Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Animal Nutrition Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES, as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease in animals.Otters: Fish-eating carnivores of the family MUSTELIDAE, found on both hemispheres.Oceanography: The science that deals with the ocean and its phenomena. (Webster, 3d ed)Acanthocephala: A phylum of parasitic worms, closely related to tapeworms and containing two genera: Moniliformis, which sometimes infects man, and Macracanthorhynchus, which infects swine.Petroleum: Naturally occurring complex liquid hydrocarbons which, after distillation, yield combustible fuels, petrochemicals, and lubricants.Petroleum Pollution: Release of oil into the environment usually due to human activity.MuseumsWyomingLipidoses: Conditions characterized by abnormal lipid deposition due to disturbance in lipid metabolism, such as hereditary diseases involving lysosomal enzymes required for lipid breakdown. They are classified either by the enzyme defect or by the type of lipid involved.Harmful Algal Bloom: An algal bloom where the algae produce powerful toxins that can kill fish, birds, and mammals, and ultimately cause illness in humans. The harmful bloom can also cause oxygen depletion in the water due to the death and decomposition of non-toxic algae species.Scent Glands: Exocrine glands in animals which secrete scents which either repel or attract other animals, e.g. perianal glands of skunks, anal glands of weasels, musk glands of foxes, ventral glands of wood rats, and dorsal glands of peccaries.Helminthiasis, Animal: Infestation of animals with parasitic worms of the helminth class. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Pacific OceanEcotoxicology: The study of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION and the toxic effects of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS on the ECOSYSTEM. The term was coined by Truhaut in 1969.Mustelidae: A family of terrestrial carnivores with long, slender bodies, long tails, and anal scent glands. They include badgers, weasels, martens, FERRETS; MINKS; wolverines, polecats, and OTTERS.Anseriformes: An order of BIRDS comprising the waterfowl, particularly DUCKS; GEESE; swans; and screamers.Water Pollutants, Chemical: Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.Diving: An activity in which the organism plunges into water. It includes scuba and bell diving. Diving as natural behavior of animals goes here, as well as diving in decompression experiments with humans or animals.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Animal DiseasesEcosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Urbanization: The process whereby a society changes from a rural to an urban way of life. It refers also to the gradual increase in the proportion of people living in urban areas.AlaskaBivalvia: A class in the phylum MOLLUSCA comprised of mussels; clams; OYSTERS; COCKLES; and SCALLOPS. They are characterized by a bilaterally symmetrical hinged shell and a muscular foot used for burrowing and anchoring.Water Pollution: Contamination of bodies of water (such as LAKES; RIVERS; SEAS; and GROUNDWATER.)CaliforniaEcology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated: Hydrocarbon compounds with one or more of the hydrogens replaced by CHLORINE.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Extinction, Biological: The ceasing of existence of a species or taxonomic groups of organisms.Blood Chemical Analysis: An examination of chemicals in the blood.Gene Flow: The change in gene frequency in a population due to migration of gametes or individuals (ANIMAL MIGRATION) across population barriers. In contrast, in GENETIC DRIFT the cause of gene frequency changes are not a result of population or gamete movement.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Rain: Water particles that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Food Chain: The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Influenza Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent infection by viruses in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE. It includes both killed and attenuated vaccines. The composition of the vaccines is changed each year in response to antigenic shifts and changes in prevalence of influenza virus strains. The vaccine is usually bivalent or trivalent, containing one or two INFLUENZAVIRUS A strains and one INFLUENZAVIRUS B strain.Shock: A pathological condition manifested by failure to perfuse or oxygenate vital organs.Toxoplasmosis, Animal: Acquired infection of non-human animals by organisms of the genus TOXOPLASMA.Influenza B virus: Species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS B that cause HUMAN INFLUENZA and other diseases primarily in humans. Antigenic variation is less extensive than in type A viruses (INFLUENZA A VIRUS) and consequently there is no basis for distinct subtypes or variants. Epidemics are less likely than with INFLUENZA A VIRUS and there have been no pandemics. Previously only found in humans, Influenza B virus has been isolated from seals which may constitute the animal reservoir from which humans are exposed.British Columbia: A province of Canada on the Pacific coast. Its capital is Victoria. The name given in 1858 derives from the Columbia River which was named by the American captain Robert Gray for his ship Columbia which in turn was named for Columbus. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p178 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p81-2)DNA, Mitochondrial: Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Breeding: The production of offspring by selective mating or HYBRIDIZATION, GENETIC in animals or plants.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Toxoplasma: A genus of protozoa parasitic to birds and mammals. T. gondii is one of the most common infectious pathogenic animal parasites of man.Poaceae: A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.Weather: The state of the ATMOSPHERE over minutes to months.Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal: Allergic rhinitis that occurs at the same time every year. It is characterized by acute CONJUNCTIVITIS with lacrimation and ITCHING, and regarded as an allergic condition triggered by specific ALLERGENS.Pollen: The fertilizing element of plants that contains the male GAMETOPHYTES.Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 3 and neuraminidase 2. The H3N2 subtype was responsible for the Hong Kong flu pandemic of 1968.Anestrus: A state of sexual inactivity in female animals exhibiting no ESTROUS CYCLE. Causes of anestrus include pregnancy, presence of offspring, season, stress, and pathology.Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype: A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS with the surface proteins hemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1. The H1N1 subtype was responsible for the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Humidity: A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.Tropical Climate: A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Football: A competitive team sport played on a rectangular field. This is the American or Canadian version of the game and also includes the form known as rugby. It does not include non-North American football (= SOCCER).Estrus: The period in the ESTROUS CYCLE associated with maximum sexual receptivity and fertility in non-primate female mammals.Meteorological Concepts: The atmospheric properties, characteristics and other atmospheric phenomena especially pertaining to WEATHER or CLIMATE.Gambia: A republic in western Africa, constituting an enclave within SENEGAL extending on both sides of the Gambia River. Its capital is Banjul, formerly Bathurst.Animal Migration: Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.Soccer: A game in which a round inflated ball is advanced by kicking or propelling with any part of the body except the hands or arms. The object of the game is to place the ball in opposite goals.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.North DakotaParturition: The process of giving birth to one or more offspring.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Burkina Faso: A republic in western Africa, south and east of MALI and west of NIGER. Its capital is Ouagadougou. It was formerly called Upper Volta until 1984.Insect Vectors: Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Sentinel Surveillance: Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Luteinizing Hormone: A major gonadotropin secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Luteinizing hormone regulates steroid production by the interstitial cells of the TESTIS and the OVARY. The preovulatory LUTEINIZING HORMONE surge in females induces OVULATION, and subsequent LUTEINIZATION of the follicle. LUTEINIZING HORMONE consists of two noncovalently linked subunits, alpha and beta. Within a species, the alpha subunit is common in the three pituitary glycoprotein hormones (TSH, LH and FSH), but the beta subunit is unique and confers its biological specificity.Guadeloupe: The name of two islands of the West Indies, separated by a narrow channel. Their capital is Basse-Terre. They were discovered by Columbus in 1493, occupied by the French in 1635, held by the British at various times between 1759 and 1813, transferred to Sweden in 1813, and restored to France in 1816. Its status was changed from colony to a French overseas department in 1946. Columbus named it in honor of the monastery of Santa Maria de Guadalupe in Spain. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p470 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p221)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Snow: Frozen water crystals that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Pandemics: Epidemics of infectious disease that have spread to many countries, often more than one continent, and usually affecting a large number of people.Deer: The family Cervidae of 17 genera and 45 species occurring nearly throughout North America, South America, and Eurasia, on most associated continental islands, and in northern Africa. Wild populations of deer have been established through introduction by people in Cuba, New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, and other places where the family does not naturally occur. They are slim, long-legged and best characterized by the presence of antlers. Their habitat is forests, swamps, brush country, deserts, and arctic tundra. They are usually good swimmers; some migrate seasonally. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1362)Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Photoperiod: The time period of daily exposure that an organism receives from daylight or artificial light. It is believed that photoperiodic responses may affect the control of energy balance and thermoregulation.Meteorology: The science of studying the characteristics of the atmosphere such as its temperature, density, winds, clouds, precipitation, and other atmospheric phenomena and aiming to account for the weather in terms of external influences and the basic laws of physics. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)BrazilCryptomeria: A plant genus of the family TAXODIACEAE. Its POLLEN is one of the major ALLERGENS.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Mali: A country in western Africa, east of MAURITANIA and south of ALGERIA. Its capital is Bamako. From 1904-1920 it was known as Upper Senegal-Niger; prior to 1958, as French Sudan; 1958-1960 as the Sudanese Republic and 1959-1960 it joined Senegal in the Mali Federation. It became an independent republic in 1960.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Biomass: Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.Influenza A virus: The type species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS A that causes influenza and other diseases in humans and animals. Antigenic variation occurs frequently between strains, allowing classification into subtypes and variants. Transmission is usually by aerosol (human and most non-aquatic hosts) or waterborne (ducks). Infected birds shed the virus in their saliva, nasal secretions, and feces.Anopheles: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) that are known vectors of MALARIA.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Hibernation: The dormant state in which some warm-blooded animal species pass the winter. It is characterized by narcosis and by sharp reduction in body temperature and metabolic activity and by a depression of vital signs.MontanaIncidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Nesting Behavior: Animal behavior associated with the nest; includes construction, effects of size and material; behavior of the adult during the nesting period and the effect of the nest on the behavior of the young.Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Skiing: A snow sport which uses skis to glide over the snow. It does not include water-skiing.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.United StatesSenegal: A republic in western Africa, southwest of MAURITANIA and east of MALI. Its capital is Dakar.Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Sexual Maturation: Achievement of full sexual capacity in animals and in humans.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Betula: A plant genus of the family BETULACEAE. The tree has smooth, resinous, varicolored or white bark, marked by horizontal pores (lenticels), which usually peels horizontally in thin sheets.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Agricultural Irrigation: The routing of water to open or closed areas where it is used for agricultural purposes.Ambrosia: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. The POLLEN is one cause of HAYFEVER.
  • Furharvesters are no longer required to obtain a permit to hold furs for sale after the season closes on Jan. 31, 2017. (iowadnr.gov)
  • Otter Lodge is a completely new property for 2017, positioned right on the bank of the River Fowey. (cornwallscottages.co.uk)
  • Otter Creek Horse Trials in Wheeler, Wisconsin, hosted the Area IV leg of the Charles Owen Technical Merit series at their fall event on September 15-17, 2017. (useventing.com)
  • Scrimmages continue through Thursday before the Otters depart for Buffalo where they'll be one of six OHL teams competing in the 2017 OHL Pre-Season Showcase. (ontariohockeyleague.com)
  • The Firebirds are one of six teams competing in the 2017 OHL Pre-Season Showcase in Buffalo, NY where they open their schedule against the Windsor Spitfires on Friday, September 1st at 12:30pm. (ontariohockeyleague.com)
  • Scrimmages take place on Tuesday and Wednesday before the Blueshirts head to Buffalo as one of six teams competing in the 2017 OHL Pre-Season Showcase. (ontariohockeyleague.com)
  • Intrasquad games run Tuesday through Thursday before the team departs for Buffalo as one of six clubs competing in the 2017 OHL Pre-Season Showcase. (ontariohockeyleague.com)
  • The lack of re-establishment of the species is probably due to high mortality or reproductive failure following the dispersal of otters into unsuitable areas ( Medina 1996). (iucnredlist.org)
  • In much of their range, populations of Spotted-necked Otters are faced with habitat loss or degradation, polluted waters, and/or degraded water ecosystems due to the introduction of exotic species such as Water Hyacinth ( Eichhornia crassipes ) and Nile Perch ( Lates niloticus ) and marginal agricultural practices. (iucnredlist.org)
  • Additionally, regional human populations are poor and increasingly placing pressure on all resources including water, vegetation, the otter prey base,as well as reducing suitable resting and denning sites vital to survival of the species. (iucnredlist.org)
  • Northern sea otters are protected from hunting and harassment by the federal Marine Mammal Protection Act and are listed as threatenedunder the Washington State Endangered Species Act. (pdza.org)
  • The Oriental Small-clawed Otter ( Aonyx cinerea ), also known as Asian Small-clawed Otter , is the smallest otter species in the world, weighing less than 5 kg. (thefullwiki.org)
  • Due to ongoing habitat loss, pollution and hunting in some areas, the Oriental small-clawed otter is evaluated as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (thefullwiki.org)
  • By 1975, according to Colorado Parks and Wildlife, river otters' numbers got so low they were classified as a state endangered species. (aspentimes.com)
  • They share their habitat with three other species of otter: Eurasian, smooth coated and hairy nosed. (mogozoo.com.au)
  • Sea otters in southeast Alaska are not listed as threatened or endangered, but the agency cannot intervene to protect commercial fisheries until a species is at "optimum sustainable population. (phys.org)
  • Using spraint analysis and relative frequency of occurrence data from the literature, we described the dietary patterns of Eurasian otters ( Lutra lutra ) in 23 study sites within the Pannonian biogeographical region in Hungary. (peerj.com)
  • Wildlife changes with the seasons at Muscatatuck! (fws.gov)
  • Hunters are reminded that several North Dakota national wildlife refuges open to late-season upland game bird hunting the day after the deer gun season closes. (nd.gov)
  • The annual Washington sea otter survey is organized and run by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, with support from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, Seattle Aquarium and the Quinault Indian Nation. (pdza.org)
  • Mike Porras, public information officer for the northwest region of the Colorado Parks and Wildlife, said Schurr's incident is the first he's heard of an otter attacking a human. (aspentimes.com)
  • Clear cool days are great for spotting wildlife such as bobcats, deer, bear, and river otter. (fws.gov)
  • A resurgence of the beaver population beginning in the 1940s created excellent otter habitat on nearly every stream in the state, wrote retired wildlife biologist Eric Orff. (wmur.com)
  • Wildlife experts are urging fishermen to "go slow" as they head out of Moss Landing harbor for the start to recreational salmon season in the Monterey Bay. (ksbw.com)
  • In the 1960s, Alaska's wildlife agency moved more than 400 sea otters from the Aleutian Islands to southeast Alaska to reintroduce them to their historic range. (phys.org)
  • Federal and state wildlife officials said in a statement Wednesday that the young-adult female Southern sea otter was found on a beach in San Simeon on Sept. 26. (phys.org)
  • At least 840 sea otters were taken for subsistence reasons last year, the highest since 1993, and not surprising given the growing size of the population, wildlife biologist Verena Gill with Fish and Wildlife said. (csmonitor.com)
  • The Otters are the oldest current team in the Frontier League and have won two championships in 2006 and 2016. (wikipedia.org)
  • On the field the Otters have reached the playoffs in 9 seasons, including six Frontier League Championship series with FLCS wins in 2006 and 2016. (wikipedia.org)
  • He expects the decrease in trappers to continue for the 2016-17 season. (iowadnr.gov)
  • In this May 21, 2016 file photo, a northern sea otter floats on its back while crushing a clam shell with its teeth in the small boat harbor at Seward, Alaska. (phys.org)
  • In this May 21, 2016 file photo, a pair of northern sea otters float on their backs in the small boat harbor at Seward, Alaska. (phys.org)
  • River otters are fairly easy to find when the lakes and marshes are frozen and the otters can often been seen popping in and out of just a few fishing holes. (fws.gov)
  • River otters are common in Muscatatuck wetlands but not always seen. (fws.gov)
  • All clawless and river otters have a gestation period of about two months. (seaworld.org)
  • Extirpation of the Southern River Otter began in local basins but has become widespread. (iucnredlist.org)
  • In Chile, river otters occurred from Cachapoal River (34ºS) (Gay 1847, Reed 1877) up to the Peninsula de Taitao (46ºS) with a continuous distribution in rivers and lakes (Medina 1996). (iucnredlist.org)
  • Southern River Otter subpopulations that inhabit marine environments are distributed along the Pacific coast of Chile from 46ºS to Tierra del Fuego in Chile (Cabrera 1957, Redford and Eisenberg 1992, Sielfeld 1992, Malmierca et al . (iucnredlist.org)
  • While Schurr was in the water, she was attacked by a river otter. (aspentimes.com)
  • Watch out for vicious river otters. (aspentimes.com)
  • That's what Glenwood Springs nurse Nancy Schurr, 56, discovered when a river otter attacked her on Aug. 21 during a float trip on the Colorado River west of Grand Junction. (aspentimes.com)
  • A Bureau of Land Management brochure about Ruby-Horsethief canyons even mentions that visitors "might see some rare river otters. (aspentimes.com)
  • He is looking for the lost river otters of the desert Southwest. (nwf.org)
  • Some believe that trappers eradicated the Southwestern river otter during the last century. (nwf.org)
  • There have been no confirmed sightings of this river otter subspecies in more than 30 years. (nwf.org)
  • Are there any surviving pockets of Southwestern river otters out there? (nwf.org)
  • There, stuffed and mounted, is one of only three known specimens of the Southwestern, or Sonoran, river otter. (nwf.org)
  • It is the last documented Southwestern river otter caught in New Mexico. (nwf.org)
  • Southwestern river otters represent genetic diversity, and that diversity should be preserved at all costs," says Polechla. (nwf.org)
  • OTTER KIND: The Southwestern, or Sonoran, is one of seven North American river otter subspecies. (nwf.org)
  • River otters weigh about 20 pounds and can measure four feet in length including their long tails, which are used for steering and propulsion. (nwf.org)
  • Unlike their cousins the sea otters, which spend most of their time in water, river otters spend half their time on land and use rivers to hunt and travel. (nwf.org)
  • Long whiskers help them find prey in murky water, and river otters can hold their breath for five minutes. (nwf.org)
  • After river otters mate, a fertilized egg remains in the female's uterus for 10 months before gestation begins. (nwf.org)
  • Once you've seen river otters in the wild, you never forget it," says Carol Peterson of the River Otter Alliance, a conservation group in Englewood, Colorado. (nwf.org)
  • American Indians revered these animals and European settlers marveled at river otters' abundance, naming several places after the creatures-from Otter Mountain in Colorado to Bayou de Loutre (French for otter) in Louisiana. (nwf.org)
  • Otter Lodge is an amazing, brand new property right on the banks of the River Fowey. (cornwallscottages.co.uk)
  • River fishing, in season. (cornwallscottages.co.uk)
  • River otter are now more common in New Hampshire than they have been in about 200 years, yet their secretive lifestyle hides their existence from all but the most observant people," he wrote. (wmur.com)
  • The Squam Lakes Natural Science Center notes that river otters are dark brown, fading to tan on the underside and on the muzzle and throat. (wmur.com)
  • 1985-1991: Bird banding studies , snowshoe hare and river otter restoration projects, small mammal studies, vegetation plot assessments in the eastern United States with various federal and state agencies and consulting firms. (usgs.gov)
  • only the river otter is larger. (massaudubon.org)
  • Unlike other otters, they catch their prey in their paws instead of with their mouth. (thefullwiki.org)
  • While fish make up the major portion of their diet, otters also prey on crayfish, frogs, small mammals, aquatic insects, turtles, water snakes and even eat some plant material like blueberries. (wmur.com)
  • Otters are reclusive and shy around people, and they're generally not aggressive," Porras said. (aspentimes.com)
  • Playful and reclusive, the otter population has come back over the past four or five decades in the Granite State, thanks to improvements in habitat and protection through limited trapping seasons. (wmur.com)
  • Moea the sea otter munches on some crab. (pdza.org)
  • Sea otters dive for red sea urchins, geoduck clams, sea cucumbers-delicacies in Asia markets-plus prized Dungeness crab. (phys.org)
  • Juneau, Alaska - An Alaska state senator is proposing a bounty on sea otters, the cute little marine mammals often seen by tourists swimming on their backs between cruise ships, sometimes munching on a fresh crab or clams. (csmonitor.com)
  • Fisherman Ladd Norheim of the southeast Alaska community of Petersburg said the sea otters are "decimating" Dungeness crab stocks and would like to see some kind of management. (csmonitor.com)
  • Russian and U.S. hunters over 150 years virtually wiped out sea otters until the signing of an international treaty to protect northern fur seals and sea otters in 1911. (phys.org)
  • Endless views, a sweeping deck that over hangs the tidelands with a dock to the water, watch otters play, seals and eagles just about in every direction. (vrbo.com)
  • Shyer otters, bears and eagles are occasionally spotted. (eastmannh.org)
  • North Dakota's deer gun season opens Nov. 10 at noon, and the state Game and Fish Department cautions deer hunters to be wary of ice conditions. (nd.gov)
  • In the statewide 2014-2015 seasons, hunters harvested an estimated 303,973 deer. (bymnews.com)
  • 2003, Hendrix and Glaser 2007) also has the potential of decreasing suitable habitat for otters and increasing human/otter conflict for increasingly scarce resources such as water, land, and fish. (iucnredlist.org)
  • Both this decrease in suitable habitat and increase in human/otter conflict are currently occurring and will certainly increase over the next three generations. (iucnredlist.org)
  • Zookeepers from Point Defiance Zoo's Rocky Shores habitat have helped with the otter count for at least a decade. (pdza.org)
  • Early historians described otters as being common throughout the state, but unregulated trapping and hunting, pollution of water and elimination of beaver -- whose dams create otter habitat -- led to the near demise of the otter in the state by the late 1800s. (wmur.com)
  • Most sea otter births occur in the water. (seaworld.org)
  • These animals make burrows with an entrance below water level (like otters) and during the day find shelter there and then become active in the afternoon. (wikipedia.org)
  • Males move long distances via water in search of mates and it is thought that males rut (or fight) during the wet season. (wikipedia.org)
  • The otters then have no insulation against cold water temperatures, and ingest the oil as they try to groom. (pdza.org)
  • Diego and Alicia must save two baby otters that became separated when the Bobo brothers were messing around in the water and create a huge wave. (tv.com)
  • On land, otters are clumsy, but in the water they move with the grace of dancers. (nwf.org)
  • Otters have special adaptations for living in water that give them the ability to dive to a depth of 60 feet and stay underwater of up to three or four minutes. (wmur.com)
  • Otters can swim at six to seven miles per hour both above and below water. (wmur.com)
  • Otters are very playful, wrestling and chasing each other and rolling in the water. (wmur.com)
  • Clean water is essential to otters so seeing one indicates a healthy waterway, according to Squam Lakes Natural Science Center. (wmur.com)
  • Water - Two quarts per person is recommended in every season. (nynjtc.org)
  • As the otter lives almost exclusively on fish, it is rarely met with far from water, and usually frequents the shores of brooks, rivers, lakes and, in some localities, the sea itself. (wikisource.org)
  • In China otters are taught to catch fish, being let into the water for the purpose attached to a long cord. (wikisource.org)
  • The changing seasons are especially evident to those who float and view the world from water level. (outdoorswimmingsociety.com)
  • Even our "Otter Water" is bottled locally! (otterbein.edu)
  • The Marine Mammal Protection Act protects sea otters and other marine mammals and prohibits people from killing and harassing these animals. (ksbw.com)
  • On Wednesday, he introduced legislation that would have the state pay $100 for each sea otter lawfully killed under the federal Marine Mammal Protection Act. (csmonitor.com)
  • The season will be 68 games long, followed by a playoffs. (conquerclub.com)
  • Most of Canada's top juniors still haven't hit the ice since the CHL and the three regional leagues under its umbrella decided on March 12 to pause their seasons and later cancelled their playoffs and the Memorial Cup championship tournament. (cbc.ca)
  • Spotted-necked Otters are found in lakes and larger rivers throughout much of Africa south of 10°N. They are common in Lake Victoria and across Zambia, but for some unexplained reason often are absent from what appear to be suitable habitats, such as the lakes and rivers, of East Africa and the Zambezi below Victoria Falls (Estes 1992). (iucnredlist.org)
  • While paddling this fall in the Lakes Region, I spotted a family of otters at play on a set of ledges near a stream which feeds the lake. (wmur.com)
  • Today, otters live in nearly all the rivers, streams, lakes and ponds in New Hampshire. (wmur.com)
  • The Great Lakes: Midwest U.S. and Canada Temperature/ Climate (mostly 4 season. (prezi.com)
  • The Otters have promoted over 50 of their players to Major League baseball franchises including two players in 2013 (1B/DH Andrew Clark - New York Yankees, RHP Bryce Morrow - San Diego). (wikipedia.org)
  • During the early season, hunters took six cats from a harvest limit of eight. (nd.gov)
  • Fishermen have watched their harvest shrink as sea otters spread and colonize, Doherty said. (phys.org)
  • This past season was the third-highest harvest on record, with 3,748 bears being harvested. (bymnews.com)
  • Although not a well-known fact, most kiwi fruits harvest during the autumn months making winter the prime season to get in your kiwi fix. (halocigs.com)
  • Preferred environments include fast flowing rivers, streams, swamps, coastal rivers, and during rainy season some may retreat to small forest pools (altitude range from 0-1,800m). (wikipedia.org)
  • All of this has caused Polechla to urge a moratorium on any more otter relocations in the Southwest, including one being considered for the Grand Canyon, until all the region's rivers are surveyed. (nwf.org)
  • North Dakota waterfowl hunters are reminded the statewide duck and white-fronted goose seasons close Dec. 3. (nd.gov)
  • The following persons are not considered to be guest hunters: other quota permit holders, non-hunters and exempt hunters (on areas and during seasons that allow exemptions). (myfwc.com)
  • During the archery and the archery/muzzleloading gun seasons, the area is divided into 7 zones with Zone A limited to 18 hunters, Zones B, C and D limited to 14 hunters each, Zone E limited to 6 hunters, Zone F limited to 32 hunters and Zone G limited to 42 hunters. (myfwc.com)
  • Northern sea otters, once hunted to the brink of extinction along Alaska's Panhandle, have made a spectacular comeback by gobbling some of the state's finest seafood-and fishermen are not happy about the competition. (phys.org)
  • Californian sea otters give new meaning to "love bite. (pbs.org)
  • North American, smooth, spot-necked, and marine otters give birth in winter and spring, one year following mating. (seaworld.org)
  • These partially webbed paws give them an excellent sense of touch and coordination, providing them with more dexterity than other otters with full webbing. (thefullwiki.org)
  • In New Hampshire, female otters give birth to two or three offspring each year. (wmur.com)
  • The latest plan is to start the season on Jan. 8 and have each team play up to 50 games (down from the usual 68), all within their existing division. (cbc.ca)
  • His play this season has cemented his status as a top-10 draft pick this summer and it wouldn't be surprising to see the flashy young pivot step right into an NHL uniform next year. (si.com)
  • How far the Battalion goes in the post-season will depend in part on his play. (si.com)
  • The Otters also have two more records to play for - the franchise mark for home wins in a season (30 in 2013-14), and adding to their league mark of three straight 50-win seasons. (goerie.com)
  • Season 2 of Hearthstone Ranked Play has ended! (icy-veins.com)
  • Ranked Play Season 2 has ended, and the Black Temple card back has been distributed to all players who have earned Rank 20 during the season. (icy-veins.com)
  • June is here and with it comes Ranked Play Season 3, featuring a new card back as well as new opportunities for 16 skilled players to top the Legend ranks and qualify for a spot a the World Championship Qualifiers. (icy-veins.com)
  • SPRINGFIELD, Mass. - The Flames' American Hockey League affiliate will play home games in Calgary this season after requesting relocation from Stockton, Calif. (yahoo.com)
  • Giant otters are born late August to early October, during the dry season. (seaworld.org)
  • The giant otter shrew (Potamogale velox) is a semiaquatic, carnivorous tenrec. (wikipedia.org)
  • Contrary to its name the giant otter shrew is not a true shrew (Soricidae) but a tenrec (Tenrecidae). (wikipedia.org)
  • The giant otter shrew is a mammal superficially similar to an otter in appearance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Giant otter shrews are native to central Africa, from the southern regions of Nigeria (central Rainforest Zone), and then eastward through Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and the Central African Republic, Chad, the Republic of Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan to the northern regions of Angola and Zambia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The giant otter shrew builds burrows among riverbank crevices. (wikipedia.org)
  • Giant otter shrews fare very poorly in captivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Giant otter shrews breed during the wet/rainy season. (wikipedia.org)
  • The move leaves the Vancouver Canucks (Utica, N.Y.) and the Edmonton Oilers (Bakersfield, Calif.) as the lone Canadian teams with American-based AHL affiliates this season. (yahoo.com)
  • Among the 145 choices offered by the nonprofit organization: studying crocodiles in Costa Rica, sea otters in Monterey, Calif., temple monkeys in Sri Lanka and orchids in Spain. (latimes.com)
  • The 2020-21 season opened on Oct. 2 but quickly hit the rocks. (cbc.ca)
  • The Stockton Heat plan to move north of the border for the 2020 season, giving the Flames easier access to their players during the COVID-19 pandemic. (yahoo.com)
  • on 3 September, AL&E has completely canceled its 2020-21 Antarctic season. (southpolestation.com)
  • and from the UK: this 7 August BBC News article "Coronavirus severely restricts Antarctic science" as well as this 7 August BAS press release "Update on 2020/21 Antarctic field season: responding to COVID-19 pandemic" . (southpolestation.com)
  • 4 August updates on the 2020-21 season: First, the program announced on 4 August US time that the McMurdo upgrade project otherwise known as AIMS would be suspended for the 2020-21 austral summer season. (southpolestation.com)
  • As they dive below the surface, otters automatically slow their heart rate and concentrate blood flow to the brain and vital organs, thus conserving oxygen, according to the National Geographic. (wmur.com)