An idiopathic systemic inflammatory granulomatous disorder comprised of epithelioid and multinucleated giant cells with little necrosis. It usually invades the lungs with fibrosis and may also involve lymph nodes, skin, liver, spleen, eyes, phalangeal bones, and parotid glands.
Sarcoidosis affecting predominantly the lungs, the site most frequently involved and most commonly causing morbidity and mortality in sarcoidosis. Pulmonary sarcoidosis is characterized by sharply circumscribed granulomas in the alveolar, bronchial, and vascular walls, composed of tightly packed cells derived from the mononuclear phagocyte system. The clinical symptoms when present are dyspnea upon exertion, nonproductive cough, and wheezing. (Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p431)
Intradermal injection of a heated (pasteurized) saline suspension of sarcoid tissue obtained from a sarcoid spleen or lymph node. In patients with active sarcoidosis a dusky red nodule develops slowly over the next few weeks at the injection site. Histologic examination, an essential part of the complete test, reveals sarcoid tissue.
A relatively small nodular inflammatory lesion containing grouped mononuclear phagocytes, caused by infectious and noninfectious agents.
Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.
Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.
Diseases of LYMPH; LYMPH NODES; or LYMPHATIC VESSELS.
'Skin diseases' is a broad term for various conditions affecting the skin, including inflammatory disorders, infections, benign and malignant tumors, congenital abnormalities, and degenerative diseases, which can cause symptoms such as rashes, discoloration, eruptions, lesions, itching, or pain.
An erythematous eruption commonly associated with drug reactions or infection and characterized by inflammatory nodules that are usually tender, multiple, and bilateral. These nodules are located predominantly on the shins with less common occurrence on the thighs and forearms. They undergo characteristic color changes ending in temporary bruise-like areas. This condition usually subsides in 3-6 weeks without scarring or atrophy.
A group of diseases in which the dominant feature is the involvement of the CARDIAC MUSCLE itself. Cardiomyopathies are classified according to their predominant pathophysiological features (DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY; HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY; RESTRICTIVE CARDIOMYOPATHY) or their etiological/pathological factors (CARDIOMYOPATHY, ALCOHOLIC; ENDOCARDIAL FIBROELASTOSIS).
Unstable isotopes of gallium that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Ga atoms with atomic weights 63-68, 70 and 72-76 are radioactive gallium isotopes.
Inflammation of part or all of the uvea, the middle (vascular) tunic of the eye, and commonly involving the other tunics (sclera and cornea, and the retina). (Dorland, 27th ed)
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.
A glucocorticoid with the general properties of the corticosteroids. It is the drug of choice for all conditions in which routine systemic corticosteroid therapy is indicated, except adrenal deficiency states.
A peptidyl-dipeptidase that catalyzes the release of a C-terminal dipeptide, -Xaa-*-Xbb-Xcc, when neither Xaa nor Xbb is Pro. It is a Cl(-)-dependent, zinc glycoprotein that is generally membrane-bound and active at neutral pH. It may also have endopeptidase activity on some substrates. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 3.4.15.1.
Granulomatous disorders affecting one or more sites in the respiratory tract.
A process in which normal lung tissues are progressively replaced by FIBROBLASTS and COLLAGEN causing an irreversible loss of the ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream via PULMONARY ALVEOLI. Patients show progressive DYSPNEA finally resulting in death.
Adrenal cortex hormones are steroid hormones produced by the outer portion of the adrenal gland, consisting of glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids, and androgens, which play crucial roles in various physiological processes such as metabolism regulation, stress response, electrolyte balance, and sexual development and function.
Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
A manifestation of sarcoidosis marked by chronic inflammation of the parotid gland and the uvea.
Characteristic cells of granulomatous hypersensitivity. They appear as large, flattened cells with increased endoplasmic reticulum. They are believed to be activated macrophages that have differentiated as a result of prolonged antigenic stimulation. Further differentiation or fusion of epithelioid cells is thought to produce multinucleated giant cells (GIANT CELLS).
Abnormally high level of calcium in the blood.

Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) clotting activity in human plasma in health and disease in various animal plasmas. (1/1112)

Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) is an agent in normal human plasma that corrects the impaired in vitro surface-mediated plasma reactions of blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and kinin generation observed in Fitzgerald trait plasma. To assess the possible pathophysiologic role of Fitzgerald factor, its titer was measured by a functional clot-promoting assay. Mean +/- SD in 42 normal adults was 0.99+/-0.25 units/ml, one unit being the activity in 1 ml of normal pooled plasma. No difference in titer was noted between normal men and women, during pregnancy, or after physical exercise. Fitzgerald factor activity was significantly reduced in the plasmas of eight patients with advanced hepatic cirrhosis (0.40+/-0.09 units/ml) and of ten patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (0.60+/-0.30 units/ml), but was normal in plasmas of patients with other congenital clotting factor deficiencies, nephrotic syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or sarcoidosis, or under treatment with warfarin. The plasmas of 21 mammalian species tested appeared to contain Fitzgerald factor activity, but those of two avian, two repitilian, and one amphibian species did not correct the coagulant defect in Fitzgerald trait plasmas.  (+info)

Abnormal calcium metabolism in normocalcaemic sarcoidosis. (2/1112)

In studies of calcium metabolism in 13 unselected patients with untreated sarcoidosis all were normocalcaemic but five had hypercalcuria. All had normal renal function. Calcium absorption was indexed by a double isotope test. 45Ca hyperabsorption occurred in six patients. Ten kinetic studies were carried out with 47Ca and in six bone turnover was increased. 45Ca absorption correlated well with the calculated bone uptake rate of calcium, and with urine calcium excretion. These results suggest that in sarcoidosis abnormalities in calcium metabolism are fairly common although they rarely result in sustained hypercalcaemia.  (+info)

Sarcoidosis of the upper respiratory tract and its association with lupus pernio. (3/1112)

In a series of 34 patients with sarcoidosis affecting the upper respiratory tract and nose, 26 had lupus pernio (LP) and 17 had sarcoidosis of the upper respiratory tract (SURT). In nine patients these features coexisted. A patient presenting with SURT carried a 50% risk of developing LP although one feature could be present without the other. Both were disorders of women of the child-bearing years of life. SURT, like LP, was an indicator of chronic fibrotic sarcoidosis, developing insidiously and progressing indolently over the years. It was complicated by ulceration, septal perforation, and LP. Three patients had nasal septal perforations, in two instances following submucous resection. This operation is contraindicated in patients with active sarcoidosis, particularly when granulomas are found on nasal biopsy. The Kveim-Siltzbach skin test was positive in all patients with SURT, making it invaluable in the differential diagnosis of granuloma of the nasal cavity.  (+info)

Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in tissues affected by sarcoidosis. (4/1112)

BACKGROUND: Although some studies have reported the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) DNA in tissues affected by sarcoidosis, the data are conflicting. The aim of this study was to collect prospectively tissue from patients with sarcoidosis in whom tuberculosis had been excluded, and to use polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to search for DNA sequences specific for MTb. METHODS: Fresh tissue samples (node or lung biopsy) taken from 23 patients with newly diagnosed sarcoidosis, 10 with other respiratory disease, and four patients with culture positive tuberculosis were analysed using PCR to amplify a 123 bp fragment of IS6110, the insertion element present in MTb, and nested PCR to further amplify an 85 bp sequence within the 123 bp product. DNA was also extracted from formalin fixed tissue from eight additional patients with sarcoidosis. RESULTS: MTb DNA was not detected in any of the tissue samples from patients with sarcoidosis or other respiratory disease but was found in all four patients with tuberculosis. CONCLUSIONS: This study has shown the absence of MTb DNA in lymph node and lung biopsy samples from patients with sarcoidosis. MTb is therefore unlikely to be a factor in the pathogenesis of this disease.  (+info)

Cutaneous sarcoidosis. (5/1112)

Sarcoidosis is a multi-organ granulomatous disorder of unknown cause. Skin sarcoidosis occurs in about 25% of patients with systemic disease and may also arise in isolation. A wide range of clinical presentations of cutaneous sarcoidosis is recognised. The diagnosis rests on the presence of non-caseating granulomas on skin biopsy and the exclusion of other granulomatous skin disease. The treatment and overall prognosis of cutaneous sarcoidosis is primarily dependent on the degree of systemic involvement. In patients with aggressive disease limited to the skin immunosuppressive therapy may be indicated.  (+info)

Enhanced expression of human metalloelastase (MMP-12) in cutaneous granulomas and macrophage migration. (6/1112)

Accumulation of inflammatory cells such as macrophages may lead to degeneration of connective tissue matrix in various skin diseases. Macrophage metalloelastase, is a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-12) capable of degrading elastin as well as various basement membrane components. To investigate the role of human macrophage metalloelastase in skin, we assessed by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry 66 specimens representing skin diseases characterized either by changes in elastic fibers or by pronounced infiltrations of extravasating and migrating macrophages. CD68 immunostaining was performed to identify the human macrophage metalloelastase-positive cells and Weigert's Resorcin-Fuchsin staining to reveal the status of elastic fibers. We found abundant expression of human macrophage metalloelastase mRNA in macrophages in areas devoid of normal elastic fibers in granulomatous skin diseases sarcoidosis, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, and granuloma annulare. Positive cells for human macrophage metalloelastase protein could be detected in the same regions as well as positive immunostaining for urokinase plasminogen activator. Of the other matrix metalloproteinases capable of degrading elastin, 92 kDa gelatinase colocalized with human macrophage metalloelastase, while 72 kDa gelatinase was produced by surrounding fibroblast-like cells. Furthermore, human macrophage metalloelastase was expressed by macrophages in areas with disrupted basement membrane, as assessed by type IV collagen staining, in pityriasis lichenoides and dermatitis herpetiformis. Specimens of anetoderma, acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans and pseudoxanthoma elasticum showed no signal for human macrophage metalloelastase. Matrilysin was not detected in any of the samples investigated. Our study suggests that human macrophage metalloelastase may contribute to elastin degradation occurring in granulomatous skin diseases and may aid macrophage migration through the epidermal and vascular basement membranes in inflammatory disorders.  (+info)

Antibodies to the IL-12 receptor beta 2 chain mark human Th1 but not Th2 cells in vitro and in vivo. (7/1112)

Great attention has been placed on the possibility of distinguishing Th1 from Th2 cells on the basis of differential expression of surface receptors. We have recently shown that the differential expression of the IL-12R beta 2 chain in Th1 and Th2 cells, as measured at the mRNA level, accounts for an important regulatory mechanism in the differentiation of the two cell subsets. In this study, we identify IL-12R expression at the protein level. We have generated an anti-IL-12R beta 2-specific mAb and analyzed IL-12R beta 2 expression on polarized Th cell populations generated in vitro and on T cells derived from patients with Th1- or Th2-mediated inflammatory conditions. Although IL-12R beta 2 was absent in freshly isolated PBMC and in cord blood cells, we were able to detect IL-12R beta 2 expression selectively in differentiated Th1 and T cytotoxic 1, but not Th2 or T cytotoxic 2 cells. In the presence of IL-12, cell surface expression of the IL-12R beta 2 subunit was readily detected on T cells after 24 h, reached the maximum at day 5, and declined thereafter. Most importantly, the anti-IL-12R beta 2 mAb recognizes lung T cells from patients with sarcoidosis, a disease characterized by a typical cell-mediated, Th1-type inflammatory response. In contrast, IL-12R beta 2 was absent in lung T cells from patients with allergic asthma, a disease characterized by a Th2-type inflammatory response. The mAb reported in this study should represent a powerful tool to investigate the role of Th1 and Th2 cells in inflammatory conditions and to monitor therapies aimed at altering the balance of Th cell subsets.  (+info)

Central nervous system sarcoidosis--diagnosis and management. (8/1112)

A series of 68 patients with neurosarcoidosis is reported, with particular emphasis on clinical aspects, diagnosis and treatment. A classification system based on clinical diagnostic probability is proposed, consisting of probable and definite disease, the latter being dependent on finding sarcoid granulomas on nervous system histology, which was obtained in 12 patients (18%). The role of investigations, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), chest radiography, Kveim skin test, Gallium 67 isotope scanning and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies, is considered. Sixty-two percent of patients presented with nervous system disease, most commonly affecting the optic nerve and chiasm. Other common presentations included cranial nerve palsies, spinal cord and brainstem manifestations. Investigations yielding most diagnostic information included the Kveim test (41/48, 85% positive), raised CSF protein and/or cells (50/62, 81%) and gallium 67 scan (14/31, 45%). Eleven out of 29 patients (38%) patients showed meningeal enhancement on MRI scanning and 43% of scans demonstrated multiple white-matter lesions. Mean follow-up for the group was 4.6 years. Forty-seven patients were seen for > 18 months, and over half of these patients progressed despite corticosteroid and other immunosuppressive therapies. The benefit of a large patient database prospectively studied, with extended follow-up is discussed in order to learn more about prognosis and advance therapy in neurosarcoidosis.  (+info)

Sarcoidosis is a multi-system disorder characterized by the formation of granulomas (small clumps of inflammatory cells) in various organs, most commonly the lungs and lymphatic system. These granulomas can impair the function of the affected organ(s), leading to a variety of symptoms. The exact cause of sarcoidosis is unknown, but it's thought to be an overactive immune response to an unknown antigen, possibly triggered by an infection, chemical exposure, or another environmental factor.

The diagnosis of sarcoidosis typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, imaging studies (such as chest X-rays and CT scans), and laboratory tests (including blood tests and biopsies). While there is no cure for sarcoidosis, treatment may be necessary to manage symptoms and prevent complications. Corticosteroids are often used to suppress the immune system and reduce inflammation, while other medications may be prescribed to treat specific organ involvement or symptoms. In some cases, sarcoidosis may resolve on its own without any treatment.

Sarcoidosis, pulmonary is a specific form of sarcoidosis, which is a multisystem inflammatory disorder characterized by the formation of noncaseating granulomas (small clusters of immune cells) in one or more organs. In pulmonary sarcoidosis, these granulomas primarily affect the lungs, but can also involve the lymph nodes within the chest. The condition is often asymptomatic, but some individuals may experience symptoms such as cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, and fatigue. Pulmonary sarcoidosis can lead to complications like pulmonary fibrosis (scarring of lung tissue) and chronic interstitial lung disease, which can impact lung function and quality of life. The exact cause of sarcoidosis is unknown, but it is believed to involve an abnormal immune response triggered by exposure to certain antigens, such as environmental particles or infectious agents.

The Kveim test is a specific intradermal skin test that was used in the diagnosis of certain forms of vasculitis, such as sarcoidosis. The test involves the injection of a small amount of tissue from a patient with known sarcoidosis into the skin of the person being tested. If the individual has sarcoidosis, a positive reaction will occur within 2-3 months, characterized by the formation of a granuloma (a small nodular inflammatory lesion) at the injection site.

However, it's important to note that the Kveim test is no longer widely used due to several limitations, including the subjective nature of the results and the risk of transmitting infectious diseases from the donor tissue. Currently, sarcoidosis is diagnosed based on a combination of clinical symptoms, radiological findings, laboratory tests, and sometimes biopsy results.

A granuloma is a small, nodular inflammatory lesion that occurs in various tissues in response to chronic infection, foreign body reaction, or autoimmune conditions. Histologically, it is characterized by the presence of epithelioid macrophages, which are specialized immune cells with enlarged nuclei and abundant cytoplasm, often arranged in a palisading pattern around a central area containing necrotic debris, microorganisms, or foreign material.

Granulomas can be found in various medical conditions such as tuberculosis, sarcoidosis, fungal infections, and certain autoimmune disorders like Crohn's disease. The formation of granulomas is a complex process involving both innate and adaptive immune responses, which aim to contain and eliminate the offending agent while minimizing tissue damage.

Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is a type of clinical specimen obtained through a procedure called bronchoalveolar lavage. This procedure involves inserting a bronchoscope into the lungs and instilling a small amount of saline solution into a specific area of the lung, then gently aspirating the fluid back out. The fluid that is recovered is called bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

BAL fluid contains cells and other substances that are present in the lower respiratory tract, including the alveoli (the tiny air sacs where gas exchange occurs). By analyzing BAL fluid, doctors can diagnose various lung conditions, such as pneumonia, interstitial lung disease, and lung cancer. They can also monitor the effectiveness of treatments for these conditions by comparing the composition of BAL fluid before and after treatment.

BAL fluid is typically analyzed for its cellular content, including the number and type of white blood cells present, as well as for the presence of bacteria, viruses, or other microorganisms. The fluid may also be tested for various proteins, enzymes, and other biomarkers that can provide additional information about lung health and disease.

Lung diseases refer to a broad category of disorders that affect the lungs and other structures within the respiratory system. These diseases can impair lung function, leading to symptoms such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, and wheezing. They can be categorized into several types based on the underlying cause and nature of the disease process. Some common examples include:

1. Obstructive lung diseases: These are characterized by narrowing or blockage of the airways, making it difficult to breathe out. Examples include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiectasis, and cystic fibrosis.
2. Restrictive lung diseases: These involve stiffening or scarring of the lungs, which reduces their ability to expand and take in air. Examples include idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, and asbestosis.
3. Infectious lung diseases: These are caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites that infect the lungs. Examples include pneumonia, tuberculosis, and influenza.
4. Vascular lung diseases: These affect the blood vessels in the lungs, impairing oxygen exchange. Examples include pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension, and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH).
5. Neoplastic lung diseases: These involve abnormal growth of cells within the lungs, leading to cancer. Examples include small cell lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and mesothelioma.
6. Other lung diseases: These include interstitial lung diseases, pleural effusions, and rare disorders such as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).

It is important to note that this list is not exhaustive, and there are many other conditions that can affect the lungs. Proper diagnosis and treatment of lung diseases require consultation with a healthcare professional, such as a pulmonologist or respiratory therapist.

Lymphatic diseases refer to a group of conditions that affect the lymphatic system, which is an important part of the immune and circulatory systems. The lymphatic system consists of a network of vessels, organs, and tissues that help to transport lymph fluid throughout the body, fight infection, and remove waste products.

Lymphatic diseases can be caused by various factors, including genetics, infections, cancer, and autoimmune disorders. Some common types of lymphatic diseases include:

1. Lymphedema: A condition that causes swelling in the arms or legs due to a blockage or damage in the lymphatic vessels.
2. Lymphoma: A type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system, including Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
3. Infections: Certain bacterial and viral infections can affect the lymphatic system, such as tuberculosis, cat-scratch disease, and HIV/AIDS.
4. Autoimmune disorders: Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and scleroderma can cause inflammation and damage to the lymphatic system.
5. Congenital abnormalities: Some people are born with abnormalities in their lymphatic system, such as malformations or missing lymph nodes.

Symptoms of lymphatic diseases may vary depending on the specific condition and its severity. Treatment options may include medication, physical therapy, surgery, or radiation therapy. It is important to seek medical attention if you experience symptoms of a lymphatic disease, as early diagnosis and treatment can improve outcomes.

Skin diseases, also known as dermatological conditions, refer to any medical condition that affects the skin, which is the largest organ of the human body. These diseases can affect the skin's function, appearance, or overall health. They can be caused by various factors, including genetics, infections, allergies, environmental factors, and aging.

Skin diseases can present in many different forms, such as rashes, blisters, sores, discolorations, growths, or changes in texture. Some common examples of skin diseases include acne, eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis, fungal infections, viral infections, bacterial infections, and skin cancer.

The symptoms and severity of skin diseases can vary widely depending on the specific condition and individual factors. Some skin diseases are mild and can be treated with over-the-counter medications or topical creams, while others may require more intensive treatments such as prescription medications, light therapy, or even surgery.

It is important to seek medical attention if you experience any unusual or persistent changes in your skin, as some skin diseases can be serious or indicative of other underlying health conditions. A dermatologist is a medical doctor who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of skin diseases.

Erythema nodosum is a type of inflammation that occurs in the fatty layer of the skin, causing painful, red or purple bumps (nodules) to form. It is a type of panniculitis, which refers to any condition that causes inflammation of the fatty layer of tissue beneath the skin.

Erythema nodosum is often associated with a variety of underlying conditions, such as infections (e.g., streptococcus, tuberculosis), medications (e.g., sulfa drugs, oral contraceptives), inflammatory bowel disease (e.g., Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis), and pregnancy.

The bumps associated with erythema nodosum typically appear on the shins, ankles, knees, or other areas of the legs, although they can also occur on the arms, hands, or face. The bumps may be tender to the touch, warm, and swollen, and they may cause pain or discomfort when walking or standing for prolonged periods.

In most cases, erythema nodosum resolves on its own within a few weeks to several months, although symptoms can be managed with medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids. Treating the underlying condition is also important for resolving erythema nodosum and preventing recurrences.

Cardiomyopathies are a group of diseases that affect the heart muscle, leading to mechanical and/or electrical dysfunction. The American Heart Association (AHA) defines cardiomyopathies as "a heterogeneous group of diseases of the myocardium associated with mechanical and/or electrical dysfunction that usually (but not always) exhibit inappropriate ventricular hypertrophy or dilatation and frequently lead to heart failure."

There are several types of cardiomyopathies, including:

1. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM): This is the most common type of cardiomyopathy, characterized by an enlarged left ventricle and impaired systolic function, leading to heart failure.
2. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM): In this type, there is abnormal thickening of the heart muscle, particularly in the septum between the two ventricles, which can obstruct blood flow and increase the risk of arrhythmias.
3. Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM): This is a rare form of cardiomyopathy characterized by stiffness of the heart muscle, impaired relaxation, and diastolic dysfunction, leading to reduced filling of the ventricles and heart failure.
4. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC): In this type, there is replacement of the normal heart muscle with fatty or fibrous tissue, primarily affecting the right ventricle, which can lead to arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death.
5. Unclassified cardiomyopathies: These are conditions that do not fit into any of the above categories but still significantly affect the heart muscle and function.

Cardiomyopathies can be caused by genetic factors, acquired conditions (e.g., infections, toxins, or autoimmune disorders), or a combination of both. The diagnosis typically involves a comprehensive evaluation, including medical history, physical examination, electrocardiogram (ECG), echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and sometimes genetic testing. Treatment depends on the type and severity of the condition but may include medications, lifestyle modifications, implantable devices, or even heart transplantation in severe cases.

Gallium radioisotopes refer to specific types of gallium atoms that have unstable nuclei and emit radiation as they decay towards a more stable state. These isotopes are commonly used in medical imaging, such as in gallium scans, to help diagnose conditions like inflammation, infection, or cancer.

Gallium-67 (^67^Ga) is one of the most commonly used radioisotopes for medical purposes. It has a half-life of about 3.26 days and decays by emitting gamma rays. When administered to a patient, gallium-67 binds to transferrin, a protein that carries iron in the blood, and is taken up by cells with increased metabolic activity, such as cancer cells or immune cells responding to infection or inflammation. The distribution of gallium-67 in the body can then be visualized using a gamma camera, providing valuable diagnostic information.

Uveitis is the inflammation of the uvea, the middle layer of the eye between the retina and the white of the eye (sclera). The uvea consists of the iris, ciliary body, and choroid. Uveitis can cause redness, pain, and vision loss. It can be caused by various systemic diseases, infections, or trauma. Depending on the part of the uvea that's affected, uveitis can be classified as anterior (iritis), intermediate (cyclitis), posterior (choroiditis), or pan-uveitis (affecting all layers). Treatment typically includes corticosteroids and other immunosuppressive drugs to control inflammation.

Bronchoscopy is a medical procedure that involves the examination of the inside of the airways and lungs with a flexible or rigid tube called a bronchoscope. This procedure allows healthcare professionals to directly visualize the airways, take tissue samples for biopsy, and remove foreign objects or secretions. Bronchoscopy can be used to diagnose and manage various respiratory conditions such as lung infections, inflammation, cancer, and bleeding. It is usually performed under local or general anesthesia to minimize discomfort and risks associated with the procedure.

Prednisolone is a synthetic glucocorticoid drug, which is a class of steroid hormones. It is commonly used in the treatment of various inflammatory and autoimmune conditions due to its potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Prednisolone works by binding to specific receptors in cells, leading to changes in gene expression that reduce the production of substances involved in inflammation, such as cytokines and prostaglandins.

Prednisolone is available in various forms, including tablets, syrups, and injectable solutions. It can be used to treat a wide range of medical conditions, including asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, allergies, skin conditions, and certain types of cancer.

Like other steroid medications, prednisolone can have significant side effects if used in high doses or for long periods of time. These may include weight gain, mood changes, increased risk of infections, osteoporosis, diabetes, and adrenal suppression. As a result, the use of prednisolone should be closely monitored by a healthcare professional to ensure that its benefits outweigh its risks.

Peptidyl-dipeptidase A is more commonly known as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). It is a key enzyme in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which regulates blood pressure and fluid balance.

ACE is a membrane-bound enzyme found primarily in the lungs, but also in other tissues such as the heart, kidneys, and blood vessels. It plays a crucial role in converting the inactive decapeptide angiotensin I into the potent vasoconstrictor octapeptide angiotensin II, which constricts blood vessels and increases blood pressure.

ACE also degrades the peptide bradykinin, which is involved in the regulation of blood flow and vascular permeability. By breaking down bradykinin, ACE helps to counteract its vasodilatory effects, thereby maintaining blood pressure homeostasis.

Inhibitors of ACE are widely used as medications for the treatment of hypertension, heart failure, and diabetic kidney disease, among other conditions. These drugs work by blocking the action of ACE, leading to decreased levels of angiotensin II and increased levels of bradykinin, which results in vasodilation, reduced blood pressure, and improved cardiovascular function.

A granuloma in the respiratory tract refers to a small nodular lesion that forms in the lung tissue due to an ongoing immune response. It is typically composed of macrophages, lymphocytes, and other inflammatory cells that cluster together around a foreign substance or organism that the body cannot eliminate.

Granulomas can form in response to various stimuli, including infectious agents such as mycobacteria (tuberculosis, nontuberculous mycobacteria), fungi, and parasites, as well as non-infectious causes like inhaled particles (e.g., silica, beryllium) or autoimmune diseases (e.g., sarcoidosis).

These lesions can cause damage to the lung tissue over time, leading to symptoms such as cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, and fatigue. Diagnosis often involves imaging studies like chest X-rays or CT scans, followed by biopsy and microscopic examination to confirm the presence of granulomas and identify the underlying cause. Treatment depends on the underlying cause but may include antibiotics, corticosteroids, or other immunosuppressive medications.

Pulmonary fibrosis is a specific type of lung disease that results from the thickening and scarring of the lung tissues, particularly those in the alveoli (air sacs) and interstitium (the space around the air sacs). This scarring makes it harder for the lungs to properly expand and transfer oxygen into the bloodstream, leading to symptoms such as shortness of breath, coughing, fatigue, and eventually respiratory failure. The exact cause of pulmonary fibrosis can vary, with some cases being idiopathic (without a known cause) or related to environmental factors, medications, medical conditions, or genetic predisposition.

The adrenal cortex hormones are a group of steroid hormones produced and released by the outer portion (cortex) of the adrenal glands, which are located on top of each kidney. These hormones play crucial roles in regulating various physiological processes, including:

1. Glucose metabolism: Cortisol helps control blood sugar levels by increasing glucose production in the liver and reducing its uptake in peripheral tissues.
2. Protein and fat metabolism: Cortisol promotes protein breakdown and fatty acid mobilization, providing essential building blocks for energy production during stressful situations.
3. Immune response regulation: Cortisol suppresses immune function to prevent overactivation and potential damage to the body during stress.
4. Cardiovascular function: Aldosterone regulates electrolyte balance and blood pressure by promoting sodium reabsorption and potassium excretion in the kidneys.
5. Sex hormone production: The adrenal cortex produces small amounts of sex hormones, such as androgens and estrogens, which contribute to sexual development and function.
6. Growth and development: Cortisol plays a role in normal growth and development by influencing the activity of growth-promoting hormones like insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1).

The main adrenal cortex hormones include:

1. Glucocorticoids: Cortisol is the primary glucocorticoid, responsible for regulating metabolism and stress response.
2. Mineralocorticoids: Aldosterone is the primary mineralocorticoid, involved in electrolyte balance and blood pressure regulation.
3. Androgens: Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate derivative (DHEAS) are the most abundant adrenal androgens, contributing to sexual development and function.
4. Estrogens: Small amounts of estrogens are produced by the adrenal cortex, mainly in women.

Disorders related to impaired adrenal cortex hormone production or regulation can lead to various clinical manifestations, such as Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), Cushing's syndrome (hypercortisolism), and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH).

A biopsy is a medical procedure in which a small sample of tissue is taken from the body to be examined under a microscope for the presence of disease. This can help doctors diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, such as cancer, infections, or autoimmune disorders. The type of biopsy performed will depend on the location and nature of the suspected condition. Some common types of biopsies include:

1. Incisional biopsy: In this procedure, a surgeon removes a piece of tissue from an abnormal area using a scalpel or other surgical instrument. This type of biopsy is often used when the lesion is too large to be removed entirely during the initial biopsy.

2. Excisional biopsy: An excisional biopsy involves removing the entire abnormal area, along with a margin of healthy tissue surrounding it. This technique is typically employed for smaller lesions or when cancer is suspected.

3. Needle biopsy: A needle biopsy uses a thin, hollow needle to extract cells or fluid from the body. There are two main types of needle biopsies: fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and core needle biopsy. FNA extracts loose cells, while a core needle biopsy removes a small piece of tissue.

4. Punch biopsy: In a punch biopsy, a round, sharp tool is used to remove a small cylindrical sample of skin tissue. This type of biopsy is often used for evaluating rashes or other skin abnormalities.

5. Shave biopsy: During a shave biopsy, a thin slice of tissue is removed from the surface of the skin using a sharp razor-like instrument. This technique is typically used for superficial lesions or growths on the skin.

After the biopsy sample has been collected, it is sent to a laboratory where a pathologist will examine the tissue under a microscope and provide a diagnosis based on their findings. The results of the biopsy can help guide further treatment decisions and determine the best course of action for managing the patient's condition.

A lung is a pair of spongy, elastic organs in the chest that work together to enable breathing. They are responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide through the process of respiration. The left lung has two lobes, while the right lung has three lobes. The lungs are protected by the ribcage and are covered by a double-layered membrane called the pleura. The trachea divides into two bronchi, which further divide into smaller bronchioles, leading to millions of tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the exchange of gases occurs.

Uveoparotid fever, also known as Heerfordt's syndrome, is not precisely defined as a fever. Instead, it is a rare manifestation of sarcoidosis, a multisystem granulomatous disorder of unknown cause. The condition is named after the Danish ophthalmologist, Christian Frederik Heerfordt, who first described it in 1909.

Uveoparotid fever is characterized by the following symptoms:

1. Uveitis: Inflammation of the uveal tract, which includes the iris, ciliary body, and choroid, leading to eye pain, redness, photophobia (sensitivity to light), blurred vision, and floaters.
2. Parotid gland enlargement: Swelling of one or both parotid glands, located in front of and below the ears.
3. Facial palsy: Weakness or loss of movement on one side of the face, similar to Bell's palsy.
4. Fever: Elevated body temperature may be present but is not always a consistent finding.

Other possible symptoms associated with sarcoidosis include cough, shortness of breath, skin rashes, fatigue, and joint pain. The diagnosis typically involves a combination of clinical presentation, imaging studies, and tissue biopsy to confirm the presence of noncaseating granulomas, which are characteristic of sarcoidosis. Treatment usually includes corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapy to manage inflammation and prevent complications.

Epithelioid cells are a type of cell that can be found in certain types of tissue in the body, including connective tissue and some organs. These cells have a characteristic appearance under a microscope, with an enlarged, oval or round shape and a pale, abundant cytoplasm. They may also have a nucleus that is centrally located and has a uniform, rounded shape.

Epithelioid cells are often seen in the context of inflammation or disease, particularly in relation to granulomatous disorders such as sarcoidosis and tuberculosis. In these conditions, epithelioid cells can form clusters known as granulomas, which are a hallmark of the diseases. The exact function of epithelioid cells is not fully understood, but they are thought to play a role in the immune response and may help to contain and eliminate foreign substances or pathogens from the body.

Hypercalcemia is a medical condition characterized by an excess of calcium ( Ca2+ ) in the blood. While the normal range for serum calcium levels is typically between 8.5 to 10.2 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter) or 2.14 to 2.55 mmol/L (millimoles per liter), hypercalcemia is generally defined as a serum calcium level greater than 10.5 mg/dL or 2.6 mmol/L.

Hypercalcemia can result from various underlying medical disorders, including primary hyperparathyroidism, malignancy (cancer), certain medications, granulomatous diseases, and excessive vitamin D intake or production. Symptoms of hypercalcemia may include fatigue, weakness, confusion, memory loss, depression, constipation, nausea, vomiting, increased thirst, frequent urination, bone pain, and kidney stones. Severe or prolonged hypercalcemia can lead to serious complications such as kidney failure, cardiac arrhythmias, and calcification of soft tissues. Treatment depends on the underlying cause and severity of the condition.

... may be divided into the following types: Annular sarcoidosis Erythrodermic sarcoidosis Ichthyosiform sarcoidosis ... in sarcoidosis Asteroid body in sarcoidosis Hamazaki-Wesenberg bodies in sarcoidosis in lymph node Diagnosis of sarcoidosis is ... Papular sarcoid Scar sarcoid Subcutaneous sarcoidosis Systemic sarcoidosis Ulcerative sarcoidosis Treatments for sarcoidosis ... especially CNS sarcoidosis; minimally effective in sarcoidosis myopathy), and pulmonary sarcoidosis. As the granulomas are ...
Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease of unknown cause that results in the formation of non-caseating granulomas in multiple organs ... Testicular sarcoidosis can present as a diffuse painless scrotal mass or can mimic acute epididymo-orchitis. Usually it appears ... The peak incidence of sarcoidosis and testicular neoplasia coincide at 20-40 years and this is why most patients end up having ... Paknejad O, Gilani MA, Khoshchehreh M (2011). "Testicular masses in a man with a plausible sarcoidosis". Indian J. Urol. 27 (2 ...
Ulcerative sarcoidosis is a cutaneous condition affecting roughly 5% of people with sarcoidosis.: 710 Annular sarcoidosis is a ... 711 Erythrodermic sarcoidosis is a cutaneous condition and very rare form of sarcoidosis.: 710 Hypopigmented sarcoidosis is a ... by caused by sarcoidosis.: 710 Subcutaneous sarcoidosis (also known as "Darier-Roussy disease" and "Darier-Roussy sarcoid") is ... 709 Morpheaform sarcoidosis is a very rare cutaneous condition characterized by specific cutaneous skin lesions of sarcoidosis ...
It was co-founded by D. Geraint James, who had set up the first international conference on sarcoidosis almost 30 years earlier ... "Statement on Sarcoidosis". American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 160 (2): 736-755. 1 August 1999. doi: ... The World Association of Sarcoidosis and other Granulomatous Disorders, also known as WASOG is an organisation of physicians ... Drent, M.; Costabel, U. (2005). Sarcoidosis: European Respiratory Monograph. European Respiratory Society. p. 336. ISBN ...
... it was classified as a distinct manifestation of sarcoidosis. Darier-Roussy disease Sarcoidosis List of cutaneous conditions ... Heerfordt syndrome is present in 4.1 to 5.6% of those with sarcoidosis. The condition was first described in 1909 by Danish ... In the United States, sarcoidosis has a prevalence of approximately 10 cases per 100,000 whites and 36 cases per 100,000 blacks ... In patients that have already been diagnosed with sarcoidosis, Heerfordt syndrome can be inferred from the major symptoms of ...
Subcutaneous sarcoidosis (Darier-Roussy disease, Darier-Roussy sarcoid) Systemic sarcoidosis Ulcerative sarcoidosis Xanthoma ... Letterer-Siwe disease Localized granuloma annulare Löfgren syndrome Lupus pernio Morpheaform sarcoidosis Mucosal sarcoidosis ... Dempsey OJ, Paterson EW, Kerr KM, Denison AR (2009). "Sarcoidosis". BMJ. 339: b3206. doi:10.1136/bmj.b3206. PMID 19717499. ... disease Heerfordt's syndrome Hereditary progressive mucinous histiocytosis Hypopigmented sarcoidosis Ichthyosiform sarcoidosis ...
"Sarcoidosis". The Lecturio Medical Concept Library. Retrieved 22 August 2021. "Whipple's Disease". The Lecturio Medical Concept ... Henoch-Schönlein purpura Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D with recurrent fever Sarcoidosis Whipple's disease TNF receptor associated ...
Sharma OP (March 1993). "Arthur Conan Doyle and Jonathan Hutchinson: the sarcoidosis connection". Sarcoidosis. 10 (1): 69-70. ... Geraint DJ (June 2002). "Pioneers of sarcoidosis: Jonathan Hutchinson (1828-1913)". Sarcoidosis, Vasculitis and Diffuse Lung ... Sharma OP (March 1986). "Vanity Fair, Spy and Jonathan Hutchinson". Sarcoidosis. 3 (1): 75-6. PMID 3554427. Key JD, Mann RJ ( ... James, D. G. (1969). "Centenary commemoration of sarcoidosis and of Jonathan Hutchinson". British Medical Journal. 2 (5649): ...
Subsequently, with the personal financial support of Gianfranco Rizzato, the journal Sarcoidosis, later renamed Sarcoidosis ... Sarcoidosis and Other Granulomatous Disorders, co-authored with W. Jones, and published by W. B. Saunders, the clinical and ... James's lifetime work on sarcoidosis led him to be known as the "King of Sarcoid". In 1964 James was elected President of the ... By 1958, James had written seven papers on sarcoidosis, two being on its effects on eyes, and had published his first book The ...
"Sarcoidosis , Doctor , Patient". Patient. Retrieved 2016-03-11. Dennis, Mark; Bowen, William Talbot; Cho, Lucy (2012-01-01). ... Sarcoidosis The mechanism of hepatomegaly consists of vascular swelling, inflammation (infectious in origin), and deposition of ...
Sarcoidosis is a disease of unknown cause characterized by non-necrotizing ("non-caseating") granulomas in multiple organs and ... The granulomas of sarcoidosis are similar to those of tuberculosis and other infectious granulomatous diseases. In most cases ... Necrosis in granulomas Granuloma without necrosis in a lymph node of a person with sarcoidosis Granuloma with central necrosis ... Iannuzzi M, Rybicki BA, Teirstein AS (2007). "Sarcoidosis". New England Journal of Medicine. 357 (21): 2153-2165. doi:10.1056/ ...
James WE (2019-01-01). "Chapter 23 - Nonpharmacological Therapy for Pulmonary Sarcoidosis". In Baughman RP, Valeyre D (eds.). ... Sarcoidosis. Philadelphia: Elsevier. pp. 277-284. doi:10.1016/b978-0-323-54429-0.00023-9. ISBN 978-0-323-54429-0. S2CID ...
"More Information". Sarcoidosis Program. Retrieved 2019-08-09. Sanofi halts tests of arthritis drug for use as a COVID-19 ... In July 2019, a multi-center trial was launched to study 'Sarilumab in Patients With Glucocorticoid-Dependent Sarcoidosis.' In ...
He had sarcoidosis. Armstrong was born in Holden, Alberta, in 1941. He bought his first car, a 1936 Ford Coupe, for five ...
... can also occur as a result of vocal cord dysfunction (VCD). Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease of ... Bokhari, SRA; Zulfiqar, H; Mansur, A (January 2021). Sarcoidosis in StatPearls. PMID 28613460. Harrison's Principles of ...
... has been used off-label in treating refractory sarcoidosis, where other treatments have not been effective. ... Wijsenbeek MS, Culver DA (December 2015). "Treatment of Sarcoidosis". Clinics in Chest Medicine. 36 (4): 751-767. doi:10.1016/j ...
List of cutaneous conditions Sarcoidosis Ohta H, Tazawa R, Nakamura A, et al. (2006). "Acute-onset sarcoidosis with erythema ... Löfgren syndrome is a type of acute sarcoidosis, an inflammatory disorder characterized by swollen lymph nodes in the chest, ... Löfgren S (1953). "Primary pulmonary sarcoidosis. I. Early signs and symptoms". Acta Med Scand. 145 (6): 424-431. doi:10.1111/j ...
HGSNAT Sarcoidosis, early-onset; 609464; NOD2 SC phocomelia syndrome; 269000; ESCO2 Scapuloperoneal myopathy, X-linked dominant ...
Scott RB (15 October 1938). "The Sarcoidosis of Boeck". Br Med J. 2 (4058): 777-781, 800-1. doi:10.1136/bmj.2.4058.777. PMC ...
van Maarsseveen, Ton C.; de Groot, Jan; Stam, Jaap; van Diest, Paul J. (1993-05-01). "Peripolesis in Alveolar Sarcoidosis". ... In patients with active sarcoidosis, which is characterized by lymphocyte-macrophage cooperation, lymphocyte peripolesis ...
Hedfors E, Holm G, Pettersson D (June 1974). "Lymphocyte subpopulations in sarcoidosis". Clinical and Experimental Immunology. ... sarcoidosis, multiple sclerosis, and iatrogenic (caused by other medical treatments) conditions. Lymphocytopenia is a frequent ...
Ishihara M, Ohno S (Nov 1997). "Genetic influences on sarcoidosis". Eye. 11. 11 (2): 155-61. doi:10.1038/eye.1997.44. PMID ...
Early onset sarcoidosis is Blau syndrome without a family history, Blau syndrome has been diagnosed in patients who have not ... "Blau's Disease / Juvenile Sarcoidosis". www.printo.it. Kaufman, Katherine; Becker, Mara (9 February 2021). "Distinguishing Blau ... Symptoms usually begin before the age of four, and the disease manifests as early onset cutaneous sarcoidosis, granulomatous ... from Blau syndrome and early-onset sarcoidosis to NOD2-mediated disease and Crohn's disease. RMD Open 2015; 1: e000097. PMID ...
Karadağ, AS; Parish, LC (2019-05-01). "Sarcoidosis: a great imitator". Clinics in Dermatology. 37 (3): 240-254. doi:10.1016/j. ... Tchernev, G (2006). "Cutaneous sarcoidosis: The 'great imitator': Etiopathogenesis, morphology, differential diagnosis, and ... Sarcoidosis Endometriosis, often misdiagnosed Multiple sclerosis Celiac disease Closely related to gut function is liver ...
Sarcoidosis: Nephrocalcinosis is one of the most common symptoms. Vitamin D: This can cause nephrocalcinosis because of vitamin ... Muther, R. S.; McCarron, D. A.; Bennett, W. M. (April 1981). "Renal manifestations of sarcoidosis". Archives of Internal ...
Bogart, A.S.; Daniel, D.D.; Poster, K.G. (1954). "Cortisone Treatment of Sarcoidosis". Diseases of the Chest. 26 (2): 224-228. ... and stop the development of sarcoidosis. Oral use of cortisone has a number of potential systemic adverse effects, including ...
... sarcoidosis in the lungs; and to treat edema in certain nephrotic syndromes. In the UK tetracosactide is used for short-term ...
Chen ES (September 2016). "Innate immunity in sarcoidosis pathobiology". Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine. 22 (5): 469-475 ... of function with development of Crohn's disease and early-onset sarcoidosis. Mutations in NOD2 in cooperation with ...
Heck AW, Phillips LH (August 1989). "Sarcoidosis and the nervous system". Neurologic Clinics. 7 (3): 641-54. doi:10.1016/S0733- ... sarcoidosis. Multiple sclerosis may also be causal. Vitamin deficiency states: Vitamin B12 (Methylcobalamin), vitamin A, ... HIV Sarcoidosis Cryoglobulinemia Reactions to exposure to chemical agents, including trichloroethylene and dapsone[medical ...
"T-lymphocyte activity in HLA-DR17 positive patients with active and clinically recovered sarcoidosis". Sarcoidosis Vasc Diffuse ... 2007). "HLA class I and class II frequencies in patients with sarcoidosis from Croatia: role of HLA-B8, −DRB1*0301, and −DQB1* ... DR17 is associated with non-chronic sarcoidosis, infantile spasm/epilepsy, rabies vaccine-induced autoimmune encephalomyelitis ... "HLA-DR predicts the prognosis in Scandinavian patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis". Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 156 (5): 1601-5 ...
Sarcoidosis may be divided into the following types: Annular sarcoidosis Erythrodermic sarcoidosis Ichthyosiform sarcoidosis ... in sarcoidosis Asteroid body in sarcoidosis Hamazaki-Wesenberg bodies in sarcoidosis in lymph node Diagnosis of sarcoidosis is ... Papular sarcoid Scar sarcoid Subcutaneous sarcoidosis Systemic sarcoidosis Ulcerative sarcoidosis Treatments for sarcoidosis ... especially CNS sarcoidosis; minimally effective in sarcoidosis myopathy), and pulmonary sarcoidosis. As the granulomas are ...
The optimal management of sarcoidosis has not been well defined. Although corticosteroids remain the mainstay of treatment, ... Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown cause affecting young and middle-aged adults. Patients commonly ... Infliximab for refractory sarcoidosis [published correction in Sarcoidosis Vasc Diffuse Lung Dis 2001;18:310]. Sarcoidosis Vasc ... Efficacy of azathio-prine as second-line treatment in pulmonary sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis Vasc Diffuse Lung Dis. 1999;16:87-92. ...
The description of sarcoidosis goes back to 1899, when Caesar Boeck described the skin nodules characterized by epithelioid ... Sarcoidosis, a systemic, granulomatous disease, can occur in adult and pediatric patients, but it is nonetheless relatively ... Management of pediatric sarcoidosis. The goal of therapy in sarcoidosis is to prevent or minimize inflammation and granuloma ... Signs and symptoms of pediatric sarcoidosis. The presentation in sarcoidosis can vary widely, depending on the extent and ...
Breast cancer has been shown to precede a diagnosis of sarcoidosis in 18%-24% of patients with sarcoidosis. 5,6 The mechanism ... Osseous sarcoidosis is an uncommon manifestation of sarcoidosis that can mimic metastatic bone disease on imaging. ... Can sarcoidosis and metastatic bone lesions be reliably differentiated on routine MRI? AJR Am J Roentgenol 2012;198:1387-93. ... Sarcoidosis is typically thought of as a pulmonary disease, but it can affect any organ in the body and involves bone in about ...
Sarcoidosis is a condition that causes granulomas in your lungs, lymph nodes, skin, eyes and other parts of your body. Symptoms ... Sarcoidosis symptoms differ depending on what part of your body has granulomas.. What is sarcoidosis?. Sarcoidosis is a ... How common is sarcoidosis?. Sarcoidosis is considered a rare disease. There are usually fewer than 200,000 cases of sarcoidosis ... Sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis is a condition that causes lumps or nodules (granulomas) to form in your lungs, lymph nodes, skin, ...
What You Should Know About Sarcoidosis. Local Audio Posts May 4, 2015 15 ...
... project supported by the National Institutes of Health has developed a tool to rapidly and inexpensively diagnose sarcoidosis, ... Though the exact cause of sarcoidosis is unknown, researchers suspect it is an immune disorder triggered by a group of specific ... Currently, diagnosing sarcoidosis isnt a straightforward process, and requires tissue removal and testing with additional ... Peng, C., et al. (2024) Discovery of Two Novel Immunoepitopes and Development of Peptide-based Sarcoidosis Immunoassay. ...
Four patients developed multiple narrowings or occlusions of bronchi during the early stages of sarcoidosis when the chest ... of bronchial narrowing should be considered in patients who develop breathlessness or wheezing at any stage of sarcoidosis, and ...
Sarcoidosis, an inflammatory disease of unknown cause that can affect almost any organ, has been noted in unexpectedly large ... Clinical Course of Sarcoidosis in World Trade Center Exposed Firefighters. Chest. 153(1):114-123. ... We will also assess genetic differences with similarly WTC-exposed firefighters who did not develop sarcoidosis. The results ... their clinical patterns and genetic markers and compare them with those of previously reported non-WTC-exposed sarcoidosis ...
Sarcoidosis (say sar-koy-DOH-sus) is a rare disease that creates tiny lumps of cells throughout the body. These lumps are ... How is sarcoidosis diagnosed?. Sarcoidosis is often found in patients who dont have any symptoms of sarcoidosis but who have ... What causes sarcoidosis?. No one knows for sure what causes sarcoidosis.. It may be caused by an abnormal response of the ... Sarcoidosis. Conditions Basics. Sarcoidosis (say "sar-koy-DOH-sus") is a rare disease that creates tiny lumps of cells ...
Uptake of Fluorine-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose in Sarcoidosis Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from Journal of ... The Utility of 18F-FDG PET/CT for Diagnosis and Adjustment of Therapy in Patients with Active Chronic Sarcoidosis ... Uptake of Fluorine-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose in Sarcoidosis. Petra J. Lewis and Alan Salama ... The clinical conundrum of diagnosing and treating systemic sarcoidosis in a high TB burden area ...
Sarcoidosis has been increasingly reported in association with cancer. It can precede, follow or occur at the same time as the ... We report a case of sarcoidosis that was diagnosed concomitantly with colon cancer, highlighting the diagnostic dilemma of ... sarcoidosis vs. cancer metastasis, the relationship between the two, and the value of PET scan in follow-up and monitoring of ... Sarcoidosis is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by “noncaseating granulomas.” It primarily affects ...
Temple Health is one of the few facilities in the world to be recognized as a Sarcoidosis Center of Excellence. ... Temple Lung Centers Sarcoidosis Program Recognized as a "Sarcoidosis Clinic" by International and National Sarcoidosis ... Finding strength in the sarcoidosis community. It also helps to know Im not alone. Dr. Gupta told me about a sarcoidosis ... I learned that sarcoidosis can affect the whole body, and that my digestive problems were likely related to the effects the ...
Planet Ayurveda provides effective herbal remedies for natural treatment of Sarcoidosis. Read the real story of Dr. S. K. ... Case Study No: 144 , Sarcoidosis - Dr. S. K. Bhanote. Dr. S. K. Bhanote had Sarcoidosis and was healed by Planet Ayurveda. Dr. ... Then he came back to India and began searching on the internet to find a cure for Sarcoidosis in other medical fields like ... He watched a video of a person who got the cure for Sarcoidosis by Planet Ayurveda. The person seemed genuine and was just ...
Betty Washington describes the impact of sarcoidosis and PH on her life and how she stays strong by surrounding herself with ... When Diagnosed With Sarcoidosis?. In 1991, I was diagnosed with sarcoidosis, an autoimmune disease that often affects the lungs ... Having PH and sarcoidosis has taught me to evaluate my life and be careful with my body, and appreciate what I have. If someone ... Ill never forget, in 1996 I had a sarcoidosis attack. I had been coughing up blood for a while, but it happened once while I ...
... before the doctors realized it was Sarcoidosis. Please help me if you can advise what vitamins or supplements I should be ... What can I do to improve my Sarcoidosis, this autoimmune disease that at the present time is in my lungs and thru out my body? ... What can I do to improve my Sarcoidosis, this autoimmune disease that at the present time is in my lungs and thru out my body? ... What can I do to improve my Sarcoidosis? BY: Jacob Teitelbaum, MD ... For Sarcoidosis in particular, I consider long-term antibiotic ...
Can Rheumatoid arthritis cause sarcoidosis?. admin. 15/09/2022. Can Rheumatoid arthritis cause sarcoidosis?. Co-occurrence of ... What specialty treats sarcoidosis?. Sarcoidosis, or sarcoid for short, is a disease in which the bodys immune system becomes ... What is Rheumatology & sarcoidosis?. Sarcoidosis is a disease that may develop after inflammation, causing immune cells to ... Is sarcoidosis a form of arthritis?. Chronic sarcoid arthritis typically occurs in the setting of systemic sarcoidosis. Chronic ...
Efficacy and Safety of Intravenous Efzofitimod in Patients With Pulmonary Sarcoidosis ... Efficacy and Safety of Intravenous Efzofitimod in Patients With Pulmonary Sarcoidosis. aTyr Investigative Site ...
Multiorgan accelerated silicosis misdiagnosed as sarcoidosis in two workers exposed to quartz conglomerate dust ... Multiorgan accelerated silicosis misdiagnosed as sarcoidosis in two workers exposed to quartz conglomerate dust ...
Subsequent endomyocardial biopsy showed non-caseating granulomatous inflammation, consistent with cardiac sarcoidosis. ...
M63.3: Myositis in sarcoidosis * M63.30 Myositis in sarcoidosis Multiple sites * M63.31 Myositis in sarcoidosis Shoulder region ... M63.39 Myositis in sarcoidosis Site unspecified Note In outpatient care, the ICD code on medical documents is always appended ...
Please read our article on Sarcoidosis under articles on our site. Your answer and solution lies here. ... I am challenged with sarcoidosis. I have it in my lungs but it is stable, now it has spread to my brain. What can I use to heal ... Please read our article on Sarcoidosis under articles on our site. Your answer and solution lies here. ...
Carti: Produse Sărbători creştine (2011) - Sarcoidosis Demystified: Doctors Secret Guide (ISBN: 9798223206682). Sărbători ...
Sarcoidosis - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer Version. ... Prognosis for Sarcoidosis Sarcoidosis improves or clears up spontaneously in nearly two thirds of people with lung sarcoidosis ... Symptoms of Sarcoidosis Many people with sarcoidosis have no symptoms, and the disorder is discovered on a chest x-ray that is ... Sarcoidosis (Leg). Areas in which skin color is lost and nodules are present in a person with sarcoidosis. ...
Sarcoidosis is a rare multi-organ system granulomatous disease of uncertain aetiology. Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is clinically ... Cardiac sarcoidosis: applications of imaging in diagnosis and directing treatment. Heart 2011;97:2078-87.doi:10.1136/hrt. ... CS, cardiac sarcoidosis; FDG-PET, 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography; T2W-STIR-BB, T2-weighted short-tau- ... JCS 2016 guideline on diagnosis and treatment of cardiac sarcoidosis-digest version. Circ J 2019;83:2329-88.doi:10.1253/circj. ...
Nail dystrophy in sarcoidosis is rare. The most common nail changes described in sarcoidosis include thickening of the nail ... Treatment options for nail dystrophy in sarcoidosis include systemic treatment with 10mg/day of prednisone and 200mg/day of ... In 1997, she developed systemic sarcoidosis with lung and cutaneous lesions. The patient required gradually tapered systemic ... Nail dystrophy in sarcoidosis is rare. The most common nail changes described in sarcoidosis include thickening of the nail ...
... sarcoidosis are discussed will be also an autoinflammatory disease.4 Association of the gouty arthritis and sarcoidosis has ... In sarcoidosis patients hyperuricemia is probably due to the defects of urate metabolism. The presence of the phagocytosed ... Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease with unknown cause characterized by non-caseating granuloma formations. It may present ... Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease with unknown cause characterized by non-caseating granuloma formations. It may present ...
Return to Article Details Cardiovascular magnetic resonance-guided diagnosis of cardiac affection in a Caucasian sarcoidosis ...
... fever fatigue swollen lymph nodes weight loss coughing coughing at night shortness of breath chest pain purple-red ... Sarcoidosis Would you like to know what lab results mean? DDxHub - Differential Diagnosis Hub helps to understand and explains ... The cause of sarcoidosis is unknown. The disease can appear suddenly and disappear. Or it can develop gradually and go on to ... Sarcoidosis is a disease that results from a specific type of inflammation of tissues of the body. Chronic multisystem disease ...

No FAQ available that match "sarcoidosis"