Schools: Educational institutions.School Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with health and nursing care given to primary and secondary school students by a registered nurse.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.School Admission Criteria: Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.Schools, Nursery: Schools for children usually under five years of age.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Food Services: Functions, equipment, and facilities concerned with the preparation and distribution of ready-to-eat food.Medicine, Chinese Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.Schools, Pharmacy: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of pharmacy.Individualized Medicine: Therapeutic approach tailoring therapy for genetically defined subgroups of patients.Schools, Nursing: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of nursing.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Internal Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the internal organ systems of adults.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Medicine, Kampo: System of herbal medicine practiced in Japan by both herbalists and practitioners of modern medicine. Kampo originated in China and is based on Chinese herbal medicine (MEDICINE, CHINESE TRADITIONAL).Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.United StatesNuclear Medicine: A specialty field of radiology concerned with diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative use of radioactive compounds in a pharmaceutical form.Medicine: The art and science of studying, performing research on, preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease, as well as the maintenance of health.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Food Dispensers, Automatic: Mechanical food dispensing machines.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Achievement: Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Student Dropouts: Individuals who leave school, secondary or college, prior to completion of specified curriculum requirements.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.History of MedicineClinical Medicine: The study and practice of medicine by direct examination of the patient.Osteopathic Medicine: A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Internship and Residency: Programs of training in medicine and medical specialties offered by hospitals for graduates of medicine to meet the requirements established by accrediting authorities.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.School Dentistry: Preventive dental services provided for students in primary and secondary schools.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Drugs, Chinese Herbal: Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children aged 2-12 years.Complementary Therapies: Therapeutic practices which are not currently considered an integral part of conventional allopathic medical practice. They may lack biomedical explanations but as they become better researched some (PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES; DIET; ACUPUNCTURE) become widely accepted whereas others (humors, radium therapy) quietly fade away, yet are important historical footnotes. Therapies are termed as Complementary when used in addition to conventional treatments and as Alternative when used instead of conventional treatment.Regenerative Medicine: A field of medicine concerned with developing and using strategies aimed at repair or replacement of damaged, diseased, or metabolically deficient organs, tissues, and cells via TISSUE ENGINEERING; CELL TRANSPLANTATION; and ARTIFICIAL ORGANS and BIOARTIFICIAL ORGANS and tissues.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Education, Premedical: Preparatory education meeting the requirements for admission to medical school.Sports Medicine: The field of medicine concerned with physical fitness and the diagnosis and treatment of injuries sustained in exercise and sports activities.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Medicine, Ayurvedic: The traditional Hindu system of medicine which is based on customs, beliefs, and practices of the Hindu culture. Ayurveda means "the science of Life": veda - science, ayur - life.Absenteeism: Chronic absence from work or other duty.Transportation: The means of moving persons, animals, goods, or materials from one place to another.Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children aged 13-18 years.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Integrative Medicine: The discipline concerned with using the combination of conventional ALLOPATHIC MEDICINE and ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE to address the biological, psychological, social, and spiritual aspects of health and illness.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Education, Medical, Graduate: Educational programs for medical graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic medical sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced medical degree.Lunch: The meal taken at midday.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Physical Education and Training: Instructional programs in the care and development of the body, often in schools. The concept does not include prescribed exercises, which is EXERCISE THERAPY.Occupational Medicine: Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Nutrition Policy: Guidelines and objectives pertaining to food supply and nutrition including recommendations for healthy diet.Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Education, Special: Education of the individual who markedly deviates intellectually, physically, socially, or emotionally from those considered to be normal, thus requiring special instruction.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Medicine, African Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.Training Support: Financial support for training including both student stipends and loans and training grants to institutions.Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the use of physical agents, mechanical apparatus, and manipulation in rehabilitating physically diseased or injured patients.Veterinary Medicine: The medical science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases in animals.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Personnel Selection: The process of choosing employees for specific types of employment. The concept includes recruitment.Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Bullying: Aggressive behavior intended to cause harm or distress. The behavior may be physical or verbal. There is typically an imbalance of power, strength, or status between the target and the aggressor.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Schools, Veterinary: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of veterinary medicine.Education: Acquisition of knowledge as a result of instruction in a formal course of study.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.National Library of Medicine (U.S.): An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.Child Nutrition Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease of children, infants or adolescents.Adolescent Psychology: Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Croatia: Created 7 April 1992 as a result of the division of Yugoslavia.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Community Medicine: A branch of medicine concerned with the total health of the individual within the home environment and in the community, and with the application of comprehensive care to the prevention and treatment of illness in the entire community.Schools, Health Occupations: Schools which offer training in the area of health.Tropical Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with diseases, mainly of parasitic origin, common in tropical and subtropical regions.Social Medicine: A branch of medicine concerned with the role of socio-environmental factors in the occurrence, prevention and treatment of disease.Menu PlanningChild Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Sex Education: Education which increases the knowledge of the functional, structural, and behavioral aspects of human reproduction.Problem-Based Learning: Instructional use of examples or cases to teach using problem-solving skills and critical thinking.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.BrazilLibrary Schools: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of library science or information.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.College Admission Test: Test designed to identify students suitable for admission into a graduate or undergraduate curriculum.Aptitude Tests: Primarily non-verbal tests designed to predict an individual's future learning ability or performance.Sleep Medicine Specialty: A medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of SLEEP WAKE DISORDERS and their causes.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Oral Medicine: A branch of dentistry dealing with diseases of the oral and paraoral structures and the oral management of systemic diseases. (Hall, What is Oral Medicine, Anyway? Clinical Update: National Naval Dental Center, March 1991, p7-8)Play and Playthings: Spontaneous or voluntary recreational activities pursued for enjoyment and accessories or equipment used in the activities; includes games, toys, etc.Great BritainVocational Education: Education for specific trades or occupations.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Minority Groups: A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Nutritional Sciences: The study of NUTRITION PROCESSES as well as the components of food, their actions, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.CaliforniaHealth Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Education, Predental: Preparatory education meeting the requirements for admission to dental school.Specialization: An occupation limited in scope to a subsection of a broader field.Community Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with preventive as well as diagnostic and treatment programs in a circumscribed population.Preceptorship: Practical experience in medical and health-related services that occurs as part of an educational program wherein the professionally-trained student works outside the academic environment under the supervision of an established professional in the particular field.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Drugs, Essential: Drugs considered essential to meet the health needs of a population as well as to control drug costs.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Environmental Medicine: Medical specialty concerned with environmental factors that may impinge upon human disease, and development of methods for the detection, prevention, and control of environmentally related disease.Medicine, Korean Traditional: Medical practice or discipline that is based on the knowledge, cultures, and beliefs of the people of KOREA.Holistic Health: Health as viewed from the perspective that humans and other organisms function as complete, integrated units rather than as aggregates of separate parts.Hygiene: The science dealing with the establishment and maintenance of health in the individual and the group. It includes the conditions and practices conducive to health. (Webster, 3d ed)Mentors: Senior professionals who provide guidance, direction and support to those persons desirous of improvement in academic positions, administrative positions or other career development situations.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.IndiaPhysicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Professional Practice Location: Geographic area in which a professional person practices; includes primarily physicians and dentists.Safety: Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.Bicycling: The use of a bicycle for transportation or recreation. It does not include the use of a bicycle in studying the body's response to physical exertion (BICYCLE ERGOMETRY TEST see EXERCISE TEST).Preventive Medicine: A medical specialty primarily concerned with prevention of disease (PRIMARY PREVENTION) and the promotion and preservation of health in the individual.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Prosthodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the restoration and maintenance of oral function by the replacement of missing TEETH and related structures by artificial devices or DENTAL PROSTHESES.Mainstreaming (Education): Most frequently refers to the integration of a physically or mentally disabled child into the regular class of normal peers and provision of the appropriately determined educational program.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Libraries, MedicalPhysicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Philosophy, MedicalEnvironment Design: The structuring of the environment to permit or promote specific patterns of behavior.EnglandResearch: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Learning Disorders: Conditions characterized by a significant discrepancy between an individual's perceived level of intellect and their ability to acquire new language and other cognitive skills. These disorders may result from organic or psychological conditions. Relatively common subtypes include DYSLEXIA, DYSCALCULIA, and DYSGRAPHIA.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Nutritive Value: An indication of the contribution of a food to the nutrient content of the diet. This value depends on the quantity of a food which is digested and absorbed and the amounts of the essential nutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrate, minerals, vitamins) which it contains. This value can be affected by soil and growing conditions, handling and storage, and processing.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Social Marketing: Use of marketing principles also used to sell products to consumers to promote ideas, attitudes and behaviors. Design and use of programs seeking to increase the acceptance of a social idea or practice by target groups, not for the benefit of the marketer, but to benefit the target audience and the general society.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.TurkeyEducation, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Underachievement: Performance, usually in school work, poorer than that predicted from aptitude and/or intelligence testing.TexasEthnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.JapanSubstance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Beverages: Liquids that are suitable for drinking. (From Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Community-Institutional Relations: The interactions between members of a community and representatives of the institutions within that community.Toilet Facilities: Facilities provided for human excretion, often with accompanying handwashing facilities.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Career Mobility: The upward or downward mobility in an occupation or the change from one occupation to another.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Societies, Dental: Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Staff Development: The process by which the employer promotes staff performance and efficiency consistent with management goals and objectives.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Snacks: Foods eaten between MEALTIMES.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Administrative Personnel: Individuals responsible for the development of policy and supervision of the execution of plans and functional operations.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.
  • The Otago Medical School was founded in 1875, but the first (part-time) Lecturer in Pathology and Morbid Anatomy, Dr W Stewart Roberts, was not appointed until 1885. (otago.ac.nz)
  • During his tenure, there were many significant changes in the Otago Medical School. (otago.ac.nz)
  • Having twice secured a competitive place at Otago Medical School he declined both times, first in favour of completing a Bachelor of Arts in music and philosophy, and the second time to train as a teacher of Transcendental Meditation. (alkalizeforhealth.net)
  • Under the supervision of Dr Scott Solomon and Dr Marc Pfeffer he completed a post doctoral fellowship at The Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and Harvard Medical School in Boston, USA. (gla.ac.uk)
  • We are aware that you may not be able to take the above qualifications at school or college and therefore we allow applicants to provide evidence of participating in other activities aimed at increasing social responsibility, for example, National Citizen Service (NCS) or the Duke of Edinburgh award in lieu of a formal qualification. (manchester.ac.uk)
  • In November 1996, The American Heart Foundation chose blood pressure research on the TM technique as amongst the most significant studies for health from all their 10 medical journals. (alkalizeforhealth.net)
  • As a serving officer in the Royal Army Medical Corps in World War I, Professor Drennan was unable to take up his appointment until October 1916. (otago.ac.nz)
  • I subsequently pursued Internal Medicine residency training at Johns Hopkins followed by a fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. (uic.edu)
  • Many Medical/veterinary/dental students from other universities also come to Leeds to study. (wikipedia.org)
  • A group of Edinburgh Medical School students and alumni have set up a charity that aims to encourage state school students to apply to study medicine. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Grateful and keen to give something back, Callum immediately offered his support to the programmes and, in doing so, began to learn more about the barriers and misconceptions that prevent potential students from applying to study medicine. (ed.ac.uk)
  • The team at You Can Be A Doctor passionately believe that a career in medicine should be a realistic option for all school students to consider regardless of their background, postcode or the tradition of the school. (ed.ac.uk)
  • You Can Be A Doctor aims to fill that gap and help school students across Scotland enter the profession and lift up their communities. (ed.ac.uk)
  • The project isn't just online however and crucially includes opportunities for school students to visit the Medical School and learn first-hand. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Working closely with Pathways to the Professions, state school students from all over Edinburgh and the Lothians have experienced elements of being a medical student such as anatomy and clinical skills. (ed.ac.uk)
  • With a focus on grades, the team have also run revision sessions on campus where school students can study in a relaxed environment with an academic on hand for any questions. (ed.ac.uk)
  • Professor Hazel Hutchison, School of Language, Literature, Music and Visual Culture, tells us about the Feedback Dialogue Form she uses to encourage students to engage more consciously with their feedback. (abdn.ac.uk)
  • Laurie Woodard, MD, has taught the art of caring for vulnerable populations to thousands of students at the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine. (aamc.org)
  • As a passionate advocate for people with disabilities and their health, Dr. Woodard has developed specialized instruction in disability for medical students at all levels, participates in national efforts to incorporate disability in core health care curricula and models a hands-on commitment through her community volunteer activities. (aamc.org)
  • In addition to considering all of South Dakota as their community, faculty and students at the Sanford School of Medicine embrace an engaged scholarship mindset, sharing their work with the broader medical community through publications that are designed to enhance the nation's rural workforce. (aamc.org)
  • University College is committed to assisting new students to achieve a successful transition from high school to university life. (uaeu.ac.ae)
  • These examinations are the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination for Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) medical students and the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) for Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) medical students. (answers.com)
  • All medical students have the potential to encounter a client who requires emergency care. (auckland.ac.nz)
  • In just under a month from now, many of our dental and medical students will participate in the annual Teddy Bear Hospital Community Day. (otago.ac.nz)
  • He is a consultant expert to medicines formulary development committees in both the private and public sectors in South Africa, and has a special interest in the cost- effectiveness of medicines, pharrnaco-economics and drug utilisation review .He is consultant to the Council for Medical Aid Schemes process of algorithm development for the chronic disease aspect of the PMBs. (sun.ac.za)
  • Professor Eric F D'Ath, a protege of Drennan, was appointed to the Chair of Pathology and Medical Jurisprudence in 1929. (otago.ac.nz)