Phase of the CELL CYCLE following G1 and preceding G2 when the entire DNA content of the nucleus is replicated. It is achieved by bidirectional replication at multiple sites along each chromosome.
The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.
The period of the CELL CYCLE preceding DNA REPLICATION in S PHASE. Subphases of G1 include "competence" (to respond to growth factors), G1a (entry into G1), G1b (progression), and G1c (assembly). Progression through the G1 subphases is effected by limiting growth factors, nutrients, or inhibitors.
The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.
Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.
The interval between two successive CELL DIVISIONS during which the CHROMOSOMES are not individually distinguishable. It is composed of the G phases (G1 PHASE; G0 PHASE; G2 PHASE) and S PHASE (when DNA replication occurs).
A type of CELL NUCLEUS division by means of which the two daughter nuclei normally receive identical complements of the number of CHROMOSOMES of the somatic cells of the species.
A key regulator of CELL CYCLE progression. It partners with CYCLIN E to regulate entry into S PHASE and also interacts with CYCLIN A to phosphorylate RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN. Its activity is inhibited by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P27 and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P21.
Protein kinases that control cell cycle progression in all eukaryotes and require physical association with CYCLINS to achieve full enzymatic activity. Cyclin-dependent kinases are regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events.
A 50-kDa protein that complexes with CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 2 in the late G1 phase of the cell cycle.
A large family of regulatory proteins that function as accessory subunits to a variety of CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES. They generally function as ENZYME ACTIVATORS that drive the CELL CYCLE through transitions between phases. A subset of cyclins may also function as transcriptional regulators.
A cyclin subtype that has specificity for CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 2. It plays a role in progression of the CELL CYCLE through G1/S and G2/M phase transitions.
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
A family of cell cycle-dependent kinases that are related in structure to CDC28 PROTEIN KINASE; S CEREVISIAE; and the CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE found in mammalian species.
The period of the CELL CYCLE following DNA synthesis (S PHASE) and preceding M PHASE (cell division phase). The CHROMOSOMES are tetraploid in this point.
A unique DNA sequence of a replicon at which DNA REPLICATION is initiated and proceeds bidirectionally or unidirectionally. It contains the sites where the first separation of the complementary strands occurs, a primer RNA is synthesized, and the switch from primer RNA to DNA synthesis takes place. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)
A family of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that control expression of a variety of GENES involved in CELL CYCLE regulation. E2F transcription factors typically form heterodimeric complexes with TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR DP1 or transcription factor DP2, and they have N-terminal DNA binding and dimerization domains. E2F transcription factors can act as mediators of transcriptional repression or transcriptional activation.
A group of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues in proteins, with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
Product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene. It is a nuclear phosphoprotein hypothesized to normally act as an inhibitor of cell proliferation. Rb protein is absent in retinoblastoma cell lines. It also has been shown to form complexes with the adenovirus E1A protein, the SV40 T antigen, and the human papilloma virus E7 protein.
Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.
An antiviral antibiotic produced by Cephalosporium aphidicola and other fungi. It inhibits the growth of eukaryotic cells and certain animal viruses by selectively inhibiting the cellular replication of DNA polymerase II or the viral-induced DNA polymerases. The drug may be useful for controlling excessive cell proliferation in patients with cancer, psoriasis or other dermatitis with little or no adverse effect upon non-multiplying cells.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS.
An E2F transcription factor that interacts directly with RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN and CYCLIN A and activates GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION required for CELL CYCLE entry and DNA synthesis. E2F1 is involved in DNA REPAIR and APOPTOSIS.
A nucleoside that substitutes for thymidine in DNA and thus acts as an antimetabolite. It causes breaks in chromosomes and has been proposed as an antiviral and antineoplastic agent. It has been given orphan drug status for use in the treatment of primary brain tumors.
A quiescent state of cells during G1 PHASE.
Phosphoprotein with protein kinase activity that functions in the G2/M phase transition of the CELL CYCLE. It is the catalytic subunit of the MATURATION-PROMOTING FACTOR and complexes with both CYCLIN A and CYCLIN B in mammalian cells. The maximal activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 is achieved when it is fully dephosphorylated.
Nuclear antigen with a role in DNA synthesis, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. PCNA is required for the coordinated synthesis of both leading and lagging strands at the replication fork during DNA replication. PCNA expression correlates with the proliferation activity of several malignant and non-malignant cell types.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.
Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.
A transcription factor that possesses DNA-binding and E2F-binding domains but lacks a transcriptional activation domain. It is a binding partner for E2F TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS and enhances the DNA binding and transactivation function of the DP-E2F complex.
A ubiquitously expressed regulatory protein that contains a retinoblastoma protein binding domain and an AT-rich interactive domain. The protein may play a role in recruiting HISTONE DEACETYLASES to the site of RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN-containing transcriptional repressor complexes.
A cyclin subtype that is transported into the CELL NUCLEUS at the end of the G2 PHASE. It stimulates the G2/M phase transition by activating CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE.
A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that coordinates the activation of CYCLIN and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES during the CELL CYCLE. It interacts with active CYCLIN D complexed to CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 4 in proliferating cells, while in arrested cells it binds and inhibits CYCLIN E complexed to CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 2.
The material of CHROMOSOMES. It is a complex of DNA; HISTONES; and nonhistone proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE) found within the nucleus of a cell.
Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
Enzyme activated in response to DNA DAMAGE involved in cell cycle arrest. The gene is located on the long (q) arm of chromosome 22 at position 12.1. In humans it is encoded by the CHEK2 gene.
A genus of ascomycetous fungi of the family Schizosaccharomycetaceae, order Schizosaccharomycetales.
Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.
A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.
Proteins obtained from the species Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.
Genes that code for proteins that regulate the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. These genes form a regulatory network that culminates in the onset of MITOSIS by activating the p34cdc2 protein (PROTEIN P34CDC2).
Nucleoproteins, which in contrast to HISTONES, are acid insoluble. They are involved in chromosomal functions; e.g. they bind selectively to DNA, stimulate transcription resulting in tissue-specific RNA synthesis and undergo specific changes in response to various hormones or phytomitogens.
Protein encoded by the bcl-1 gene which plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle. Overexpression of cyclin D1 is the result of bcl-1 rearrangement, a t(11;14) translocation, and is implicated in various neoplasms.
Compounds that inhibit cell production of DNA or RNA.
A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that mediates TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P53-dependent CELL CYCLE arrest. p21 interacts with a range of CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES and associates with PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN and CASPASE 3.
A group of cell cycle proteins that negatively regulate the activity of CYCLIN/CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE complexes. They inhibit CELL CYCLE progression and help control CELL PROLIFERATION following GENOTOXIC STRESS as well as during CELL DIFFERENTIATION.
Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.
Geminin inhibits DNA replication by preventing the incorporation of MCM complex into pre-replication complex. It is absent during G1 phase of the CELL CYCLE and accumulates through S, G2,and M phases. It is degraded at the metaphase-anaphase transition by the ANAPHASE-PROMOTING COMPLEX-CYCLOSOME.
A family of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of ATP and a protein to ADP and a phosphoprotein.
Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
3-Hydroxy-4-oxo-1(4H)-pyridinealanine. An antineoplastic alanine-substituted pyridine derivative isolated from Leucena glauca.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of fungi.
A family of structurally-related proteins that were originally identified by their ability to complex with cyclin proteins (CYCLINS). They share a common domain that binds specifically to F-BOX MOTIFS. They take part in SKP CULLIN F-BOX PROTEIN LIGASES, where they can bind to a variety of F-BOX PROTEINS.
Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 is a key regulator of G1 PHASE of the CELL CYCLE. It partners with CYCLIN D to phosphorylate RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN. CDK4 activity is inhibited by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P16.
The origin recognition complex is a multi-subunit DNA-binding protein that initiates DNA REPLICATION in eukaryotes.
Proteins found in any species of fungus.
A subclass of dual specificity phosphatases that play a role in the progression of the CELL CYCLE. They dephosphorylate and activate CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
A minichromosome maintenance protein that is a key component of the six member MCM protein complex. It is also found in tightly-bound trimeric complex with MINICHROMOSOME MAINTENANCE COMPLEX COMPONENT 6 and MINICHROMOSOME MAINTENANCE COMPLEX COMPONENT 7.
Thymidine is a pyrimidine nucleoside, consisting of a thymine base linked to a deoxyribose sugar by a β-N1-glycosidic bond, which plays a crucial role in DNA replication and repair processes as one of the four nucleosides in DNA.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
A minichromosome maintenance protein that is a key component of the six member MCM protein complex. It is also found in tightly-bound trimeric complex with MINICHROMOSOME MAINTENANCE COMPLEX COMPONENT 4 and MINICHROMOSOME MAINTENANCE COMPLEX COMPONENT 6.
The temporal order in which the DNA of the GENOME is replicated.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
A group of PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES which activate critical signaling cascades in double strand breaks, APOPTOSIS, and GENOTOXIC STRESS such as ionizing ultraviolet A light, thereby acting as a DNA damage sensor. These proteins play a role in a wide range of signaling mechanisms in cell cycle control.
Either of the two longitudinally adjacent threads formed when a eukaryotic chromosome replicates prior to mitosis. The chromatids are held together at the centromere. Sister chromatids are derived from the same chromosome. (Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as "dark repair" because they do not require light.
Cell lines whose original growing procedure consisted being transferred (T) every 3 days and plated at 300,000 cells per plate (J Cell Biol 17:299-313, 1963). Lines have been developed using several different strains of mice. Tissues are usually fibroblasts derived from mouse embryos but other types and sources have been developed as well. The 3T3 lines are valuable in vitro host systems for oncogenic virus transformation studies, since 3T3 cells possess a high sensitivity to CONTACT INHIBITION.
Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.
Structures within the nucleus of fungal cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.
A minichromosome maintenance protein that is a key component of the six member MCM protein complex. It contains a NUCLEAR LOCALIZATION SIGNAL, which provide targeting of the protein complex. In addition, acetylation of this protein may play a role in regulating of DNA replication and cell cycle progression.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
A minichromosome maintenance protein that is a key component of the six member MCM protein complex. It contains a NUCLEAR LOCALIZATION SIGNAL which may provide targeting of the protein complex and an extended N-terminus which is rich in SERINE residues.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
An E2F transcription factor that interacts directly with RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN and CYCLIN A. E2F2 activates GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION required for CELL CYCLE entry and DNA synthesis.
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.
An increased tendency of the GENOME to acquire MUTATIONS when various processes involved in maintaining and replicating the genome are dysfunctional.
Regulatory signaling systems that control the progression of the CELL CYCLE through the G1 PHASE and allow transition to S PHASE when the cells are ready to undergo DNA REPLICATION. DNA DAMAGE, or the deficiencies in specific cellular components or nutrients may cause the cells to halt before progressing through G1 phase.
A broadly expressed type D cyclin. Experiments using KNOCKOUT MICE suggest a role for cyclin D3 in LYMPHOCYTE development.
A cyclin D subtype which is regulated by GATA4 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR. Experiments using KNOCKOUT MICE suggest a role for cyclin D2 in granulosa cell proliferation and gonadal development.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
A widely-expressed cyclin A subtype that functions during the G1/S and G2/M transitions of the CELL CYCLE.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Complexes of enzymes that catalyze the covalent attachment of UBIQUITIN to other proteins by forming a peptide bond between the C-terminal GLYCINE of UBIQUITIN and the alpha-amino groups of LYSINE residues in the protein. The complexes play an important role in mediating the selective-degradation of short-lived and abnormal proteins. The complex of enzymes can be broken down into three components that involve activation of ubiquitin (UBIQUITIN-ACTIVATING ENZYMES), conjugation of ubiquitin to the ligase complex (UBIQUITIN-CONJUGATING ENZYMES), and ligation of ubiquitin to the substrate protein (UBIQUITIN-PROTEIN LIGASES).
Regulatory signaling systems that control the progression through the CELL CYCLE. They ensure that the cell has completed, in the correct order and without mistakes, all the processes required to replicate the GENOME and CYTOPLASM, and divide them equally between two daughter cells. If cells sense they have not completed these processes or that the environment does not have the nutrients and growth hormones in place to proceed, then the cells are restrained (or "arrested") until the processes are completed and growth conditions are suitable.
The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.
In a prokaryotic cell or in the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell, a structure consisting of or containing DNA which carries the genetic information essential to the cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
An E3 ubiquitin ligase primarily involved in regulation of the metaphase-to-anaphase transition during MITOSIS through ubiquitination of specific CELL CYCLE PROTEINS. Enzyme activity is tightly regulated through subunits and cofactors, which modulate activation, inhibition, and substrate specificity. The anaphase-promoting complex, or APC-C, is also involved in tissue differentiation in the PLACENTA, CRYSTALLINE LENS, and SKELETAL MUSCLE, and in regulation of postmitotic NEURONAL PLASTICITY and excitability.
A cyclin subtype that is specific for CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 4 and CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 6. Unlike most cyclins, cyclin D expression is not cyclical, but rather it is expressed in response to proliferative signals. Cyclin D may therefore play a role in cellular responses to mitogenic signals.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
An alkylating agent in cancer therapy that may also act as a mutagen by interfering with and causing damage to DNA.
A family of proteins that share the F-BOX MOTIF and are involved in protein-protein interactions. They play an important role in process of protein ubiquition by associating with a variety of substrates and then associating into SCF UBIQUITIN LIGASE complexes. They are held in the ubiquitin-ligase complex via binding to SKP DOMAIN PROTEINS.
An E2F transcription factor that represses GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION required for CELL CYCLE entry and DNA synthesis. E2F4 recruits chromatin remodeling factors indirectly to target gene PROMOTER REGIONS through RETINOBLASTOMA LIKE PROTEIN P130 and RETINOBLASTOMA LIKE PROTEIN P107.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
A cyclin B subtype that colocalizes with MICROTUBULES during INTERPHASE and is transported into the CELL NUCLEUS at the end of the G2 PHASE.
DNA present in neoplastic tissue.
A family of structurally related proteins that were originally discovered for their role in cell-cycle regulation in CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS. They play important roles in regulation of the CELL CYCLE and as components of UBIQUITIN-PROTEIN LIGASES.
A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.
The portion of chromosome material that remains condensed and is transcriptionally inactive during INTERPHASE.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in fungi.
A DNA-dependent DNA polymerase characterized in E. coli and other lower organisms. It may be present in higher organisms and has an intrinsic molecular activity only 5% of that of DNA Polymerase I. This polymerase has 3'-5' exonuclease activity, is effective only on duplex DNA with gaps or single-strand ends of less than 100 nucleotides as template, and is inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents. EC 2.7.7.7.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
An E2F transcription factor that interacts directly with RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN and CYCLIN A. E2F3 regulates GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION required for CELL CYCLE entry and DNA synthesis.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.
A diverse class of enzymes that interact with UBIQUITIN-CONJUGATING ENZYMES and ubiquitination-specific protein substrates. Each member of this enzyme group has its own distinct specificity for a substrate and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. Ubiquitin-protein ligases exist as both monomeric proteins multiprotein complexes.
A family of proteins that were originally identified in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE as being essential for maintaining the structure of minichromosomes00. They form into a protein complex that has helicase activity and is involved in a variety of DNA-related functions including replication elongation, RNA transcription, chromatin remodeling, and genome stability.
Cyclin-dependent kinase 6 associates with CYCLIN D and phosphorylates RETINOBLASTOMA PROTEIN during G1 PHASE of the CELL CYCLE. It helps regulate the transition to S PHASE and its kinase activity is inhibited by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P18.
The functional hereditary units of FUNGI.
Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.
Nocodazole is an antineoplastic agent which exerts its effect by depolymerizing microtubules.
The phase of cell nucleus division following METAPHASE, in which the CHROMATIDS separate and migrate to opposite poles of the spindle.
A single-stranded DNA-binding protein that is found in EUKARYOTIC CELLS. It is required for DNA REPLICATION; DNA REPAIR; and GENETIC RECOMBINATION.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
The clear constricted portion of the chromosome at which the chromatids are joined and by which the chromosome is attached to the spindle during cell division.
A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.
Products of proto-oncogenes. Normally they do not have oncogenic or transforming properties, but are involved in the regulation or differentiation of cell growth. They often have protein kinase activity.
Any DNA sequence capable of independent replication or a molecule that possesses a REPLICATION ORIGIN and which is therefore potentially capable of being replicated in a suitable cell. (Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
The degree of replication of the chromosome set in the karyotype.
A negative regulator of the CELL CYCLE that undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION by CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES. It contains a conserved pocket region that binds E2F4 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR and interacts with viral ONCOPROTEINS such as POLYOMAVIRUS TUMOR ANTIGENS; ADENOVIRUS E1A PROTEINS; and PAPILLOMAVIRUS E7 PROTEINS.
A continuous cell line of high contact-inhibition established from NIH Swiss mouse embryo cultures. The cells are useful for DNA transfection and transformation studies. (From ATCC [Internet]. Virginia: American Type Culture Collection; c2002 [cited 2002 Sept 26]. Available from http://www.atcc.org/)
High molecular weight proteins found in the MICROTUBULES of the cytoskeletal system. Under certain conditions they are required for TUBULIN assembly into the microtubules and stabilize the assembled microtubules.
Cellular DNA-binding proteins encoded by the c-myc genes. They are normally involved in nucleic acid metabolism and in mediating the cellular response to growth factors. Elevated and deregulated (constitutive) expression of c-myc proteins can cause tumorigenesis.

The yeast ser/thr phosphatases sit4 and ppz1 play opposite roles in regulation of the cell cycle. (1/4298)

Yeast cells overexpressing the Ser/Thr protein phosphatase Ppz1 display a slow-growth phenotype. These cells recover slowly from alpha-factor or nutrient depletion-induced G1 arrest, showing a considerable delay in bud emergence as well as in the expression of the G1 cyclins Cln2 and Clb5. Therefore, an excess of the Ppz1 phosphatase interferes with the normal transition from G1 to S phase. The growth defect is rescued by overexpression of the HAL3/SIS2 gene, encoding a negative regulator of Ppz1. High-copy-number expression of HAL3/SIS2 has been reported to improve cell growth and to increase expression of G1 cyclins in sit4 phosphatase mutants. We show here that the described effects of HAL3/SIS2 on sit4 mutants are fully mediated by the Ppz1 phosphatase. The growth defect caused by overexpression of PPZ1 is intensified in strains with low G1 cyclin levels (such as bck2Delta or cln3Delta mutants), whereas mutation of PPZ1 rescues the synthetic lethal phenotype of sit4 cln3 mutants. These results reveal a role for Ppz1 as a regulatory component of the yeast cell cycle, reinforce the notion that Hal3/Sis2 serves as a negative modulator of the biological functions of Ppz1, and indicate that the Sit4 and Ppz1 Ser/Thr phosphatases play opposite roles in control of the G1/S transition.  (+info)

p27 is involved in N-cadherin-mediated contact inhibition of cell growth and S-phase entry. (2/4298)

In this study the direct involvement of cadherins in adhesion-mediated growth inhibition was investigated. It is shown here that overexpression of N-cadherin in CHO cells significantly suppresses their growth rate. Interaction of these cells and two additional fibroblastic lines with synthetic beads coated with N-cadherin ligands (recombinant N-cadherin ectodomain or specific antibodies) leads to growth arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The cadherin-reactive beads inhibit the entry into S phase and the reduction in the levels of cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitors p21 and p27, following serum-stimulation of starved cells. In exponentially growing cells these beads induce G1 arrest accompanied by elevation in p27 only. We propose that cadherin-mediated signaling is involved in contact inhibition of growth by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase and elevation of p27 levels.  (+info)

Leukemia translocation protein PLZF inhibits cell growth and expression of cyclin A. (3/4298)

The PLZF gene was identified by its fusion with the RARalpha locus in a therapy resistant form of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) associated with the t(11;17)(q23;q21) translocation. Here we describe PLZF as a negative regulator of cell cycle progression ultimately leading to growth suppression. PLZF can bind and repress the cyclin A2 promoter while expression of cyclin A2 reverts the growth suppressed phenotype of myeloid cells expressing PLZF. In contrast RARalpha-PLZF, a fusion protein generated in t(11;17)(q23;q21)-APL activates cyclin A2 transcription and allows expression of cyclin A in anchorage-deprived NIH3T3 cells. Therefore, cyclin A2 is a candidate target gene for PLZF and inhibition of cyclin A expression may contribute to the growth suppressive properties of PLZF. Deregulation of cyclin A2 by RARalpha-PLZF may represent an oncogenic mechanism of this chimeric protein and contribute to the aggressive clinical phenotype of t(11;17)(q23;q21)-associated APL.  (+info)

Interleukin-6 dependent induction of the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 is lost during progression of human malignant melanoma. (4/4298)

Human melanoma cell lines derived from early stage primary tumors are particularly sensitive to growth arrest induced by interleukin-6 (IL-6). This response is lost in cell lines derived from advanced lesions, a phenomenon which may contribute to tumor aggressiveness. We sought to determine whether resistance to growth inhibition by IL-6 can be explained by oncogenic alterations in cell cycle regulators or relevant components of intracellular signaling. Our results show that IL-6 treatment of early stage melanoma cell lines caused G1 arrest, which could not be explained by changes in levels of G1 cyclins (D1, E), cdks (cdk4, cdk2) or by loss of cyclin/cdk complex formation. Instead, IL-6 caused a marked induction of the cdk inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 in three different IL-6 sensitive cell lines, two of which also showed a marked accumulation of the cdk inhibitor p27Kip1. In contrast, IL-6 failed to induce p21WAF1/CIP1 transcript and did not increase p21WAF1/CIP1 or p27kip1 proteins in any of the resistant lines. In fact, of five IL-6 resistant cell lines, only two expressed detectable levels of p21WAF1/CIP1 mRNA and protein, while in three other lines, p21WAF1/CIP1 was undetectable. IL-6 dependent upregulation of p21WAF1/CIP1 was associated with binding of both STAT3 and STAT1 to the p21WAF1/CIP1 promoter. Surprisingly, however, IL-6 stimulated STAT binding to this promoter in both sensitive and resistant cell lines (with one exception), suggesting that gross deregulation of this event is not the unifying cause of the defect in p21WAF1/CIP1 induction in IL-6 resistant cells. In somatic cell hybrids of IL-6 sensitive and resistant cell lines, the resistant phenotype was dominant and IL-6 failed to induce p21WAF1/CIP1. Thus, our results suggest that in early stage human melanoma cells, IL-6 induced growth inhibition involves induction of p21WAF1/CIP1 which is lost in the course of tumor progression presumably as a result of a dominant oncogenic event.  (+info)

Caffeine can override the S-M checkpoint in fission yeast. (5/4298)

The replication checkpoint (or 'S-M checkpoint') control prevents progression into mitosis when DNA replication is incomplete. Caffeine has been known for some time to have the capacity to override the S-M checkpoint in animal cells. We show here that caffeine also disrupts the S-M checkpoint in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. By contrast, no comparable effects of caffeine on the S. pombe DNA damage checkpoint were seen. S. pombe cells arrested in early S phase and then exposed to caffeine lost viability rapidly as they attempted to enter mitosis, which was accompanied by tyrosine dephosphorylation of Cdc2. Despite this, the caffeine-induced loss of viability was not blocked in a temperature-sensitive cdc2 mutant incubated at the restrictive temperature, although catastrophic mitosis was prevented under these conditions. This suggests that, in addition to S-M checkpoint control, a caffeine-sensitive function may be important for maintenance of cell viability during S phase arrest. The lethality of a combination of caffeine with the DNA replication inhibitor hydroxyurea was suppressed by overexpression of Cds1 or Chk1, protein kinases previously implicated in S-M checkpoint control and recovery from S phase arrest. In addition, the same combination of drugs was specifically tolerated in cells overexpressing either of two novel S. pombe genes isolated in a cDNA library screen. These findings should allow further molecular investigation of the regulation of S phase arrest, and may provide a useful system with which to identify novel drugs that specifically abrogate the checkpoint control.  (+info)

Regulation of the start of DNA replication in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. (6/4298)

Cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe were grown in minimal medium with different nitrogen sources under steady-state conditions, with doubling times ranging from 2.5 to 14 hours. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy confirmed earlier findings that at rapid growth rates, the G1 phase was short and cell separation occurred at the end of S phase. For some nitrogen sources, the growth rate was greatly decreased, the G1 phase occupied 30-50% of the cell cycle, and cell separation occurred in early G1. In contrast, other nitrogen sources supported low growth rates without any significant increase in G1 duration. The method described allows manipulation of the length of G1 and the relative cell cycle position of S phase in wild-type cells. Cell mass was measured by flow cytometry as scattered light and as protein-associated fluorescence. The extensions of G1 were not related to cell mass at entry into S phase. Our data do not support the hypothesis that the cells must reach a certain fixed, critical mass before entry into S. We suggest that cell mass at the G1/S transition point is variable and determined by a set of molecular parameters. In the present experiments, these parameters were influenced by the different nitrogen sources in a way that was independent of the actual growth rate.  (+info)

Immunologic proliferation marker Ki-S2 as prognostic indicator for lymph node-negative breast cancer. (7/4298)

BACKGROUND: Proper treatment of lymph node-negative breast cancer depends on an accurate prognosis. To improve prognostic models for this disease, we evaluated whether an immunohistochemical marker for proliferating cells, Ki-S2 (a monoclonal antibody that binds to a 100-kd nuclear protein expressed in S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle), is an accurate indicator of prognosis. METHODS: We studied 371 Swedish women with lymph node-negative breast cancer; the median follow-up time was 95 months. The fraction of tumor cells in S phase was assessed by flow cytometry, and tumor cell proliferation was measured immunohistochemically with the monoclonal antibodies Ki-S2 and Ki-S5 (directed against the nuclear antigen Ki-67). A combined prognostic index was calculated on the basis of the S-phase fraction, progesterone receptor content, and tumor size. RESULTS: In multivariate analyses that did or did not (263 and 332 observations, respectively) include the S-phase fraction and the combined prognostic index, the Ki-S2 labeling index (percentage of antibody-stained tumor cell nuclei) emerged as the most statistically significant predictor of overall survival, disease-specific survival, and disease-free survival (all two-sided P<.0001). In the risk group defined by a Ki-S2 labeling index of 10% or less, life expectancy was not statistically significantly different from that of age-matched women without breast cancer, whereas the group with a high Ki-S2 labeling index had an increased risk of mortality of up to 20-fold. CONCLUSIONS: Cellular proliferation is a major determinant of the biologic behavior of breast cancer. Prognosis is apparently best indicated by the percentage of cells in S through M phases of the cell cycle. Measurement of the Ki-S2 labeling index of a tumor sample may improve a clinician's ability to make an accurate prognosis and to identify patients with a low risk of recurrence who may not need adjuvant therapy.  (+info)

Fus3p and Kss1p control G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through a balance of distinct arrest and proliferative functions that operate in parallel with Far1p. (8/4298)

In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mating pheromones activate two MAP kinases (MAPKs), Fus3p and Kss1p, to induce G1 arrest prior to mating. Fus3p is known to promote G1 arrest by activating Far1p, which inhibits three Clnp/Cdc28p kinases. To analyze the contribution of Fus3p and Kss1p to G1 arrest that is independent of Far1p, we constructed far1 CLN strains that undergo G1 arrest from increased activation of the mating MAP kinase pathway. We find that Fus3p and Kss1p both control G1 arrest through multiple functions that operate in parallel with Far1p. Fus3p and Kss1p together promote G1 arrest by repressing transcription of G1/S cyclin genes (CLN1, CLN2, CLB5) by a mechanism that blocks their activation by Cln3p/Cdc28p kinase. In addition, Fus3p and Kss1p counteract G1 arrest through overlapping and distinct functions. Fus3p and Kss1p together increase the expression of CLN3 and PCL2 genes that promote budding, and Kss1p inhibits the MAP kinase cascade. Strikingly, Fus3p promotes proliferation by a novel function that is not linked to reduced Ste12p activity or increased levels of Cln2p/Cdc28p kinase. Genetic analysis suggests that Fus3p promotes proliferation through activation of Mcm1p transcription factor that upregulates numerous genes in G1 phase. Thus, Fus3p and Kss1p control G1 arrest through a balance of arrest functions that inhibit the Cdc28p machinery and proliferative functions that bypass this inhibition.  (+info)

In the context of cell biology, "S phase" refers to the part of the cell cycle during which DNA replication occurs. The "S" stands for synthesis, reflecting the active DNA synthesis that takes place during this phase. It is preceded by G1 phase (gap 1) and followed by G2 phase (gap 2), with mitosis (M phase) being the final stage of the cell cycle.

During S phase, the cell's DNA content effectively doubles as each chromosome is replicated to ensure that the two resulting daughter cells will have the same genetic material as the parent cell. This process is carefully regulated and coordinated with other events in the cell cycle to maintain genomic stability.

The cell cycle is a series of events that take place in a cell leading to its division and duplication. It consists of four main phases: G1 phase, S phase, G2 phase, and M phase.

During the G1 phase, the cell grows in size and synthesizes mRNA and proteins in preparation for DNA replication. In the S phase, the cell's DNA is copied, resulting in two complete sets of chromosomes. During the G2 phase, the cell continues to grow and produces more proteins and organelles necessary for cell division.

The M phase is the final stage of the cell cycle and consists of mitosis (nuclear division) and cytokinesis (cytoplasmic division). Mitosis results in two genetically identical daughter nuclei, while cytokinesis divides the cytoplasm and creates two separate daughter cells.

The cell cycle is regulated by various checkpoints that ensure the proper completion of each phase before progressing to the next. These checkpoints help prevent errors in DNA replication and division, which can lead to mutations and cancer.

The G1 phase, or Gap 1 phase, is the first phase of the cell cycle, during which the cell grows in size and synthesizes mRNA and proteins in preparation for subsequent steps leading to mitosis. During this phase, the cell also checks its growth and makes sure that it is large enough to proceed through the cell cycle. If the cell is not large enough, it will arrest in the G1 phase until it has grown sufficiently. The G1 phase is followed by the S phase, during which DNA replication occurs.

DNA replication is the biological process by which DNA makes an identical copy of itself during cell division. It is a fundamental mechanism that allows genetic information to be passed down from one generation of cells to the next. During DNA replication, each strand of the double helix serves as a template for the synthesis of a new complementary strand. This results in the creation of two identical DNA molecules. The enzymes responsible for DNA replication include helicase, which unwinds the double helix, and polymerase, which adds nucleotides to the growing strands.

Cell cycle proteins are a group of regulatory proteins that control the progression of the cell cycle, which is the series of events that take place in a eukaryotic cell leading to its division and duplication. These proteins can be classified into several categories based on their functions during different stages of the cell cycle.

The major groups of cell cycle proteins include:

1. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs): CDKs are serine/threonine protein kinases that regulate key transitions in the cell cycle. They require binding to a regulatory subunit called cyclin to become active. Different CDK-cyclin complexes are activated at different stages of the cell cycle.
2. Cyclins: Cyclins are a family of regulatory proteins that bind and activate CDKs. Their levels fluctuate throughout the cell cycle, with specific cyclins expressed during particular phases. For example, cyclin D is important for the G1 to S phase transition, while cyclin B is required for the G2 to M phase transition.
3. CDK inhibitors (CKIs): CKIs are regulatory proteins that bind to and inhibit CDKs, thereby preventing their activation. CKIs can be divided into two main families: the INK4 family and the Cip/Kip family. INK4 family members specifically inhibit CDK4 and CDK6, while Cip/Kip family members inhibit a broader range of CDKs.
4. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C): APC/C is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets specific proteins for degradation by the 26S proteasome. During the cell cycle, APC/C regulates the metaphase to anaphase transition and the exit from mitosis by targeting securin and cyclin B for degradation.
5. Other regulatory proteins: Several other proteins play crucial roles in regulating the cell cycle, such as p53, a transcription factor that responds to DNA damage and arrests the cell cycle, and the polo-like kinases (PLKs), which are involved in various aspects of mitosis.

Overall, cell cycle proteins work together to ensure the proper progression of the cell cycle, maintain genomic stability, and prevent uncontrolled cell growth, which can lead to cancer.

Interphase is a phase in the cell cycle during which the cell primarily performs its functions of growth and DNA replication. It is the longest phase of the cell cycle, consisting of G1 phase (during which the cell grows and prepares for DNA replication), S phase (during which DNA replication occurs), and G2 phase (during which the cell grows further and prepares for mitosis). During interphase, the chromosomes are in their relaxed, extended form and are not visible under the microscope. Interphase is followed by mitosis, during which the chromosomes condense and separate to form two genetically identical daughter cells.

Mitosis is a type of cell division in which the genetic material of a single cell, called the mother cell, is equally distributed into two identical daughter cells. It's a fundamental process that occurs in multicellular organisms for growth, maintenance, and repair, as well as in unicellular organisms for reproduction.

The process of mitosis can be broken down into several stages: prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase. During prophase, the chromosomes condense and become visible, and the nuclear envelope breaks down. In prometaphase, the nuclear membrane is completely disassembled, and the mitotic spindle fibers attach to the chromosomes at their centromeres.

During metaphase, the chromosomes align at the metaphase plate, an imaginary line equidistant from the two spindle poles. In anaphase, sister chromatids are pulled apart by the spindle fibers and move toward opposite poles of the cell. Finally, in telophase, new nuclear envelopes form around each set of chromosomes, and the chromosomes decondense and become less visible.

Mitosis is followed by cytokinesis, a process that divides the cytoplasm of the mother cell into two separate daughter cells. The result of mitosis and cytokinesis is two genetically identical cells, each with the same number and kind of chromosomes as the original parent cell.

Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 (CDK2) is a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle, which is the process by which cells grow and divide. CDK2 is activated when it binds to a regulatory subunit called a cyclin.

During the cell cycle, CDK2 helps to control the progression from the G1 phase to the S phase, where DNA replication occurs. Specifically, CDK2 phosphorylates various target proteins that are involved in the regulation of DNA replication and the initiation of mitosis, which is the process of cell division.

CDK2 activity is tightly regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, and protein degradation. Dysregulation of CDK2 activity has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer. Therefore, CDK2 is an important target for the development of therapies aimed at treating these diseases.

Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in regulating the cell cycle, transcription, and other cellular processes. They are activated by binding to cyclin proteins, which accumulate and degrade at specific stages of the cell cycle. The activation of CDKs leads to phosphorylation of various downstream target proteins, resulting in the promotion or inhibition of different cell cycle events. Dysregulation of CDKs has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, and they are considered important targets for drug development.

Cyclin E is a type of cyclin protein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle, particularly during the G1 phase and the transition to the S phase. It functions as a regulatory subunit of the Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) complex, which is responsible for promoting the progression of the cell cycle.

Cyclin E is synthesized during the late G1 phase of the cell cycle and accumulates to high levels until it forms a complex with CDK2. The Cyclin E-CDK2 complex then phosphorylates several target proteins, leading to the activation of various downstream pathways that promote DNA replication and cell cycle progression.

The regulation of Cyclin E expression and activity is tightly controlled through multiple mechanisms, including transcriptional regulation, protein stability, and proteasomal degradation. Dysregulation of Cyclin E has been implicated in various human cancers, including breast, ovarian, and lung cancer, due to its role in promoting uncontrolled cell proliferation and genomic instability.

Cyclins are a family of regulatory proteins that play a crucial role in the cell cycle, which is the series of events that take place as a cell grows, divides, and produces two daughter cells. They are called cyclins because their levels fluctuate or cycle during the different stages of the cell cycle.

Cyclins function as subunits of serine/threonine protein kinase complexes, forming an active enzyme that adds phosphate groups to other proteins, thereby modifying their activity. This post-translational modification is a critical mechanism for controlling various cellular processes, including the regulation of the cell cycle.

There are several types of cyclins (A, B, D, and E), each of which is active during specific phases of the cell cycle:

1. Cyclin D: Expressed in the G1 phase, it helps to initiate the cell cycle by activating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) that promote progression through the G1 restriction point.
2. Cyclin E: Active during late G1 and early S phases, it forms a complex with CDK2 to regulate the transition from G1 to S phase, where DNA replication occurs.
3. Cyclin A: Expressed in the S and G2 phases, it associates with both CDK2 and CDK1 to control the progression through the S and G2 phases and entry into mitosis (M phase).
4. Cyclin B: Active during late G2 and M phases, it partners with CDK1 to regulate the onset of mitosis by controlling the breakdown of the nuclear envelope, chromosome condensation, and spindle formation.

The activity of cyclins is tightly controlled through several mechanisms, including transcriptional regulation, protein degradation, and phosphorylation/dephosphorylation events. Dysregulation of cyclin expression or function can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and proliferation, which are hallmarks of cancer.

Cyclin A is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the progression of the cell cycle, particularly through the G1 and S phases. It forms a complex with and acts as a regulatory subunit for cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), specifically CDK2 and CDK1. The activation of Cyclin A-CDK complexes leads to phosphorylation of various target proteins, which in turn regulates DNA replication and the transition to mitosis.

Cyclin A levels rise during the late G1 phase and peak during the S phase, after which they decline rapidly during the G2 phase. Any abnormalities in Cyclin A regulation or expression can contribute to uncontrolled cell growth and cancer development.

Cell division is the process by which a single eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) divides into two identical daughter cells. This complex process involves several stages, including replication of DNA, separation of chromosomes, and division of the cytoplasm. There are two main types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of cell division that results in two genetically identical daughter cells. It is a fundamental process for growth, development, and tissue repair in multicellular organisms. The stages of mitosis include prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, followed by cytokinesis, which divides the cytoplasm.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is a type of cell division that occurs in the gonads (ovaries and testes) during the production of gametes (sex cells). Meiosis results in four genetically unique daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. This process is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity. The stages of meiosis include meiosis I and meiosis II, which are further divided into prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

In summary, cell division is the process by which a single cell divides into two daughter cells, either through mitosis or meiosis. This process is critical for growth, development, tissue repair, and sexual reproduction in multicellular organisms.

CDC2 and CDC28 are members of the Serine/Threonine protein kinase family, which play crucial roles in the regulation of the cell cycle. These kinases were originally identified in yeast (CDC28) and humans (CDC2), but they are highly conserved across eukaryotes.

CDC2-CDC28 Kinases function as a part of larger complexes, often associated with cyclins, to control different phases of the cell cycle by phosphorylating specific substrates at key regulatory points. The activity of CDC2-CDC28 Kinases is tightly regulated through various mechanisms, including phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, and protein binding interactions.

During the G2 phase of the cell cycle, CDC2-CDC28 Kinases are inactivated by phosphorylation at specific residues (Tyr15 and Thr14). As the cell approaches mitosis, a family of phosphatases called Cdc25 removes these inhibitory phosphates, leading to activation of the kinase. Activated CDC2-CDC28 Kinases then initiate mitotic processes such as chromosome condensation and nuclear envelope breakdown.

In summary, CDC2-CDC28 Kinases are essential regulators of the eukaryotic cell cycle, controlling various aspects of cell division through phosphorylation of specific substrates. Their activity is tightly regulated to ensure proper progression through the cell cycle and prevent uncontrolled cell growth, which can lead to diseases such as cancer.

The G2 phase, also known as the "gap 2 phase," is a stage in the cell cycle that occurs after DNA replication (S phase) and before cell division (mitosis). During this phase, the cell prepares for mitosis by completing the synthesis of proteins and organelles needed for chromosome separation. The cell also checks for any errors or damage to the DNA before entering mitosis. This phase is a critical point in the cell cycle where proper regulation ensures the faithful transmission of genetic information from one generation of cells to the next. If significant DNA damage is detected during G2, the cell may undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis) instead of dividing.

A replication origin is a specific location in a DNA molecule where the process of DNA replication is initiated. It serves as the starting point for the synthesis of new strands of DNA during cell division. The origin of replication contains regulatory elements and sequences that are recognized by proteins, which then recruit and assemble the necessary enzymes to start the replication process. In eukaryotic cells, replication origins are often found in clusters, with multiple origins scattered throughout each chromosome.

E2F transcription factors are a family of proteins that play crucial roles in the regulation of the cell cycle, DNA repair, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). These factors bind to specific DNA sequences called E2F responsive elements, located in the promoter regions of target genes. They can act as either transcriptional activators or repressors, depending on which E2F family member is involved, the presence of co-factors, and the phase of the cell cycle.

The E2F family consists of eight members, divided into two groups based on their functions: activator E2Fs (E2F1, E2F2, and E2F3a) and repressor E2Fs (E2F3b, E2F4, E2F5, E2F6, and E2F7). Activator E2Fs promote the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression, DNA replication, and repair. Repressor E2Fs, on the other hand, inhibit the transcription of these same genes as well as genes involved in differentiation and apoptosis.

Dysregulation of E2F transcription factors has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer. Overexpression or hyperactivation of activator E2Fs can lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, while loss of function or inhibition of repressor E2Fs can result in impaired differentiation and increased susceptibility to malignancies. Therefore, understanding the roles and regulation of E2F transcription factors is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies against cancer and other diseases associated with cell cycle dysregulation.

Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases (PSTKs) are a type of protein kinase that catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the hydroxyl side chains of serine or threonine residues on target proteins. This phosphorylation process plays a crucial role in various cellular signaling pathways, including regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. PSTKs are involved in many physiological and pathological processes, and their dysregulation has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders.

DNA-binding proteins are a type of protein that have the ability to bind to DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), the genetic material of organisms. These proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as regulation of gene expression, DNA replication, repair and recombination.

The binding of DNA-binding proteins to specific DNA sequences is mediated by non-covalent interactions, including electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals forces. The specificity of binding is determined by the recognition of particular nucleotide sequences or structural features of the DNA molecule.

DNA-binding proteins can be classified into several categories based on their structure and function, such as transcription factors, histones, and restriction enzymes. Transcription factors are a major class of DNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region of genes and recruiting other proteins to modulate transcription. Histones are DNA-binding proteins that package DNA into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin structure. Restriction enzymes are DNA-binding proteins that recognize and cleave specific DNA sequences, and are widely used in molecular biology research and biotechnology applications.

Retinoblastoma Protein (pRb or RB1) is a tumor suppressor protein that plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle and preventing uncontrolled cell growth. It is encoded by the RB1 gene, located on chromosome 13. The retinoblastoma protein functions as a regulatory checkpoint in the cell cycle, preventing cells from progressing into the S phase (DNA synthesis phase) until certain conditions are met.

When pRb is in its active state, it binds to and inhibits the activity of E2F transcription factors, which promote the expression of genes required for DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Phosphorylation of pRb by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) leads to the release of E2F factors, allowing them to activate their target genes and drive the cell into S phase.

Mutations in the RB1 gene can result in the production of a nonfunctional or reduced amount of pRb protein, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and an increased risk of developing retinoblastoma, a rare form of eye cancer, as well as other types of tumors.

Nuclear proteins are a category of proteins that are primarily found in the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell. They play crucial roles in various nuclear functions, such as DNA replication, transcription, repair, and RNA processing. This group includes structural proteins like lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, and regulatory proteins, such as histones and transcription factors, that are involved in gene expression. Nuclear localization signals (NLS) often help target these proteins to the nucleus by interacting with importin proteins during active transport across the nuclear membrane.

Aphidicolin is an antimicrotubule agent that is specifically a inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha. It is an antibiotic that is produced by the fungus Cephalosporium aphidicola and is used in research to study the cell cycle and DNA replication. In clinical medicine, it has been explored as a potential anticancer agent, although its use is not currently approved for this indication.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the genetic material present in the cells of organisms where it is responsible for the storage and transmission of hereditary information. DNA is a long molecule that consists of two strands coiled together to form a double helix. Each strand is made up of a series of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - that are linked together by phosphate and sugar groups. The sequence of these bases along the length of the molecule encodes genetic information, with A always pairing with T and C always pairing with G. This base-pairing allows for the replication and transcription of DNA, which are essential processes in the functioning and reproduction of all living organisms.

DNA damage refers to any alteration in the structure or composition of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which is the genetic material present in cells. DNA damage can result from various internal and external factors, including environmental exposures such as ultraviolet radiation, tobacco smoke, and certain chemicals, as well as normal cellular processes such as replication and oxidative metabolism.

Examples of DNA damage include base modifications, base deletions or insertions, single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, and crosslinks between the two strands of the DNA helix. These types of damage can lead to mutations, genomic instability, and chromosomal aberrations, which can contribute to the development of diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and aging-related conditions.

The body has several mechanisms for repairing DNA damage, including base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, and double-strand break repair. However, if the damage is too extensive or the repair mechanisms are impaired, the cell may undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death) to prevent the propagation of potentially harmful mutations.

E2F1 is a member of the E2F family of transcription factors, which are involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Specifically, E2F1 plays a role as a transcriptional activator, binding to specific DNA sequences and promoting the expression of genes required for the G1/S transition of the cell cycle.

In more detail, E2F1 forms a complex with a retinoblastoma protein (pRb) in the G0 and early G1 phases of the cell cycle. When pRb is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinases during the late G1 phase, E2F1 is released and can then bind to its target DNA sequences and activate transcription of genes involved in DNA replication and cell cycle progression.

However, if E2F1 is overexpressed or activated inappropriately, it can also promote apoptosis, making it a key player in both cell proliferation and cell death pathways. Dysregulation of E2F1 has been implicated in the development of various human cancers, including breast, lung, and prostate cancer.

Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) is a synthetic thymidine analog that can be incorporated into DNA during cell replication. It is often used in research and medical settings as a marker for cell proliferation or as a tool to investigate DNA synthesis and repair. When cells are labeled with BrdU and then examined using immunofluorescence or other detection techniques, the presence of BrdU can indicate which cells have recently divided or are actively synthesizing DNA.

In medical contexts, BrdU has been used in cancer research to study tumor growth and response to treatment. It has also been explored as a potential therapeutic agent for certain conditions, such as neurodegenerative diseases, where promoting cell proliferation and replacement of damaged cells may be beneficial. However, its use as a therapeutic agent is still experimental and requires further investigation.

G0 phase, also known as the resting phase or quiescent stage, is a part of the cell cycle in which cells are not actively preparing to divide. In this phase, cells are metabolically active and can carry out their normal functions, but they are not synthesizing DNA or dividing. Cells in G0 phase have left the cell cycle and may remain in this phase for an indefinite period of time, until they receive signals to re-enter the cell cycle and begin preparing for division again.

It's important to note that not all cells go through the G0 phase. Some cells, such as stem cells and certain types of immune cells, may spend most of their time in G0 phase and only enter the cell cycle when they are needed to replace damaged or dying cells. Other cells, such as those lining the digestive tract, continuously divide and do not have a G0 phase.

CDC2 protein kinase, also known as cell division cycle 2 or CDK1, is a type of enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the series of events that cells undergo as they grow, replicate their DNA, and divide into two daughter cells.

CDC2 protein kinase is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family, which are serine/threonine protein kinases that are activated by binding to regulatory subunits called cyclins. CDC2 protein kinase is primarily associated with the regulation of the G2 phase and the entry into mitosis, the stage of the cell cycle where nuclear and cytoplasmic division occur.

CDC2 protein kinase functions by phosphorylating various target proteins, which alters their activity and contributes to the coordination of the different events that occur during the cell cycle. The activity of CDC2 protein kinase is tightly regulated through a variety of mechanisms, including phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, as well as the binding and destruction of cyclin subunits.

Dysregulation of CDC2 protein kinase has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, where uncontrolled cell division can lead to the formation of tumors. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of CDC2 protein kinase is an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is a protein that plays an essential role in the process of DNA replication and repair in eukaryotic cells. It functions as a cofactor for DNA polymerase delta, enhancing its activity during DNA synthesis. PCNA forms a sliding clamp around DNA, allowing it to move along the template and coordinate the actions of various enzymes involved in DNA metabolism.

PCNA is often used as a marker for cell proliferation because its levels increase in cells that are actively dividing or have been stimulated to enter the cell cycle. Immunostaining techniques can be used to detect PCNA and determine the proliferative status of tissues or cultures. In this context, 'proliferating' refers to the rapid multiplication of cells through cell division.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

The cell nucleus is a membrane-bound organelle found in the eukaryotic cells (cells with a true nucleus). It contains most of the cell's genetic material, organized as DNA molecules in complex with proteins, RNA molecules, and histones to form chromosomes.

The primary function of the cell nucleus is to regulate and control the activities of the cell, including growth, metabolism, protein synthesis, and reproduction. It also plays a crucial role in the process of mitosis (cell division) by separating and protecting the genetic material during this process. The nuclear membrane, or nuclear envelope, surrounding the nucleus is composed of two lipid bilayers with numerous pores that allow for the selective transport of molecules between the nucleoplasm (nucleus interior) and the cytoplasm (cell exterior).

The cell nucleus is a vital structure in eukaryotic cells, and its dysfunction can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

HeLa cells are a type of immortalized cell line used in scientific research. They are derived from a cancer that developed in the cervical tissue of Henrietta Lacks, an African-American woman, in 1951. After her death, cells taken from her tumor were found to be capable of continuous division and growth in a laboratory setting, making them an invaluable resource for medical research.

HeLa cells have been used in a wide range of scientific studies, including research on cancer, viruses, genetics, and drug development. They were the first human cell line to be successfully cloned and are able to grow rapidly in culture, doubling their population every 20-24 hours. This has made them an essential tool for many areas of biomedical research.

It is important to note that while HeLa cells have been instrumental in numerous scientific breakthroughs, the story of their origin raises ethical questions about informed consent and the use of human tissue in research.

Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins are the proteins that are produced by the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This organism is a single-celled eukaryote that has been widely used as a model organism in scientific research for many years due to its relatively simple genetic makeup and its similarity to higher eukaryotic cells.

The genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been fully sequenced, and it is estimated to contain approximately 6,000 genes that encode proteins. These proteins play a wide variety of roles in the cell, including catalyzing metabolic reactions, regulating gene expression, maintaining the structure of the cell, and responding to environmental stimuli.

Many Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins have human homologs and are involved in similar biological processes, making this organism a valuable tool for studying human disease. For example, many of the proteins involved in DNA replication, repair, and recombination in yeast have human counterparts that are associated with cancer and other diseases. By studying these proteins in yeast, researchers can gain insights into their function and regulation in humans, which may lead to new treatments for disease.

Transcription factor DP1 (TFDP1) is not a specific medical term, but it is a term used in molecular biology and genetics. TFDP1 is a protein that functions as a transcription factor, which means it helps regulate the expression of genes by binding to specific DNA sequences and controlling the rate of transcription of those genes into messenger RNA (mRNA).

TFDP1 typically forms a complex with another transcription factor called E2F, and this complex plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle and promoting cell division. TFDP1 can act as both a transcriptional activator and repressor, depending on which E2F family member it binds to and the specific context of the cell.

Mutations or dysregulation of TFDP1 have been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer. For example, overexpression of TFDP1 has been observed in several types of cancer, such as breast, lung, and prostate cancer, and is often associated with poor clinical outcomes. Therefore, understanding the role of TFDP1 in gene regulation and cellular processes may provide insights into the development of new therapeutic strategies for treating human diseases.

Retinoblastoma-Binding Protein 1 (RBP1) is not a medical term itself, but it is a protein that has been studied in the context of cancer research, including retinoblastoma. According to scientific and medical literature, RBP1 is a protein that binds to the retinoblastoma protein (pRb), which is a tumor suppressor protein. The binding of RBP1 to pRb can influence the activity of this tumor suppressor and contribute to the regulation of the cell cycle and cell growth.

In the case of retinoblastoma, mutations in the RB1 gene, which encodes for the pRb protein, have been identified as a cause of this rare eye cancer in children. However, the role of RBP1 in retinoblastoma or other cancers is not well-defined and requires further research to fully understand its implications in disease development and potential therapeutic targets.

Cyclin B is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the cell cycle, specifically the transition from G2 phase to mitosis (M phase) in eukaryotic cells. Cyclin B binds and activates cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), forming the complex known as M-phase promoting factor (MPF). This complex triggers the events leading to cell division, such as chromosome condensation, nuclear envelope breakdown, and spindle formation. The levels of cyclin B increase during the G2 phase and are degraded by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) at the onset of anaphase, allowing the cell cycle to progress into the next phase.

Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27, also known as CDKN1B or p27Kip1, is a protein that regulates the cell cycle. It inhibits the activity of certain cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), which are enzymes that play key roles in regulating the progression of the cell cycle.

The cell cycle is a series of events that cells undergo as they grow and divide. Cyclins and CDKs help to control the different stages of the cell cycle by activating and deactivating various proteins at specific times. The p27 protein acts as a brake on the cell cycle, preventing cells from dividing too quickly or abnormally.

When p27 binds to a CDK-cyclin complex, it prevents the complex from phosphorylating its target proteins, which are necessary for the progression of the cell cycle. By inhibiting CDK activity, p27 helps to ensure that cells divide only when the proper conditions are met.

Mutations in the CDKN1B gene, which encodes p27, have been associated with several types of cancer, including breast, lung, and prostate cancer. These mutations can lead to decreased levels of p27 or impaired function, allowing cells to divide uncontrollably and form tumors.

Chromatin is the complex of DNA, RNA, and proteins that make up the chromosomes in the nucleus of a cell. It is responsible for packaging the long DNA molecules into a more compact form that fits within the nucleus. Chromatin is made up of repeating units called nucleosomes, which consist of a histone protein octamer wrapped tightly by DNA. The structure of chromatin can be altered through chemical modifications to the histone proteins and DNA, which can influence gene expression and other cellular processes.

Flow cytometry is a medical and research technique used to measure physical and chemical characteristics of cells or particles, one cell at a time, as they flow in a fluid stream through a beam of light. The properties measured include:

* Cell size (light scatter)
* Cell internal complexity (granularity, also light scatter)
* Presence or absence of specific proteins or other molecules on the cell surface or inside the cell (using fluorescent antibodies or other fluorescent probes)

The technique is widely used in cell counting, cell sorting, protein engineering, biomarker discovery and monitoring disease progression, particularly in hematology, immunology, and cancer research.

Phosphorylation is the process of adding a phosphate group (a molecule consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen atoms) to a protein or other organic molecule, which is usually done by enzymes called kinases. This post-translational modification can change the function, localization, or activity of the target molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Phosphorylation is reversible, and the removal of the phosphate group is facilitated by enzymes called phosphatases.

Checkpoint Kinase 2 (Chk2) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a crucial role in the DNA damage response and the regulation of the cell cycle. It is activated by various types of DNA damage, including double-strand breaks, and phosphorylates several downstream targets involved in cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Chk2 is a key player in the G2/M checkpoint, which prevents cells with damaged DNA from entering mitosis and dividing. Mutations in the Chk2 gene have been associated with increased risk of cancer.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Schizosaccharomyces" is not a medical term. It is a genus name in the field of microbiology and genetics, referring to a group of budding, tear-shaped yeasts that are widely used as model organisms in scientific research. The most well-known species within this genus is Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which has been extensively studied for its cell cycle regulation, DNA repair mechanisms, and other fundamental biological processes.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to help.

Histones are highly alkaline proteins found in the chromatin of eukaryotic cells. They are rich in basic amino acid residues, such as arginine and lysine, which give them their positive charge. Histones play a crucial role in packaging DNA into a more compact structure within the nucleus by forming a complex with it called a nucleosome. Each nucleosome contains about 146 base pairs of DNA wrapped around an octamer of eight histone proteins (two each of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4). The N-terminal tails of these histones are subject to various post-translational modifications, such as methylation, acetylation, and phosphorylation, which can influence chromatin structure and gene expression. Histone variants also exist, which can contribute to the regulation of specific genes and other nuclear processes.

"Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a scientific name used in the field of microbiology. It refers to a species of yeast that is commonly used in various industrial processes, such as baking and brewing. It's also widely used in scientific research due to its genetic tractability and eukaryotic cellular organization.

However, it does have some relevance to medical fields like medicine and nutrition. For example, certain strains of S. cerevisiae are used as probiotics, which can provide health benefits when consumed. They may help support gut health, enhance the immune system, and even assist in the digestion of certain nutrients.

In summary, "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is a species of yeast with various industrial and potential medical applications.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Schizosaccharomyces pombe proteins" is not a medical term or concept. Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a type of single-celled microorganism called a yeast, which is often used as a model organism in scientific research. Proteins are complex molecules that do most of the work in cells and are necessary for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs.

In the context of scientific research, "Schizosaccharomyces pombe proteins" would refer to the specific proteins found in or studied using this particular type of yeast. These proteins may have similarities to human proteins and can be used to help understand basic biological processes, as well as diseases that occur in humans. However, it is important to note that while research using model organisms like Schizosaccharomyces pombe has led to many important discoveries, the findings may not always translate directly to humans.

I'm happy to help! However, I believe there may be a slight mistake in your question. The abbreviation "cdc" is not typically associated with genetics or genes in the context of medical definitions.

If you meant to ask for a definition of "genes," here it is:

Genes are segments of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) that contain the instructions for the development, function, and reproduction of all living organisms. They are the basic units of heredity, passed down from one generation to the next. Genes encode specific proteins or RNA molecules that play critical roles in the structure, function, and regulation of the body's cells, tissues, and organs.

If you had a different term in mind, please let me know, and I will be happy to provide a definition for it!

Chromosomal proteins, non-histone, are a diverse group of proteins that are associated with chromatin, the complex of DNA and histone proteins, but do not have the characteristic structure of histones. These proteins play important roles in various nuclear processes such as DNA replication, transcription, repair, recombination, and chromosome condensation and segregation during cell division. They can be broadly classified into several categories based on their functions, including architectural proteins, enzymes, transcription factors, and structural proteins. Examples of non-histone chromosomal proteins include high mobility group (HMG) proteins, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs), and condensins.

Cyclin D1 is a type of cyclin protein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle, which is the process by which cells divide and grow. Specifically, Cyclin D1 is involved in the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle. It does this by forming a complex with and acting as a regulatory subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) or CDK6, which phosphorylates and inactivates the retinoblastoma protein (pRb). This allows the E2F transcription factors to be released and activate the transcription of genes required for DNA replication and cell cycle progression.

Overexpression of Cyclin D1 has been implicated in the development of various types of cancer, as it can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and division. Therefore, Cyclin D1 is an important target for cancer therapy, and inhibitors of CDK4/6 have been developed to treat certain types of cancer that overexpress Cyclin D1.

Nucleic acid synthesis inhibitors are a class of antimicrobial, antiviral, or antitumor agents that block the synthesis of nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) by interfering with enzymes involved in their replication. These drugs can target various stages of nucleic acid synthesis, including DNA transcription, replication, and repair, as well as RNA transcription and processing.

Examples of nucleic acid synthesis inhibitors include:

1. Antibiotics like quinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin), rifamycins (e.g., rifampin), and trimethoprim, which target bacterial DNA gyrase, RNA polymerase, or dihydrofolate reductase, respectively.
2. Antiviral drugs like reverse transcriptase inhibitors (e.g., zidovudine, lamivudine) and integrase strand transfer inhibitors (e.g., raltegravir), which target HIV replication by interfering with viral enzymes required for DNA synthesis.
3. Antitumor drugs like antimetabolites (e.g., methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil) and topoisomerase inhibitors (e.g., etoposide, doxorubicin), which interfere with DNA replication and repair in cancer cells.

These drugs have been widely used for treating various bacterial and viral infections, as well as cancers, due to their ability to selectively inhibit the growth of target cells without affecting normal cellular functions significantly. However, they may also cause side effects related to their mechanism of action or off-target effects on non-target cells.

Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, also known as CDKN1A or p21/WAF1/CIP1, is a protein that regulates the cell cycle. It inhibits the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), which are enzymes that play crucial roles in controlling the progression of the cell cycle.

The binding of p21 to CDKs prevents the phosphorylation and activation of downstream targets, leading to cell cycle arrest. This protein is transcriptionally activated by tumor suppressor protein p53 in response to DNA damage or other stress signals, and it functions as an important mediator of p53-dependent growth arrest.

By inhibiting CDKs, p21 helps to ensure that cells do not proceed through the cell cycle until damaged DNA has been repaired, thereby preventing the propagation of potentially harmful mutations. Additionally, p21 has been implicated in other cellular processes such as apoptosis, differentiation, and senescence. Dysregulation of p21 has been associated with various human diseases, including cancer.

Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor proteins (CDKIs) are a family of regulatory proteins that play a crucial role in the control of the cell cycle. They function by binding to and inhibiting the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), which are serine/threonine protein kinases that help drive the progression of the cell cycle.

There are two main families of CDKIs: the Ink4 family and the Cip/Kip family. The Ink4 family members, including p16INK4a, p15INK4b, p18INK4c, and p19INK4d, specifically inhibit CDK4 and CDK6, preventing their association with cyclin D and thus blocking the transition from G1 to S phase of the cell cycle. The Cip/Kip family members, including p21CIP1, p27KIP1, and p57KIP2, inhibit a broader range of CDKs, including CDK1, CDK2, CDK4, and CDK6, and can regulate multiple stages of the cell cycle.

CDKIs play important roles in various biological processes, such as cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Dysregulation of CDKI function has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, where loss or mutation of CDKIs can lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Therefore, CDKIs are attractive targets for the development of anti-cancer therapies.

Tumor suppressor proteins are a type of regulatory protein that helps control the cell cycle and prevent cells from dividing and growing in an uncontrolled manner. They work to inhibit tumor growth by preventing the formation of tumors or slowing down their progression. These proteins can repair damaged DNA, regulate gene expression, and initiate programmed cell death (apoptosis) if the damage is too severe for repair.

Mutations in tumor suppressor genes, which provide the code for these proteins, can lead to a decrease or loss of function in the resulting protein. This can result in uncontrolled cell growth and division, leading to the formation of tumors and cancer. Examples of tumor suppressor proteins include p53, Rb (retinoblastoma), and BRCA1/2.

Geminin is a protein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle, specifically in the process of DNA replication. It functions as a regulatory protein that helps ensure the proper timing and completion of DNA replication before cell division occurs.

In more detail, Geminin binds to and inhibits the activity of several proteins involved in initiating DNA replication, such as CDT1 and CDC6. By doing so, it prevents the premature re-replication of DNA during the same cell cycle, which is essential for maintaining genomic stability.

Geminin is expressed in a cell cycle-dependent manner, with its levels peaking during the S and G2 phases, when DNA replication occurs, and declining during mitosis. This precise regulation of Geminin expression and activity helps coordinate the various stages of the cell cycle and ensures that DNA replication and cell division occur in a controlled and orderly fashion.

It's worth noting that deregulation of Geminin expression or function has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, where abnormal cell cycle control can contribute to uncontrolled cell growth and proliferation.

Protein kinases are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in many cellular processes by adding phosphate groups to other proteins, a process known as phosphorylation. This modification can activate or deactivate the target protein's function, thereby regulating various signaling pathways within the cell. Protein kinases are essential for numerous biological functions, including metabolism, signal transduction, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Abnormal regulation of protein kinases has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Fibroblasts are specialized cells that play a critical role in the body's immune response and wound healing process. They are responsible for producing and maintaining the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the non-cellular component present within all tissues and organs, providing structural support and biochemical signals for surrounding cells.

Fibroblasts produce various ECM proteins such as collagens, elastin, fibronectin, and laminins, forming a complex network of fibers that give tissues their strength and flexibility. They also help in the regulation of tissue homeostasis by controlling the turnover of ECM components through the process of remodeling.

In response to injury or infection, fibroblasts become activated and start to proliferate rapidly, migrating towards the site of damage. Here, they participate in the inflammatory response, releasing cytokines and chemokines that attract immune cells to the area. Additionally, they deposit new ECM components to help repair the damaged tissue and restore its functionality.

Dysregulation of fibroblast activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including fibrosis (excessive scarring), cancer (where they can contribute to tumor growth and progression), and autoimmune diseases (such as rheumatoid arthritis).

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Cell proliferation is the process by which cells increase in number, typically through the process of cell division. In the context of biology and medicine, it refers to the reproduction of cells that makes up living tissue, allowing growth, maintenance, and repair. It involves several stages including the transition from a phase of quiescence (G0 phase) to an active phase (G1 phase), DNA replication in the S phase, and mitosis or M phase, where the cell divides into two daughter cells.

Abnormal or uncontrolled cell proliferation is a characteristic feature of many diseases, including cancer, where deregulated cell cycle control leads to excessive and unregulated growth of cells, forming tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites in the body.

Mimosine is not a medical term per se, but it is a chemical compound that has been studied in the context of biomedical research. Mimosine is an alkaloid found in certain plants, including the mimosa tree (Leucaena leucocephala). It has been shown to have various biological activities, such as anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects on certain types of cells. However, it is not a term that is commonly used in medical diagnoses or treatments.

In terms of its chemical structure, mimosine is an amino acid that contains a pyrrolidone ring with a hydroxyl group at the 3-position and a carboxylic acid group at the 2-position. It can inhibit certain enzymes involved in DNA replication and repair, which may contribute to its anti-proliferative effects.

It's worth noting that mimosine has been studied for its potential therapeutic benefits, such as its ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cells. However, more research is needed to determine its safety and efficacy in humans before it can be considered a viable treatment option.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Fungal DNA refers to the genetic material present in fungi, which are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as larger organisms like mushrooms. The DNA of fungi, like that of all living organisms, is made up of nucleotides that are arranged in a double helix structure.

Fungal DNA contains the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of fungi. This includes the instructions for making proteins, which are essential for the structure and function of cells, as well as other important molecules such as enzymes and nucleic acids.

Studying fungal DNA can provide valuable insights into the biology and evolution of fungi, as well as their potential uses in medicine, agriculture, and industry. For example, researchers have used genetic engineering techniques to modify the DNA of fungi to produce drugs, biofuels, and other useful products. Additionally, understanding the genetic makeup of pathogenic fungi can help scientists develop new strategies for preventing and treating fungal infections.

S-phase kinase-associated proteins (Skp2) are a group of proteins that are associated with the S-phase kinase, which is a type of enzyme that helps to regulate the cell cycle. Specifically, Skp2 is involved in the ubiquitination and degradation of certain proteins that play a role in controlling the progression of the cell cycle.

Skp2 is a member of the F-box protein family, which are components of the Skp1-Cul1-F-box (SCF) complex, a type of E3 ubiquitin ligase. The SCF complex recognizes and binds to specific proteins, tagging them for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the proteasome.

One of the key targets of Skp2 is the tumor suppressor protein p27, which inhibits the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and helps to regulate the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle. By targeting p27 for degradation, Skp2 promotes the progression of the cell cycle and has been implicated in the development of various types of cancer.

Overall, Skp2 plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle and has important implications for the development and treatment of various diseases, including cancer.

Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 (CDK4) is a type of enzyme, specifically a serine/threonine protein kinase, that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the series of events that take place in a cell leading to its division and duplication. CDK4, when activated by binding to cyclin D, helps to promote the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle. This transition is a critical point in the regulation of cell growth and division, and dysregulation of this process can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and cancer. CDK4 inhibitors are used in the treatment of certain types of cancer, such as breast and lung cancer, to block the activity of CDK4 and prevent tumor cell proliferation.

The Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) is a protein complex in eukaryotic cells that plays a crucial role in the initiation of DNA replication. It specifically recognizes and binds to the origins of replication, which are specific sequences on the DNA molecule where replication begins. The ORC serves as a platform for the assembly of additional proteins required for the initiation of DNA replication, including the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex. This whole process is highly regulated and essential for the accurate duplication of genetic material during cell division.

Fungal proteins are a type of protein that is specifically produced and present in fungi, which are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds. These proteins play various roles in the growth, development, and survival of fungi. They can be involved in the structure and function of fungal cells, metabolism, pathogenesis, and other cellular processes. Some fungal proteins can also have important implications for human health, both in terms of their potential use as therapeutic targets and as allergens or toxins that can cause disease.

Fungal proteins can be classified into different categories based on their functions, such as enzymes, structural proteins, signaling proteins, and toxins. Enzymes are proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in fungal cells, while structural proteins provide support and protection for the cell. Signaling proteins are involved in communication between cells and regulation of various cellular processes, and toxins are proteins that can cause harm to other organisms, including humans.

Understanding the structure and function of fungal proteins is important for developing new treatments for fungal infections, as well as for understanding the basic biology of fungi. Research on fungal proteins has led to the development of several antifungal drugs that target specific fungal enzymes or other proteins, providing effective treatment options for a range of fungal diseases. Additionally, further study of fungal proteins may reveal new targets for drug development and help improve our ability to diagnose and treat fungal infections.

CDC25 phosphatases are a group of enzymes that play crucial roles in the regulation of the cell cycle, which is the series of events that cells undergo as they grow and divide. Specifically, CDC25 phosphatases function to remove inhibitory phosphates from certain cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), thereby activating them and allowing the cell cycle to progress.

There are three main types of CDC25 phosphatases in humans, known as CDC25A, CDC25B, and CDC25C. These enzymes are named after the original yeast homolog, called Cdc25, which was discovered to be essential for cell cycle progression.

CDC25 phosphatases are tightly regulated during the cell cycle, with their activity being controlled by various mechanisms such as phosphorylation, protein-protein interactions, and subcellular localization. Dysregulation of CDC25 phosphatases has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, where they can contribute to uncontrolled cell growth and division. Therefore, understanding the functions and regulation of CDC25 phosphatases is an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Minichromosome Maintenance Complex Component 4 (MCM4) is a protein that is a part of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex, which is involved in the initiation and regulation of DNA replication. The MCM complex is made up of several different proteins, including MCM2-7, and helps to ensure that DNA replication occurs only once per cell cycle. MCM4 has helicase activity, which means it can unwind double-stranded DNA during the replication process. It also plays a role in the regulation of the cell cycle and is essential for cell survival. Defects in MCM4 have been associated with certain types of cancer.

Thymidine is a pyrimidine nucleoside that consists of a thymine base linked to a deoxyribose sugar by a β-N1-glycosidic bond. It plays a crucial role in DNA replication and repair processes as one of the four nucleosides in DNA, along with adenosine, guanosine, and cytidine. Thymidine is also used in research and clinical settings for various purposes, such as studying DNA synthesis or as a component of antiviral and anticancer therapies.

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

Minichromosome Maintenance Complex Component 7 (MCM7) is a protein that is a part of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex, which is involved in the initiation and regulation of DNA replication. The MCM complex is made up of several different proteins, including MCM2-7, and plays a crucial role in the cell cycle by ensuring that DNA replication occurs only once per cell cycle. MCM7 has helicase activity, which helps to unwind the DNA double helix during replication. Defects in MCM7 have been associated with certain types of cancer.

DNA replication timing refers to the specific point during the cell cycle when a particular segment or region of the DNA molecule is copied or replicated. The genome of an organism is composed of millions of base pairs of DNA, and not all of these regions are replicated at the same time. Instead, DNA replication is a highly regulated process that occurs in a specific order and pattern during the S phase of the cell cycle.

During DNA replication, the double helix structure of DNA is unwound, and each strand serves as a template for the synthesis of a new complementary strand. The timing of DNA replication can vary between different regions of the genome, with some regions replicating early in the S phase and others replicating later. This temporal organization of DNA replication is known as the DNA replication program or timing profile.

The regulation of DNA replication timing is critical for maintaining genomic stability and ensuring that all regions of the genome are accurately replicated before cell division. Abnormalities in DNA replication timing have been associated with various diseases, including cancer and developmental disorders. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that control DNA replication timing is an important area of research in molecular biology and genetics.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) proteins are a type of protein that play a crucial role in the maintenance and repair of DNA in cells. The ATM gene produces these proteins, which are involved in several important cellular processes such as:

1. DNA damage response: When DNA is damaged, ATM proteins help to detect and respond to the damage by activating various signaling pathways that lead to DNA repair or apoptosis (programmed cell death) if the damage is too severe.
2. Cell cycle regulation: ATM proteins regulate the cell cycle by controlling checkpoints that ensure proper DNA replication and division. This helps prevent the propagation of cells with damaged DNA.
3. Telomere maintenance: ATM proteins help maintain telomeres, which are the protective caps at the ends of chromosomes. Telomeres shorten as cells divide, and when they become too short, cells can no longer divide and enter a state of senescence or die.

Mutations in the ATM gene can lead to Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), a rare inherited disorder characterized by neurological problems, immune system dysfunction, increased risk of cancer, and sensitivity to ionizing radiation. People with A-T have defective ATM proteins that cannot properly respond to DNA damage, leading to genomic instability and increased susceptibility to disease.

Chromatids are defined as the individual strands that make up a duplicated chromosome. They are formed during the S phase of the cell cycle, when replication occurs and each chromosome is copied, resulting in two identical sister chromatids. These chromatids are connected at a region called the centromere and are held together by cohesin protein complexes until they are separated during mitosis or meiosis.

During mitosis, the sister chromatids are pulled apart by the mitotic spindle apparatus and distributed equally to each daughter cell. In meiosis, which is a type of cell division that occurs in the production of gametes (sex cells), homologous chromosomes pair up and exchange genetic material through a process called crossing over. After crossing over, each homologous chromosome consists of two recombinant chromatids that are separated during meiosis I, and then sister chromatids are separated during meiosis II.

Chromatids play an essential role in the faithful transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next, ensuring that each daughter cell or gamete receives a complete set of chromosomes with intact and functional genes.

'Tumor cells, cultured' refers to the process of removing cancerous cells from a tumor and growing them in controlled laboratory conditions. This is typically done by isolating the tumor cells from a patient's tissue sample, then placing them in a nutrient-rich environment that promotes their growth and multiplication.

The resulting cultured tumor cells can be used for various research purposes, including the study of cancer biology, drug development, and toxicity testing. They provide a valuable tool for researchers to better understand the behavior and characteristics of cancer cells outside of the human body, which can lead to the development of more effective cancer treatments.

It is important to note that cultured tumor cells may not always behave exactly the same way as they do in the human body, so findings from cell culture studies must be validated through further research, such as animal models or clinical trials.

Apoptosis is a programmed and controlled cell death process that occurs in multicellular organisms. It is a natural process that helps maintain tissue homeostasis by eliminating damaged, infected, or unwanted cells. During apoptosis, the cell undergoes a series of morphological changes, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and fragmentation into membrane-bound vesicles called apoptotic bodies. These bodies are then recognized and engulfed by neighboring cells or phagocytic cells, preventing an inflammatory response. Apoptosis is regulated by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways that involve proteins such as caspases, Bcl-2 family members, and inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs).

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

DNA repair is the process by which cells identify and correct damage to the DNA molecules that encode their genome. DNA can be damaged by a variety of internal and external factors, such as radiation, chemicals, and metabolic byproducts. If left unrepaired, this damage can lead to mutations, which may in turn lead to cancer and other diseases.

There are several different mechanisms for repairing DNA damage, including:

1. Base excision repair (BER): This process repairs damage to a single base in the DNA molecule. An enzyme called a glycosylase removes the damaged base, leaving a gap that is then filled in by other enzymes.
2. Nucleotide excision repair (NER): This process repairs more severe damage, such as bulky adducts or crosslinks between the two strands of the DNA molecule. An enzyme cuts out a section of the damaged DNA, and the gap is then filled in by other enzymes.
3. Mismatch repair (MMR): This process repairs errors that occur during DNA replication, such as mismatched bases or small insertions or deletions. Specialized enzymes recognize the error and remove a section of the newly synthesized strand, which is then replaced by new nucleotides.
4. Double-strand break repair (DSBR): This process repairs breaks in both strands of the DNA molecule. There are two main pathways for DSBR: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ directly rejoins the broken ends, while HR uses a template from a sister chromatid to repair the break.

Overall, DNA repair is a crucial process that helps maintain genome stability and prevent the development of diseases caused by genetic mutations.

3T3 cells are a type of cell line that is commonly used in scientific research. The name "3T3" is derived from the fact that these cells were developed by treating mouse embryo cells with a chemical called trypsin and then culturing them in a flask at a temperature of 37 degrees Celsius.

Specifically, 3T3 cells are a type of fibroblast, which is a type of cell that is responsible for producing connective tissue in the body. They are often used in studies involving cell growth and proliferation, as well as in toxicity tests and drug screening assays.

One particularly well-known use of 3T3 cells is in the 3T3-L1 cell line, which is a subtype of 3T3 cells that can be differentiated into adipocytes (fat cells) under certain conditions. These cells are often used in studies of adipose tissue biology and obesity.

It's important to note that because 3T3 cells are a type of immortalized cell line, they do not always behave exactly the same way as primary cells (cells that are taken directly from a living organism). As such, researchers must be careful when interpreting results obtained using 3T3 cells and consider any potential limitations or artifacts that may arise due to their use.

Tumor suppressor protein p53, also known as p53 or tumor protein p53, is a nuclear phosphoprotein that plays a crucial role in preventing cancer development and maintaining genomic stability. It does so by regulating the cell cycle and acting as a transcription factor for various genes involved in apoptosis (programmed cell death), DNA repair, and cell senescence (permanent cell growth arrest).

In response to cellular stress, such as DNA damage or oncogene activation, p53 becomes activated and accumulates in the nucleus. Activated p53 can then bind to specific DNA sequences and promote the transcription of target genes that help prevent the proliferation of potentially cancerous cells. These targets include genes involved in cell cycle arrest (e.g., CDKN1A/p21), apoptosis (e.g., BAX, PUMA), and DNA repair (e.g., GADD45).

Mutations in the TP53 gene, which encodes p53, are among the most common genetic alterations found in human cancers. These mutations often lead to a loss or reduction of p53's tumor suppressive functions, allowing cancer cells to proliferate uncontrollably and evade apoptosis. As a result, p53 has been referred to as "the guardian of the genome" due to its essential role in preventing tumorigenesis.

Chromosomes in fungi are thread-like structures that contain genetic material, composed of DNA and proteins, present in the nucleus of a cell. Unlike humans and other eukaryotes that have a diploid number of chromosomes in their somatic cells, fungal chromosome numbers can vary widely between and within species.

Fungal chromosomes are typically smaller and fewer in number compared to those found in plants and animals. The chromosomal organization in fungi is also different from other eukaryotes. In many fungi, the chromosomes are condensed throughout the cell cycle, whereas in other eukaryotes, chromosomes are only condensed during cell division.

Fungi can have linear or circular chromosomes, depending on the species. For example, the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) has a set of 16 small circular chromosomes, while other fungi like Neurospora crassa (red bread mold) and Aspergillus nidulans (a filamentous fungus) have linear chromosomes.

Fungal chromosomes play an essential role in the growth, development, reproduction, and survival of fungi. They carry genetic information that determines various traits such as morphology, metabolism, pathogenicity, and resistance to environmental stresses. Advances in genomic technologies have facilitated the study of fungal chromosomes, leading to a better understanding of their structure, function, and evolution.

Minichromosome Maintenance Complex Component 3 (MCM3) is a protein that is a part of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex, which is involved in the initiation and regulation of DNA replication. The MCM complex is made up of several different proteins, including MCM2-7, and helps to ensure that DNA replication occurs only once per cell cycle. MCM3 specifically plays a role in the loading and unloading of the MCM helicase onto DNA, helping to regulate the initiation of DNA replication. It is also involved in the cellular response to DNA damage and is considered a marker for actively proliferating cells.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

Minichromosome Maintenance Complex Component 2 (MCM2) is a protein that is a part of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex, which is involved in the initiation and regulation of DNA replication. MCM2 is specifically a helicase that helps to unwind the DNA double helix during replication. It is essential for the proper duplication of genetic material and cell division. Abnormalities in MCM2 function have been implicated in various diseases, including cancer.

Carrier proteins, also known as transport proteins, are a type of protein that facilitates the movement of molecules across cell membranes. They are responsible for the selective and active transport of ions, sugars, amino acids, and other molecules from one side of the membrane to the other, against their concentration gradient. This process requires energy, usually in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate).

Carrier proteins have a specific binding site for the molecule they transport, and undergo conformational changes upon binding, which allows them to move the molecule across the membrane. Once the molecule has been transported, the carrier protein returns to its original conformation, ready to bind and transport another molecule.

Carrier proteins play a crucial role in maintaining the balance of ions and other molecules inside and outside of cells, and are essential for many physiological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and nutrient uptake.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

E2F2 is a member of the E2F family of transcription factors, which are involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression and differentiation. Specifically, E2F2 forms a complex with a retinoblastoma protein (pRb) to regulate the expression of genes required for DNA replication and cell cycle progression. When pRb is phosphorylated and inactivated by cyclin-dependent kinases during the G1 phase of the cell cycle, E2F2 is released and can activate the transcription of its target genes, promoting the transition from G1 to S phase. In addition to its role in the cell cycle, E2F2 has also been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis and differentiation in certain contexts.

According to the medical definition, ultraviolet (UV) rays are invisible radiations that fall in the range of the electromagnetic spectrum between 100-400 nanometers. UV rays are further divided into three categories: UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (100-280 nm).

UV rays have various sources, including the sun and artificial sources like tanning beds. Prolonged exposure to UV rays can cause damage to the skin, leading to premature aging, eye damage, and an increased risk of skin cancer. UVA rays penetrate deeper into the skin and are associated with skin aging, while UVB rays primarily affect the outer layer of the skin and are linked to sunburns and skin cancer. UVC rays are the most harmful but fortunately, they are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere and do not reach the surface.

Healthcare professionals recommend limiting exposure to UV rays, wearing protective clothing, using broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, and avoiding tanning beds to reduce the risk of UV-related health problems.

Genomic instability is a term used in genetics and molecular biology to describe a state of increased susceptibility to genetic changes or mutations in the genome. It can be defined as a condition where the integrity and stability of the genome are compromised, leading to an increased rate of DNA alterations such as point mutations, insertions, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements.

Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer cells and can also be observed in various other diseases, including genetic disorders and aging. It can arise due to defects in the DNA repair mechanisms, telomere maintenance, epigenetic regulation, or chromosome segregation during cell division. These defects can result from inherited genetic mutations, acquired somatic mutations, exposure to environmental mutagens, or age-related degenerative changes.

Genomic instability is a significant factor in the development and progression of cancer as it promotes the accumulation of oncogenic mutations that contribute to tumor initiation, growth, and metastasis. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying genomic instability is crucial for developing effective strategies for cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

The G1 phase cell cycle checkpoint is a point in the cell cycle where the cell checks and regulates its progression from the G1 phase to the S phase. During this checkpoint, the cell evaluates various factors such as availability of nutrients, growth factors, and the absence of DNA damage to determine whether it should proceed with DNA replication or undergo cellular senescence, differentiation, or apoptosis (programmed cell death). The G1 phase checkpoint is controlled by a complex network of signaling pathways, including the p53 and Rb tumor suppressor proteins.

Cyclin D3 is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the cell cycle, particularly during the G1 phase. It forms a complex with and acts as a regulatory subunit of CDK4 or CDK6, which are cyclin-dependent kinases. This complex plays a crucial role in phosphorylating and inactivating the retinoblastoma protein (pRb), leading to the release of E2F transcription factors that promote the expression of genes required for DNA replication and cell cycle progression into the S phase.

Cyclin D3 is primarily expressed in activated lymphocytes and is essential for normal immune function, as well as in certain tissues during development. Alterations in CYCLIN D3 gene expression or function have been implicated in several types of cancer, such as leukemias and lymphomas, due to their role in uncontrolled cell proliferation.

Cyclin D2 is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the cell cycle, particularly in the G1 phase. It forms a complex with and acts as a regulatory subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) or CDK6, promoting the transition from G1 to S phase of the cell cycle. The expression of cyclin D2 is regulated by various growth factors, hormones, and oncogenes, and its dysregulation has been implicated in the development of several types of cancer.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Cyclin A2 is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the cell cycle, which is the series of events that cells undergo as they grow and divide. Specifically, Cyclin A2 plays a role in the progression from the G1 phase to the S phase (DNA synthesis phase) and from the G2 phase to the M phase (mitosis phase) of the cell cycle. It does this by binding to and activating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), which are enzymes that help regulate the cell cycle.

Cyclin A2 is expressed at various points during the cell cycle, but its levels peak during the S and G2 phases. The protein is degraded during mitosis, ensuring that it is not present in excess during the next cell cycle. Dysregulation of Cyclin A2 has been implicated in the development of cancer, as uncontrolled cell growth and division are hallmarks of this disease.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Complexes, also known as E3 ubiquitin ligases, are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the ubiquitination process. Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification where ubiquitin molecules are attached to specific target proteins, marking them for degradation by the proteasome or altering their function, localization, or interaction with other proteins.

The ubiquitination process involves three main steps:

1. Ubiquitin activation: Ubiquitin is activated by an E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme in an ATP-dependent reaction.
2. Ubiquitin conjugation: The activated ubiquitin is then transferred to an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme.
3. Ubiquitin ligation: Finally, the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme interacts with a specific E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which facilitates the transfer and ligation of ubiquitin to the target protein.

Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Complexes are responsible for recognizing and binding to specific substrate proteins, ensuring that ubiquitination occurs on the correct targets. They can be divided into three main categories based on their structural features and mechanisms of action:

1. Really Interesting New Gene (RING) finger E3 ligases: These E3 ligases contain a RING finger domain, which directly interacts with both the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and the substrate protein. They facilitate the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 to the target protein by bringing them into close proximity.
2. Homologous to E6-AP C terminus (HECT) E3 ligases: These E3 ligases contain a HECT domain, which interacts with the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and forms a thioester bond with ubiquitin before transferring it to the substrate protein.
3. RING-between-RING (RBR) E3 ligases: These E3 ligases contain both RING finger and HECT-like domains, which allow them to function similarly to both RING finger and HECT E3 ligases. They first form a thioester bond with ubiquitin using their RING1 domain before transferring it to the substrate protein via their RING2 domain.

Dysregulation of Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Complexes has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Understanding their mechanisms and functions can provide valuable insights into disease pathogenesis and potential therapeutic strategies.

Cell cycle checkpoints are control mechanisms that regulate the cell cycle and ensure the accurate and timely progression through different phases of the cell cycle. These checkpoints monitor specific cellular events, such as DNA replication and damage, chromosome separation, and proper attachment of the mitotic spindle to the chromosomes. If any of these events fail to occur properly or are delayed, the cell cycle checkpoints trigger a response that can halt the cell cycle until the problem is resolved. This helps to prevent cells with damaged or incomplete genomes from dividing and potentially becoming cancerous.

There are three main types of cell cycle checkpoints:

1. G1 Checkpoint: Also known as the restriction point, this checkpoint controls the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle. It monitors the availability of nutrients, growth factors, and the integrity of the genome before allowing the cell to proceed into DNA replication.
2. G2 Checkpoint: This checkpoint regulates the transition from the G2 phase to the M phase of the cell cycle. It checks for completion of DNA replication and absence of DNA damage before allowing the cell to enter mitosis.
3. Mitotic (M) Checkpoint: Also known as the spindle assembly checkpoint, this checkpoint ensures that all chromosomes are properly attached to the mitotic spindle before anaphase begins. It prevents the separation of sister chromatids until all kinetochores are correctly attached and tension is established between them.

Cell cycle checkpoints play a crucial role in maintaining genomic stability, preventing tumorigenesis, and ensuring proper cell division. Dysregulation of these checkpoints can lead to various diseases, including cancer.

Cell survival refers to the ability of a cell to continue living and functioning normally, despite being exposed to potentially harmful conditions or treatments. This can include exposure to toxins, radiation, chemotherapeutic drugs, or other stressors that can damage cells or interfere with their normal processes.

In scientific research, measures of cell survival are often used to evaluate the effectiveness of various therapies or treatments. For example, researchers may expose cells to a particular drug or treatment and then measure the percentage of cells that survive to assess its potential therapeutic value. Similarly, in toxicology studies, measures of cell survival can help to determine the safety of various chemicals or substances.

It's important to note that cell survival is not the same as cell proliferation, which refers to the ability of cells to divide and multiply. While some treatments may promote cell survival, they may also inhibit cell proliferation, making them useful for treating diseases such as cancer. Conversely, other treatments may be designed to specifically target and kill cancer cells, even if it means sacrificing some healthy cells in the process.

Chromosomes are thread-like structures that exist in the nucleus of cells, carrying genetic information in the form of genes. They are composed of DNA and proteins, and are typically present in pairs in the nucleus, with one set inherited from each parent. In humans, there are 23 pairs of chromosomes for a total of 46 chromosomes. Chromosomes come in different shapes and forms, including sex chromosomes (X and Y) that determine the biological sex of an individual. Changes or abnormalities in the number or structure of chromosomes can lead to genetic disorders and diseases.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

The Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) is a large E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle. It is responsible for targeting specific proteins for degradation by the proteasome, which is a multi-subunit protein complex that mediates the controlled breakdown of ubiquitinated proteins.

During anaphase, the final stage of mitosis, the APC/C becomes active and triggers the degradation of several key regulatory proteins, including securin and cyclin B. The destruction of these proteins allows for the separation of chromosomes and the completion of cell division.

The APC/C is composed of multiple subunits, including a catalytic core that binds to ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) and several coactivators that regulate its activity. The activation of the APC/C requires the binding of one of two coactivators, Cdc20 or CDH1, which recognize specific substrates for degradation.

Dysregulation of the APC/C has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that regulate its activity is an important area of research with potential therapeutic implications.

Cyclin D is a type of cyclin protein that plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cell cycle, which is the process by which cells grow and divide. Specifically, Cyclin D is involved in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and works in conjunction with its partner enzyme, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) or CDK6, to phosphorylate and regulate the activity of several key proteins that control the transition from G1 to S phase.

There are several different types of Cyclin D proteins, including Cyclin D1, Cyclin D2, and Cyclin D3, which are encoded by different genes but share similar structures and functions. Overexpression or dysregulation of Cyclin D has been implicated in the development of various human cancers, as it can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and division. Therefore, understanding the role of Cyclin D in the cell cycle and its regulation is important for developing potential cancer therapies.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) is not a medication, but rather a chemical compound with the formula CH3SO3CH3. It's an alkylating agent that is used in laboratory settings for various research purposes, including as a methylating agent in biochemical and genetic studies.

MMS works by transferring its methyl group (CH3) to other molecules, which can result in the modification of DNA and other biological macromolecules. This property makes it useful in laboratory research, but it also means that MMS is highly reactive and toxic. Therefore, it must be handled with care and appropriate safety precautions.

It's important to note that MMS is not used as a therapeutic agent in medicine due to its high toxicity and potential to cause serious harm if mishandled or misused.

F-box proteins are a family of proteins that are characterized by the presence of an F-box domain, which is a motif of about 40-50 amino acids. This domain is responsible for binding to Skp1, a component of the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. The F-box proteins serve as the substrate recognition subunit of this complex and are involved in targeting specific proteins for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome.

There are multiple types of F-box proteins, including FBXW (also known as β-TrCP), FBXL, and FBLX, each with different substrate specificities. These proteins play important roles in various cellular processes such as cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, and DNA damage response by controlling the stability of key regulatory proteins.

Abnormal regulation of F-box proteins has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, developmental disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases.

E2F4 is a member of the E2F family of transcription factors, which are involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression and differentiation. E2F4 can function as both a transcriptional activator and repressor, depending on which proteins it interacts with. It primarily acts as a repressor, binding to DNA and preventing the transcription of target genes involved in cell cycle progression. E2F4 has been shown to play important roles in various biological processes, including development, differentiation, and tumor suppression.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

Cyclin B1 is a type of cyclin protein that regulates the cell cycle, specifically the transition from G2 phase to mitosis (M phase) in eukaryotic cells. It forms a complex with and acts as a regulatory subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), also known as CDC2. During the G2 phase, Cyclin B1 levels accumulate and upon reaching a certain threshold, it binds to CDK1 to form the maturation promoting factor (MPF). The activation of MPF triggers the onset of mitosis by promoting nuclear envelope breakdown, chromosome condensation, and other events required for cell division. After the completion of mitosis, Cyclin B1 is degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, allowing the cell cycle to progress back into G1 phase.

The term "DNA, neoplasm" is not a standard medical term or concept. DNA refers to deoxyribonucleic acid, which is the genetic material present in the cells of living organisms. A neoplasm, on the other hand, is a tumor or growth of abnormal tissue that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

In some contexts, "DNA, neoplasm" may refer to genetic alterations found in cancer cells. These genetic changes can include mutations, amplifications, deletions, or rearrangements of DNA sequences that contribute to the development and progression of cancer. Identifying these genetic abnormalities can help doctors diagnose and treat certain types of cancer more effectively.

However, it's important to note that "DNA, neoplasm" is not a term that would typically be used in medical reports or research papers without further clarification. If you have any specific questions about DNA changes in cancer cells or neoplasms, I would recommend consulting with a healthcare professional or conducting further research on the topic.

Cullin proteins are a family of structurally related proteins that play a crucial role in the function of E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes. These complexes are responsible for targeting specific cellular proteins for degradation by the proteasome, which is a key process in maintaining protein homeostasis within cells.

Cullin proteins act as scaffolds that bring together different components of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, including RING finger proteins and substrate receptors. There are several different cullin proteins identified in humans (CUL1, CUL2, CUL3, CUL4A, CUL4B, CUL5, and CUL7), each of which can form distinct E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes with unique substrate specificities.

The regulation of cullin proteins is critical for normal cellular function, and dysregulation of these proteins has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer. For example, mutations in CUL1 have been found in certain types of breast and ovarian cancers, while alterations in CUL3 have been linked to neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

Overall, cullin proteins are essential components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, which plays a critical role in regulating protein turnover and maintaining cellular homeostasis.

Cricetinae is a subfamily of rodents that includes hamsters, gerbils, and relatives. These small mammals are characterized by having short limbs, compact bodies, and cheek pouches for storing food. They are native to various parts of the world, particularly in Europe, Asia, and Africa. Some species are popular pets due to their small size, easy care, and friendly nature. In a medical context, understanding the biology and behavior of Cricetinae species can be important for individuals who keep them as pets or for researchers studying their physiology.

Heterochromatin is a type of chromatin (the complex of DNA, RNA, and proteins that make up chromosomes) that is characterized by its tightly packed structure and reduced genetic activity. It is often densely stained with certain dyes due to its high concentration of histone proteins and other chromatin-associated proteins. Heterochromatin can be further divided into two subtypes: constitutive heterochromatin, which is consistently highly condensed and transcriptionally inactive throughout the cell cycle, and facultative heterochromatin, which can switch between a condensed, inactive state and a more relaxed, active state depending on the needs of the cell. Heterochromatin plays important roles in maintaining the stability and integrity of the genome by preventing the transcription of repetitive DNA sequences and protecting against the spread of transposable elements.

Gene expression regulation in fungi refers to the complex cellular processes that control the production of proteins and other functional gene products in response to various internal and external stimuli. This regulation is crucial for normal growth, development, and adaptation of fungal cells to changing environmental conditions.

In fungi, gene expression is regulated at multiple levels, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, and post-translational modifications. Key regulatory mechanisms include:

1. Transcription factors (TFs): These proteins bind to specific DNA sequences in the promoter regions of target genes and either activate or repress their transcription. Fungi have a diverse array of TFs that respond to various signals, such as nutrient availability, stress, developmental cues, and quorum sensing.
2. Chromatin remodeling: The organization and compaction of DNA into chromatin can influence gene expression. Fungi utilize ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes and histone modifying enzymes to alter chromatin structure, thereby facilitating or inhibiting the access of transcriptional machinery to genes.
3. Non-coding RNAs: Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) play a role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in fungi. These sncRNAs can guide RNA-induced transcriptional silencing (RITS) complexes to specific target loci, leading to the repression of gene expression through histone modifications and DNA methylation.
4. Alternative splicing: Fungi employ alternative splicing mechanisms to generate multiple mRNA isoforms from a single gene, thereby increasing proteome diversity. This process can be regulated by RNA-binding proteins that recognize specific sequence motifs in pre-mRNAs and promote or inhibit splicing events.
5. Protein stability and activity: Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, can influence their stability, localization, and activity. These PTMs play a crucial role in regulating various cellular processes, including signal transduction, stress response, and cell cycle progression.

Understanding the complex interplay between these regulatory mechanisms is essential for elucidating the molecular basis of fungal development, pathogenesis, and drug resistance. This knowledge can be harnessed to develop novel strategies for combating fungal infections and improving agricultural productivity.

DNA Polymerase II is a type of enzyme involved in DNA replication and repair in eukaryotic cells. It plays a crucial role in the process of proofreading and correcting errors that may occur during DNA synthesis.

During DNA replication, DNA polymerase II helps to fill in gaps or missing nucleotides behind the main replicative enzyme, DNA Polymerase epsilon. It also plays a significant role in repairing damaged DNA by removing and replacing incorrect or damaged nucleotides.

DNA Polymerase II is highly accurate and has a strong proofreading activity, which allows it to correct most of the errors that occur during DNA synthesis. This enzyme is also involved in the process of translesion synthesis, where it helps to bypass lesions or damage in the DNA template, allowing replication to continue.

Overall, DNA Polymerase II is an essential enzyme for maintaining genomic stability and preventing the accumulation of mutations in eukaryotic cells.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

E2F3 is a member of the E2F family of transcription factors, which are involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression and apoptosis (programmed cell death). Specifically, E2F3 can function as either an activator or a repressor of transcription, depending on whether it forms a complex with a retinoblastoma protein (pRb) or not.

When E2F3 is bound to pRb, it acts as a transcriptional repressor and helps to keep cells in a quiescent state by preventing the expression of genes required for DNA replication and cell cycle progression. However, when pRb is phosphorylated and inactivated by cyclin-dependent kinases during the G1 phase of the cell cycle, E2F3 is released and can then function as a transcriptional activator.

Activation of E2F3 leads to the expression of genes required for DNA replication and entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. In addition to its role in regulating the cell cycle, E2F3 has also been implicated in the development and progression of various types of cancer, including breast, lung, and prostate cancer. Dysregulation of E2F3 activity can contribute to uncontrolled cell growth and tumor formation.

Recombinant fusion proteins are artificially created biomolecules that combine the functional domains or properties of two or more different proteins into a single protein entity. They are generated through recombinant DNA technology, where the genes encoding the desired protein domains are linked together and expressed as a single, chimeric gene in a host organism, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells.

The resulting fusion protein retains the functional properties of its individual constituent proteins, allowing for novel applications in research, diagnostics, and therapeutics. For instance, recombinant fusion proteins can be designed to enhance protein stability, solubility, or immunogenicity, making them valuable tools for studying protein-protein interactions, developing targeted therapies, or generating vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

Examples of recombinant fusion proteins include:

1. Etaglunatide (ABT-523): A soluble Fc fusion protein that combines the heavy chain fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of an immunoglobulin with the extracellular domain of the human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). This fusion protein functions as a decoy receptor, neutralizing IL-6 and its downstream signaling pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.
2. Etanercept (Enbrel): A soluble TNF receptor p75 Fc fusion protein that binds to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and inhibits its proinflammatory activity, making it a valuable therapeutic option for treating autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis.
3. Abatacept (Orencia): A fusion protein consisting of the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) linked to the Fc region of an immunoglobulin, which downregulates T-cell activation and proliferation in autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
4. Belimumab (Benlysta): A monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein, preventing its interaction with the B-cell surface receptor and inhibiting B-cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
5. Romiplostim (Nplate): A fusion protein consisting of a thrombopoietin receptor agonist peptide linked to an immunoglobulin Fc region, which stimulates platelet production in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).
6. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp): A hyperglycosylated erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that functions as a longer-acting form of recombinant human erythropoietin, used to treat anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease or cancer.
7. Palivizumab (Synagis): A monoclonal antibody directed against the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which prevents RSV infection and is administered prophylactically to high-risk infants during the RSV season.
8. Ranibizumab (Lucentis): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody fragment that binds and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), used in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other ocular disorders.
9. Cetuximab (Erbitux): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), used in the treatment of colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
10. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully humanized monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease.
11. Bevacizumab (Avastin): A recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to VEGF-A, used in the treatment of various cancers, including colorectal, lung, breast, and kidney cancer.
12. Trastuzumab (Herceptin): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets HER2/neu receptor, used in the treatment of breast cancer.
13. Rituximab (Rituxan): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that binds to CD20 antigen on B cells, used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis.
14. Palivizumab (Synagis): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus, used in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in high-risk infants.
15. Infliximab (Remicade): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
16. Natalizumab (Tysabri): A humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to α4β1 integrin, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease.
17. Adalimumab (Humira): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis.
18. Golimumab (Simponi): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and ulcerative colitis.
19. Certolizumab pegol (Cimzia): A PEGylated Fab' fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets TNF-α, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Crohn's disease.
20. Ustekinumab (Stelara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-12 and IL-23, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and Crohn's disease.
21. Secukinumab (Cosentyx): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
22. Ixekizumab (Taltz): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17A, used in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.
23. Brodalumab (Siliq): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-17 receptor A, used in the treatment of psoriasis.
24. Sarilumab (Kevzara): A fully human monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
25. Tocilizumab (Actemra): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-6 receptor, used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, giant cell arteritis, and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-induced cytokine release syndrome.
26. Siltuximab (Sylvant): A chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment of multicentric Castleman disease.
27. Satralizumab (Enspryng): A humanized monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6 receptor alpha, used in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.
28. Sirukumab (Plivensia): A human monoclonal antibody that targets IL-6, used in the treatment

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a type of short, double-stranded RNA molecule that plays a role in the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The RNAi pathway is a natural cellular process that regulates gene expression by targeting and destroying specific messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, thereby preventing the translation of those mRNAs into proteins.

SiRNAs are typically 20-25 base pairs in length and are generated from longer double-stranded RNA precursors called hairpin RNAs or dsRNAs by an enzyme called Dicer. Once generated, siRNAs associate with a protein complex called the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which uses one strand of the siRNA (the guide strand) to recognize and bind to complementary sequences in the target mRNA. The RISC then cleaves the target mRNA, leading to its degradation and the inhibition of protein synthesis.

SiRNAs have emerged as a powerful tool for studying gene function and have shown promise as therapeutic agents for a variety of diseases, including viral infections, cancer, and genetic disorders. However, their use as therapeutics is still in the early stages of development, and there are challenges associated with delivering siRNAs to specific cells and tissues in the body.

Ubiquitin-protein ligases, also known as E3 ubiquitin ligases, are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the ubiquitination process. Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification where ubiquitin molecules are attached to specific target proteins, marking them for degradation by the proteasome or for other regulatory functions.

Ubiquitin-protein ligases catalyze the final step in this process by binding to both the ubiquitin protein and the target protein, facilitating the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to the target protein. There are several different types of ubiquitin-protein ligases, each with their own specificity for particular target proteins and regulatory functions.

Ubiquitin-protein ligases have been implicated in various cellular processes such as protein degradation, DNA repair, signal transduction, and regulation of the cell cycle. Dysregulation of ubiquitination has been associated with several diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammatory responses. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of ubiquitin-protein ligases is an important area of research in biology and medicine.

Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) proteins are a group of highly conserved helicase proteins that play essential roles in the initiation and regulation of eukaryotic DNA replication. They are named after the discovery that they are associated with the minichromosomes of budding yeast.

In humans, there are six main MCM proteins (MCM2-7) that form a hexameric complex, which is loaded onto origins of replication during the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This complex functions as a helicase, unwinding double-stranded DNA to create single-stranded templates for the replication machinery.

MCMs are also involved in the regulation of the DNA replication process, ensuring that it is initiated only once per cell cycle and that it proceeds in a controlled and efficient manner. Dysregulation of MCM proteins has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, where overexpression of these proteins can lead to genomic instability and increased rates of cell division.

Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6 (CDK6) is a type of enzyme known as a protein kinase, which adds phosphate groups to other proteins in the cell. CDK6 is primarily involved in regulating the cell cycle, the process by which cells divide and grow.

CDK6 functions by binding to cyclin proteins, forming active complexes that help drive the progression of the cell cycle from one phase to the next. Specifically, CDK6 plays a crucial role in the transition from the G1 phase to the S phase of the cell cycle, where DNA replication occurs.

CDK6 activity is tightly regulated by various mechanisms, including phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, as well as by binding to inhibitory proteins such as p16INK4a and p21CIP1. Dysregulation of CDK6 has been implicated in the development of several types of cancer, making it a potential target for cancer therapy.

Fungal genes refer to the genetic material present in fungi, which are eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as larger organisms like mushrooms. The genetic material of fungi is composed of DNA, just like in other eukaryotes, and is organized into chromosomes located in the nucleus of the cell.

Fungal genes are segments of DNA that contain the information necessary to produce proteins and RNA molecules required for various cellular functions. These genes are transcribed into messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, which are then translated into proteins by ribosomes in the cytoplasm.

Fungal genomes have been sequenced for many species, revealing a diverse range of genes that encode proteins involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, signaling, and regulation. Comparative genomic analyses have also provided insights into the evolutionary relationships among different fungal lineages and have helped to identify unique genetic features that distinguish fungi from other eukaryotes.

Understanding fungal genes and their functions is essential for advancing our knowledge of fungal biology, as well as for developing new strategies to control fungal pathogens that can cause diseases in humans, animals, and plants.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

Nocodazole is not a medical condition or disease, but rather a pharmacological agent used in medical research and clinical settings. It's a synthetic chemical compound that belongs to the class of drugs known as microtubule inhibitors. Nocodazole works by binding to and disrupting the dynamic assembly and disassembly of microtubules, which are important components of the cell's cytoskeleton and play a critical role in cell division.

Nocodazole is primarily used in research settings as a tool for studying cell biology and mitosis, the process by which cells divide. It can be used to synchronize cells in the cell cycle or to induce mitotic arrest, making it useful for investigating various aspects of cell division and chromosome behavior.

In clinical settings, nocodazole has been used off-label as a component of some cancer treatment regimens, particularly in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. Its ability to disrupt microtubules can interfere with the proliferation of cancer cells and enhance the effectiveness of certain anti-cancer drugs. However, its use is not widespread due to potential side effects and the availability of alternative treatments.

Anaphase is a stage in the cell division process called mitosis, where sister chromatids (the two copies of each chromosome formed during DNA replication) separate at the centromeres and move toward opposite poles of the cell. This separation is facilitated by the attachment of microtubules from the spindle apparatus to the kinetochores, protein structures located on the centromeres of each sister chromatid. Anaphase is followed by telophase, during which the nuclear membrane reforms around each set of separated chromosomes, and cytokinesis, the division of the cytoplasm to form two separate daughter cells.

Replication Protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA binding protein complex that plays a crucial role in the process of DNA replication, repair, and recombination. In eukaryotic cells, RPA is composed of three subunits: RPA70, RPA32, and RPA14. The primary function of RPA is to coat single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) generated during these processes, protecting it from degradation, preventing the formation of secondary structures, and promoting the recruitment of other proteins involved in DNA metabolism.

RPA binds ssDNA with high affinity and specificity, forming a stable complex that protects the DNA from nucleases, chemical modifications, and other damaging agents. The protein also participates in the regulation of various enzymatic activities, such as helicase loading and activation, end processing, and polymerase processivity.

During DNA replication, RPA is essential for the initiation and elongation phases. It facilitates the assembly of the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) at origins of replication, aids in the recruitment and activation of helicases, and promotes the switch from MCM2-7 helicase to polymerase processivity during DNA synthesis.

In addition to its role in DNA replication, RPA is involved in various DNA repair pathways, including nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair (BER), mismatch repair (MMR), and double-strand break repair (DSBR). It also plays a critical role in meiotic recombination during sexual reproduction.

In summary, Replication Protein A (RPA) is a eukaryotic single-stranded DNA binding protein complex that protects, stabilizes, and regulates ssDNA during DNA replication, repair, and recombination processes.

Promoter regions in genetics refer to specific DNA sequences located near the transcription start site of a gene. They serve as binding sites for RNA polymerase and various transcription factors that regulate the initiation of gene transcription. These regulatory elements help control the rate of transcription and, therefore, the level of gene expression. Promoter regions can be composed of different types of sequences, such as the TATA box and CAAT box, and their organization and composition can vary between different genes and species.

Down-regulation is a process that occurs in response to various stimuli, where the number or sensitivity of cell surface receptors or the expression of specific genes is decreased. This process helps maintain homeostasis within cells and tissues by reducing the ability of cells to respond to certain signals or molecules.

In the context of cell surface receptors, down-regulation can occur through several mechanisms:

1. Receptor internalization: After binding to their ligands, receptors can be internalized into the cell through endocytosis. Once inside the cell, these receptors may be degraded or recycled back to the cell surface in smaller numbers.
2. Reduced receptor synthesis: Down-regulation can also occur at the transcriptional level, where the expression of genes encoding for specific receptors is decreased, leading to fewer receptors being produced.
3. Receptor desensitization: Prolonged exposure to a ligand can lead to a decrease in receptor sensitivity or affinity, making it more difficult for the cell to respond to the signal.

In the context of gene expression, down-regulation refers to the decreased transcription and/or stability of specific mRNAs, leading to reduced protein levels. This process can be induced by various factors, including microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation, histone modification, or DNA methylation.

Down-regulation is an essential mechanism in many physiological processes and can also contribute to the development of several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

A centromere is a specialized region found on chromosomes that plays a crucial role in the separation of replicated chromosomes during cell division. It is the point where the sister chromatids (the two copies of a chromosome formed during DNA replication) are joined together. The centromere contains highly repeated DNA sequences and proteins that form a complex structure known as the kinetochore, which serves as an attachment site for microtubules of the mitotic spindle during cell division.

During mitosis or meiosis, the kinetochore facilitates the movement of chromosomes by interacting with the microtubules, allowing for the accurate distribution of genetic material to the daughter cells. Centromeres can vary in their position and structure among different species, ranging from being located near the middle of the chromosome (metacentric) to being positioned closer to one end (acrocentric). The precise location and characteristics of centromeres are essential for proper chromosome segregation and maintenance of genomic stability.

RNA interference (RNAi) is a biological process in which RNA molecules inhibit the expression of specific genes. This process is mediated by small RNA molecules, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), that bind to complementary sequences on messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, leading to their degradation or translation inhibition.

RNAi plays a crucial role in regulating gene expression and defending against foreign genetic elements, such as viruses and transposons. It has also emerged as an important tool for studying gene function and developing therapeutic strategies for various diseases, including cancer and viral infections.

Proto-oncogene proteins are normal cellular proteins that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, such as signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). They are involved in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and survival under physiological conditions.

When proto-oncogene proteins undergo mutations or aberrations in their expression levels, they can transform into oncogenic forms, leading to uncontrolled cell growth and division. These altered proteins are then referred to as oncogene products or oncoproteins. Oncogenic mutations can occur due to various factors, including genetic predisposition, environmental exposures, and aging.

Examples of proto-oncogene proteins include:

1. Ras proteins: Involved in signal transduction pathways that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Activating mutations in Ras genes are found in various human cancers.
2. Myc proteins: Regulate gene expression related to cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and metabolism. Overexpression of Myc proteins is associated with several types of cancer.
3. EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor): A transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that regulates cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Mutations or overexpression of EGFR are linked to various malignancies, such as lung cancer and glioblastoma.
4. Src family kinases: Intracellular tyrosine kinases that regulate signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, survival, and migration. Dysregulation of Src family kinases is implicated in several types of cancer.
5. Abl kinases: Cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases that regulate various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and stress responses. Aberrant activation of Abl kinases, as seen in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation.

Understanding the roles of proto-oncogene proteins and their dysregulation in cancer development is essential for developing targeted cancer therapies that aim to inhibit or modulate these aberrant signaling pathways.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "replicon" is not a term that has a widely accepted or specific medical definition. It is a term that is used in the field of molecular biology, where it refers to a segment of DNA that contains an origin of replication. The origin of replication is the site on the DNA molecule where the process of DNA replication is initiated. This concept is important in the fields of genetics and virology, but it is not a term that is commonly used in clinical medicine.

If you have any questions related to the medical field, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you!

Ploidy is a term used in genetics to describe the number of sets of chromosomes in a cell or an organism. The ploidy level can have important implications for genetic inheritance and expression, as well as for evolutionary processes such as speciation and hybridization.

In most animals, including humans, the normal ploidy level is diploid, meaning that each cell contains two sets of chromosomes - one set inherited from each parent. However, there are also many examples of polyploidy, in which an organism has more than two sets of chromosomes.

Polyploidy can arise through various mechanisms, such as genome duplication or hybridization between different species. In some cases, polyploidy may confer evolutionary advantages, such as increased genetic diversity and adaptability to new environments. However, it can also lead to reproductive isolation and the formation of new species.

In plants, polyploidy is relatively common and has played a significant role in their evolution and diversification. Many crop plants are polyploids, including wheat, cotton, and tobacco. In some cases, artificial induction of polyploidy has been used to create new varieties with desirable traits for agriculture and horticulture.

Overall, ploidy is an important concept in genetics and evolution, with implications for a wide range of biological processes and phenomena.

Retinoblastoma-like protein p107, also known as RBL1 or p107, is a tumor suppressor protein that belongs to the family of "pocket proteins." This protein is encoded by the RBL1 gene in humans. It plays a crucial role in regulating the cell cycle and preventing uncontrolled cell growth, which can lead to cancer.

The p107 protein is structurally similar to the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and functions in a related manner. Both proteins interact with E2F transcription factors to control the expression of genes required for DNA replication and cell division. When the p107 protein is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinases during the G1 phase of the cell cycle, it releases E2F transcription factors, allowing them to activate the transcription of target genes necessary for S phase entry and DNA replication.

Retinoblastoma-like protein p107 is often inactivated or mutated in various human cancers, including retinoblastoma, small cell lung cancer, and certain types of sarcomas. Loss of p107 function can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and tumor formation. However, it's important to note that the role of p107 in cancer development is complex and may depend on its interactions with other proteins and signaling pathways.

NIH 3T3 cells are a type of mouse fibroblast cell line that was developed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The "3T3" designation refers to the fact that these cells were derived from embryonic Swiss mouse tissue and were able to be passaged (i.e., subcultured) more than three times in tissue culture.

NIH 3T3 cells are widely used in scientific research, particularly in studies involving cell growth and differentiation, signal transduction, and gene expression. They have also been used as a model system for studying the effects of various chemicals and drugs on cell behavior. NIH 3T3 cells are known to be relatively easy to culture and maintain, and they have a stable, flat morphology that makes them well-suited for use in microscopy studies.

It is important to note that, as with any cell line, it is essential to verify the identity and authenticity of NIH 3T3 cells before using them in research, as contamination or misidentification can lead to erroneous results.

Medical Definition:
Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are a diverse group of proteins that bind to microtubules, which are key components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. MAPs play crucial roles in regulating microtubule dynamics and stability, as well as in mediating interactions between microtubules and other cellular structures. They can be classified into several categories based on their functions, including:

1. Microtubule stabilizers: These MAPs promote the assembly of microtubules and protect them from disassembly by enhancing their stability. Examples include tau proteins and MAP2.
2. Microtubule dynamics regulators: These MAPs modulate the rate of microtubule polymerization and depolymerization, allowing for dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton during cell division and other processes. Examples include stathmin and XMAP215.
3. Microtubule motor proteins: These MAPs use energy from ATP hydrolysis to move along microtubules, transporting various cargoes within the cell. Examples include kinesin and dynein.
4. Adapter proteins: These MAPs facilitate interactions between microtubules and other cellular structures, such as membranes, organelles, or signaling molecules. Examples include MAP4 and CLASPs.

Dysregulation of MAPs has been implicated in several diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease (where tau proteins form abnormal aggregates called neurofibrillary tangles) and cancer (where altered microtubule dynamics can contribute to uncontrolled cell division).

Proto-oncogene proteins, such as c-Myc, are crucial regulators of normal cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). When proto-oncogenes undergo mutations or alterations in their regulation, they can become overactive or overexpressed, leading to the formation of oncogenes. Oncogenic forms of c-Myc contribute to uncontrolled cell growth and division, which can ultimately result in cancer development.

The c-Myc protein is a transcription factor that binds to specific DNA sequences, influencing the expression of target genes involved in various cellular processes, such as:

1. Cell cycle progression: c-Myc promotes the expression of genes required for the G1 to S phase transition, driving cells into the DNA synthesis and division phase.
2. Metabolism: c-Myc regulates genes associated with glucose metabolism, glycolysis, and mitochondrial function, enhancing energy production in rapidly dividing cells.
3. Apoptosis: c-Myc can either promote or inhibit apoptosis, depending on the cellular context and the presence of other regulatory factors.
4. Differentiation: c-Myc generally inhibits differentiation by repressing genes that are necessary for specialized cell functions.
5. Angiogenesis: c-Myc can induce the expression of pro-angiogenic factors, promoting the formation of new blood vessels to support tumor growth.

Dysregulation of c-Myc is frequently observed in various types of cancer, making it an important therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

Look up Phase, phase, or phases in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Phase or phases may refer to: State of matter, or phase, ... Phase 2 (disambiguation) Phase 3 (disambiguation) Phase 4 (disambiguation) Phase 5 (disambiguation) Phase space (disambiguation ... Phase space formulation, a formulation of quantum mechanics in phase space Phase (waves), the position of a point in time (an ... Phase (band), a Greek alternative rock band Phases (band), an indie pop American band, formerly known as JJAMZ Phase (album), a ...
The G1 phase, gap 1 phase, or growth 1 phase, is the first of four phases of the cell cycle that takes place in eukaryotic cell ... Around 30 to 40 percent of cell cycle time is spent in the G1 phase. G1 phase together with the S phase and G2 phase comprise ... The G1/S checkpoint is the point between G1 phase and the S phase in which the cell is cleared for progression into the S phase ... the G1 phase is barely existent and is defined as the gap, if one exists, between the end of mitosis and the S phase. G1 phase ...
... is a health science and pop culture podcast that aims to debunk health and wellness-industry myths and ... "Maintenance Phase Twitter Status". Twitter. Retrieved June 1, 2022. Dibdin, Emma (January 27, 2022). "For an Antidote to Diet ...
... is a 1986 American made-for-television thriller drama film directed by Tony Richardson and starring Peter Strauss ... Penalty Phase at IMDb v t e (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Short description is ... Penalty Phase' looks at problems of a judge". The New York Times. Retrieved 26 November 2015. Allan Jalon (November 20, 1986 ...
This permits the expression of the pupil-plane phase aberrations φ {\displaystyle \varphi } to the image plane Fourier phase as ... New Brown Dwarf Binaries from Kernel Phase Interferometry [2] Ireland 2013 : Phase errors in diffraction-limited imaging: ... This equation can be used for model-fitting as it represents the interpretation of a sub-space of the Fourier phase that is ... In order to extract kernel-phases from an image, some requirements must be met: Images are nyquist-sampled (at least 2 pixels ...
Multiplying the equation of a plane wave Aei(k·r − ωt) by a phase factor shifts the phase of the wave by θ: e i θ A e i ( k ⋅ r ... In optics, the phase factor is an important quantity in the treatment of interference. Berry phase Bra-ket notation Euler's ... However, differences in phase factors between two interacting quantum states can sometimes be measurable (such as in the Berry ... For any complex number written in polar form (such as r eiθ), the phase factor is the complex exponential factor (eiθ). The ...
... is the creation of two distinct phases from a single homogeneous mixture. The most common type of phase ... Colloids are formed by phase separation, though not all phase separations forms colloids - for example oil and water can form ... Phase separation also exists in ultracold gas systems. It has been shown experimentally in a two-component ultracold Fermi gas ... The phase separation can compete with other phenomena as vortex lattice formation or an exotic Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov ...
... may refer to: Phase reversal Phase inversion (chemistry) This disambiguation page lists articles associated ... with the title Phase inversion. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the ...
750~150 BCE Pigeon Phase, ca. 200 BCE-100 CE Connestee Phase, 150-1000 CE Pisgah phase, 1000-1500 CE Qualla Phase, ca. 1500 CE- ... 7500-4300 BCE Morrow Mountain Phase, ca. 4300-2500 BCE Savannah River Phase, ca. 2500-750 BCE Swannanoa Phase, ca. ... The Qualla Phase pottery that followed is thought to have resulted from be the result of the merging of Lamar and Pisgah phases ... The Pisgah phase (1000 to 1450/1500 CE) is an archaeological phase of the South Appalachian Mississippian culture (a regional ...
Official website Phase 7 at IMDb Phase 7 at Rotten Tomatoes The director talks about the film (in Spanish) (Articles with short ... "Phase 7". M-Appeal.com. Retrieved 2014-03-15. Miska, Brad (2011-06-20). "Bloody Disgusting Selects: 'Phase 7' Hits Theaters ... "Phase 7 (2011)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved 2014-03-15. Nelson, Rob (2011-07-06). "Review: 'Phase 7'". Variety. Retrieved 2014- ... Keough, Peter (2011-07-12). "Review: Phase 7". The Phoenix. Retrieved 2014-03-15. Hewitt, Chris (2011-07-13). "'Phase 7' review ...
... (RP) refer to : Reversed-phase chromatography, any chromatographic method that uses a non-polar stationary phase ... Reverse phase protein lysate microarray, a micro-cell lysate dot-blot that allows measurement of protein expression levels This ... disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Reverse phase. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to ...
It is now widely accepted that the anti-phase cell firing that results from phase precession is an important component of ... O'Keefe and Recce termed this advancement relative to the wave phase "phase precession". Subsequent studies showed that each ... Bose A, Recce M (19 June 2001). "Phase precession and phase-locking of hippocampal pyramidal cells". Hippocampus. 11 (3): 204- ... or whether phase precession was a peculiar property of hippocampal tissue. The finding that theta wave phase precession is also ...
Phase lineup on Musicbrainz.org Wikimedia Commons has media related to Phase (band). Official website Phase discography at ... Phase (26 April 2015). "Phase Back on Track #2 ~ Perdition". Phaseship - The Phase Archives. Retrieved 12 October 2016. " ... Phase". Billboard Magazine. 124 (21): 36. ISSN 0006-2510. OCLC 732913734. Retrieved 23 June 2012. "Phase - New Songs, Playlists ... Phase /feɪz/ is a UK-based rock band formed in Larissa, Greece in 2003. It was founded by Thanos Grigoriou, who was performing ...
... is Maria Mena's debut album, which was released by Sony Music Norway. It reached #6 on the Norwegian charts. Her ... Album information from cdon Maria Mena's Official Website v t e "Norwegian album certifications - Maria Mena - Another Phase" ( ...
Phase line, 1-dimensional case Phase space, n-dimensional case Phase portrait D.W. Jordan; P. Smith (2007). Non-Linear Ordinary ... any pair of variables). It is a two-dimensional case of the general n-dimensional phase space. The phase plane method refers to ... The entire field is the phase portrait, a particular path taken along a flow line (i.e. a path always tangent to the vectors) ... In this way, phase planes are useful in visualizing the behaviour of physical systems; in particular, of oscillatory systems ...
In signal processing, linear phase is a property of a filter where the phase response of the filter is a linear function of ... Some examples of linear and non-linear phase are shown below. A discrete-time filter with linear phase may be achieved by an ... Therefore, both magnitude and phase graphs (Bode plots) are customarily used to examine a filter's linearity. A "linear" phase ... has a maximally flat group delay approximation function a phase equalizer A filter is called a linear phase filter if the phase ...
... methods exist in two main domains: Acoustic phase conjugation Optical phase conjugation A. P. Brysev et al., ... As in time reversal, the wave re-emitted by a phase conjugation mirror will auto-compensate the phase distortion and auto-focus ... Propagation of a time reversal replica demonstrates a remarkable property of phase-conjugated wave fields. Phase conjugation of ... Wave phase conjugation of ultrasonic beams, Physics-Uspekhi (1998) Okulov, A Yu (2008). "Angular momentum of photons and phase ...
Look up phase angle in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Phase angle may refer to: Phase (waves), the angular displacement of a ... instantaneous phase of an analytic signal representation Phase angle (astronomy), the angle between the incident light and ... angular component of the complex number representation of a sinusoid Analytic representation phase, ... reflected light Angle Polar coordinate system This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Phase angle. If ...
From early Angel 2 phase to late Angel 3 phase, the percentage of decorated sherds relative to all sherds declined from 3% to ... The proposed Angel 1 phase (Stephan-Steinkamp phase, 1100 to 1200?), is represented only by pottery sherds in the vicinity of, ... Angel phase archaeological sites date from c. 1050 - 1350 CE and are located on the northern and southern sides of the Ohio ... During this phase at Angel, pottery design indicates that this was the same time period as when Middle Wickliffe transitioned ...
... (Synthesis Phase) is the phase of the cell cycle in which DNA is replicated, occurring between G1 phase and G2 phase. ... S phase index (SPI) S-fraction or S-phase fraction (oncology/pathology prognosis) Restriction point David M (2007). The cell ... Throughout M phase and G1 phase, cells assemble inactive pre-replication complexes (pre-RC) on replication origins distributed ... This process depends on the kinase activity of Cdc7 and various S-phase CDKs, both of which are upregulated upon S-phase entry ...
The Jhangar phase was an archaeological culture, named after the type site Jhangar, that followed the Jhukar phase of the Late ... Rangpur culture in Gujarat, also part of late phase of IVC, was also contemporaneous to both. It is a non-urban culture, ... Chronological dating Phases in archaeology Pottery in the Indian subcontinent Periodisation of the Indus Valley civilisation ... subculture of Late Harrapan IVC phase) in Punjab was contemporaneous to Jhukar-Jhangar culture (subculture of Late Harrapan IVC ...
The track "Pure Phase" was the basis for a limited edition release called "Pure Phase Tones For DJs", which consisted of 16 ... "Pure Phase - Spiritualized". AllMusic. Retrieved 4 January 2016. Kot, Greg (30 March 1995). "Spiritualized: Pure Phase ( ... Mulvey, John (July 2021). "Spiritualized: Pure Phase". Mojo. No. 332. p. 99. "Spiritualized: Pure Phase". Q. No. 102. March ... Pure Phase is the second studio album by Spiritualized, released on 28 March 1995. The album was recorded in the Moles Studio ...
... (Quarta Fase, QF) is a faction within the Democratic Party (PD), a political party in Italy. The name of the ... This phase, according to the faction's website, started with the foundation of Democracy is Freedom - The Daisy (DL), that put ... Fourth Phase (All articles with dead external links, Articles with dead external links from February 2022, CS1 maint: archived ... The failure of The Populars to be a united faction led Fioroni, Franceschini and Soro, backed by Marini, to set Fourth Phase. ...
... "Boss Burger N' Chips (Remix) - From Exclusives for Others by Inverse Phase". Inverse Phase (via Bandcamp). ... Inverse Phase - Shuttle Scuttle OST released Inverse Phase. "Pretty Eight Machine". Inverse Phase (via (Bandcamp). Retrieved ... Inverse Phase. "Nine Inch Nintendos? 8-Bit Nails? Something like that!". Inverse Phase (via Kickstarter). Retrieved March 9, ... Inverse Phase - VGMdb "Music , Inverse Phase". Bandcamp. Retrieved August 9, 2022. Stinson, Elizabeth (September 28, 2010). " ...
The phase detector needs to compute the phase difference of its two input signals. Let α be the phase of the first input and β ... The phase detector is an essential element of the phase-locked loop (PLL). Detecting phase difference is important in other ... A phase detector for a bang-bang charge pump must always have a dead band where the phases of inputs are close enough that the ... Phase detectors for phase-locked loop circuits may be classified in two types. A Type I detector is designed to be driven by ...
The imperial phase is the period in which a musical artist is regarded to be at their commercial and creative peak ... While its original usage implied that an imperial phase was a one-time occurrence for a single artist, artists have been ... Finally, "self-definition" is the concept that the imperial phase defines the rest of the artist's career; future works will be ... Macpherson, Alex (10 January 2019). "Ariana Grande's Imperial Phase As A Pop Star Began In Earnest With 'Thank U, Next'". ...
The difference between a minimum-phase and a general transfer function is that a minimum-phase system has all of the poles and ... only for a minimum-phase system, the phase response of H(s) is related to the gain by arg ⁡ [ H ( j ω ) ] = − H { log ⁡ ( , H ... only the class of minimum-phase systems is closed under inversion. Intuitively, the minimum-phase part of a general causal ... A minimum-phase system, whether discrete-time or continuous-time, has an additional useful property that the natural logarithm ...
... refers to a period in the late 11th and early 12th centuries, when drastic changes in ceramics and masonry ... and the masonry and layout of great houses built during the McElmo phase, which was the last major construction era in the ... which overlaps with the McElmo Phase. Archeologists initially suggested that the McElmo influence was brought to Chaco Canyon ... canyon, differ significantly from those built during the early parts of the Bonito Phase (850 to 1140), ...
... is a brief transitional phase between the Ġgantija and Tarxien phases, the two main phases during which the principal ... The Saflieni phase is one of the eleven phases of Maltese prehistory, the fourth of five in the middle or Temple period. It is ... 21 Saflieni-phase ceramics may provide a useful indication of separation between the two long phases.: 45 They have been ... The Saflieni phase, from approximately 3300-3000 BC,[citation needed] ...
Early contrasting views either considered non-proliferating cells to simply be in an extended G1 phase or in a cell cycle phase ... Stem cell quiescence has been recently suggested to be composed of two distinct functional phases, G0 and an 'alert' phase ... The G0 phase describes a cellular state outside of the replicative cell cycle. Classically, cells were thought to enter G0 ... Thus it was thought of as a resting phase. G0 is now known to take different forms and occur for multiple reasons. For example ...
Look up Phase, phase, or phases in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Phase or phases may refer to: State of matter, or phase, ... Phase 2 (disambiguation) Phase 3 (disambiguation) Phase 4 (disambiguation) Phase 5 (disambiguation) Phase space (disambiguation ... Phase space formulation, a formulation of quantum mechanics in phase space Phase (waves), the position of a point in time (an ... Phase (band), a Greek alternative rock band Phases (band), an indie pop American band, formerly known as JJAMZ Phase (album), a ...
The G1 phase, gap 1 phase, or growth 1 phase, is the first of four phases of the cell cycle that takes place in eukaryotic cell ... Around 30 to 40 percent of cell cycle time is spent in the G1 phase. G1 phase together with the S phase and G2 phase comprise ... The G1/S checkpoint is the point between G1 phase and the S phase in which the cell is cleared for progression into the S phase ... the G1 phase is barely existent and is defined as the gap, if one exists, between the end of mitosis and the S phase. G1 phase ...
Maintenance Phase is a health science and pop culture podcast that aims to debunk health and wellness-industry myths and ... "Maintenance Phase Twitter Status". Twitter. Retrieved June 1, 2022. Dibdin, Emma (January 27, 2022). "For an Antidote to Diet ...
Project phases Phase 2 01.04.2022 - 31.12.2026 (Current phase) Phase 1 11.05.2016 - 31.12.2022 (Completed) ... Results from previous phases: Since its inception in 2016, the first phase of the IDSUN Trust Fund has delivered significant ... Current phase Swiss budget CHF 8392500 Swiss disbursement to date CHF 0 Budget inclusive project partner CHF 11518750 ... Sustainable Urbanization Indonesia IDSUN, Phase II. The IDSUN Trust Fund supports the Government of Indonesia and its cities to ...
The epitaxial growth then proceeds by a layer-by-layer process in the solid phase through atomic motion during… ... In solid phase epitaxy a thin amorphous (noncrystalline) film layer is first deposited on a crystalline substrate, which is ... Other articles where solid phase epitaxy is discussed: epitaxy: ... In solid phase epitaxy a thin amorphous (noncrystalline) film ... The epitaxial growth then proceeds by a layer-by-layer process in the solid phase through atomic motion during… ...
Phase-field models of solidification are presented in the context of diffuse-interface theories based on conserved and non- ... Phase-field models for binary alloys are also given, with representative numerical calculations. Extensions to phase ... Phase-field models of solidification are presented in the context of diffuse-interface theories based on conserved and non- ... Phase-field models for single-component materials are derived, and the sharp interface limits that relate the models to ...
... and Moon phase in Bradford - England - United Kingdom for April 2024. When and where does the Moon rise and set? ... Moon Phases*Night Sky*Meteor Showers*Day and Night Map*Moon Light World Map*Eclipses*Live Streams*Seasons*Astronomy News ... Sun & Moon Today Sunrise & Sunset Moonrise & Moonset Moon Phases Eclipses Night Sky ...
... phase. This method is most effective for large planets in close orbits around dim stars because their phases change more ... Phase curve signals can also be confused for variations in brightness across the surface of the star itself, due for example to ... Like our own Moon, planets have phases. When the planet is in between us and its star, we see its nightside (like the new Moon ... Like transits, phase-curve signals are imprinted in measurements of stellar brightness over time, which are much easier and ...
We empower educators to reimagine and redesign learning through impactful pedagogy and meaningful technology use. We achieve this by offering transformative professional learning, fostering vibrant communities, and ensuring that digital tools and experiences are accessible and effective. ...
The three phases of a frame. Compose has three main phases:. *Composition: What UI to show. Compose runs composable functions ... Phased state reads. As mentioned above, there are three main phases in Compose, and Compose tracks what state is read within ... Phase 2: Layout. The layout phase consists of two steps: measurement and placement. The measurement step runs the measure ... Figure 1. The three phases in which Compose transforms data into UI.. The order of these phases is generally the same, allowing ...
The diagram attached shows two coherent sources P and Q which produce waves of the same phase with wavelength , labda . If the ... 4. Can phase difference be negative?. Yes, phase difference can be negative. This occurs when one wave is ahead of the other by ... 3. Why is phase difference important in the study of waves?. Phase difference is important because it can affect the ... 2. How is phase difference calculated?. Phase difference can be calculated by finding the time difference between corresponding ...
Phase 2 will allow our players to group and play with cross platform friends. ... Crossplay Phase 2 FAQ. Crossplay Phase 2 is coming October 20th. Phase 2 will allow our players to group and play with cross ... 1. What is Phase 2 of Crossplay?. Crossplay Phase 2s functionality will extend to group play with your cross-platform friends ... 9. Will in game communication change with Crossplay Phase 2?. To deploy Phase 2, voice-chat in Crossplay matches will be ...
... (2017-2020) focused particularly on viral pathogens of biosafety levels 3 and 4. Phase II (2021-2024) focuses ... EAC-RNPHRL-CD Project - Phase I Milestones Posted in Mobile Labs The key objective of the Project is to strengthen the capacity ... Phase I of the EAC Regional Network of Public Health Reference Laboratories registered the following milestones:. *Procurement ... This is being achieved through the mobile laboratory networks divided into two phases of implementation. ...
Final results of the pivotal twin phase 3 studies of gantenerumab in early Alzheimers disease (AD) confirm that the ... Cite this: Antiamyloid Gantenerumab Disappoints in Phase 3 Trials - Medscape - Nov 21, 2023. ...
... will phase out its 210MW Sejingkat coal-fired power plant here as it adds more renewable energy capacity, like hydro and solar ... The Sejingkat power station was built in two phases in 1998 and 2004, and is the oldest of the three operating coal-fired power ... KUCHING: Sarawak Energy Bhd (SEB) will phase out its 210MW Sejingkat coal-fired power plant here as it adds more renewable ...
The Planning Phase is critical to a projects success. A well thought-out project plan will provide the project team with a ... Phase Gate:Project Plan Review & Approval. A project plan is finalized when it is formally accepted and approved by the ... In the Planning Phase, the Project Manager works with the project team to create the technical design, task list, resource plan ... Formal approval acknowledges that all the deliverables produced during the Planning Phase are complete, reviewed, and accepted ...
An invitation to join a webinar about the report for phase 2 cycle 2 of the WHOIS Accuracy Reporting System (ARS), issued in ... New WHOIS ARS Report (Phase 2 Cycle 6) Now Available *. New Report Presents Syntax and Operability Accuracy of WHOIS Data in ... The Cycle 2 report acts as a follow-on to the Phase 2 Cycle 1 report published in December 2015. In Cycle 2, ICANN measured ... On 8 June 2016, ICANN published the WHOIS Accuracy Reporting System (ARS) Phase 2 Cycle 2 report. ICANN will hold an ...
Trump Announces Phase 1 Of Trade Deal With China As part of the deal, the next round of 30% tariffs will not be imposed. More ... 11 in Washington, D.C. Trump announced a Phase 1 partial trade deal with China. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption ... President Trump on Friday announced what he calls "Phase 1" of a larger trade deal with China. ... 11 in Washington, D.C. Trump announced a Phase 1 partial trade deal with China. ...
Theoretically, such a phase could exist in any graphene-based material. In future work, the team plans to explore how the ... "Finding a new phase like this one is exciting because it adds to our holistic understanding of graphene-based systems." ... "These phases arise from electron-electron interactions," said Rubio-Verdú, a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions Fellow who studies ... This phase, however, currently occurs at very low temperatures-even so-called high-temperature superconductors, used in devices ...
Recently, a pseudogap phase also has been observed in Sr2IrO4-and Hsiehs group has found that the multipolar order they have ... This phase, characterized by an unusual ordering of electrons, offers possibilities for new electronic device functionalities ... The whole field of electronic materials is driven by the discovery of new phases, which provide the playgrounds in which to ... The discovery of this phase was completely unexpected and not based on any prior theoretical prediction, says Hsieh, an ...
... If you are in the market for a new appliance, you will want to read about the ... Phase 2 of the appliance rebate program starts Tuesday. Click on the 5 On Your Side story in the box for all the details. ...
The open-label Phase I study will assess the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of MORAb-066 administered with weekly ... "We are excited to have initiated this Phase I study of MORAb-066," stated Nicholas Nicolaides, Ph.D., President and CEO of ... Tennessee has opened enrollment in a Phase I clinical study with MORAb-066 in patients with advanced or metastatic breast, ...
Article 49: Retirement (Phased Retirement Options, 49.7-49.24). Article 27: Research Faculty Workload (27.16) - TTR balance ... The phased retirement does not commence until the notice period has elapsed. ... have a minimum of 10 years of full-time continuous service at the University may elect to participate in one of three phased ...
... or Phase Change Memory is a type of non-volatile memory that is much faster than the common flash memory, and it uses up to one ... In this "Phase Change Memory: The Next Big Thing in Data Storage?" featured article, Herman Mehling offers an overview of phase ... Because no electrical power is required to maintain either phase of the material, so phase-change memory is non-volatile. ... Because no electrical power is required to maintain either phase of the material, so phase-change memory is non-volatile. ...
For general definitions related to Phase 2 preparation, visitors should read the Phase 2 workflow page before arriving at ... Visitor Mode Phase 2 Guidelines. This page provides information about Observation Block (OB) creation only for users assigned ... Starting in October 2019 the web-based replacement for the ESO Phase 2 observing preparation tool P2PP named p2ls, has been ... With the introduction of p2ls also the Phase 2 delegation becomes available for La Silla. Visitor Mode observers traveling to ...
The large, special, phase-conjugating plasma tube for Priores giant device. The final machine would have treated humans whole ... is phase conjugated, a specific healing delta frequency pattern results.. If phase conjugate replicas of a cancers cells ... Phase Conjugates of Death Photons are Healing Photons. The Kaznacheyev experiments in the Soviet Union proved that any ... That was because the Academicians knew nothing of scalar electromagnetics, and phase conjugation, and the Priore machine was a ...
The Solar Roadways® journey began on an ordinary day as most life changing adventures do. Scott and Julie had known each other since they were small children, in southern California in the 1960s when roads and highways looked, well - just like they do today!. Years later, married and living in Idaho, Scott and Julie were working in their garden. Wed been reading Al Gores An Inconvenient Truth and were feeling very concerned about climate and environmental issues. Julie wondered aloud whether roads could be made out of solar panels. Wed been contemplating buying rooftop solar panels out of concern for the environment. Suddenly, an image popped into Julies mind of solar panels on the driveway and the road. She asked Scotts opinion of this idea, but he just laughed and said that would be impossible - the fragile solar panels would be crushed by cars.. Julie dismissed the idea, but Scotts engineering mind just couldnt let it go. About a week later, he said, "If we can design a protective ...
... first described luteal phase deficiency (LPD). The inadequate secretory transformation of the endometrium, resulting from ... Whereas the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle can vary in length, the secretory phase lasts approximately 14 days, ... Luteal phase deficiency affects women of all races. Only women are affected. Luteal phase deficiency primarily affects women ... encoded search term (Luteal Phase Dysfunction) and Luteal Phase Dysfunction What to Read Next on Medscape ...
  • In luteal phase dysfunction (LPD), the inadequate secretory transformation of the endometrium results from deficient progesterone production. (medscape.com)
  • Oral clomiphene citrate and vaginal progesterone suppositories in the treatment of luteal phase dysfunction: a comparative study. (medscape.com)
  • However, data show that 6-10% of women who are fertile demonstrate an inadequate luteal phase, which confirms the need for a better understanding of normal variations in the menstrual cycle and in variations that could be pathologic. (medscape.com)
  • Whereas the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle can vary in length, the secretory phase lasts approximately 14 days, correlating with the life span of the corpus luteum. (medscape.com)
  • Hajishaiha M, Ghasemi-Rad M, Karimpour N, Mladkova N, Boromand F. Transvaginal sonographic evaluation at different menstrual cycle phases in diagnosis of uterine lesions. (medscape.com)
  • Measurement of plasma LH, FSH, estradiol and progesterone in disorders of the human menstrual cycle: the short luteal phase. (medscape.com)
  • Solid-phase extraction (SPE) has during the last three years emerged as a convenient method for the purification of compound libraries prepared by solution synthesis. (lu.se)
  • Final results of the pivotal twin phase 3 studies of gantenerumab in early Alzheimer's disease (AD) confirm that the investigational antiamyloid agent lowered amyloid plaque burden but did not slow clinical decline in patients with early AD. (medscape.com)
  • Glaukos Corporation announced that the phase 3 iDose TR pivotal trials met their primary efficacy endpoint, as iDose TR was not found to be inferior to topical timolol 0.5% BID topical timolol ophthalmic solution. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • We are very pleased to announce these robust and replicative positive phase 3 pivotal data results for iDose TR, which mark a major milestone for our company and powerfully reaffirms our view that iDose TR can be a transformative novel technology able to fundamentally improve the glaucoma treatment paradigm for patients," said Thomas Burns, Glaukos chairman and chief executive officer, in a press release. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • The iDose TR phase 3 programs consisted of 2 prospective, randomized, double-masked pivotal clinical trials. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Glaukos Announces Positive Topline Outcomes for Both Phase 3 Pivotal Trials of iDose TR , Achieving Primary Efficacy Endpoints and Demonstrating Favorable Tolerability and Safety Profiles. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • The following mechanisms can cause an inadequate endometrial response to hormonal stimulation during the luteal phase. (medscape.com)
  • Prevalence of out-of-phase endometrial biopsy specimens. (medscape.com)
  • In this observed nematic phase, the image can now only be flipped 180 degrees. (eurekalert.org)
  • For every pole (ie order) there is a 90 degrees phase shift. (diyaudio.com)
  • The open-label Phase I study will assess the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of MORAb-066 administered with weekly intravenous infusions. (prnewswire.com)
  • Among the numerous gas-phase biomarkers that can be used to assess the lung health of CF patients, acetaldehyde was selected for this investigation. (nist.gov)
  • Unlike most cancers, chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is classified into phases rather than stages, based partly on the percentage of immature white blood cells (blasts) in peripheral blood and bone marrow. (medscape.com)
  • June 25, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Morphotek®, Inc., a subsidiary of Eisai Inc., announced today that the Sarah Cannon Research Institute in Nashville, Tennessee has opened enrollment in a Phase I clinical study with MORAb-066 in patients with advanced or metastatic breast, pancreatic, colorectal or non-small cell lung cancer (adenocarcinoma) malignancies. (prnewswire.com)
  • A tuberculosis vaccine developed at McMaster University published phase one clinical study results today. (science20.com)
  • The U-Mass Lowell PHASE in healthcare research project has been a five-year NIOSH-funded study of health disparities among healthcare workers. (cdc.gov)
  • Thailand's vaccination programme will be divided into three phases, with priority given to healthcare workers, the elderly and the seriously ill, government spokesman Anucha Burapachaisri said on Sunday. (bangkokpost.com)
  • The position of the moon-phase display in the hour and minute circle allows the large-format depiction of the moon and the starry sky. (alange-soehne.com)
  • Serum progesterone levels have been studied as a means to diagnose luteal phase deficiency. (medscape.com)
  • Normal x-ray imaging relies only on attenuation in the sample, but information about phase shift and scattering of the x-rays can be computed when special conditions are fulfilled. (lu.se)
  • In this project, we have built a phase contrast X-ray tomograph based on a microfocus Cu source. (lu.se)
  • Much better contrast can be achieved using phase contrast. (lu.se)
  • It's capable of X-ray absorption contrast and phase contrast imaging at a spatial resolution of about 1 micrometer in 2D and 3D. (lu.se)
  • DSN: CC37.NHIS95.DISABIL.CONDITON 1995 NATIONAL HEALTH INTERVIEW SURVEY Disability Phase I Public Use Data File Background In the United States there are an estimated 35-43 million people with physical and mental disabilities. (cdc.gov)
  • only the data from the second year (1995) of Phase I is included here. (cdc.gov)
  • The sample size for Phase I was 95,091 persons in 1995 and was 107,469 persons in 1994. (cdc.gov)
  • In both phase 3 trials, 81% of participants who took the slow-release iDose TR were free of other IOP-lowering topical medications at 12 months. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • State and local health departments should include mental health management in each phase of a disaster (pre-event, response, recovery, and evaluation). (cdc.gov)
  • The Planning Phase is critical to a project's success. (umb.edu)
  • McNeely MJ, Soules MR. The diagnosis of luteal phase deficiency: a critical review. (medscape.com)
  • Maintenance Phase is a health science and pop culture podcast that aims to debunk health and wellness-industry myths and discusses anti-fatness in mainstream American culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • This project really builds upon a previous Healthy Communities model used by NACDD and was modified to consist of six phases that really are a crucial part of the inclusive healthy community change processes that are focused on improving the health and well-being of people with disabilities. (cdc.gov)
  • Before we dive into the Commitment phase, I'd love for you to start by telling us more about your specific job- title and the role of the Ohio Disability and Health program, and also how you are uniquely integrated at the state health department. (cdc.gov)
  • For phase 6, the Center for Health Care Strategies (CHCS) will showcase effective implementation strategies through first-person perspectives and practical resources and create new venues for peer-to-peer sharing (e.g., deep-dive webinars and virtual site visits). (commonwealthfund.org)
  • The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced that providers may begin applying for a $20 billion Phase 3 General Distribution of Provider Relief Funds(PRF) on Monday, October 5 and that even those providers who have received a full 2% of their annual patient care revenue through prior distributions may be eligible for an "add-on" payment based upon their incurred coronavirus expenses and lost revenues. (leadingage.org)
  • As with the NHIS Core, the NHIS-D Phase I questions were answered by any available adult in the household who was knowledgeable about the health of other household members. (cdc.gov)
  • In order to examine these issues in detail, the Phase I questionnaire had 3 sections exclusively for children: a section on special health needs of children, a section on special education services for children, and a section on early childhood development for children under 5 years of age. (cdc.gov)
  • Within the cell cycle, there is a stringent set of regulations known as the cell cycle control system that controls the timing and coordination of the phases to ensure a correct order of events. (wikipedia.org)
  • If we look at the Android View system, it has three main phases: measure, layout, and drawing. (android.com)
  • Complexes of cyclin that are active during other phases of the cell cycle are kept inactivated to prevent any cell-cycle events from occurring out of order. (wikipedia.org)
  • In order for the cell to continue through the G1-pm, there must be a high amount of growth factors and a steady rate of protein synthesis, otherwise the cell will move into G0 phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • The order of these phases is generally the same, allowing data to flow in one direction from composition to layout to drawing to produce a frame (also known as unidirectional data flow ). (android.com)
  • A 1st order XO is inherently phase correct (assuming everything is lined up & you have perfect drivers). (diyaudio.com)
  • A fourth order Bessel highpass filter for the tweeter at 6000Hz has 0 degree phase at 20 Hz and -360 degree phase at 100kHz. (diyaudio.com)
  • The three phases in which Compose transforms data into UI. (android.com)
  • A plasmonic sensing platform was developed as a noninvasive method to monitor gas-phase biomarkers related to cystic fibrosis (CF). The nanohole array (NHA) sensing platform is based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and offers a rapid data acquisition capability. (nist.gov)
  • Thus, it was decided to use a two phase data collection plan with a series of disability questionnaires. (cdc.gov)
  • The Phase I questionnaire collected basic data on disability and was used as a screening device to determine eligibility for the second phase of the survey. (cdc.gov)
  • These sample selection criteria were applied to the unedited data from Phase I. Interviewing for Phase II began in August 1994 and was completed in 1997. (cdc.gov)
  • The data from the DFS will be released separately from Phase I. Therefore only a brief description of this second phase is included here. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition, they create a heating curve and relate the heats of vaporization and fusion to phase changes and intermolecular forces. (colorado.edu)
  • G1 phase ends when the cell moves into the S phase of interphase. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first restriction point is growth-factor dependent and determines whether the cell moves into the G0 phase, while the second checkpoint is nutritionally-dependent and determines whether the cell moves into the S phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • Understanding the full suite of electronic behavior in moiré materials like twisted graphene may one day help physicists make better sense of another quantum phase, superconductivity, in which an electrical current moves through a material with zero resistance. (eurekalert.org)
  • The patient may report menstrual cycles of less than 26 days or a luteal phase of less than 11 days by basal body temperatures. (medscape.com)
  • van der Linden M, Buckingham K, Farquhar C, Kremer JA, Metwally M. Luteal phase support for assisted reproduction cycles. (medscape.com)
  • This phase, however, currently occurs at very low temperatures-even so-called high-temperature superconductors, used in devices like MRI machines, must be kept nearly 100 °F below zero. (eurekalert.org)
  • These phases arise from electron-electron interactions," said Rubio-Verdú, a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions Fellow who studies electronic phases in moiré materials like twisted graphene with Pasupathy. (eurekalert.org)
  • Around 30 to 40 percent of cell cycle time is spent in the G1 phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • The spokesman, however, did not give the time frame for each phase. (bangkokpost.com)
  • NHIS-D Phase I: The Phase I Disability questionnaire was administered at the same time as the NHIS Core, and collected information about all members of the NHIS households. (cdc.gov)
  • You can safely assume that these three phases happen virtually for every frame, but for the sake of performance, Compose avoids repeating work that would compute the same results from the same inputs in all of these phases. (android.com)
  • In this contribution we present some preliminary results on the dynamical evolution of two planet systems around stellar hosts evolving from the main sequence to the white dwarf phase. (lu.se)
  • If a cell is signaled to remain undivided, instead of moving onto the S phase, it will leave the G1 phase and move into a state of dormancy called the G0 phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • First described in another state of matter called a liquid crystal, a nematic phase occurs when particles in a material break an otherwise symmetrical structure and come to loosely orient with one another along the same axis. (eurekalert.org)
  • Implementing these sets of algorithms, we describe a dynamic pore-network model and reproduce some of the fundamental properties of both the transient and steady-state two-phase flow. (arxiv.org)
  • In steady-state flow, the model verifies the linear to non-linear transition of the effective rheological properties and satisfy the relations between the seepage velocities of two-phase flow in porous media. (arxiv.org)
  • The specific inclusion criteria for Phase II are summarized in the table at the end of this document. (cdc.gov)
  • and a high concentration of Cdk inhibitors is found during G1 phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • Writing in Nature Physics , Carmen Rubio-Verdú and colleagues have found a new puzzle piece: an electronic nematic phase. (eurekalert.org)
  • Researchers will submit a new drug application to the FDA after a phase 3 trial found that iDose TR slow- and fast-release models met their primary endpoint in patients with glaucoma. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Once the required proteins and growth are complete, the cell enters the next phase of the cell cycle, S phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • NHIS-D Phase II: Eligibility for the second phase of the NHIS-D (termed the 'Disability Followback Survey or DFS') was based not only on responses to the Phase I questionnaire, but also on responses to other parts of the NHIS on activity limitation and receipt of disability benefits. (cdc.gov)
  • Sonntag B, Ludwig M. An integrated view on the luteal phase: diagnosis and treatment in subfertility. (medscape.com)
  • Luteal phase deficiency: effect of treatment on pregnancy rates. (medscape.com)
  • Today we're going to start with Phase One - the Commitment phase. (cdc.gov)
  • Compose is very similar but has an important additional phase called composition at the start. (android.com)
  • A complete blood count with differential, peripheral blood smear, and bone marrow analysis are used to determine the phase. (medscape.com)
  • We are excited to have initiated this Phase I study of MORAb-066," stated Nicholas Nicolaides , Ph.D., President and CEO of Morphotek. (prnewswire.com)
  • The new vaccine, based on a genetically modified cold virus, was developed in the lab of Zhou Xing, professor of pathology and molecular medicine and the McMaster Immunology Research Centre, who co-led the phase one study. (science20.com)
  • In humans, the normal physiological temperature is around 37 °C (98.6 °F). G1 phase is particularly important in the cell cycle because it determines whether a cell commits to division or to leaving the cell cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the phase angle and the initial column angle are optimized for a quick on-center steering ratio, the response gains are higher, resulting in a sporty and agile feel. (sae.org)
  • National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend against using WHO definitions for accelerated or blast phase CML, and instead recommend Modified MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) criteria for accelerated phase CML and International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry (IBMTR) criteria for blast phase. (medscape.com)
  • igeneon (Vienna, Austria) said in a double-blind Phase II trial in 239 cancer patients, IGN101 did not meet the primary endpoint of increasing overall survival in the intent-to-treat population compar. (biocentury.com)
  • This section describes how the three Compose phases are executed for composables in greater detail. (android.com)
  • We present in detail a set of algorithms to carry out fluid displacements in a dynamic pore-network model of immiscible two-phase flow in porous media. (arxiv.org)
  • It is not clear if private pay only providers who meet this 2020 opening criteria are also eligible to apply under this Phase 3 General Distribution. (leadingage.org)
  • Members should keep in mind that only $20 billion is set aside for this phase. (leadingage.org)
  • are notable exceptions, where the composition of its children depends on the parent's layout phase. (android.com)
  • In the layout phase, Compose uses the UI tree produced in the composition phase as input. (android.com)
  • So, before we dive into our first phase of really talking about the commitment aspect of the work and the project partners, I'd really - David - I'd love to hear from you. (cdc.gov)
  • In the Planning Phase, the Project Manager works with the project team to create the technical design, task list, resource plan, communications plan, budget, and initial schedule for the project, and establishes the roles and responsibilities of the project team and its stakeholders. (umb.edu)
  • Skanska has completed the first 27,000 sqm phase of its 67,000 sqm H2Offices project in the Váci Corridor. (bbj.hu)
  • The EUR 65 million project will be completed with the 18,000 sqm phase III, due to be finished in 2026/2027. (bbj.hu)
  • HHS has now updated its CARES Act Provider Relief Fund website with more information on the Phase 3 application process. (leadingage.org)
  • Previous research with diverse types of sensing platforms, with materials ranging from metal oxides to 2-D materials, detected gas-phase acetaldehyde with the lowest detection limit at the µmol/mol (parts-per-million (ppm)) level. (nist.gov)
  • Reasons the cell would not move into the S phase include insufficient cell growth, damaged DNA, or other preparations have not been completed. (wikipedia.org)

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