Removal of the whole or part of the vitreous body in treating endophthalmitis, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, intraocular foreign bodies, and some types of glaucoma.
An operation for retinal detachment which reduces the size of the globe by indenting the sclera so that it approximates the retina.
The white, opaque, fibrous, outer tunic of the eyeball, covering it entirely excepting the segment covered anteriorly by the cornea. It is essentially avascular but contains apertures for vessels, lymphatics, and nerves. It receives the tendons of insertion of the extraocular muscles and at the corneoscleral junction contains the canal of Schlemm. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
Hemorrhage into the VITREOUS BODY.
Separation of the inner layers of the retina (neural retina) from the pigment epithelium. Retinal detachment occurs more commonly in men than in women, in eyes with degenerative myopia, in aging and in aphakia. It may occur after an uncomplicated cataract extraction, but it is seen more often if vitreous humor has been lost during surgery. (Dorland, 27th ed; Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p310-12).
The transparent, semigelatinous substance that fills the cavity behind the CRYSTALLINE LENS of the EYE and in front of the RETINA. It is contained in a thin hyaloid membrane and forms about four fifths of the optic globe.
Perforations through the whole thickness of the retina including the macula as the result of inflammation, trauma, degeneration, etc. The concept includes retinal breaks, tears, dialyses, and holes.
Organic siloxanes which are polymerized to the oily stage. The oils have low surface tension and density less than 1. They are used in industrial applications and in the treatment of retinal detachment, complicated by proliferative vitreoretinopathy.
A membrane on the vitreal surface of the retina resulting from the proliferation of one or more of three retinal elements: (1) fibrous astrocytes; (2) fibrocytes; and (3) retinal pigment epithelial cells. Localized epiretinal membranes may occur at the posterior pole of the eye without clinical signs or may cause marked loss of vision as a result of covering, distorting, or detaching the fovea centralis. Epiretinal membranes may cause vascular leakage and secondary retinal edema. In younger individuals some membranes appear to be developmental in origin and occur in otherwise normal eyes. The majority occur in association with retinal holes, ocular concussions, retinal inflammation, or after ocular surgery. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p291)
Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.
Suppurative inflammation of the tissues of the internal structures of the eye frequently associated with an infection.
A method of stopping internal bleeding or blood flow, or the closure of a wound or body cavity, achieved by applying pressure or introducing an absorbent liquid, gel, or tampon.
Insertion of an artificial lens to replace the natural CRYSTALLINE LENS after CATARACT EXTRACTION or to supplement the natural lens which is left in place.
Diseases affecting the eye.
Vitreoretinal membrane shrinkage or contraction secondary to the proliferation of primarily retinal pigment epithelial cells and glial cells, particularly fibrous astrocytes, followed by membrane formation. The formation of fibrillar collagen and cellular proliferation appear to be the basis for the contractile properties of the epiretinal and vitreous membranes.
A procedure for removal of the crystalline lens in cataract surgery in which an anterior capsulectomy is performed by means of a needle inserted through a small incision at the temporal limbus, allowing the lens contents to fall through the dilated pupil into the anterior chamber where they are broken up by the use of ultrasound and aspirated out of the eye through the incision. (Cline, et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed & In Focus 1993;1(1):1)
Surgical formation of an external opening in the sclera, primarily in the treatment of glaucoma.
Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the eye.
Detachment of the corpus vitreum (VITREOUS BODY) from its normal attachments, especially the retina, due to shrinkage from degenerative or inflammatory conditions, trauma, myopia, or senility.
Deeply perforating or puncturing type intraocular injuries.
Disease of the RETINA as a complication of DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by the progressive microvascular complications, such as ANEURYSM, interretinal EDEMA, and intraocular PATHOLOGIC NEOVASCULARIZATION.
The removal of a cataractous CRYSTALLINE LENS from the eye.
The performance of surgical procedures with the aid of a microscope.
Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).
An oval area in the retina, 3 to 5 mm in diameter, usually located temporal to the posterior pole of the eye and slightly below the level of the optic disk. It is characterized by the presence of a yellow pigment diffusely permeating the inner layers, contains the fovea centralis in its center, and provides the best phototropic visual acuity. It is devoid of retinal blood vessels, except in its periphery, and receives nourishment from the choriocapillaris of the choroid. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
The back two-thirds of the eye that includes the anterior hyaloid membrane and all of the optical structures behind it: the VITREOUS HUMOR; RETINA; CHOROID; and OPTIC NERVE.
Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.
The pressure of the fluids in the eye.
Fluid accumulation in the outer layer of the MACULA LUTEA that results from intraocular or systemic insults. It may develop in a diffuse pattern where the macula appears thickened or it may acquire the characteristic petaloid appearance referred to as cystoid macular edema. Although macular edema may be associated with various underlying conditions, it is most commonly seen following intraocular surgery, venous occlusive disease, DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, and posterior segment inflammatory disease. (From Survey of Ophthalmology 2004; 49(5) 470-90)
Bleeding from the vessels of the retina.
A form of secondary glaucoma which develops as a consequence of another ocular disease and is attributed to the forming of new vessels in the angle of the anterior chamber.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
The use of green light-producing LASERS to stop bleeding. The green light is selectively absorbed by HEMOGLOBIN, thus triggering BLOOD COAGULATION.
The front third of the eyeball that includes the structures between the front surface of the cornea and the front of the VITREOUS BODY.
Refers to any inflammation of the sclera including episcleritis, a benign condition affecting only the episclera, which is generally short-lived and easily treated. Classic scleritis, on the other hand, affects deeper tissue and is characterized by higher rates of visual acuity loss and even mortality, particularly in necrotizing form. Its characteristic symptom is severe and general head pain. Scleritis has also been associated with systemic collagen disease. Etiology is unknown but is thought to involve a local immune response. Treatment is difficult and includes administration of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents such as corticosteroids. Inflammation of the sclera may also be secondary to inflammation of adjacent tissues, such as the conjunctiva.
The administration of substances into the VITREOUS BODY of the eye with a hypodermic syringe.
Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.
Presence of an intraocular lens after cataract extraction.
A refractive error in which rays of light entering the EYE parallel to the optic axis are brought to a focus in front of the RETINA when accommodation (ACCOMMODATION, OCULAR) is relaxed. This results from an overly curved CORNEA or from the eyeball being too long from front to back. It is also called nearsightedness.
Artificial implanted lenses.
The coagulation of tissue by an intense beam of light, including laser (LASER COAGULATION). In the eye it is used in the treatment of retinal detachments, retinal holes, aneurysms, hemorrhages, and malignant and benign neoplasms. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)
Devices, usually incorporating unidirectional valves, which are surgically inserted in the sclera to maintain normal intraocular pressure.
The space in the eye, filled with aqueous humor, bounded anteriorly by the cornea and a small portion of the sclera and posteriorly by a small portion of the ciliary body, the iris, and that part of the crystalline lens which presents through the pupil. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p109)
Partial or complete opacity on or in the lens or capsule of one or both eyes, impairing vision or causing blindness. The many kinds of cataract are classified by their morphology (size, shape, location) or etiology (cause and time of occurrence). (Dorland, 27th ed)
Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.
Specialized ophthalmic technique used in the surgical repair and or treatment of disorders that include retinal tears or detachment; MACULAR HOLES; hereditary retinal disease; AIDS-related retinal infections; ocular tumors; MACULAR DEGENERATION; DIABETIC RETINOPATHY; and UVEITIS.
Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
An imaging method using LASERS that is used for mapping subsurface structure. When a reflective site in the sample is at the same optical path length (coherence) as the reference mirror, the detector observes interference fringes.
An ocular disease, occurring in many forms, having as its primary characteristics an unstable or a sustained increase in the intraocular pressure which the eye cannot withstand without damage to its structure or impairment of its function. The consequences of the increased pressure may be manifested in a variety of symptoms, depending upon type and severity, such as excavation of the optic disk, hardness of the eyeball, corneal anesthesia, reduced visual acuity, seeing of colored halos around lights, disturbed dark adaptation, visual field defects, and headaches. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.
A scientific tool based on ULTRASONOGRAPHY and used not only for the observation of microstructure in metalwork but also in living tissue. In biomedical application, the acoustic propagation speed in normal and abnormal tissues can be quantified to distinguish their tissue elasticity and other properties.
A genus of tree shrews of the family TUPAIIDAE which consists of about 12 species. One of the most frequently encountered species is T. glis. Members of this genus inhabit rain forests and secondary growth areas in southeast Asia.
Visualization of a vascular system after intravenous injection of a fluorescein solution. The images may be photographed or televised. It is used especially in studying the retinal and uveal vasculature.
Absence of crystalline lens totally or partially from field of vision, from any cause except after cataract extraction. Aphakia is mainly congenital or as result of LENS DISLOCATION AND SUBLUXATION.
Liquid perfluorinated carbon compounds which may or may not contain a hetero atom such as nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur, but do not contain another halogen or hydrogen atom. This concept includes fluorocarbon emulsions and fluorocarbon blood substitutes.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
The surgical removal of the eyeball leaving the eye muscles and remaining orbital contents intact.
The period following a surgical operation.
Infections in the inner or external eye caused by microorganisms belonging to several families of bacteria. Some of the more common genera found are Haemophilus, Neisseria, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Chlamydia.
The only family of the order SCANDENTIA, variously included in the order Insectivora or in the order Primates, and often in the order Microscelidea, consisting of five genera. They are TUPAIA, Ananthana (Indian tree shrew), Dendrogale (small smooth-tailed tree shrew), Urogale (Mindanao tree shrew), and Ptilocercus (pen-tailed tree shrew). The tree shrews inhabit the forest areas of eastern Asia from India and southwestern China to Borneo and the Philippines.
Blockage of the RETINAL VEIN. Those at high risk for this condition include patients with HYPERTENSION; DIABETES MELLITUS; ATHEROSCLEROSIS; and other CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.
The concave interior of the eye, consisting of the retina, the choroid, the sclera, the optic disk, and blood vessels, seen by means of the ophthalmoscope. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
The mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the eyelids and the anterior pericorneal surface of the eyeball.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The administration of substances into the eye with a hypodermic syringe.
The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.
An esterified form of TRIAMCINOLONE. It is an anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid used topically in the treatment of various skin disorders. Intralesional, intramuscular, and intra-articular injections are also administered under certain conditions.
Absence of the crystalline lens resulting from cataract extraction.
The thin, highly vascular membrane covering most of the posterior of the eye between the RETINA and SCLERA.
Intraocular hemorrhage from the vessels of various tissues of the eye.
Inflammation of part or all of the uvea, the middle (vascular) tunic of the eye, and commonly involving the other tunics (sclera and cornea, and the retina). (Dorland, 27th ed)
A bilateral retinopathy occurring in premature infants treated with excessively high concentrations of oxygen, characterized by vascular dilatation, proliferation, and tortuosity, edema, and retinal detachment, with ultimate conversion of the retina into a fibrous mass that can be seen as a dense retrolental membrane. Usually growth of the eye is arrested and may result in microophthalmia, and blindness may occur. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Tumors or cancer of the EYE.
Mild to fulminant necrotizing vaso-occlusive retinitis associated with a high incidence of retinal detachment and poor vision outcome.
A tricarbocyanine dye that is used diagnostically in liver function tests and to determine blood volume and cardiac output.
The making of a continuous circular tear in the anterior capsule during cataract surgery in order to allow expression or phacoemulsification of the nucleus of the lens. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Hemorrhage from the vessels of the choroid.
Plastic surgery of the SCLERA. This procedure is used frequently to prevent blindness and poor vision in patients, especially children, with MYOPIA.
A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). It is slightly overlapped at its margin by the ciliary processes. Adaptation by the CILIARY BODY is crucial for OCULAR ACCOMMODATION.
Visual impairments limiting one or more of the basic functions of the eye: visual acuity, dark adaptation, color vision, or peripheral vision. These may result from EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; VISUAL PATHWAY diseases; OCCIPITAL LOBE diseases; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS; and other conditions (From Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p132).
Formation of new blood vessels originating from the retinal veins and extending along the inner (vitreal) surface of the retina.
Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
The clear, watery fluid which fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. It has a refractive index lower than the crystalline lens, which it surrounds, and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea and the crystalline lens. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p319)
A local anesthetic of the ester type that has a rapid onset of action and a longer duration of action than procaine hydrochloride. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1017)
Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.
Infection by a variety of fungi, usually through four possible mechanisms: superficial infection producing conjunctivitis, keratitis, or lacrimal obstruction; extension of infection from neighboring structures - skin, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx; direct introduction during surgery or accidental penetrating trauma; or via the blood or lymphatic routes in patients with underlying mycoses.
Mild to severe infections of the eye and its adjacent structures (adnexa) by adult or larval protozoan or metazoan parasites.
The absence or restriction of the usual external sensory stimuli to which the individual responds.
The use of freezing as a special surgical technique to destroy or excise tissue.
The thin noncellular outer covering of the CRYSTALLINE LENS composed mainly of COLLAGEN TYPE IV and GLYCOSAMINOGLYCANS. It is secreted by the embryonic anterior and posterior epithelium. The embryonic posterior epithelium later disappears.
The most anterior portion of the uveal layer, separating the anterior chamber from the posterior. It consists of two layers - the stroma and the pigmented epithelium. Color of the iris depends on the amount of melanin in the stroma on reflection from the pigmented epithelium.
Inflammation of the retinal vasculature with various causes including infectious disease; LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS, SYSTEMIC; MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS; BEHCET SYNDROME; and CHORIORETINITIS.
Surgically correct retinal detachment by scleral buckle or pars plana vitrectomy. Prior to surgery, oral or topical anti ...
Retinal detachment is repaired with a scleral buckle or with vitrectomy. Removal or enucleation of the eye is a last resort ...
When a Cochrane review compared pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with scleral buckle surgery, it was found that although there may ... Pneumatic retinopexy has significantly lower success rates compared to scleral buckle surgery and vitrectomy. Some initially ... Radial scleral buckle is indicated for U-shaped tears or Fishmouth tears, and posterior breaks. Circumferential scleral buckle ... compared to scleral buckle. Vitrectomy is an increasingly used treatment for retinal detachment. It involves the removal of the ...
Where the disease has progressed further, techniques such as scleral buckling and vitrectomy surgery may assist in re-attaching ...
There are several modern treatment methods for fixing a retinal detachment: pneumatic retinopexy, scleral buckle, cryotherapy, ... laser photocoagulation and pars plana vitrectomy. Both hypertension and diabetes mellitus can cause damage to the tiny blood ...
Scleral buckling and/or vitrectomy surgery may be considered for severe ROP (stages 4 and 5) for eyes that progress to retinal ... Retinal examination with scleral depression is generally recommended for patients born before 30-32 weeks gestation, or 4-6 ... The peripheral portions of the retina are sometimes pushed into view using scleral depression. Examination of the retina of a ...
Done Pars plana vitrectomy versus scleral buckling for repairing simple rhegmatogenous retinal detachments PMID 30848830 https ... Vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling versus vitrectomy with no peeling for idiopathic full-thickness ... Done Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor for prevention of postoperative vitreous cavity haemorrhage after vitrectomy for ... Done Vitrectomy for idiopathic macular hole PMID 25965055 https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD009080.pub2 ...
The diagnosing the disease is based on ophthalmoscopy with scleral depression and contact lens examination. The fellow eye ... treatment with temporal peripapillary laser photocoagulation followed by vitrectomy and gas injection followed by face-down ...
... scleral buckling MeSH E04.540.892 - scleroplasty MeSH E04.540.960 - vitrectomy MeSH E04.545.100 - apicoectomy MeSH E04.545.350 ...
Steps to reattach the retina may include vitrectomy to clear the inner jelly, scleral buckling to create a support for the ... Vitrectomy is a surgery to remove some or all of the vitreous humor from the eye. Anterior vitrectomy entails removing small ... Several technologies and systems exist to treat vitrectomy. Additional surgical steps involved as part of modern vitrectomy ... Pars plana vitrectomy is a general term for a group of operations accomplished in the deeper part of the eye, all of which ...
... pars plana vitrectomy with scleral buckle versus pars plana victrectomy without scleral buckle. Scleral buckles are done using ... "Pars plana vitrectomy combined with scleral buckle versus pars plana vitrectomy for giant retinal tear". Cochrane Database Syst ... The scleral buckle is secured around the eyeball under the conjunctiva. This moves the wall of the eye closer to the detached ... Scleral buckles come in many shapes and sizes. A silicone sponge (with air filled cells) is a cylindrical element that comes in ...
Pars plana vitrectomy or trans pars plana vitrectomy is a procedure to remove vitreous opacities and membranes through a pars ... A scleral buckle is used in the repair of a retinal detachment to indent or "buckle" the sclera inward, usually by sewing a ... Vitrectomy Anterior vitrectomy is the removal of the front portion of vitreous tissue. It is used for preventing or treating ... An evisceration is the removal of the eye's contents, leaving the scleral shell intact. Usually performed to reduce pain in a ...
Pars plana vitrectomy may be advised in complications like vitreous hemorrhage and retinal detachment. John F, Salmon (13 ... Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) Eales disease Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy Chronic myelogenous leukemia Scleral buckle ...
Anterior vitrectomy is performed to remove the vitreous in the pupil and anterior part of eye. Then the IOL which is already ... Scleral flaps and conjunctiva are then closed with fibrin glue. In IOL scaffold the IOL is placed above the iris (diaphragm of ... Here two partial thickness scleral flaps measuring 2.5 to 2.5 mm are made 180 degrees diagonally apart. Infusion is placed by ... The haptics of the IOL are brought out under the flaps as in the glued IOL method and tucked into the scleral tunnel made with ...
Where the disease has progressed further, techniques such as scleral buckling and vitrectomy surgery may assist in re-attaching ... The silicone band (scleral buckle, blue) is placed around the eye. This brings the wall of the eye into contact with the ...
... for phakic patients requiring a vitrectomy it is becoming increasingly common for ophthalmologists to offer the vitrectomy ... In MSICS, the lens is removed through a self-sealing scleral tunnel wound in the sclera which, ideally, is watertight and does ... Almony, Arghavan; Holekamp, Nancy M; Bai, Fang; Shui, Ying-Bo; Beebe, David (2012). "Small-gauge vitrectomy does not protect ... Nearly every person who undergoes a vitrectomy-without ever having had cataract surgery-will experience progression of nuclear ...
An appropriately constructed scleral tunnel is watertight and does not require suturing. The "small" in the title refers to the ... Some experts recommend early intervention when this condition occurs (posterior pars plana vitrectomy). Neovascular glaucoma ... Exposure of the eyeball using an eyelid speculum; Entry into the eye through a minimal incision (corneal or scleral); ... Surgical management may involve anterior vitrectomy and, occasionally, alternative planning for implanting the intraocular lens ...
Vitrectomy - is a surgery to remove some or all of the vitreous humor from the eye. Anterior vitrectomy entails removing small ... Kleinmann, G; Kim, H. J.; Yee, R. W. (2006). "Scleral expansion procedure for the correction of presbyopia". International ... Pars plana vitrectomy is a general term for a group of operations accomplished in the deeper part of the eye, all of which ...
... Jeroni ... The patients underwent 23-gauge vitrectomy via the sulcus to rescue dislocated IOLs and fix them to the scleral wall with a ...
Tailored vitrectomy and laser photocoagulation without scleral buckling for all primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachments ... Tailored vitrectomy and laser photocoagulation without scleral buckling for all primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachments ... To investigate the anatomical and functional results and the complications in eyes operated on using vitrectomy without scleral ... Conclusions: The tailored vitrectomy protocol is well suited to all types of RRD. Increased lens opacification in phakic eyes ...
Vitrectomy and gas for inferior break retinal detachments: are the results comparable to vitrectomy, gas, and scleral buckle? ... Vitrectomy and gas for inferior break retinal detachments: are the results comparable to vitrectomy, gas, and scleral buckle? ... Conclusion: Vitrectomy and gas without the application of a scleral buckle may be used to safely treat inferior break retinal ... In conclusion, this study suggests that there is a place for vitrectomy and gas without the use of a scleral buckle in the ...
The outcomes of scleral buckling versus re-vitrectomy for the treatment of recurrent inferior retinal detachment in silicone ... In this retrospective study we evaluated the anatomic outcomes of scleral buckling (SB) versus re-vitrectomy for the treatment ... after primary vitrectomy, re-vitrectomy may be recommended, especially for the eyes with severe anterior proliferative ... In the re-vitrectomy group, the retinal reattachment rate was similar in the early period and the late period (70.8% versus ...
Surgical outcomes of combined pars plana vitrectomy and scleral buckling in eyes with advanced Coats disease and Coats-like ... Surgical outcomes of combined pars plana vitrectomy and scleral buckling in eyes with advanced Coats disease and Coats-like ... Austen N Knapp, Prethy Rao, Bozho Todorich, Antonio Capone; Surgical outcomes of combined pars plana vitrectomy and scleral ... Both FSHD eyes required a second vitrectomy with SO placement for recurrent retinal detachments. There were no recurrent total ...
Liang, YB, Fong, YYY, Cheng, LL & Young, AL 2017, High speed small gauge anterior vitrectomy cutter for scleral fixated ... High speed small gauge anterior vitrectomy cutter for scleral fixated intraocular lens implantation. / Liang, Yuan Bo; Fong, ... N2 - AIM: To report the outcomes of anterior vitrectomy using high speed cutter for scleral fixated intraocular lens (SFIOL) ... AB - AIM: To report the outcomes of anterior vitrectomy using high speed cutter for scleral fixated intraocular lens (SFIOL) ...
Scleral Buckle. A flexible silicone band is sewn around the eye in the operating room to secure the retina in place. May be ... Vitrectomy. Surgically removes the vitreous gel -- the clear, jelly-like substance that fills the center of your eye behind the ...
Houston Location - 7789 Southwest Fwy. Suite 530, Houston, TX 77074 Phone: 281-495-2222 Fax: 281-495-2146 Email: [email protected] ...
Vitrectomy, scleral buckle and pneumatic retinopexy are offered by Mr. Adam Ross in Bristol, Bath and Weston-super-Mare, UK. ... Scleral buckle: a silicone band is stitched onto the white of the eye so that it pushes against the tear till it heals. ... Vitrectomy: This procedure is used for large retinal tears. Your doctor replaces your vitreous (a gel-like substance between ...
From Scleral Buckling to Small Gauge Vitrectomy. * Editors * (view affiliations) *Ulrich Spandau ... Small gauge vitrectomy offers new possibilities to tackle this difficult pathology however this surgical approach may differ ...
Scleral buckle was less expensive than pars plana vitrectomy by 10.7% in phakic patients. 2. Pars plana vitrectomy was ... Scleral buckle is more cost effective than vitrectomy for phakic patients. July 26, 2013 , Andrew Bishara, MD ... 2. Pars plana vitrectomy was more cost effective than scleral buckle by 12.1% for pseudophakic or aphakic patients. ... 1. Scleral buckle was less expensive than pars plana vitrectomy by 10.7% in phakic patients. ...
To compare the safety and efficacy of topical anesthesia versus retrobulbar anesthesia in 27-gauge pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) ... A. opened the lid using eye speculum; B. trocar inserted the sclera; C. vitrectomy; D. scleral indentation; E. cannula removal ... scleral indentation (2/9, 22.2%), vitrectomy procedure (1/9, 11.1%), and trocar removal (1/9, 11.1%). Only one patient (6.7%) ... while a small proportion of patients reported that during scleral indentation (2/12, 16.7%), and vitrectomy procedure (1/12, ...
Scleral buckle. Your doctor sews a silicone band (buckle) around the white of your eye (called the sclera). This pushes it ... Vitrectomy. This surgery repairs large tears or detachment. Your doctor removes the vitreous gel and replaces it with a gas ... A vitrectomy also might require you to hold your head in one position for some time. ...
Scleral buckling; Vitrectomy; Pneumatic retinopexy; Laser retinopexy; Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair. Images. ... The scleral buckle method indents the wall of the eye inward so that it meets the hole in the retina. Scleral buckling can be ... Most vitrectomies are done with numbing medicine while you are awake.. In complex cases, both procedures may be done at the ... The vitrectomy procedure uses very small devices inside the eye to release tension on the retina. This allows the retina to ...
Machemer created the vitreous infusion suction cutter (VISC), which was the first closed-system vitrectomy device with infusion ... Modern pars plana vitrectomy was developed by Robert Machemer in 1970. ... Pars plana vitrectomy versus combined pars plana vitrectomy and scleral buckle for primary repair of rhegmatogenous retinal ... encoded search term (Pars Plana Vitrectomy) and Pars Plana Vitrectomy What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and ...
Scleral Buckling. *Vitrectomy. *Vitrectomy (incl. Macular Hole Repair). *Vitreoretinal Surgery. Background Check. 0. ...
Vitrectomy. Scleral buckle surgery.. Gas bubble. Silicon oil.. Done by: Lulu Saedan, Maryam Radwan, Banan Al-Batati, Nora ...
Scleral Buckling. *Vitrectomy. *Vitrectomy (incl. Macular Hole Repair). *Vitreoretinal Surgery. Background Check. Malpractice ...
Scleral Fixation of Posterior Chamber Intraocular Lenses Using Gore-Tex Suture With Concurrent 23-Gauge Pars Plana Vitrectomy ... Scleral Fixation of Posterior Chamber Intraocular Lenses Using Gore-Tex Suture With Concurrent 23-Gauge Pars Plana Vitrectomy ... Interface vitrectomy is used after a full vitreous cavity air fill for enhanced visualization of the vitreous base. The ... Interface vitrectomy is used after a full vitreous cavity air fill for enhanced visualization of the vitreous base. The ...
Treatments and Tools for vitrectomy. Find vitrectomy information, treatments for vitrectomy and vitrectomy symptoms. ... vitrectomy - MedHelps vitrectomy Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, ... After Scleral buckle vitrectomy surgury. - Eye Care Community - Dec 04, 2013 Hi i have been seeing same black curtain as it was ... I had vitrectomy for ERM and macular hole on left eye in May 2014 and vitrectomy for ERM o... ...
Today, with the advent of scleral buckling and small-gauge pars plana vitrectomy, in addition to laser and cryotherapy ...
Scleral buckle. *Vision exams. *Vitrectomy. Ophthalmologist Associations:. The American Academy of Ophthalmology and the ...
Scleral buckle. *Vision exams. *Vitrectomy. Ophthalmologist Associations:. The American Academy of Ophthalmology and the ...
Scleral buckle: Silicone band placed around the eye to allow the retina to reattach ... Vitrectomy: Procedure that delicately removes scar tissue and allows the retina to reattach ...
Retinal detachment with inferior retinal breaks: Primary vitrectomy versus vitrectomy with scleral buckle (PRO Study Report No ... Six-months primary success rate for retinal detachment between vitrectomy and scleral buckling. Koto, Takashi; Kawasaki, Ryo; ... Comparison of scleral fixation of intraocular lens: sutureless intrascleral fixation versus conventional sutured scleral ... Posterior scleral contraction to treat myopic foveoschisis in highly myopic eyes. Ye, Jie; Pan, An-Peng; Zhu, Shuangqian; More ...
Scleral Buckling and Vitrectomy. Scleral buckling (SB) is an established technique for the treatment of rhegmatogenous RDs. ... Primary pars plana vitrectomy versus scleral buckle surgery for the treatment of pseudophakic retinal detachment. A randomized ... Recent advances in pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) techniques have encouraged retinal surgeons to expand the role of vitrectomy in ... a failed pneumatic retinopexy does not jeopardize the success of future scleral buckling or vitrectomy if warranted (Ryan SJ, ...
... breaks does not significantly improve primary anatomical success in comparison to treatment with 20 G or 23/25 G vitrectomy ... Combining an encircling band with vitrectomy in patients with pseudophakic retinal detachment and inferior or multiple ... Keywords: Inferior breaks; Pseudophakic; Randomized clinical trial; Retinal detachment; Scleral buckling; Vitrectomy. ... or 20 G vitrectomy without any buckle (group C), or 23/25 G vitrectomy without any buckle (group E2). The primary endpoint was ...
Pars plana vitrectomy [group I] or scleral buckling [group II] was performed as primary procedure. Patients were followed for ... To evaluate the outcome of primary pars plana vitrectomy with silicon oil tamponade versus scleral buckling procedureas a ... Anatomical outcome in pars plana vitrectomy procedure was 96.2% as compared to scleral buckling procedure 87.0%. Functional ... Visual outcome and visual rehabilitation is earlier and better in scleral buckling as compared to pars plana vitrectomy ...
... scleral buckle(SB), and combined vitrectomy and scleral buckle(SB+PPV). METHODS: This nonrandomized, retrospective case series ... vitrectomy, pneumatic retinopexy, or a combination of scleral buckle and vitrectomy (SBV). Patients who have experienced a ... Surgical outcomes after pneumatic retinopexy, scleral buckle placement, and/or pars plana vitrectomy in cases of primary ... We investigate the most common and current procedures: pneumatic retinopexy (PR), pars plana vitrectomy(PPV), ...
23-Gauge Pars Plana Vitrectomy Versus Scleral Buckling Versus Combined Pars Plana Vitrectomy-Scleral Buckling for Medium- ... 23-Gauge Pars Plana Vitrectomy Versus Scleral Buckling Versus Combined Pars Plana Vitrectomy-Scleral Buckling for Medium- ...
  • Vitrectomy and gas for inferior break retinal detachments: are the results comparable to vitrectomy, gas, and scleral buckle? (bmj.com)
  • To compare the success rates of vitrectomy and gas with vitrectomy, gas, and buckle in the treatment of inferior break retinal detachments. (bmj.com)
  • group A consisted of 41 patients who underwent a vitrectomy and gas, group B consisted of 45 patients who underwent a vitrectomy, gas, and scleral buckle. (bmj.com)
  • Vitrectomy and gas without the application of a scleral buckle may be used to safely treat inferior break retinal detachments. (bmj.com)
  • It may be used as an alternative to vitrectomy, gas, and buckle which has an increased risk of choroidal haemorrhage, requires a longer operating time, and has all the associated complications of a scleral buckle. (bmj.com)
  • 1- 3 When patients with inferior retinal break detachments require a vitrectomy it is routinely carried out in combination with a scleral buckle in order to support the inferior retina thus avoiding difficult posturing. (bmj.com)
  • This procedure is technically demanding, has an increased risk of choroidal haemorrhage, 5 requires a longer operating time, 6 and has all the associated complications of a scleral buckle-that is, exposure, refractive change, diplopia, possible decreased retinal blood flow, and risk of anterior segment ischaemia. (bmj.com)
  • These results were compared with patients who underwent the standard treatment of vitrectomy, gas, and scleral buckle. (bmj.com)
  • This was a retrospective, consecutive interventional surgical case series of six eyes of five patients with stage 4 Coats' Disease and Coats'-like exudative detachment associated with FSHD who underwent combined 20 or 23G pars plana vitrectomy, endolaser, and encircling scleral buckle (PPV/EL/SB) by a single surgeon at our institution between 2010-2016. (arvojournals.org)
  • Scleral buckle: a silicone band is stitched onto the white of the eye so that it pushes against the tear till it heals. (adamross.co.uk)
  • 1. Scleral buckle was less expensive than pars plana vitrectomy by 10.7% in phakic patients. (2minutemedicine.com)
  • 2. Pars plana vitrectomy was more cost effective than scleral buckle by 12.1% for pseudophakic or aphakic patients. (2minutemedicine.com)
  • This study demonstrates that for a specific subset of retinal detachments, surgically inserting a scleral buckle (SB) is more cost effective than a pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) if the patient still has his or her natural lens. (2minutemedicine.com)
  • This study attempted to assess the difference in costs associated with two comparable treatments used to repair retinal detachments, scleral buckle (SB) and pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). (2minutemedicine.com)
  • The scleral buckle method indents the wall of the eye inward so that it meets the hole in the retina. (medlineplus.gov)
  • We investigate the most common and current procedures: pneumatic retinopexy (PR), pars plana vitrectomy(PPV), scleral buckle(SB), and combined vitrectomy and scleral buckle(SB+PPV). (bu.edu)
  • The main inclusion criteria were diagnosis with a primary (meaning it is a first RD experienced by the eye) RRD and subsequent treatment with scleral buckle, vitrectomy, pneumatic retinopexy, or a combination of scleral buckle and vitrectomy (SBV). (bu.edu)
  • After Scleral buckle vitrectomy surgury. (medhelp.org)
  • Scleral buckle and vitrectomy surgeries require general anesthesia, so they are done in an operating room. (kidshealth.org)
  • Subgroup analysis of a prospective randomized controlled multicenter trial in patients with uncomplicated PRD assigned either to 20 G vitrectomy plus encircling band (group E1), or 20 G vitrectomy without any buckle (group C), or 23/25 G vitrectomy without any buckle (group E2). (nih.gov)
  • In some cases, a "scleral buckle" or tiny silicone band, is attached to the outside of the eyeball to gently push the wall of the eye against the detached retina and hold the retina in position. (eye.md)
  • A scleral buckle is a piece of silicone sponge, rubber, or semi-hard plastic that your eye doctor ( ophthalmologist ) places on the outside of the eye (the sclera, or the white of the eye). (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • Placing a scleral buckle reattaches the retina in most cases. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • The pressure of the scleral buckle can raise the fluid pressure inside the eyeball. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • Since a scleral buckle pushes in on the eye, it can change the shape of the eye. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • The change caused by a scleral buckle may cause a refractive error that can affect vision. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • The scleral buckle can affect the eye muscles and how well they control the movement of the eyes. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • Surgically correct retinal detachment by scleral buckle or pars plana vitrectomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The band, called a scleral buckle, can be left in place to protect the eye for months, or sometimes years. (childrenshospital.org)
  • If the vitreous is attached, there is a crystalline lens, and if the patient is young, we tend to do a scleral buckle," says Dr. Papakostas. (nyp.org)
  • The scleral buckle has been performed for years and has a very high success rate," says Dr. Papakostas. (nyp.org)
  • I had a vitrectomy and scleral buckle 1 year ago to repair a retinal detachment. (medhelp.org)
  • Most patients( 64.3%) were treated with the conventional method of cryotherapy to tears, scleral buckle and with subretinal fluid drainage. (ispub.com)
  • A combination of scleral buckle and vitrectomy was done in 25.5% of patients. (ispub.com)
  • Some of the procedures performed were combination of scleral buckle, vitrectomy and pneumoretinopexy. (ispub.com)
  • The scleral buckle is attached to the posterior portion of the eye and is invisible after surgery. (allaboutvision.com)
  • In retin a over the counter complex cases today, a scleral buckle (see below) is often also performed together with the vitrectomy. (silentbobspeaks.com)
  • To compare the safety and efficacy of topical anesthesia versus retrobulbar anesthesia in 27-gauge pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for vitreous floaters. (springer.com)
  • Here, we compared the effect of topical and retrobulbar anesthesia for 27-gauge pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for symptomatic vitreous floaters. (springer.com)
  • Modern pars plana vitrectomy was developed by Robert Machemer in 1970. (medscape.com)
  • Pars plana vitrectomy is appropriate whenever access to the posterior segment of the eye is necessary for treatment. (medscape.com)
  • Pars plana vitrectomy is often performed under emergency conditions (eg, treatment of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, management of endophthalmitis, or retrieval of an intraocular foreign body). (medscape.com)
  • Today, with the advent of scleral buckling and small-gauge pars plana vitrectomy, in addition to laser and cryotherapy techniques, rapid ED diagnosis and treatment of a retinal detachment truly can be a vision-saving opportunity. (medscape.com)
  • A surgeon will perform pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) or scleral buckling to treat a complex retinal detachment. (oomc.com)
  • To evaluate the outcome of primary pars plana vitrectomy with silicon oil tamponade versus scleral buckling procedureas a treatment for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment . (bvsalud.org)
  • Pars plana vitrectomy [group I] or scleral buckling [group II] was performed as primary procedure . (bvsalud.org)
  • Anatomical outcome in pars plana vitrectomy is better as compared to sclera buckling. (bvsalud.org)
  • Objective: To compare outcomes of retinal detachment repair following pneumatic retinopexy (PnR) versus pars plana vitrectomy in terms of anatomical success, functional success and patient quality of life in patients with extended criteria. (centerwatch.com)
  • To report a retrospective series of seven phakic eyes of seven patients suffering from a malignant glaucoma-like syndrome following pars plana vitrectomy and silicone oil (SO) injection. (dovepress.com)
  • Seven eyes with retinal detachment treated with pars plana vitrectomy with or without scleral buckling with SO tamponade. (dovepress.com)
  • This was a retrospective review of seven cases that received pars plana vitrectomy and SO with or without scleral buckling for different causes of retinal detachment (three were rhegmatogenous and four were tractional). (dovepress.com)
  • Aqueous misdirection syndrome may be observed following pars plana vitrectomy and SO tamponade. (dovepress.com)
  • Aqueous misdirection syndrome may be observed after pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and silicone oil (SO) injection. (dovepress.com)
  • Nd:YAG laser vitreolysis versus pars plana vitrectomy for vitreous floaters. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The patient underwent removal of the nail and pars plana vitrectomy. (healio.com)
  • Scleral buckling and pars plana vitrectomy reattached the retina. (ebscohost.com)
  • To evaluate the patient characteristics and to determine the factors affecting the development time and type of cataract occurring after pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) as well as the possible difficulties and/or complications encountered during and after this cataract surgery by phacoemulsification. (omicsonline.org)
  • The development of a cataract, mostly nuclear, represents a classical evolution after pars plana vitrectomy (PPV), mainly due to changes in oxygenation of the lens. (omicsonline.org)
  • The decision was made to proceed with pars plana vitrectomy to remove the subretinal gas. (harvard.edu)
  • Eyes operated on with pars plana vitrectomy needed fewer reoperations over 180 days than eyes subjected to scleral buckling (SB) in a retrospective comparison of patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). (modernmedicine.com)
  • Although many surgeons are not comfortable with pars plana vitrectomy, this approach removes all vitreous from the anterior segment without damage to the corneal endothelium or iris, eliminates vitreous to the wounds, and is effective at removing residual cortex. (eyeworld.org)
  • If a pars plana vitrectomy approach is utilized, the phaco wound should be sutured to prevent iris prolapse. (eyeworld.org)
  • Although trocar-cannula systems have revolutionized sutureless, transconjunctival vitreoretinal surgery, they are unnecessary for pars plana approaches to anterior vitrectomy. (eyeworld.org)
  • To investigate the anatomical and functional results and the complications in eyes operated on using vitrectomy without scleral buckling for all forms of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). (bmj.com)
  • 1- 3 A vitrectomy was initially reserved for patients in whom scleral buckling was thought to be difficult-for example, those with media opacities, posterior breaks, and multiple tears. (bmj.com)
  • 13 In this paper we review the results of patients with inferior break retinal detachments who underwent a vitrectomy without a buckling procedure. (bmj.com)
  • In this retrospective study we evaluated the anatomic outcomes of scleral buckling (SB) versus re-vitrectomy for the treatment of recurrent inferior retinal detachment (RD) in silicone oil (SiO) tamponade eyes after primary vitrectomy. (ovid.com)
  • Scleral buckling can be done using numbing medicine while you are awake (local anesthesia) or when you are asleep and pain free ( general anesthesia ). (medlineplus.gov)
  • The eye will be covered with a patch after scleral buckling and vitrectomy, but not after laser surgery or an injection. (kidshealth.org)
  • The vitreous gel is removed and is combined with a scleral buckling (see previous point) procedure, or the eye is filled with a gas bubble. (health24.com)
  • Scleral buckling surgery is a common way to treat retinal detachment . (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • Scleral buckling is effective in supporting a tear, hole, or break in the retina that has caused the detachment. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • Scleral buckling poses some short-term and long-term risks. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • Vision may change for several months after scleral buckling surgery. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • 2 Risk factors for IOP elevation demonstrated in that study include intraoperative or previous scleral buckling, intraoperative lensectomy or endophotocoagulation, and postoperative fibrin formation. (dovepress.com)
  • If your child's retinal becomes partly or completely detached-Stage 4 or 5-your doctor may refer him to a retinal surgeon for treatment, usually scleral buckling or vitrectomy. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Scleral buckling involves placing a silicone band around the eye and tightening it until the retina is close enough to the wall to reattach itself. (childrenshospital.org)
  • In 2001 a survey among retinal surgeons regarding the treatment of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment either with scleral buckling methods or primary vitrectomy was performed. (bioportfolio.com)
  • To study the anatomical status and visual outcome of scleral buckling surgery in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) at tertiary eye care center in Nepal. (nepjol.info)
  • This is a prospective, noncomparative, consecutive, interventional study of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment managed with scleral buckling surgery performed in Lumbini Eye Institute, Nepal. (nepjol.info)
  • Timely surgical management with scleral buckling surgery can give good anatomical and visual outcome. (nepjol.info)
  • Treatment of rhegmatogenous detachment may include sealing retinal breaks (by laser or cryotherapy), supporting the breaks with scleral buckling, pneumatic retinopexy, and/or vitrectomy. (merckmanuals.com)
  • The median interval between PPV and phacoemulsification was 11,2 months and there was no statistically significant difference in this interval in relation to age (inferior or superior than 50 years) (p=0.485), presence of diabetes (p=0.236), scleral buckling (p=0.72), etiology of vitrectomy (p=0.46) or the type of tomponade used (p=0.449). (omicsonline.org)
  • Retinal detachment can be treated with vitrectomy and/or scleral buckling procedure. (aapos.org)
  • Although there have been extensive descriptions of vitrectomy techniques, little has been written about microsurgical techniques for scleral buckling operations. (worldcat.org)
  • The most common surgical procedures for reattaching a retina are scleral buckling, pneumatic retinopexy and vitrectomy. (swedish.org)
  • Scleral buckling - During this procedure, your ophthalmologist will wrap a silicone band around the eye and stitch it to the sclera, the outside wall of the eye. (swedish.org)
  • Scleral buckling surgery often is combined with one of the following procedures to fuse the retina to its underlying supporting tissue (called the retinal pigment epithelium, or RPE). (allaboutvision.com)
  • Confirming the risk of late-onset, primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) after scleral buckling and vitrectomy, as well as baseline risk factors, can help facilitate earlier detection and treatment of POAG . (mayoclinic.org)
  • The research team used data from the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) to identify all residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, who underwent scleral buckling, vitrectomy or both between 2004 and 2015. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The 10-year probability of POAG was 17.5 percent and 10.0 percent in the scleral buckling with vitrectomy and the vitrectomy-only cohorts, respectively, compared with 1.0 percent in the nonoperative cohort. (mayoclinic.org)
  • None of the eyes in the scleral buckling cohort developed glaucoma. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The rates of POAG in operative eyes undergoing scleral buckling with vitrectomy and vitrectomy-only were significantly greater than the 1.0 percent rate of POAG for the Olmsted County general population. (mayoclinic.org)
  • We found that there was a tenfold to seventeenfold increased risk of POAG in eyes after vitrectomy or scleral buckling with vitrectomy surgery when compared with fellow nonoperative eyes," says Dr. Sit. (mayoclinic.org)
  • If pneumatic retinopexy is unsuccessful, vitrectomy and/or scleral buckling still retinal can be performed. (silentbobspeaks.com)
  • The vitrectomy procedure uses very small devices inside the eye to release tension on the retina. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Your retina doctor may recommend an operation called a "vitrectomy" in which the clear jelly-like substance that fills the eyeball (vitreous) is removed and replaced with a gas bubble or saline-like fluid. (eye.md)
  • With vitrectomy, the vitreous humor present between the eye lens and the retina is removed and replaced with a saline solution. (oomc.com)
  • Vitrectomy - To release fibrous tissue that is pulling on or growing over the retina, a vitrectomy may be necessary. (swedish.org)
  • Anterior vitrectomy is performed in close proximity to the vitreous base, a zone of permanent adherence of vitreous to peripheral retina with 1/100 the tensile strength of posterior retina. (eyeworld.org)
  • She underwent pneumatic retinopexy complicated by subretinal gas, which was successfully managed with vitrectomy with perfluorocarbon liquid injection and fluid/exchange. (harvard.edu)
  • The use of vitrectomy and gas for the primary repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachments has become increasingly accepted. (bmj.com)
  • A vitreoretinal database was used to select all patients who underwent a primary vitrectomy with gas for a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with one or more inferior retinal breaks from January 2001 to July 2003. (bmj.com)
  • To investigate the frequency of residual cortex and the effectiveness of removal of residual cortex in the fovea during vitrectomy for primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair. (bioportfolio.com)
  • To evaluate the correlation between metamorphopsia and outer retinal morphologic changes after successful vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). (bioportfolio.com)
  • Vitrectomy: This procedure is used for large retinal tears. (adamross.co.uk)
  • Regarding the vitrectomy surgery procedure for vitreous floaters, it is much simpler than other vitreoretinal surgeries, mainly reflecting in lower usage of scleral indentation, photocoagulation, and an apparently shorter duration. (springer.com)
  • [ 1 ] Machemer created the vitreous infusion suction cutter (VISC), which was the first closed-system vitrectomy device with infusion and aspiration to control intraocular pressure during the surgical procedure. (medscape.com)
  • However, technological advancement with better vitrectomy systems and advanced instrumentation allow for this procedure to be used in a much greater number of applications. (medscape.com)
  • Currently, vitrectomy surgery is fairly routine surgery for the vitreoretinal surgeon and can usually be performed safely as an outpatient procedure with excellent results. (medscape.com)
  • In the early surgery groups, the retinal reattachment rate was similar in the SB group compared to the re-vitrectomy group (80.8% versus 70.8%, p = 0.411). (ovid.com)
  • While in the late surgery groups, retinal reattachment rate was trended higher in the re-vitrectomy group compared to the SB group (73.3% versus 47.8%, p = 0.058). (ovid.com)
  • For recurrent inferior RD in SO-filled eyes, SB surgery provides similar therapeutic effectiveness with satisfactory anatomic outcomes compared to the re-vitrectomy. (ovid.com)
  • The anesthetic methods for vitrectomy surgery include retrobulbar and peribulbar anesthesia. (springer.com)
  • Vitrectomy surgery for vitreous floaters is widely considered more straight forward than other vitreoretinal surgeries. (springer.com)
  • Especially with regard to the use of 27-gauge vitrectomy, the sclerotomy is minimally invasive, and reduces the pain of surgery to some extent. (springer.com)
  • This can be done by itself or with a vitrectomy surgery depending on what the surgeon feels is appropriate. (harvardeye.com)
  • I had a retinal detachment about 6 months ago, where a vitrectomy surgery was done. (medhelp.org)
  • PVR usually requires additional treatment, including vitrectomy surgery. (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • If surgery is needed, a vitrectomy is usually done. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This complication is even so common, that some surgeons systematically propose a combined vitrectomy-cataract surgery, especially in macular diseases [ 1 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • In more than 80% of cases, this cataract will require surgery within 2 years after vitrectomy. (omicsonline.org)
  • To report a surgical technique for retinal detachment surgery using transconjunctival sutureless 23-gauge vitrectomy with silicone oil injection. (scielo.br)
  • Thirty-one patients with retinal detachment underwent vitreoretinal surgery using a transconjunctival sutureless 23-gauge vitrectomy system. (scielo.br)
  • The retinal detachment surgery with silicone oil injection in transconjunctival sutureless 23-gauge vitrectomy is a safe and efficient technique to repair retinal detachment and it has the advantage of being minimally invasive. (scielo.br)
  • I n spite of extraordinary advancements in cataract surgery techniques and technology, rupture of the posterior capsule, posterior dislocation of lens material, and the need for anterior vitrectomy still occur at a substantial rate. (eyeworld.org)
  • Cellulose sponges should never be used to test for vitreous during cataract surgery or penetrating keratoplasty or removal of vitreous at the site of traumatic corneal-scleral lacerations. (eyeworld.org)
  • while in the late period (1-6 months) after primary vitrectomy, re-vitrectomy may be recommended, especially for the eyes with severe anterior proliferative vitreoretinopathy and retinal foreshortening. (ovid.com)
  • Gregory Blaha, MD, PhD, presents a combined retinoschisis-retinal detachment with proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) that was repaired with 25-gauge vitrectomy using a chandelier light and bi-manual forceps. (eyetube.net)
  • AIM: To report the outcomes of anterior vitrectomy using high speed cutter for scleral fixated intraocular lens (SFIOL) implantation in patients with posterior capsular rupture. (qub.ac.uk)
  • METHODS: Medical records of 51 patients with posterior capsular rupture who received high speed cutter anterior vitrectomy via limbal incision with SFIOL implantation from June 2011 to December 2013 were reviewed retrospectively for visual outcomes and complications. (qub.ac.uk)
  • CONCLUSION: High speed cutter anterior vitrectomy via limbal incision is a safe and effective method for those with posterior capsular rupture for SFIOL implantation. (qub.ac.uk)
  • The most common complication was vitreous haemorrhage (5.9{\%}) and transient rise in intraocular pressure (5.9{\%}) which all spontaneously resolved ● CONCLUSION: High speed cutter anterior vitrectomy via limbal incision is a safe and effective method for those with posterior capsular rupture for SFIOL implantation. (qub.ac.uk)
  • To assess visual results and complications of a modified technique of posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PC IOLs) in aphakic eyes without scleral flaps. (hindawi.com)
  • This technique of one-haptic scleral fixation of posterior chamber IOLs is a good choice in presence of insufficient capsule support. (hindawi.com)
  • The aim of the present study is to evaluate the visual results and complications of one-haptic scleral fixation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses in aphakic eyes with inadequate capsule support without scleral flaps. (hindawi.com)
  • It is highly recommended for cases of myopic macular hole retinal detachment with atrophic background and deep posterior staphyloma and for recurrent cases after vitrectomy with or without silicone oil. (nih.gov)
  • Vitrectomy done in 9.2% of patients was performed in proliferative retinopathy, giant retinal tear, bullous retinal detachment, posterior breaks or those with media opacity. (ispub.com)
  • This study was focused on evaluation of simplified techniques of scleral fixation of hydrophobic single piece Acrylic posterior chamber IOLs in terms of visual outcome and complications. (escrs.org)
  • The patients underwent 23-gauge vitrectomy via the sulcus to rescue dislocated IOLs and fix them to the scleral wall with a previously looped nonabsorbable polyester suture. (hindawi.com)
  • While patients who underwent combined SB+PPV, vitrectomy alone, and SB had higher rates of mac-off RRD at 67%, 60%, and 58% respectively. (bu.edu)
  • Based on different retinal proliferation states in different postoperative periods after primary vitrectomy, we also compared the anatomic outcomes of the two surgical procedures in two specific postoperative periods, early period (≤1 month) and late period (1-6 months). (ovid.com)
  • Overall, the results of our study demonstrate very good outcomes for patients treated with PR, vitrectomy, SB, and combine SB+PPV. (bu.edu)
  • To evaluate the effects of scleral suture for the sclerotomy wound leakage and the clinical outcomes in 23-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy with fluid- air exchange. (bvsalud.org)
  • To test if an encircling band improves outcomes in vitrectomy for pseudophakic retinal detachment (PRD) with inferior or with multiple (4 or more) breaks. (nih.gov)
  • Outcomes of 27-Gauge Vitrectomy-Assisted Choroidal and Subretinal Biopsy. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Successful outcomes with vitrectomy are due, in large part, to advances in instrumentation technology," says Dr. Papakostas. (nyp.org)
  • The surgical protocol was tailored for each case and consisted of vitrectomy, laser photocoagulation and tamponade. (bmj.com)
  • However, as more intraocular gas remained in the sclera -sutured group than in the sutureless group statistically, the scleral suture should be considered in cases that require long-term gas tamponade. (bvsalud.org)
  • The other six cases were recurrent after vitrectomy and silicone oil tamponade. (nih.gov)
  • One of the most innovative vitreoretinal surgical techniques introduced in recent years is transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy (1-2) . (scielo.br)
  • Unfortunately, it was not recognized that severe intraoperative vitreoretinal traction is inherent in cellulose sponge anterior vitrectomy. (eyeworld.org)
  • Scleral fixation of foldable IOL is an effective but surgically demanding technique. (escrs.org)
  • Single or double haptic scleral fixation of foldable hydrophobic single piece IOL was performed under local anaesthesia or topical anaesthesia combined with local infiltration of Injection Xylocain. (escrs.org)
  • This outcome suggests that multiple mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of POAG after vitrectomy, and not just elevated intraocular pressure. (mayoclinic.org)
  • 1) I had a floaters only Vitrectomy last July and there was no floaters since then. (medhelp.org)
  • A surgeon will perform a vitrectomy as treatment for macular hole repair. (oomc.com)
  • I had vitrectomy for ERM and macular hole on left eye in May 2014 and vitrectomy for ERM o. (medhelp.org)
  • I had vitrectomy for macular pucker 4 months ago. (medhelp.org)
  • Anterior core vitrectomy was performed as a routine accompaniment. (escrs.org)
  • Phacoemulsification and Core Vitrectomy in Fuchs' Heterochromic Uveitis. (semanticscholar.org)
  • In all patients retinal reattachment and injection of silicone oil through transconjunctival sutureless 23-gauge vitrectomy system was possible. (scielo.br)
  • All patients had recurrent inferior RD in the SiO-filled eyes within 6 months after the primary vitrectomy, and were treated by either SB or re-vitrectomy. (ovid.com)
  • Both FSHD eyes required a second vitrectomy with SO placement for recurrent retinal detachments. (arvojournals.org)
  • Recurrent vitreous hemorrhage after vitrectomy for complications of diabetic retinopathy is a common occurrence. (bioportfolio.com)
  • To report the initial experience of 27-gauge vitrectomy-assisted choroidal and subretinal biopsy PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective, interventional case series. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the scleral suture used at the end of the operation, sclera -sutured group and sutureless group. (bvsalud.org)
  • In the cases of 23-gauge sutureless vitrectomy with fluid- air exchange, the scleral suture may be effective to prevent the sclerotomy wound leakage and maintain the intraocular gas longer, but there was no statistically significant difference in the final success rate between the 2 groups. (bvsalud.org)
  • Trans-scleral suture passage was performed with Ab Externo (from outside in) technique in all the cases. (escrs.org)
  • Fixation suture was always buried beneath partial thickness scleral flap/tunnel. (escrs.org)
  • This must be differentiated from other causes of post vitrectomy glaucoma. (dovepress.com)
  • Postoperative vitreous hemorrhage is a common complication after vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The SB and re-vitrectomy groups exhibited similar retinal reattachment rate (65.3% versus 72.2%, p = 0.449) after reoperation. (ovid.com)
  • In the re-vitrectomy group, the retinal reattachment rate was similar in the early period and the late period (70.8% versus 73.3%, p = 0.839). (ovid.com)
  • There is no reason to become somewhat over conscious about the slightly higher risk of complications with scleral-sutured PC IOL. (escrs.org)
  • Anterior vitrectomy was performed. (escrs.org)
  • Anterior vitrectomy began with the pioneering work of David Kasner in the late 1960s, using cellulose sponges and scissors to remove anterior vitreous. (eyeworld.org)
  • Anterior vitrectomy is never "simple," as some surgeons have incorrectly stated. (eyeworld.org)
  • Dynamic scleral depression during indirect ophthalmoscopy may help the surgeon to see the retinal breaks and distinguish them from other lesions. (aao.org)
  • Peripheral fundus examination, using either indirect ophthalmoscopy with scleral depression, the slit lamp with the eye in extreme positions of gaze, or using a 3-mirror lens, should be done. (merckmanuals.com)
  • It may be more accurate to describe the disease as vitrectomy-associated glaucoma, but further research is required to clarify the mechanism of damage. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Small gauge vitrectomy offers new possibilities to tackle this difficult pathology however this surgical approach may differ from one retinal surgeon to the next. (springer.com)
  • Vitrectomy allows us to treat complicated forms of retinal detachments that involve scar tissue formation and also retinal detachments after open-globe injuries. (nyp.org)
  • The development of the small-gauge vitrectomy, wide-angle viewing systems, and the curved illuminated laser probe were key changes in the field. (nyp.org)
  • Patients were divided into two groups based on different surgical procedures: the SB group (49 eyes) and the re-vitrectomy group (54 eyes). (ovid.com)
  • Vitrectomy involves removing the vitreous (the gel-like substance that fills the back of the eye) and replacing it with saline solution or oil. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Combining an encircling band with vitrectomy in patients with pseudophakic retinal detachment and inferior or multiple breaks does not significantly improve primary anatomical success in comparison to treatment with 20 G or 23/25 G vitrectomy alone. (nih.gov)
  • In this haute couture-themed issue, the cover story looks at the trends shaping treatment for back-of-the-eye diseases, including new therapies, smaller instruments, the popularity of vitrectomy, and advances in imaging and visualization. (issuu.com)