High-Throughput Screening Assays: Rapid methods of measuring the effects of an agent in a biological or chemical assay. The assay usually involves some form of automation or a way to conduct multiple assays at the same time using sample arrays.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Two-Hybrid System Techniques: Screening techniques first developed in yeast to identify genes encoding interacting proteins. Variations are used to evaluate interplay between proteins and other molecules. Two-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for protein-protein interactions, one-hybrid for DNA-protein interactions, three-hybrid interactions for RNA-protein interactions or ligand-based interactions. Reverse n-hybrid techniques refer to analysis for mutations or other small molecules that dissociate known interactions.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Small Molecule Libraries: Large collections of small molecules (molecular weight about 600 or less), of similar or diverse nature which are used for high-throughput screening analysis of the gene function, protein interaction, cellular processing, biochemical pathways, or other chemical interactions.Drug Evaluation, Preclinical: Preclinical testing of drugs in experimental animals or in vitro for their biological and toxic effects and potential clinical applications.Genetic Testing: Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.RNA Interference: A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Gene Library: A large collection of DNA fragments cloned (CLONING, MOLECULAR) from a given organism, tissue, organ, or cell type. It may contain complete genomic sequences (GENOMIC LIBRARY) or complementary DNA sequences, the latter being formed from messenger RNA and lacking intron sequences.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Mutagenesis: Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.Drosophila melanogaster: A species of fruit fly much used in genetics because of the large size of its chromosomes.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins: Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.Zebrafish: An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Television: The transmission and reproduction of transient images of fixed or moving objects. An electronic system of transmitting such images together with sound over a wire or through space by apparatus that converts light and sound into electrical waves and reconverts them into visible light rays and audible sound. (From Webster, 3rd ed)Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Caenorhabditis elegans: A species of nematode that is widely used in biological, biochemical, and genetic studies.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.DNA, Complementary: Single-stranded complementary DNA synthesized from an RNA template by the action of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase. cDNA (i.e., complementary DNA, not circular DNA, not C-DNA) is used in a variety of molecular cloning experiments as well as serving as a specific hybridization probe.Genes, Lethal: Genes whose loss of function or gain of function MUTATION leads to the death of the carrier prior to maturity. They may be essential genes (GENES, ESSENTIAL) required for viability, or genes which cause a block of function of an essential gene at a time when the essential gene function is required for viability.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Mutagenesis, Insertional: Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.Ethylnitrosourea: A nitrosourea compound with alkylating, carcinogenic, and mutagenic properties.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Genetic Complementation Test: A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Cell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.RNA, Small Interfering: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Embryo, Nonmammalian: The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Video Games: A form of interactive entertainment in which the player controls electronically generated images that appear on a video display screen. This includes video games played in the home on special machines or home computers, and those played in arcades.Genes, Insect: The functional hereditary units of INSECTS.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.HeLa Cells: The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Animals, Genetically Modified: ANIMALS whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING, or their offspring.Green Fluorescent Proteins: Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.X-Ray Intensifying Screens: Screens which absorb the energy in the x-ray beam that has penetrated the patient and convert this energy into a light pattern which has as nearly as possible the same information as the original x-ray beam. The more light a screen produces for a given input of x-radiation, the less x-ray exposure and thus shorter exposure time are needed to expose the film. In most film-screen systems, the film is sandwiched between two screens in a cassette so that the emulsion on each side is exposed to the light from its contiguous screen.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins: Proteins from the nematode species CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS. The proteins from this species are the subject of scientific interest in the area of multicellular organism MORPHOGENESIS.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Fungal Proteins: Proteins found in any species of fungus.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Mice, Inbred C57BLDisease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Cytoplasm: The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Genetic Techniques: Chromosomal, biochemical, intracellular, and other methods used in the study of genetics.Drug Discovery: The process of finding chemicals for potential therapeutic use.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Morphogenesis: The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Genes, Reporter: Genes whose expression is easily detectable and therefore used to study promoter activity at many positions in a target genome. In recombinant DNA technology, these genes may be attached to a promoter region of interest.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Genes, Fungal: The functional hereditary units of FUNGI.ComputersCulture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.DNA Transposable Elements: Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Arabidopsis: A plant genus of the family BRASSICACEAE that contains ARABIDOPSIS PROTEINS and MADS DOMAIN PROTEINS. The species A. thaliana is used for experiments in classical plant genetics as well as molecular genetic studies in plant physiology, biochemistry, and development.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Nerve Tissue ProteinsPhylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Cell Cycle Proteins: Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.Genomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.DNA Mutational Analysis: Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Repressor Proteins: Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Gene Knockdown Techniques: The artificial induction of GENE SILENCING by the use of RNA INTERFERENCE to reduce the expression of a specific gene. It includes the use of DOUBLE-STRANDED RNA, such as SMALL INTERFERING RNA and RNA containing HAIRPIN LOOP SEQUENCE, and ANTI-SENSE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Cell Cycle: The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.False Positive Reactions: Positive test results in subjects who do not possess the attribute for which the test is conducted. The labeling of healthy persons as diseased when screening in the detection of disease. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Protein Transport: The process of moving proteins from one cellular compartment (including extracellular) to another by various sorting and transport mechanisms such as gated transport, protein translocation, and vesicular transport.Ultrasonography: The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Staining and Labeling: The marking of biological material with a dye or other reagent for the purpose of identifying and quantitating components of tissues, cells or their extracts.Suppression, Genetic: Mutation process that restores the wild-type PHENOTYPE in an organism possessing a mutationally altered GENOTYPE. The second "suppressor" mutation may be on a different gene, on the same gene but located at a distance from the site of the primary mutation, or in extrachromosomal genes (EXTRACHROMOSOMAL INHERITANCE).Body Image: Individuals' concept of their own bodies.Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Yeasts: A general term for single-celled rounded fungi that reproduce by budding. Brewers' and bakers' yeasts are SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE; therapeutic dried yeast is YEAST, DRIED.Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases: A group of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues in proteins, with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.Arabidopsis Proteins: Proteins that originate from plants species belonging to the genus ARABIDOPSIS. The most intensely studied species of Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis thaliana, is commonly used in laboratory experiments.Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor: Methods of investigating the effectiveness of anticancer cytotoxic drugs and biologic inhibitors. These include in vitro cell-kill models and cytostatic dye exclusion tests as well as in vivo measurement of tumor growth parameters in laboratory animals.Color Perception: Mental processing of chromatic signals (COLOR VISION) from the eye by the VISUAL CORTEX where they are converted into symbolic representations. Color perception involves numerous neurons, and is influenced not only by the distribution of wavelengths from the viewed object, but also by its background color and brightness contrast at its boundary.Esthetics, Dental: Skills, techniques, standards, and principles used to improve the art and symmetry of the teeth and face to improve the appearance as well as the function of the teeth, mouth, and face. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p108)Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Mitosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division by means of which the two daughter nuclei normally receive identical complements of the number of CHROMOSOMES of the somatic cells of the species.Genome, Human: The complete genetic complement contained in the DNA of a set of CHROMOSOMES in a HUMAN. The length of the human genome is about 3 billion base pairs.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.RNA: A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)HEK293 Cells: A cell line generated from human embryonic kidney cells that were transformed with human adenovirus type 5.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Genome: The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.Chick Embryo: The developmental entity of a fertilized chicken egg (ZYGOTE). The developmental process begins about 24 h before the egg is laid at the BLASTODISC, a small whitish spot on the surface of the EGG YOLK. After 21 days of incubation, the embryo is fully developed before hatching.Genes, Suppressor: Genes that have a suppressor allele or suppressor mutation (SUPPRESSION, GENETIC) which cancels the effect of a previous mutation, enabling the wild-type phenotype to be maintained or partially restored. For example, amber suppressors cancel the effect of an AMBER NONSENSE MUTATION.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.Biological Assay: A method of measuring the effects of a biologically active substance using an intermediate in vivo or in vitro tissue or cell model under controlled conditions. It includes virulence studies in animal fetuses in utero, mouse convulsion bioassay of insulin, quantitation of tumor-initiator systems in mouse skin, calculation of potentiating effects of a hormonal factor in an isolated strip of contracting stomach muscle, etc.Protein Biosynthesis: The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Genes, Recessive: Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE only in the homozygous state.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Kidney: Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.Genes, Dominant: Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE both in the homozygous and the heterozygous state.Muscles: Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.Blotting, Northern: Detection of RNA that has been electrophoretically separated and immobilized by blotting on nitrocellulose or other type of paper or nylon membrane followed by hybridization with labeled NUCLEIC ACID PROBES.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Protein Interaction Mapping: Methods for determining interaction between PROTEINS.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Genomic Library: A form of GENE LIBRARY containing the complete DNA sequences present in the genome of a given organism. It contrasts with a cDNA library which contains only sequences utilized in protein coding (lacking introns).Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Gene Silencing: Interruption or suppression of the expression of a gene at transcriptional or translational levels.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Combinatorial Chemistry Techniques: A technology, in which sets of reactions for solution or solid-phase synthesis, is used to create molecular libraries for analysis of compounds on a large scale.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Immunoblotting: Immunologic method used for detecting or quantifying immunoreactive substances. The substance is identified by first immobilizing it by blotting onto a membrane and then tagging it with labeled antibodies.Genetic Linkage: The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.Mice, Inbred BALB CEsthetics: The branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of the beautiful. It includes beauty, esthetic experience, esthetic judgment, esthetic aspects of medicine, etc.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Peptide Library: A collection of cloned peptides, or chemically synthesized peptides, frequently consisting of all possible combinations of amino acids making up an n-amino acid peptide.Genome, Insect: The genetic complement of an insect (INSECTS) as represented in its DNA.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.
He was signed by Everton in 1901 and made six league appearances over two seasons, in which he scored one goal. In 1903, Clark ... "Charlie Clark". Greens on Screen. Retrieved 28 April 2013. "Everton Player Stats - Charles Clark". Everton F.C. Retrieved 28 ... "Appearances". Crystal Palace F.C. Archived from the original on 25 June 2012. Retrieved 28 April 2013. "Goalscorers". Crystal ... Clark made his final appearance in April 1909, which took his overall tally to 272 in league and cup competition, with nine ...
Argyle have made one appearance at Wembley Stadium, in which they won the 1996 Third Division play-off final. The club has also ... "Onismor Bhasera". Greens on Screen. Retrieved 12 May 2013. "Gongs for Reuben and Curtis". Plymouth Argyle F.C. 26 April 2014. ... The 2012-13 winner was Onismor Bhasera, who made 46 appearances in all competitions during the campaign. Top goalscorer Reuben ... "Plymouth 2001/2002 player appearances". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 6 September 2010. "Paul Wotton profile" Archived ...
"Tony Levy". Greens on Screen. Retrieved 30 July 2013. "A-International Appearances - Overall". The Ultimate New Zealand Soccer ... He made 14 appearances in the Football League for Plymouth Argyle and Torquay United, and won six caps for New Zealand at full ... his final cap an appearance in a 2-2 draw with Israel on 9 April 1989. " ...
Radio appearances[edit]. Year. Program. Episode/source 1946. Screen Guild Players. This Love of Ours[35] ... Screen Guild Players. Wuthering Heights[36] See also[edit]. .mw-parser-output .portal{border:solid #aaa 1px;padding:0}.mw- ... 17] Ingram liked Oberon's exotic appearance and quickly hired her to be an extra in a party scene in a film named The Three ... Auckland Actors Whale Rider producer & novelist reteam for Medicine Woman - Taken from Screen Daily, by Sandy George Archived 8 ...
"Digital Green Screen Projects". QVC Guest Host appearance. qvc.com. Retrieved 15 December 2010. "Picture Perfect Photos". ABC ... Erin Manning's appearance as the host of DIY Network's The Whole Picture series from 2005-2009 introduced her as the digital ... 2009: E! That Morning Show 2009: QVC Digital Green Screen Projects 2007: ABC View From the Bay - Picture Perfect Photos. 2006: ... "Up and Running with Lighting: Studio Lights and Flash with Erin Manning". Erin Manning Photography Expert appearance. lynda.com ...
Appearances Made Greens on Screen. Retrieved 30 January 2010. Goals Scored Greens on Screen. Retrieved 31 January 2010. ... Most League appearances: George Flay, 530. Most FA Cup appearances: Kevin Hodges, 39. Most League Cup appearances: Kevin Hodges ... Achievements Greens on Screen. Retrieved 30 January 2010. Western League Greens on Screen. Retrieved 30 January 2010. Second ... The player to have made the most appearances in the current squad is Romain Larrieu, with 283. Most appearances in all ...
5 appearances in Football League Trophy, 2 appearances and 1 goal in Football League play-offs. Appearances in Anglo-Italian ... "Greens on Screen Database". greensonscreen.co.uk. Retrieved 14 June 2015. Croxford, Lane & Waterman 2013, p. 476-478. ... making another 70 appearances before departing at the end of the 1987-88 season. Godfrey made 343 appearances and scored 72 ... His seven appearances brought about a positive reaction to the side's dip in form and he scored one goal during his spell, a ...
He made 105 appearances for the club in all competitions. Joyce, Michael (2004). Football League Players' Records 1888 to 1939 ... ISBN 978-1-899468-67-6. "Frank Cosgrove". Greens on Screen. Retrieved 30 June 2013. ... Frank Cosgrove, also known as Fred Cosgrove, was an English professional footballer who made 103 appearances in the Football ...
Marina Orlova's appearance on G4 TV on YouTube(13 March 2008) Vonderau, Patrick (2010). "Understanding Orlova: YouTube ... Producers, Hot for Words, and Some Pitfalls of Production Studies". Wide Screen. Retrieved 14 December 2013. Kazakina, Katya ( ...
She gradually reduced her screen appearances. After some time, she resumed her career as a playback singer to sing many ... she made history when she sang for Kamala Kotnis on screen. It was the first instance of playback singing in Telugu cinema. The ...
These traits were orchestrated with his physical appearance to create a screen persona innately powerful in the sexual sense. ... Screen Guild Players. Saturday's Children[17] References[edit]. *^ "John Garfield Dies in N.Y. Home of Actress". Los Angeles ... Screen Snapshots: Out of This World Series (1947). Documentary[edit]. *The John Garfield Story (2003) (available on Warner Home ... Bial, Henry (2005). Acting Jewish: Negotiating Ethnicity on the American Stage & Screen. University of Michigan Press. pp. 39- ...
Her on-screen appearances were rather brief. She was married to actor Yefim Kopelyan from 1941 until his death in 1975. Their ...
The forecourt has a bowed screen wall. The stone mansion has an irregular shape due to various extensions. It consists of two ... The wide eaves and fairfaced stone give the building an Italianate appearance. The pillared and enclosed entrance lobby was ...
"Kim Joo-hyuk's Unforgettable On-Screen Appearances , Viu". Viu. November 13, 2017. Retrieved November 14, 2017. Kim, Young-rok ... The series marks Chun Woo-hee's first small screen lead role. It aired on cable channel tvN every Monday and Tuesday at 22:50 ( ...
His last screen appearance was in 1934. Soon after, he became proprietor of an upmarket bar, Chez Georges Carpentier, in a chic ...
His first screen appearance was in 1915. Hebecame a member of the Hellenic Actor's Guild a few months after its foundation in ...
In February 2004, Brian attends Katie's wedding to Andy Sugden (Kelvin Fletcher). This is Brian's last on-screen appearance. In ... Carly will return on-screen in March, after deciding that Bob has to make up for the time he missed out on when she was a child ... Barbara Hope made her first appearance on 13 June 2001, played by an uncredited actress. Julie Dawn Cole took over the role ... She made her last appearance on 2 June 2017. On 11 September 2017, Atkinson announced that she would be returning to the show ...
"Kim Joo-hyuk's Unforgettable On-Screen Appearances , Viu". Viu. 2017-11-13. Retrieved 2017-11-14. Kang, Hyo-jin (6 March 2013 ...
This is their last on screen appearance. List of supercouples Branco, Nelson. "Gay Kishmet". Out.com. Retrieved July 29, 2009. ... On August 6, 2009, Oliver and Kyle share their first on screen kiss. Cristian catches them in the act and Oliver denies ... noting in a June 2009 interview with AfterElton.com that his appearances had been "building up" since the beginning of 2009. ...
In "Five by Five", guest star Eliza Dushku makes her first appearance on Angel as rogue Slayer Faith, hired by Wolfram & Hart ... I think that came off on screen." Producer Tim Minear says because writer Jim Kouf was used to writing scripts for "big feature ... Christian Kane returns as Lindsey in his first appearance since the pilot episode. "There's a lot of sexual tension between ...
Paietta, Ann Catherine; Kauppila, Jean L. (28 December 1999). Health professionals on screen. Scarecrow Press. p. 306. ISBN 978 ... In 1975 he made an appearance in the "Tonight and Every Night" episode of Z Cars. ...
Later airings were shown in full screen. The story opens with Lazlo missing, and Clam and Raj relating the tale up to this ... Most of the other campers follow Edward's lead and after a scuffle, Lazlo makes his appearance. What follows builds Edward's ...
He made 205 appearances in the Football League for Tranmere Rovers, Plymouth Argyle, Charlton Athletic and Carlisle United. ... "Hugh McAuley". Greens on Screen. Retrieved 12 August 2013. "About Us". Hugh McAuley Football Academy. Archived from the ... McAuley's son, Hugh, made 100 appearances in the Football League for Cheltenham Town. "Hugh McAuley". Post War English & ...
Dirty intensifying screens. *Static electricity causing a black starburst appearance. *Green tint to the film due to ... Speed of intensifying screens (the faster the screen the poorer the detail) ... Cone cut appearance which may occur when the X-ray beam is not positioned perpendicular over the film ... Film packet being back to front also results in a pale image accompanied by an embossed appearance from the lead pattern inside ...
Ruben's last appearance on-screen was in 1985; Rosa continued to mention Ruben, apparently still working on the Capwell grounds ... Stella Stevens (November 27, 1989-December 27, 1990) The mother of Gina DeMott made her first appearance in town at the end of ... Ally Walker (January 7, 1988-October 31, 1988) Andrea made her first appearance in town followed the oil rig explosion-she was ... The character was never fully developed as the show ended not long after Aurora's first appearance. Thaao Penghlis (May 8, 1992 ...
Radio appearances[edit]. Year. Program. Episode/source 1941. Gulf Screen Guild Theatre. No Time for Comedy[18] ... Astor's first screen test was directed by Lillian Gish, who was so impressed with her recitation of Shakespeare that she shot a ... Davis wanted Astor cast in the role after watching her screen test and seeing her play Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1. She ... When talkies arrived, her voice was initially considered too masculine and she was off the screen for a year. After she ...
2020 Center for Facial Appearances. All Rights Reserved. Design and Development by Advice Media , MedNet *Terms of Use ... Automated Hess screen testing was performed in all patients before surgery and 3 months after surgery; all patients received ... Strabismus after deep lateral wall orbital decompression in thyroid-related orbitopathy patients using automated hess screen.. ...
Appearance. Scoliosis signs and symptoms affect the shape of your childs body. If the curve increases too much, the physical ...
Cameron Diaz makes rare on-screen appearance Cameron Diaz says she feels "at peace" after stepping away from the spotlight of ...
Cameron Diaz makes rare on-screen appearance Cameron Diaz says she feels "at peace" after stepping away from the spotlight of ...
Creating the Appearance of Being: The Art of American Screen Acting 1960 to Today, by Dan Callahan. Tony McKibbin ... Screen Theorizing Today: A Celebration of Screens Fiftieth Anniversary edited by Annette Kuhn. Richard Martin ... "a theory of screens" (p.12) - what truly captures Thomsons imagination? There are several recurring themes in The Big Screen: ... David Thomson, The Big Screen: The Story of the Movies and What They Did To Us (London: Penguin, 2012). ...
Creating the Appearance of Being: The Art of American Screen Acting 1960 to Today, by Dan Callahan. Tony McKibbin ... The Two Johns: The Films of John Hughes: A History of Independent Screen Production in Australia, by John Cumming. Jake Wilson ... John Cumming, The Films of John Hughes: A History of Independent Screen Production in Australia, The Moving Image no. 12 (St. ... In Cummings eyes, the formal value of Hughes cinema can be found especially in his "work with screen design", layering ...
Apple to use high-end OLED screens for future iPhones; Harley-Davidsons Kansas City plant to close as result of Trump-led tax ... Sia Looks Stunning as She Makes Rare Public Appearance Without Her Wig. Entertainment Tonight ... Business + Coffee: Starbucks racial-bias training, new Apple iPhone screens, Harley-Davidson jobs. ... Apple to use high-end OLED screens for future iPhones; Harley-Davidsons Kansas City plant to close as result of Trump-led tax ...
iProtect Micro Screen Saver for MacBook Pro announced. April 5, 2006. [MD1] The Gray Council 2.1 - grayscale appearance code. ...
Creating the Appearance of Being: The Art of American Screen Acting 1960 to Today, by Dan Callahan. Tony McKibbin ... Appearances of the Lord of the Forest in Princess Mononoke are accompanied by suspension of sound and whitening of the screen. ... Hidden Images: The Disappearance and Re-appearance of the Leader Lady. Wendy Haslem ... bemoaning her drab appearance. But she uses her magical powers, her powers of flight, to help people in need. Kiki was made in ...
Creating the Appearance of Being: The Art of American Screen Acting 1960 to Today, by Dan Callahan. Tony McKibbin ... With a triumphant (and rare) 1972 appearance at Cannes to accompany the film (screening out of competition), Bergman was ... Shot cheaply on 16mm and first screened in six fifty-minute episodes on Swedish television, despite its plain appearance Scenes ... Yet somehow Max von Sydows brief appearance in Winter Light seems the epicenter of it all, as a man worried about the Chinese ...
Sketches of screen appearance. *Paper pieces show windows, menus, dialog boxes. *Interaction is natural *Pointing with a finger ... Each screen has one or more **hotspots** that you can click on to jump to another screen. Sometimes the transitions between ... Look** is the appearance of the prototype. A hand-sketched prototype is low-fidelity in look, compared to a prototype that uses ... Users looked at a screen and dictated into a microphone, which was connected to a typist (the wizard) in another room. Using a ...
... or built-in filters to change your appearance; add stickers, labels, shapes; and more. ... Use a filter to change your appearance. *. During a FaceTime video call, tap . (If you dont see , tap the screen.) ... During a call, tap the screen, tap , then do any of the following:. *. Tap to add a Memoji sticker or to add an Emoji sticker. ... you can use built-in filters to change your appearance and add stickers, labels, and shapes. You can also take screenshots in ...
Earlier breast cancer screening could slash death rates by 25 per cent, study reveals ... Kamala Harris hammers Donald Trumps record on coronavirus in first appearance with Joe Biden ...
Earlier breast cancer screening could slash death rates by 25 per cent, study reveals ... Kamala Harris hammers Donald Trumps record on coronavirus in first appearance with Joe Biden ...
... the meteorological and oceanographic conditions of the North-East Atlantic Ocean during the months previous to the appearance ... Risk screening of the potential invasiveness of non-native jellyfishes in the Mediterranean Sea *Nurçin Killi ... Portuguese Man-of-War (Physalia physalis) in the Mediterranean: A permanent invasion or a casual appearance?. *L. Prieto1. , ... A permanent invasion or a casual appearance? Sci. Rep. 5, 11545; doi: 10.1038/srep11545 (2015). ...
Optical display screen device. US20070066708 *. Sep 15, 2004. Mar 22, 2007. Thorsten Goldacker. Molding material containing a ... The frosted appearance can be determined by an opacity measurement. The higher the opacity number, the better the hiding power ... The appearance is evaluated visually. The total light transmission is a measurement of lighting efficiency. The Melt Flow Rate ... Polymeric articles having a textured surface and frosted appearance. US7683131 *. Sep 15, 2004. Mar 23, 2010. R hm GmbH & Co. ...
Add to home screen. ... diagnosis has already thrown her scheduled campaign appearances ... Hillary Clinton diagnosed with pneumonia, cancels California campaign trip, Ellen appearance 11 Sep, 2016 22:33 ...
Specifics: - characters @ 300-500 polys each - possibility ~30+ on screen - cartoonish/simple texturing and visual appearance ... However, if by getting rid of it I can add 5 more , characters on screen, use a really great physics system for When I measured ... However, if by getting rid of it I can add 5 more characters on screen, use a really great physics system for the characters, ... hmm...maybe I should post a couple screens to demonstrate what Im talking about seeing as how Im having difficulty finding ...
These traits were orchestrated with his physical appearance to create a screen persona innately powerful in the sexual sense. ... Screen Guild Players. Saturdays Children[17] References[edit]. *^ "John Garfield Dies in N.Y. Home of Actress". Los Angeles ... Screen Snapshots: Out of This World Series (1947). Documentary[edit]. *The John Garfield Story (2003) (available on Warner Home ... Bial, Henry (2005). Acting Jewish: Negotiating Ethnicity on the American Stage & Screen. University of Michigan Press. pp. 39- ...
High-Throughput Screen for the Chemical Inhibitors. Structural Implications for Selective Targeting. Menu. Skip to content * ... Apoptosis induction by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) appearance vectors could be. November 3, 2017. Ca2+ SignalingMmp10, SGI-1776 ... Apoptosis induction by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) appearance vectors could be a competent and promising technique for cancers ... B) Traditional western blot of survivin appearance in HeLa … SGI-1776 RNAi-targeting survivin inhibited apoptosis induction To ...
The screen uses a built-in Tobii eye-tracking sensor so it knows where the circle should be; I got to test it out briefly and ... Annabelle Wallis: Tom Cruise doesnt let co-stars run next to him on screen. Yahoo Movies UK ... Kids with lazy eye can be treated just by letting them watch TV on this special screen. ...
John Wick director bringing Ed Brubakers Kill or Be Killed to the screen ... Wentworth Miller confirms return to Flash, open to more Arrowverse appearances * Stuff We Love: Funkos adorable Pocket Pop! ... John Wick director bringing Ed Brubakers Kill or Be Killed to the screen ... John Wick director bringing Ed Brubakers Kill or Be Killed to the screen ...
Some of Ellens favorite funny ladies who made an appearance this season, including Kristen Bell. ... Valerie Harper Back on Screen Despite Cancer Struggle. Its Harpers first time back at work after a series of health setbacks ... The film, which relied on crowdfunding and support from the group UsAgainstAlzheimers, was screened this month for Oscar ...
Radio appearances[edit]. Year. Program. Episode/source 1946. Screen Guild Players. This Love of Ours[35] ... Screen Guild Players. Wuthering Heights[36] See also[edit]. .mw-parser-output .portal{border:solid #aaa 1px;padding:0}.mw- ... 17] Ingram liked Oberons exotic appearance and quickly hired her to be an extra in a party scene in a film named The Three ... Auckland Actors Whale Rider producer & novelist reteam for Medicine Woman - Taken from Screen Daily, by Sandy George Archived 8 ...
  • Apoptosis induction by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) appearance vectors could be a competent and promising technique for cancers gene therapy. (acancerjourney.info)
  • However the UTMD technique for the delivery of shRNA had not yet been optimized and such methods of apoptosis induction and the efficiency of using UTMD technique and shRNA appearance vectors was not studied. (acancerjourney.info)
  • An alternative approach, widely used in mammalian cells, is pooled screening that uses limited titers of integrating lentiviral vectors carrying a perturbative DNA sequence such that each cell receives one integrating virus. (elifesciences.org)
  • DR SHARON Giese is a household name in America, starring on hit medical shows Dr Oz and The Doctors and making regular appearances on CBS News, CNN and NBC. (news.com.au)
  • A television news screen layout or television news screen interface refers to the layout image displayed during a television news program broadcast. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main purpose of television news screen layouts are to present to viewers a concentrated level of information within the shortest amount of time possible, whilst maintaining a reasonably adequate balance so that excessive detail does not confuse the viewer. (wikipedia.org)
  • The CCTV international (CCTV-4) and finance (CCTV-2) channels adapted relatively different news screen interfaces, with CCTV-2 having a much more complex layout containing a double news ticker similar to that of CNBC for news and stock market information. (wikipedia.org)
  • News channels covering finance and economics display financial data during the opening hours of the Taiwan Stock Exchange, where the main screen layout will shrink to one quarter of the screen, leaving the remainder for live financial information such as market and stock price indeces of each listed share in succession. (wikipedia.org)
  • News ticker Digital on-screen graphic On-screen display Lower third Rodrigues, R., (2012). (wikipedia.org)
  • In a news release published on Friday, Bas-Saint-Laurent health and social services (CISSS) announced that all employees of Asta Foods will undergo a screening test because of positive cases already declared. (ctvnews.ca)
  • Genome-wide screens in Drosophila cells have offered numerous insights into gene function, yet a major limitation has been the inability to stably deliver large multiplexed DNA libraries to cultured cells allowing barcoded pooled screens. (elifesciences.org)
  • To further characterize PR photosystem structure and function, we directly screened large-insert DNA libraries derived from marine picoplankton for visibly detectable PR-expressing phenotypes. (pnas.org)
  • This chapter describes screening and assessment procedures and important considerations that might be made during and shortly after admission to an OTP, as well as assessment techniques and considerations that are important to ongoing MAT. (nih.gov)
  • The Transportation Security Administration concedes that a 4-year-old boy heading to Walt Disney World for a birthday celebration should not have been forced to remove his leg braces during an airport-security screening in Philadelphia, a Philly columnist writes. (city-data.com)
  • MORGAN COUNTY, Ala (WHNT) - The suspects charged with the murder of seven people in Valhermosa Springs in north Alabama earlier this month made their initial appearance in court Monday. (cbs42.com)
  • To present an advanced ultrasound (US) technique and propose its use as a screening diagnostic tool for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement. (hindawi.com)
  • Because of the increased cost of NAATs, certain laboratories are modifying manufacturers' procedures to improve test sensitivity without incurring the full cost associated with screening with a NAAT. (cdc.gov)
  • Wayne State University researchers have developed a test that may be able to screen for birth defects as early as five weeks into pregnancy. (medicaldaily.com)
  • and an active stylus separated from the touch screen panel and configured to output an active stylus electric field in synchronization with a driving signal of the driving signals applied to a driving line coupled to a sensing cell of the sensing cells adjacent to the active stylus when the active stylus approaches or contacts the touch screen panel. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Developmental surveillance and screening during preventive health care visits also provide the ideal opportunity for the pediatrician to offer anticipatory guidance to the family about supporting their child's development. (aappublications.org)
  • Suggested citation for this article: Wallace AS, Luther B, Guo JW, We leveraged an academic-community partnership to develop a Wang CY, Sisler S, Wong B. Implementing a Social Determinants social needs screening tool and referral process. (cdc.gov)
  • The screening process begins when an applicant or family member first contacts an OTP, often via telephone or a visit to the OTP. (nih.gov)
  • The American Heart Association teamed up with the American College of Cardiology and released a new heart health screening process for young 12- to 25-year-olds and to clarify any misconceptions about sudden heart-related deaths. (medicaldaily.com)
  • 2. Successfully complete pre-employment process and screening. (simplyhired.com)
  • The ability of this coating to repel oil will diminish over time with normal usage, and rubbing the screen with an abrasive material will further diminish its effect and may scratch your screen. (city-data.com)
  • In a bid to find out how well series 3 complied with advertising and broadcasting regulatory constraints, the researchers, along with collaborators at the University of Bath, assessed changes in tobacco content for every other one of the 42 episodes, and estimated viewer exposure to the smoking imagery on screen. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • The data are ERA-Interim daily analysis products ( http://www.ecmwf.int/en/research/climate-reanalysis/era-interim ) downloaded on 12 June, 2013. (nature.com)
  • Public health authorities in Bas-Saint-Laurent are carrying out a major COVID-19 screening operation at a pork slaughtering and primary processing plant in Saint-Alexandre-de-Kamouraska, about two hours east of Quebec City. (ctvnews.ca)
  • Television channels of differing geographical regions and channel topics vary in their general appearance. (wikipedia.org)
  • The evidence clearly shows that a link between young people's exposure to on screen tobacco imagery and starting to smoke, emphasise the researchers. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • 6 The WOMAC was developed and validated as a self report questionnaire, can be used on a computer screen, and is recommended as a primary outcome for osteoarthritis trials. (bmj.com)