focal adhesion kinase (FAK), which up-regulates E-selectin, leading to preferential homing of metastatic cancer cells to these foci. (pnas.org)
  • P-selectin, which is stored in the Weible-Palade bodies of endothelial cells, is rapidly expressed (within minutes) on the endothelial cell surface after stimulation (e.g., histamine, oxidants). (physiology.org)
  • The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether the common variants in E-selectin gene ( SELE ) were associated with the development of GD. (nature.com)
  • Furthermore, quantitative trait analysis showed a significant association of SELE haplotype with sE-selectin levels ( P =0.0438). (nature.com)
  • Despite a plausible role of E-selectin in the development of GD, it has not, to our knowledge, been previously examined whether common variation in SELE is involved in GD aetiology. (nature.com)
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the E-selectin gene (SELE) with CAD and CAD-related traits using tagging polymorphisms. (termedia.pl)
  • Cell Sciences E-Selectin ELISA Set is intended for use in a 'do it yourself' solid phase sandwich ELISA for the in vitro qualitative and quantitative determination of E-Selectin. (cellsciences.com)
  • The e-selectin assay is a solid phase ELISA designed to measure soluble e-selectin in cell culture supernates, serum, and plasma. (pacbio.com)
  • Methods Serum levels of sE-, L-, and P-selectin were determined by sandwich ELISA in 34 patients with RA, 30 patients with SSc and 15 healthy subjects. (bmj.com)
  • The effect was measured by cell ELISA and duplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and reached its maximum at 10 −7 mol/L. Angiotensin II induced only a small increase in E-selectin expression in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells. (ahajournals.org)
  • The cytoplasmic tail of human L-selectin contains two serine (S) residues at positions 364 and 367, and here we show that they play divergent roles in regulating ERM binding. (frontiersin.org)
  • A) Expression of human L-selectin on mouse L1-2 L-selectin transfectants. (nih.gov)
  • The number of CRP repeats is the major feature differentiating the type of selectin in extracellular region. (wikipedia.org)
  • The structure of selectin consists of extracellular calcium-dependent lectin domain, an EGF-like domain and a number of concensus repeat units, a transmembranal domain and a intracellular domain . (proteopedia.org)
  • L-selectin shedding occurs at a defined extracellular location, nine amino acids above the plasma membrane ( 6 , 7 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • 8 A soluble form of P-selectin resulting from proteolytic shedding of the extracellular domain has been detected in human 9 and mouse 10 plasma and was found to maintain the requirements for ligand binding. (bloodjournal.org)
  • It was also reported that patients with untreated Graves' disease (GD) had high serum level of soluble form of E-selectin (sE-selectin), the concentration of which correlated with the activity of the disease. (nature.com)
  • Szepietowski J, Wasik F, Bielicka E, Nockowski P, Noworolska A. Soluble E-selectin serum levels correlate with disease activity in psoriatic patients. (proteopedia.org)
  • VCAM-1, P-selectin, TNFR-1, and CXCL16 were enriched in the urine compared with the serum particularly in active disease, and were shown to be expressed within the diseased kidneys. (jimmunol.org)
  • Serum levels of IL-16, MDC, ECP and sE-selectin were measured at the same time points in 18 patients and compared with healthy nonatopic controls. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Serum levels of IL-16, MDC, ECP and sE-selectin were significantly higher in patients in acute stage of AD compared with controls and decreased significantly after treatment, in parallel with clinical improvement. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • There was significant correlation between serum levels of IL-16 and MDC (r = 0.53, P = 0.0443) and ECP and sE-selectin (r = 0.48, P = 0.0427). (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Elevated levels of sE-Selectin in serum have been reported in a variety of pathological conditions. (pacbio.com)
  • There is no obvious GlyCAM-1 homologue in man and, to date, L-selectin ligand(s) from human serum have not been characterized. (biochemj.org)
  • COULIER I, FLEURINCK C, De Reuck J, De Bleecker J. Serum levels of soluble ICAM-1 and E-selectin in acute stroke. (ugent.be)
  • Objectives To determine serum levels of soluble (s) E-, L-, and P-selectin in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic sclerosis (SSc), and to determine whether levels of these molecules correlate with measures of disease activity and pulmonary involvement. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusion These results suggest that the measurement of levels of serum soluble selectins may provide a useful additional marker for disease activity in RA patients and for pulmonary involvement, especially sE-selectin, in SSc patients. (bmj.com)
  • Selectins bind to sugar moieties and so are considered to be a type of lectin, cell adhesion proteins that bind sugar polymers. (wikipedia.org)
  • P-selectin has an N-terminal lectin domain followed by a EGF domain and 9 consensus repeat (CR) domains. (csbsju.edu)
  • In our previous study, we had demonstrated the association between L-selectin gene ( SELL ) polymorphism and GD. (nature.com)
  • Preclinical research points to the drug's potential role in blocking E-selectin-mediated chemo-resistance pathways as well as moving cancerous cells out of the protective environment of the bone marrow where they hide and escape the effects of chemotherapy. (businesswire.com)
  • Selectins and CXCR4 play a pivotal role in homing, adhesion, and proliferation of MM. Herein, we tested the role of E-selectin in the pathophysiology of MM by using a specific E-selectin antagonist (GMI-1271) and a dual E-selectin/CXCR4 antagonist (GMI-1359) on the proliferation and cell trafficking of MM in vitro and in vivo. (aacrjournals.org)
  • 15 16 Furthermore, soluble levels of P-selectin have been observed to increase in patients who have undergone venous surgery, suggesting that platelets and/or ECs were activated. (ahajournals.org)
  • Recently it has been shown that L-selectin is involved not only in leukocyte tethering and rolling, but also plays an important role in leukocyte activation. (biochemj.org)
  • Taken together, these results demonstrate that a post-translationally modified form of human plasma Factor H is a potential physiological ligand for L-selectin. (biochemj.org)
  • Blocking P-selectin in ischemic hearts ablated selectivity for c-kit + /CD45 + BMCs at 30 min reperfusion (selectivity ratio of 3 ± 1) while selectivity persisted in the presence of L-selectin neutralization (selectivity ratio of 17 ± 2). (upenn.edu)
  • Structure and function of L-selectin. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • However, PSGL-1 is not specific for P-selectin, as it can also function as a ligand for both E- and L-selectin. (wikipedia.org)